Win a Lifetime Geni Pro Account!

Posted October 31, 2011 by Amanda | 131 Comments

This contest is closed. Congratulations to Joe Rosenberg, winner of a Lifetime Pro account!

In celebration of Family History Month, we’ve been giving away a free one-month account of Geni Plus to several lucky winners for every day of October. Thank you to all those who entered our giveaway. We’ve thoroughly enjoyed reading your responses each week.

As promised, today we are excited to announce our grand prize for the month….a free Lifetime Pro Account!

How to Enter

Entering the contest is fast and easy. Simply answer the question below in this blog post. Your answer will be your entry to our grand prize for Family History Month.

Question

If you could have dinner with any one of your ancestors, who would it be and what would you ask them?

Rules

1 ) We reserve the right to update the rules at any time without notification
2 ) You must have a Geni account to win. (Registration is free)
3 ) No purchase needed
4 ) For your entry to be valid, you must follow the steps in the “How to Enter” section
5 ) You must provide a valid email address in your comment on this blog
6 ) Contests/giveaways must be legal in the area in which you live for you to participate
7 ) All entries must be received by Friday November 4,  2011
8 ) If you win, you must respond within five days to the notification email to claim your prize
9 ) One winner will be randomly chosen from valid entries. Your odds of winning depend on how many people enter the contest
10 ) One entry per person

Good luck!

Post written by Amanda

Amanda is the Social Media Coordinator at Geni. If you need any assistance, she will be happy to help!

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  • Mccaskillandrew

    I would want to have dinner with my grandfather McCaskill that immigrated to the US.  I’d like to ask why did he leave and how difficult was the new life in SC.  

  • Scott

    My tree doesn’t go back very far – it dead ends when my great-grandparents emigrated to the US.  But I’d like to ask my great-great grandfather (any of them) why they chose to stay in eastern Europe in the face of all the anti-semitism and pograms instead of coming with their children to the United States.

    By the way, since we can’t log in with our Geni ID’s, how will we know if we won?

    • Anonymous

      We’ll contact the winner directly to the email address provided when submitting their entry.

  • Norbertas Zioba

    I would like to have a dinner with the oldest member of my family tree. Why? Just to learn about some more ancestors!

  • Laura

    My great-great grandmother died as a result of childbirth when she had my great grandmother. She was only 26 years old. There are no known pictures of her in the family and no one really knows much about her. I would like to talk to her to see what she was like.

  • Sterling Adams

    Henry II, King of England  a great grandfather .. not sure what I would ask him .. but I can promise you I would not be sitting here today wondering if I can afford to renew my account this month or not . :-) maybe I would ask him over dinner to make sure that I was left a heir to the thrown .. hard to say 

  • Signsnsuch

    As no one seems to know who my great-great-grandfather’s father is, I would like to have dinner with him and find out where the tree go from there. Many family members and distant relatives seem to think they know who he might be, but no one can find any evidence to make an accurate connection.

  • Maria4cfp

    I would want to have time with either  of my “roadblock” ancestors One of those roadblocks is an Irish immigrant of the early 1800′s. The other is an Eastern European immigrant who arrived in 1909.

    I’d like to know how they came to this country and why. Was America everything they hoped it would be? I’d want to know about their parents and siblings. Did others in the family come to America? Why? If not, why not? What is the one thing they would like their descendants to know?

    Should be a fascinating meal!

  • Sharon Gorohoff

    I would like to have GGrandmother “Natalia” so I could find out more where in Prussia they came from and more about the German families I decended from!

  • Tarmo Mamers

    My great grandfather, Jaan Mamers. Please tell me about your parents and grand-parents.

  • Jennifer

    I think I would have dinner with my 3rd great grandfather Dennis Akins and ask him how he got to the US from Ireland. I would also ask him about his parents & also what was the biggest change was for him when he came here. He is my brick wall so I would like to find out as much as possible.

  • Janice

    My most intriguing ancestor to date is Rebecca Nurse. Through Geni.com I learned that she is my 9th Great Grandmother. I know virtually nothing of my ancestry, so, you can imagine how completely floored I was to learn of such an auspicious familial history. This being Halloween, brings the whole of the Salem witch trials even more vibrant to my mind’s eye. How frightening, to be so old and facing certain death, wrongly accused of a crime. If I could go back in time, I would return to March 1692, when a warrant was issued for the arrest of Rebecca, for being a witch. I would want to ask if she were scared and/or angry. I would tell her how sorry I am for her horrible death and what the aftermath did to the community. I would also ask her what her greatest wishes for her descendants could be. I would also describe to her, how difficult it is for me, to wrap my head around the belief system of the Puritans. I would also tell her of all the amazing changes humans have gone through over the past 320 years. I would like to see if there is any familial resemblance of me to her. My journey continues to uncover startlingly histories for me, and I continually refer back to geni.com in uncovering my genetic truth. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/djalik Alex Rusinov

    It would be my second great grandfather Josef Rusinov. I would ask him what was his real last name before the Russian Tsarist army made him change it when he was taken and served there for 30 years? djalik@gmail.com

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Phillip-Pence/100000035688153 Phillip Pence

    I would love to meet my paternal grandfather. I would like to know if there was a falling out between his two oldest sons and himself.

  • Michael Stillman

    I’d ask “Morris,” one of my paternal great-grandfathers, about the mystery surrounding his surname and who the heck his siblings were.
    michael.stillman@comcast.net

  • Tyler J. Aracena

    If I could have dinner with any of my family members, I’d choose my 2nd cousin Eugene Galiotto. He was born in 1922 and died unfortunately at 18 in 1941. He was born with a hole in his heart and my family’s heard of him, but no one really knew him except for his older brother Charles Galiotto who was born in 1924.I’d love to meet him because I myself have a disability, I only see out of one eye and I wear hearing aids because I have a hearing loss. I spoke to Charles who is still living he’s 87. But he doesn’t remember much about Eugene or his parents. Though the one thing he did tell me was that growing up, Eugene was always sick and never felt good. If I could have a dinner with Eugene, I’d ask him, “What was it like growing up being the oldest sibling, being one born with a hole in your heart, being one who was always sick all the time? Now being that you could fix a hole in your heart and back then you couldn’t I’d ask him “Do you wish you could be living around in Today’s world where they could have fixed that hole in your heart?” “Do you wish you could’ve gotten the chance to got married and have kids and contribute to the family tree?” One last thing I’d ask him would be, “Is there something that you used to watch your brother Charles do and you wished you could’ve done but you couldn’t because you had this hole in your heart?” I know I look at my older brother doing things that I wish I could do but I can’t due to my hearing and vision loss. Life being disabled is difficult. I really wish I could get to know my cousin Eugene. I love him lots, he’s missed dearly.
    I enjoy doing the family tree and learning about the relatives of mine that have had disabilities just like me, It helps me to know that I’m not alone since there were other relatives with disabilities in my family too.

    Tyler J. Aracena
    ty79978@gmail.com

  • Chris

    I would have dinner with my great grandfather, to ask him what he felt and though watching his son back up his wife and two young children in the middle of night knowing they never will come back to the Czechoslovakia, watching his great grand children bury their treasure and promising someday they come back to retrieve it. I would ask him why? what was going on? what is the secret? I know it was because of WWII, but I believe there is more to it and he would know.

  • Patrick K.

    If I could have dinner with any of my ancestors; it would be my Great-Grandfather Leopold. He came from humble upbringings in the Alsace Region in France. I used to hear stories from my great aunt that he used to stare into artisan restaurants in his town, telling himself that he’d one day be eating in there (ironically, he got diabetes when he was older) He eventually immigrated to the Philippines when he was just 18; on his own accord. He eventually grew up to be one of the most successful businessmen in the Philippines during his time; becoming the General Manager of one of the largest trading and import corporations in the country, and also received the Legion d’honneur for his charitable works. 

    Since I plan on immigrating to another country on my own very soon, I’d ask him regarding how it felt to leave his family, and what he did to survive on his own. Though our times would be very different, I think he’d be of great help.

  • David H.

    I would love to have dinner with my paternal second great grandfather.  He sent his three sons to America from somewhere in Galicia.  I believe there was also a daughter, so he could confirm.  Aside from learning what his life was like, what would be most exciting to me would be to show him pictures of his descendents, and explain to him where they are and what they’ve accomplished, to let him know that the sacrifices he made paid off in ways he never could have imagined.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WUQFRBRUCZ3JBPXVQ5QKMWRW2Y Briena K

    If I would be able to have dinner with one of my ancestors, it would be my paternal great-grandfather, Benjamin Klang. My family has no knowledge of my grandfather’s side of the family tree, because he died when my grandfather was very young, and we have no knowledge of his side of the family. I would love to know who his parents where and stories about their family.

  • http://www.facebook.com/christopher.herff Christopher Herff

    If I could have dinner with one of my ancestors, I would choose my great-grandfather Nicolas Herff.  He died at a relatively young age, when my grandfather was only a few years old, and my grandfather was orphaned shortly after that.  But I would like to know a little more about him, since there isn’t much to know.  Sometimes the most rewarding life is a short one, and I’d really want to know the little things, like what his dreams and aspirations were in life, and how did he feel about become a father.

    Christopher Herff
    nibble4bits@gmail.com

  • Eugene Kononenko

    I would really like to meet again with their grandparents. To my grandfather has told hisfascinating stories about the war. A grandmother, and even fed me with his deliciouspancakes cooked on the very real Russian stove. I really miss them.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_CQ2QMFSXJWNFRXCKQWOKTV2QWQ Karen

    Oh my gosh, I don’t think I can pick one, but I’ll try. For strictly genealogical purposes, I would pick Katherine Kimball/Kimble. She is my Great Grandmother on my father’s side. There are so many questions I have about her family- and her husband’s family- that she could answer. Her and husband Casper Adam Pabst were born in Saxony, but where? Where were all their children born? Out of 10 kids I know the specific location for 5. What was his father’s name? Where did they live in Ohio when they came here in 1883, did they go straight to Cuyahoga County? Why did they go to Indiana? So many questions.

    Also Bridget Moran, my GGG Grandma. Born in Ireland about 1803. Many questions about her place of birth and her husband Michael Moran- whom I don’t even know when he died, or where he’s buried.

    And strictly for fun, Thomas Langford Hill. I know a lot genealogically about the Hill family. But I would love to know about his life. He traveled extensively, and was a very interesting man. I definitely would ask about the Langfords tho, his Mom’s family. Don’t have much info on them.

    • Tyler J. Aracena

      Karen,

      Here’s a funny story, Reading your comment.

      I believe I’m related to Bridget Moran too! You must send me an email!

      ty79978@gmail.com
      I have some information about her on My Tree Via. Ancestry.com I’m hoping I can be of help! Tyler J. Aracena

  • Jarmo Hela

    I would like to have dinner with Östen Sursill.

    “How has this year’s sour Baltic herring (sursill in swedish) been?

  • Jane Pedersen

    My 5th Great Grandfather, Joseph Penn. Did he really serve in the Revoluntionary War as his brothers, Benjamin and Shadrach did? What was that time like? How and why did they relocate from Maryland to Kentucky? So many unanswered questions!

  • Landau

    Isser Sheinfeld, my great-grandfather, who lived in the tiny village of Putsunite, Moldova, where he died in 1920.  If I could have a bit of time with him, I could dig back farther into that side of my ancestry. My father’s maternal side is one of my weaker links in my ancestry story. Thanks for running this contest. Jerrold Landau   (jerrold@jerroldlandau.com)

  • Zvonko

    I would love to have dinner with my paternal great
    grandfather Georgi Matovski. One of his ancestors was Hristo Matov, controversal
    poliтical figure in Macedonian history. Hristo was member of macedonian party
    VMRO. They organize the wery firs political assasins in worlds history, on
    28-th April 1903 called “Thessaloniki
    bombings of 1903″. Family connection is still mistery for me and I would
    like to resolve this mistery. with my paternal great
    grandfather help!

  • Ronrabin

    I’d like to meet my g/ grandmother – Channa Rachel Gold who had 4 daughters (incluse my grandmother).
    I’d like to ask her about her family (don’t know anything about her origin), the place she was born and livind (Saffed in Israel) and about her husband – Jacob Tzvi Gold (who was he, where did he come from, what about his family?)

         Roni

  • Joe_rosenberg

    I’d pick my maternal great grandfather Eli Klivansky. He would be representative of a generation of Lithuanian Jews who left the “old country” in the late 1800′s to come to America and became the patriarch of an American family with strong roots here. I’d ask him about what made him decide to come to America and also about his extended family members he knew there. Many of them we don’t know of and therefore have not yet located their modern day descendants He might be able to shed light on those distant cousins of his who might otherwise be lost to our connected family of today,

    • Joe_rosenberg

      to clarify, Eli is a paternal, not maternal great grandfather.

  • Candice Buchanan

    There are so many ancestors I’d like to talk to, but it always comes back to the first ones I ever found, my fourth great-grandparents Andrew & Rhoda (Stevenson) Buchanan. I stumbled into their tombstone completely unawares while walking through a local cemetery when I was not quite 14 years old. I couldn’t stop thinking about them and thus began my genealogy search. My first question for them is whether or not they had anything to do with that random find? :0) I always feel like the ancestors called me up.

  • Lmgrimmer

    I think I would most like to have dinner with my Great-Great Grandmother Lottie Davis Oliver.  Lottie had a very interesting life.  She lived through both world wars.  Lottie raised two children during the depression.  She had a driver’s license in 1939 when not many women drove.  She was a trendsetter to say the least.  And I have always felt like we would have gotten along smashingly. Aside from the obvious family history related questions, and asking where her father Enoch got his name; I would ask grandmom Lottie two things.  First how she fells about the whole womens lib / feminist movement.  And secondly I would ask whether the ships got seized for the rum running or the sugar smuggling.

  • Anne Kerr

    My great-great-grandmother Hannah was the second wife of John Stone.   She was the mother of eleven of his twenty-five children.   I don’t know her maiden name, and I’d like to talk to her about her family and her life with John and her children and stepchildren.   Hannah died in March 1836 in New Jersey — the family Bible marked the event with the statement “it was dark and rainy.”

  • Yao Liu

    My mother’s paternal grandfather. He likely was the last one that knew his family history before the succession of revolutions changed everything in China. Particularly the 1911 revolution (exactly 100 years ago) that turned his family — and in fact all Manchus — from elite to fugitives overnight. There are family stories about how he had to hide at the bottom of a well to evade death, which I certainly would like to hear about it from him directly. There also are myths around his birth mother, which hopefully he could help clarify.

  • Wouterdeboeck

    I would like to meet my 4th great grand father Jean Francois De Wachter. He was signed in as a soldier in the Grande Armee of Napoleon. I found his original ‘conscription’ from 1805. In 1807 he was back in Belgium to serv and protect government buildings for 3 years (service of 5 years), but I would like to ask what he did the first two years. Did he joined the Poland campaign? Did he survive the famous Battle of Austerlitz?

  • Sgknan

    IF I COULD GET AN OPPORTUNITY TO MEET ONE OF MY ANCESTORS, I WOULD CHOOSE MY GREAT GRAND FATHER VENKATASUBRAMANIUM V, CLICK HIS PHOTO WITH MY DIGITAL CAMERA AND TAKE DOWN FROM HIM, ALL HIS PROFILE PARTICULARS AND NAMES, PHOTOS & FULL DETAILS OF HIS FOREFATHERS & THEIR FAMILIES, HIS SONS & DAUGHTERS AND THEIR FAMILIES, HIS WIFE, IN LAWS, COUSINS AND ALL RELATIVES FAMILY FOR THE GROWTH OF GENI FAMILY TREE AND ASK HIM WHAT WAS HIS PROFESSION AND WHY DID HE CAME TO THE VILLAGE, SELLAKUMARAPALAYAM, IN TAMIL NADU, INDIA AND SETTLED DOWN THERE?

  • kalpakam krishnan

    if i could get an opportunity to meet my maternal grandfather NAGASAMY WHO WAS A FAMOUS LAWYER AND VERY WELL SETTLED AT DEVAKOTTAI, RAMNADU, TAMILNADU, INDIA,  DIED AT AN YOUNG AGE, I WOULD ASK HIM WHY DID HE LEAVE HIS WIFE (GRAND MOTHER), WITHOUT PROTECTING HER INTEREST WITH A WILL? THE RESULT WAS, SHE WAS DRIVEN OUT OF HER HOUSE BY HER SON AND HAS TO DEPEND UPON HER WIDOWED DAUGHTER  LIFE TIME FOR SURVIVAL!

  • Us2indaup

    I would want to have dinner with my great-grandmother Mary, I would ask her all about what it was like growing up in post-famine Ireland and, especially, why she decided to emigrate to America.

  • Randy Seaver

    I would have dinner with my 3rd-great-grandfather, Thomas J. Newton, husband of Sophia (Buck) Brigham, and father of sopiha (Newton) Hildreth (1834-1923).  All I know about Thomas J. Newton is that he was the husband of Sophia (Buck) Brigham, and father of Sophia Newton.  I would ask him his birth date, birth place, parents names, marriage date, and occupations and life experiences. 

  • Tawny Wilcox

    I would love to have dinner with my 10g grandfather John McCoy(1690) married to Margaret Mary Martin(1694) and ask him what life was life in scotland in the 1600′s and why he migrated to ireland to have his son.i think that would be cool

  • James A. Sieks

    My dinner guest would be Heinrich Bernhard Sieks, great uncle on my father’s side.  He emigrated from Germany with his wife and settled in Chicago.  My first question would be to understand if he left Germany to avoid fighting in the Kaisers army in the 19th century and did he lose other members of his family to the Franco Prussian War.

  • Martynas Mickevičius

    I would like to meet my grandparent, who saw his own country beeing occupied. I would like to tell him that only after 50 years all of his grandchildren are living in the independent country again.

  • Jlsiddiqui

    I would love to fix dinner for my Grandfather John M. Lee, 7/6/1870 – 03/4/1956 as I would adore getting to know the Grandfather I never got to know.  He was my father’s father and I heard that he was a brilliant educator and we think a relative of the Robert E. Lee line which I’m still researching.  I would want to thank him for giving me life through marrying the most fantastic lady, Grandmother Abby, who I did meet and learned to love.  I would love to ask him to tell me all the stories about his parents and of Grandmother Abby’s relatives.  What a fabulous dinner this would be.

  • http://www.facebook.com/buchanancreations Donna Darlene Leasure Buchanan

    I would like to meet with my paternal grandmother, Marie. I did not connect with my biological father till about 5 years ago and unfortunately, my grandmother was in a nursing home and though we visited, I am not sure she knew who I was and we did not get to do storytelling. I would love to connect with her and hear her life story and hear about all her ancestry as she recalls it and about my dad when he was younger from her perspective.

  • Malka

    Great and apropos question because with the genius of Geni’s cutting edge relationship matching algorithm it is possible to locate a vast cornucopia of fascinating distant ancestors to contemplate scintillating dinner conversation with.  
    Choose just one from the endless possibilities . . . uuuuuhmmmmmm?   O.k. then please make it  my  “42nd cousin 7 times removed”,  [http://www.geni.com/people/Bahá-u-lláh-Mirza-Husayn-Ali-Nuri-/6000000010354381155 Bahá'u'lláh, Mirza Husayn Ali Nuri -میرزا حسینعلی ]! 
    Why not [http://www.geni.com/people/Karl-Marx/6000000007039207047  Karl Marx], [http://www.geni.com/people/Maimonides-Rambam-/6000000007315933705   Maimonides] or [http://www.geni.com/people/Admor-Yehuda-Leib-HaLevi-Ashlag-/6000000007274115352  Kabbalist Yehuda Ashlag, The Baal HaSulam]?
    The answer is that because of the universal, limitless, completely nonjudgmental vision of Bahá’u’lláh there would be no need to worry about saying the wrong thing and possibly offending an ancestor lost and bewildered by the discrepancy of our vast cultural, social and technological differences.  
    This visionary distant ancestor understood humanity to be in a continual process of collective evolution,  crossing all barriers and boundaries,  to work towards peace and justice for all mankind—[http://www.geni.com/worldfamilytree   Geni’s World Family Tree would be thus be the perfect topic to begin our dinner conversation with, and then we could move on to discuss infinite subjects.
    However, the one question I would truly like to ask Bahá’u’lláh is that almost 200 years ago when he envisioned a united mankind and world peace, technology was very limited.  So, now with the addition of our astonishing advances in nano technology, genetics, nuclear power, the virally wired communications,  does he still feel that it is possible for mankind’s focus to return to the simple core human values necessary for peace and justice to reign?

  • Malka

    Great and apropos question because with the genius of Geni’s cutting edge relationship matching algorithm it is possible to locate a vast cornucopia of fascinating distant ancestors to contemplate scintillating dinner conversation with.  Choose just one from the endless possibilities . . . uuuuuhmmmmmm?   O.k. then please make it  my  “42nd cousin 7 times removed”, Bahá’u’lláh, Mirza Husayn Ali Nuri -میرزا حسینعلی !   http://www.geni.com/people/Baha-u-llah-Mirza-Husayn-Ali-Nuri-/6000000010354381155.
     Why not [http://www.geni.com/people/Kar...  Karl Marx], [http://www.geni.com/people/Mai...   Maimonides] or [http://www.geni.com/people/Adm...  Kabbalist Yehuda Ashlag, The Baal HaSulam]?
    The answer is that because of the universal, limitless, completely nonjudgmental vision of Bahá’u’lláh there would be no need to worry about saying the wrong thing and possibly offending an ancestor lost and bewildered by the discrepancy of our vast cultural, social and technological differences.  
    This visionary distant ancestor understood humanity to be in a continual process of collective evolution,  crossing all barriers and boundaries,  to work towards peace and justice for all mankind—[http://www.geni.com/worldfamil…   Geni’s World Family Tree would be thus be the perfect topic to begin our dinner conversation with, and then we could move on to discuss infinite subjects.
    However, the one question I would truly like to ask Bahá’u’lláh is that almost 200 years ago when he envisioned a united mankind and world peace, technology was very limited.  So, now with the addition of our astonishing advances in nano technology, genetics, nuclear power, the virally wired communications,  does he still feel that it is possible for mankind’s focus to return to the simple core human values necessary for peace and justice to reign?  
    (Repeated with corrected links to profiles)

  • Maria

    I would like to meet my paternal grandfather. I would like to ask him about his life and struggles.

  • Sandrawatrous

    My paternal grandfather Michael Panaro.  I would ask him to tell me all about his history in Italy and all of the people He left behind.  I would also want to know everything about his marriage to Elizabeth, her death and my father being an only child.

  • Sandrawatrous

    I would also like to know all about the Panaro River and Valley near Naples, Italy and whether my ancesters lived in that region.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000159976051 Bill Balisteri

    I would have dinner with my mother and I would ask her if she could give me a hug. wbalisteri @ juno.com. Hi cousin Sandy right below me:

    • Sandrawatrous

      Hi cousin Bill.  I feel that your mom is always hugging you Bill.  Why else would  you have become the great young man that you are?  Sending a hug to you for life!  Cousin Sandy

  • Christine

     I have many ancestors that I would like to have dinner with, but I think I really would have liked to get to know my Grandparents(on both sides of the family) better. I was too young to ask questions when some of them passed away. Now that I’m older and would like to ask those questions. They were all from Poland/Germany/ Europe. They all went through the war. 1 grandfather passed away, leaving young children for my Grandmother to raise alone. 3 of my Grandparents came to the USA, to start new lives. Both my parents were hard working immigrants, but never really spoke a lot of their childhoods or the hardships they endured. They focused on their family and making a good life.
    It would be nice to know what their childhoods were like, their family traditions if any, etc.
    Yes, I do have some memories, but I’ll always wonder…     

  • Hesham

    It would be my Father and I would ask him to tell me more about his childhood.

  • Cbury

    I would choose Eleazar Putnam @6000000007275210411:disqus http://www.geni.com/people/Dea-Eleazer-Putnam/6000000007275210411 who was involved in the Salem Witch trials.  That event has fascinated me since I read “The Crucible” in elementary school. 

  • Sipa

    I would like to meet my maternal great, great, great, great, great, great grandmother and I would ask her to tell me about her grandmother.

  • Charmainevan

    I would have loved to meet Pierre Jaubert (Joubert) the 1st Joubert to come to South Africa in 1688 and have asked him about the events (French Revolution) that led him to the Cape of Good Hope and the start of the Joubert family line in South Africa 

  • Anonymous

    I would have dinner with my grandmother and ask her all about her family from Scotland.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=648746209 John Martin Furseth

    I would have liked to enjoy a really royal dinner with my 29th great grandfather, Harald I Halvdansson «Fairhair» Hårfagre. He is credited for having unified Norway into one kingdom. (Ref. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harald_I_of_Norway)

    I would like to ask him of his ancestry and personal history, so I could get it straight and documented directly from the source, once and for all ;-)

  • Seeleyteresa

    I would love to break bread with my great uncle, Carmelo Cimino.  I would ask him to tell me first hand  about being pursued by the mob, seeing his parents assassinated and putting his sisters on a ship to America to protect them before he was ultimately killed.  Of course, this meal would have to take place in an undisclosed location with pasta, wine and bodyguards.      seeleyteresa@gmail.com                                      

  • Keith

    I would like to meet my third great grandfather, Peter Joseph Clasgens. He was born in Alsace Lorraine, Prussia (circa 1804), where he married and five children. He immigrated to the U.S. in the mid-1800′s and settled in the in Sheffield Villiage, Ohio, near Elyria (southwest of Cleveland). Most of his children later settled in New Richmond, Ohio, where two of his sons, Joseph and Henry, founded the J.&H. Clagens Company, manufacturing wool (still in operation today). All of the Clasgens releatives I found in the U.S. have come through Peter.

    If I could have dinner with him, I would have several questions: Where in Alsace Lorraine did you live? What was life like then? How did you meet your wife, Anna? Why did you leave Prussia? Why did you settle in Sheffield Village? How did your sons?

  • Sadiq

    I would love to have a dinner and a word with My Grandpa ADAM and ask him as to why he had to listen to my Grandma EVE and eat that apple. The whole human race is answerable for that and is paying the price why not get an answer from Grandpa himself!

  • Scott P. Dann

    I would have dinner with my great-grandfather, Edward Dann. I would like to know about his life in Latvia, and what his name was before changing it to Dann. I want the history of my last name. 

  • Trudy marsolek

    my mom I would ask her what was  her favorite color her favorite number did she like school what was her favorite  subject was she a good student I wasnt what was her favorite holiday was it christmas like mine is does she love the winter what was her favorite thing to cook what made her laugh what made her cry  what was her dreams and why she didnt want me

    • Sandrawatrous

      Don’t be sad.  Your mom probably wanted you very much but could not take care of you the way she wanted you to be cared for.  I hope you think of her as wanting more for you then she could provide.  She probably thinks about you all the time and prays that you are having a good life.  Think positive and be happy.

  • Eyal Herlin

    I would love to meet all of my ancestors actually but if I had to pick one it would be a grandfather named Israel I never got to meet and am carrying his name as one of my middle names.I would love to hear about how he moved from Poland to Belgium and how he met his wife and handled growing 4 kids – my mom being one of them – in the shadow of the holocaust.
    Thanks for this competition and the great site.
    It helped me refresh my family history and strengthen a time in my life where I’m trying to reveal more about my roots.
    PS: Geni ppl, you should give runner ups a copy of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Up_the_Line (part of the plot is about a very different kind of meeting with ancestors…)

    All the best,Eyal Herlineyal dot herlin at gmail dot com

  • Rolf Kvamme

    I would ask my great grandfather what made him leave Germany and start a new life in the USA.  I have no information on his family before he came to the United States, so his information would be extremely helpful in completing that side of my family.

  • Rolf Kvamme

    I would ask my great grandfather what made him leave Germany and start a new life in the USA.  I have no information on his family before he came to the United States, so his information would be extremely helpful in completing that side of my family.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1683625859 Lisa Wilson

    HI! I’m a Christian & believe in the bible so I would have dinner with Noah & ask what it was like on earth before the flood.I’m sure that one question would take me than just dinner time.

  • Jakub

    My Grandmom because she can do great soup from duck-blood called Czernina. Also because she give us so much love for free (not like geni since 2 November). She’ ve never said that we have to pay for dinner/soup which we ate last years. She’ve never said that we can’t invite new person to our family. She is FAIR.

    • Ronrrr

      I agree with you that this is really a big ripoff. Should have known better.

  • Jonathan Alcantara

    I would have dinner with my Greek great-great-grandfather, Jesoula Colchamiro. It would include all my favorite Greek specialties such as moussaka, pastitsio and baklava. And I would ask him about all the families in his family tree, his father and grandfathers and grandmothers and brothers and sisters, and all the families who married into the family, so I could finally get further back in time into the history of my grandfather’s family tree.

  • Philip

    My grandfather who I’d like to ask if he had any brothers or sisters.

  • Dale L. Larson

    I would have dinner with my great grandmother, Delphine (Drew) Moore, and ask her if her grandmother really was Native American. dllarson@nelson-tel.net

  • David

    I would go right back to the beginning of mankind – to my 90th great grandfather – the Biblical Adam

    http://www.geni.com/people/Adam-%D7%90%D7%93%D7%9D-%D8%A2%D8%AF%D9%85/6000000003538706117

    First I would ask him why he ate the forbidden fruit.  Then I would ask him how many descendants he thought he had, and I would then walk him through his Geni.com tree!

  • https://twitter.com/rebeca Rebeca

    I’d have dinner with my grandmother’s mother Sara. I never had a chance to meet her, but everyone who did meet her had a good impression of her, and I’d be curious to find out more about the way she thought about everything, but I think my first question for her would be, “What do you when you encounter great mysteries?”

  • Nir Ben-zvi

    I would love to meet my grandfather 
    Shaul Ben-zvi (Kurbet)
     http://www.geni.com/people/Shaul-Ben-zvi-Kurbet/4565789180270034579
    and ask him to tell me about his childhood and his immigration to Israel.

  • Jb2w

    I would like to have dinner with my great, great, great (etc) grandfather that was a prisoner of war. I’d like to hear how he kept sane during that time and make it out alive.

    jb2w at yahoo dot com

  • Royalmovements

    If I could have dinner, with anyone of my ancestors it would be with the woman I was named after, my Great 3X Grandmother. I would ask her how/what did she feel/edure after the purchase she made to free her husband as a slave?  royalmovements@gmail.com

  • Royalmovements

    If I could have dinner with anyone of my Ancestors, it would be with my Great 3X Grandmother.
    I would ask her how/what did she feel/endure after the purchase was made freeing her husband as a slave.
    royalmovements@gmail.com

    • Royalmovements

      check

  • Bmitd67

    If I could have dinner with one ancestor I would have to say my dad. As I got older we began to relate so much better and his life covered so much territory that I would love to know more about him based on where I am in my life. What would I ask specifically? Well, I would have to ask what it was like being a country boy from the Jim Crow south living in the New York and Maryland during the post WWII/pre Korea era. His record collection looked a whole lot like mine does and I would love to hear some stories revolving around that kinda thing.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_FC7OIBMUS5PMWZ5RXINRV67WZ4 Melinda

    I would like to go back a few generations.  My great … aunt and her family emigrated from Wales, and I would love to find out about her life there, and her travels and life here in the US.  She came to the midwest through Canada and although she has some memoirs written down, it would be fabulous to speak to her.  mgarrelts (at) yahoo.com

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_AOWLTWEQOQRFL74TOVPJEXYFSI Sean O

    My grandfather. I’d love to know the thoughts behind his inspirational, yet “non-traditional” home improvements.

  • Pearlstone

    My fathers mothers mom and i would ask her whats her name and the rest of her childrens name because my grandmother never knew them because she was adopted when she was 5or 6 years old she did not remember her parents she died unknowing .

  • Anonymous

    So hard to pick just one person. I’d ask my grandmother (mom’s mom), who died when I was young, whether she felt as though she was “pushed” by her Mom toward success and achievement, and to compare that to her own sense about child-rearing with her daughter. And then, assuming that we broke the ice somewhat, I’d ask her to tell me about her two oldest boys, who died before my mother was born.

    (re a valid email address, I don’t know if you see the email address on the back-end of this Disqus comment. I don’t run a blog with disqus comments, so I don’t have any expertise about what a Disqus site moderator can see. Nor do I post my email address out in the open. So, here goes: The name that I post under with Disqus, auntialias, is a dot com. My dot com. My name is susan. put my name in front of my dot com, and you have the email address I’m generally known by here on the internets. Turing Test: Pass!)

  • ygirpl38_98

    my great great great grandpa that  came to nyc from england….as many questions about his family that i could

  • Tanelkalmet

    I would like to meet my first known forefather Jüri and ask him what he remembers about his parents and grandparents in 16th century! Could you organise it?

  • http://www.facebook.com/nengard Nicole C. Engard

    I would want to meet my paternal great grandmother so I can ask her what the family name really was before they left Italy and why they felt the need to change it (hiding from the law? just looking for a change?)

  • L Vandenbrink

    I would have dinner with my grandmother on my fathers side adn would ask her to tell me all about her family,it is one of the my  biggest dissapointment that i never found out about her family and all the Aunts and uncles of mine died before I could get any information 

  • Poul Vestby

    it should be my father because he was a great story teller of the family and di remember so much, but at that time when he lived I did not know the exicst of Geni and did not pay much attention to my ancestors, so I am really sorry that he does not live today, so that I could ask him a lot and he could tell me a lot about our family. Poul

  • Chris W.

    I would want to have dinner with my third great grandfather.  Hopefully, he could shed some light on his birth place, parents, and ancestors before him.  For decades, no researchers in my family have been able to track down anyone that came before him.

  • Roman Ali

    I would ask one of my early ancestors from Africa what gave them the physical capacity to cross deserts, jungles and other harsh terrain. Were they simply strong due to the need to hunt all the time, or did they have exercise regimes and fitness coaches?

  • Katrin Kimmel

    My greatgrandfather. I’d ask him to write down his family tree, so I could take it with me to enter on Geni. Unfortunately, due to wars and moving and what not, this data is unrecoverable and with nobody alive to fill in the gaps, that would be an awesome opportunity.

  • Gary

    I would ask my great-great grandfather about his adventures coming to the US from Germany in 1857, entering the service during the Civil War, and about his family lives, both here and in Germany.

  • Dissaann

    I think I would like to have dinner with my 8th great grandfather Michael Bar.  He came to the United States before it became united (early 1700′s).  He was a renowned guide/hunter in Pennsylvania during an era that made life uncertain.  The life expectancy for the average man was about 50 years but my 8th ggf made it to 77.  His granddaughter survived an Indian attack and lived into her 80′s.  My questions would definitely involve his strength, skills and what he had seen throughout his life.

  • Don Wehring

    I would like to have dinner with my maternal grandfather to see what actually happened when he died.  How he died.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1011730346 Debi Sanders Nuxoll

    I married into this great big family that I am trying to trace for my girls.  Someday I hope to be a paid Pro member here, but until that time 1 month would be AWESOME!!!!

  • Grant Jonasson

    My great-great-grandfather died two months before I was born. I’d ask him to tell me traditional stories from Norway and to tell stories about his journeys and adventures in North America. I believe he had 3 or 4 roundtrips by ship in the early 1900s between US/Canada and Norway.

  • Terrill Hayes

    My dinner would be with my fourth great grandfather Ephraim Hay/Hays of Bridgewater Township, Somerset, NJ. I would ask him about his parents and grandparents: their names, birth locations, and death locations.  I would ask why he and his family left NJ for NY. I would ask him to tell me about our Scots ancestry. And I would ask about his experience in the Revolutionary War. I think it would be a very enjoyable dinner!

  • Nancyannmartinez

    My paternal great grandfather. He disappeared after the 1920 census. My ggrandmother didnt speak much abt him or wouldnt give info. Rumor is he died of gunshot either fr family cleaning a gun or shot in a dispute over a poker game. I have searched the Texas death index and reviewed so many death certs but can not locate him. I’d like to ask him where he was
    born and how he met his wife. She was pregnant when they married and was a widow. Id like to know abt his parents also and how it was they moved around alot. nancyannmartinez@gmail.com.

  • Hlwagner83

    I thought about answering with my 7th great grandfather, who came to America and fought in the Revolutionary War, but I think that I would most like to have dinner with my maternal grandfather.  He died of cancer when my mom was in high school, many years before I was born, so I never got a chance to know him.  Aside from getting to know him, other than just from the stories of him I grew up with from my mom and grandma, I would ask about his first wife and son.  We know my mom and her siblings have a half brother, but don’t even know his name.  I’d ask my grandpa for names, places, and dates in hopes of being able to find him (and, of course, update my family tree on Geni accordingly!).

  • Dave Grenetz

    If I could have dinner with any one of my ancestors, who would it be and what would I ask them? That’s so easy. I would break bread with my father’s father’s father – the man who came to the US as a young man and without whom noone in my family would be here today. I would ask him about life in the old country, what he was seeking in his journey, whether he found it, and anything he knows about his ancestors (to better fill out our family tree). Then maybe I would ask him some odd James Lipton-type questions like ‘what is your favorite sound’ :)

  • Curvyjp

    I would love to have dinner with my maternal grandmother since I never had an opportunity to meet her. My parents emigrated from the Netherlands to Canada right after their wedding and my mother never saw her parents again.

  • Michele Jurlina

    I would like to see my father again – he died when I was only four years old. Though I have many happy memories, I did not have the chance to talk about the “bad” things that happened in his life, including losing two siblings in WWII. My father was one of only three children who survived the Nazi camp, but I would really like to know more about my Aunt and Uncle who did not make it. I really felt his absence when my two children were born, and it would be wonderful to see them all together over a meal!

  • Marilyn Horn

    I would love to Samuel Jordan of Jamestown, my 9th great grandfather, who was killed in the Indian uprising of 1622. I’d like to ask him about his ancestry and immediate family. Was he a Huguenot, as some sources say, or was he English? Did he ever live in France? Who was his wife, and was she French. What was his background? Although he is a well-known figure, much of the information in his profile is pure speculation.

    Marilyn Horn
    http://www.geni.com/people/Marilyn-Jean-Horn/6000000012482988261

  • Susana Gurman

    I want to meet Arieh Leib Iehuda Motioner who was called “EL Levita” because he was very intelligent. I want to ask about the Jewish life in Europe before his migration with all his family to Argentina. How did they came to the decision to emigrate and I would ask him about his parents and siblings I don’t know anything about them.

    • Susana Gurman

      He was my great grandfather.

  • http://www.facebook.com/nogakamil Kamil Karol Noga

    my great grand father cause he’s the oldest ancestors i know about and i’d ask him about his family and how our hometown looked like when he was young.

  • http://www.facebook.com/nogakamil Kamil Karol Noga

    my great grand father cause he’s the oldest ancestors i know about and i’d ask him about his family and how our hometown looked like when he was young.

  • Kalishoek

    If I could have dinner with an ancestors it would be Hugo De Groot my 16th cousin 8 times removed [http://www.geni.com/people/Hugo-De-Groot/6000000007159797265 Hugo the Great] I want to ask him from who he got his nose, because now I have it too.

  • Ray Nicklas

    I would want to have dinner with my Grandfather (my father’s father) and ask him about his experiences growing up, his father and grandfather, and what is was like to have families and plans disrupted by the Great Depression.

  • Gustavo Latorre

    If I could have that oportunity I woul like to have dinner with some of my colonnos ancestor and ask him/her how was to live at that time.

  • Helena in Sweden

    I would like to have dinner with my distant relative Paavo, who I met on Geni, and who told me that I have over 5000 relatives in Finland that I did not know about!

    I would ask him about our common ancestors, especially the relatives of Helena (my namesake!)Lindsay, born around 1570 in Northumberland, England. Her 2nd husband was a mercenary, Thomas Muchamp, who made her emigrate to Sweden during the Thirty Year War.

    Odd how history spread our realtives all over the world, and most of the time we are not even aware of it!

  • Igor Koszeghy

    kesosrot@gmail.com  Geni je super náš strom má vyše 400 členou .Asi som zmeškal súťaž .

  • Igor Koszeghy

    Fandim Geni  len to začali blokovať škoda.

  • Elizabeth Robbinson

    I would like to meet my father in law. I have never met him. My hubby lost his dad when he was 10. I would like to know more of my father in law as people speak high of him and I am sad that I could not meet him.

  • Etgardnersr

    How do you pick the most important person to have dinner with and ask questions about family. With
    25 great gr.fathers/mothers, I’d hate to slight anyone of them as they are all important to us, for any number of reasons. I’d like to get all of them together and hold a drawing. Whoever wins would be the dinner choice. I would also like to get all of the info I could from non-winners as it would surely help in answering family questions.  One of my favorites is my 19th.GGrandfather,  “Edward 1–Lonshanks–King of England” When you do the math, can anyone envision the amount of people it took to get us here and who they are (or were). Its mind boggleing. One other question: what would be the fare for dinner, as what they ate may not be to our liking and visa/versa.

  • PG Krishnaiah

    My Mom with whom I would like spend my life again PG Krishnaiah gkpemmaraju@yahoo.com

  • Mariann

    If it were possible I would like to meet many of my anchestors, but first of all I would  like to meet my grandmothers mother, Jekaterina Lange (Georgijevskaja): http://www.geni.com/people/Jekaterina-Lange/6000000009705766134
    My mother has spoken so much good about her…
    I would love to have dinner with her and chat about lots of things, mostly about family and philosophy of life I guess.

  • Dan Cornett

    I would like to talk to one of my maternal-side ancestors who came to the U.S. from Alsace-Lorraine, asking them what it was like to live there and why they decided to come to the U.S.

  • Phillip Balch

    I would want to have dinner with my tenth great grandfather, John Balch, born 398 years before me. If I were to ask him anything I’d ask him what motivated him to travel to the “New World” in 1623.

  • Phillip Balch

    I would want to have dinner with my tenth great grandfather, John Balch, born 398 years before me. If I were to ask him anything I’d ask him what motivated him to travel to the “New World” in 1623.

  • jMuilenreef

    Echt leuk dat iemand voor zijn/haar inspanningen ook eens iets terug kan verdienen. Gefeliciteerd, winnaars, we gunnen het jullie van harte ! -en ik denk dat ik mag spreken namens alle Dutch, not Deutsch-speaking Europeans who also like to documentatie their ancestry & descendants in a global friendly designed-but-earthquake-safe-constructed & architectured open-source-system… A whole team of ‘addicts to geni’ in Holland are working together in modern cooperation very conscious to make it a better platform to communicate with all our neighbours in nearby & long-distanced family-members.

  • Mike Primeaux

    I would like to have dinner with my ancestor who was the first to come from France to Canada. I haven’t been able to trace my roots that far but would love to just talk about the fear, excitement, and everything involved with the leaving a continent to start fresh.  ibalrit@gmail.com

  • Hemant

    With great enthusiasm I created a family tree at no cost which has now 500+ relatives. In the process many relatives helped. Now Geni tells me that I have exceeded limit of 100 free relatives. Neither can I afford to pay the required US$ 5 a month (or US$ 60 a year), nor would I like to embarrass myself in asking relatives to share the amount.  Everyone would be unsuspecting that this sort of thing will arise. Please help to know what to do..

    • Anonymous

      We understand that there are some users who are not able to afford an upgrade to Pro. While we are still looking at regional pricing options, you may be interested in our Geni Public Access program http://www.geni.com/corp/geni-public-access-program/ . Geni Public Access is designed to allow certain public facilities, such as libraries or genealogical societies, to provide the benefits of Geni Pro for free. You may simply request your local institution to apply.

      • Ronrrr

        You folks are unbelievable in that you created the 100 people limit “out of the blue” with no advance warning to anyone. For some years I have been bragging about the virtues of GENI. Boy was that a mistake. Rest assured that everyone I know will now learn the truth about this “free” service. 

    • Ronrrr

      Absolutely agree. What they’ve done is unconscionable.

  • Mirc Akira

    i would love to have dinner/breakfast/lunch/brunch whatever with my great, great, great grandpa to see what life was like for him coming over from poland :)

  • Kim Houvener

    Hello, 
    I would say having dinner with any one of my ancestors would be awesome! I would have to pick my Second Great Grandmother.  I would ask if she knew how wonderful her daughter Elizabeth Marcela was? My Great Grandmother was really awesome.  I would enjoy a bowl of spaghetti o’s with her when she was on her death bed.  I remember sitting next to her, never wanting her to leave this world.