The Family of Rolfe of Heacham Hall have strong connections with United States of America

Started by Ann Farley on Sunday, September 11, 2011

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9/11/2011 at 6:01 AM

Pocahontas, daughter of Chief Powhatan married John Rolfe of Heacham Hall, Heacham, Norfolk

Red Indians in family
John Rolfe II… married Pocahontas Matoaka (John is my second cousin nine times removed)

REFN: 54056 Colonial Surry, Other Early Worthies of Surry, p58-65: John Rolfe came over in the famous "Sea Venture" in 1610. After the death of Pocahontas in 1617, he returned to Virginia and married Jane Peirce 1619. Ship Passenger and Immigration Lists: Sea Venture: John Rolfe, a young man in his twenties and traveling with his wife. Their baby girl was born in Bermuda, christened Burmudas and died short thereafter. His wife died shortly after reaching Virginia Spring 1610 and he married Pocahontas in April 1614. Mistress Rolfe, first wife of the above Bermudas Rolfe, baby girl born in Bermuda, christened 11 Feb 1610, died and buried there... p507: John Rolfe and wife. 9 moths on Somers Island. Wife died on Somers Island or shortly after arriving in Virginia.

John Rolfe was a very religious man who agonized for many weeks over the decision to marry Pocahontas after she had been converted to Christianity, "for the good of the plantation, the honor of our country, for the Glory of God, for mine own salvation..." "Pocahontas was baptized christened Rebedda, and later married Rolfe on April 5, 1614." A general peach and a spirit of good will between the English and the Indians resulted from this marriage. John Thompson (William John) the eldest sone of Rev. William Thompson, born circa 1650, married Elizabeth the widow of John Salway the plantation called "Smith's Fort" on which Thomas Warren, father of Alice Mariott had build "ye fifty foot brick house". This property formerly belonged to the Indian King, Powhatan who gave it to John Rolfe when he married Pocahontas, daughter of Powhatan... Source: Title: The Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities: "Pocahontas" John Rolfe arrived in Jamestown in 1610 to cultivate tobacco, which he began exporting to England in 1612. After Pocahontas’ 1617 death, John left his and Pocahontas’ son, Thomas Rolfe, in England and returned to Virginia, where he died in 1622.

Pocahontas Descendants Pocahontas, daughter of Chief Powhatan, married John Rolfe in 1614 or 15 in Virginia. In 1615 she had her only child, Thomas Rolfe. Shortly thereafter they moved to England, where Pocahontas died in 1617. John Rolfe soon returned to Virginia, but left his son to be raised in England. **

Thomas Rolfe came back to Virginia, living on the property left by his father, which was called Kippax. Thomas Rolfe married Jane Poythress and had one daughter, Jane Rolfe. She married Robert Bolling, and had one son, John Bolling. John Bolling married Mary Kennon and had seven children. The second child and first daughter was Jane Bolling. She, the great-great granddaughter of Pochantas would marry Richard Randolph.

Spouse name: Pocahontas Mataoka
Place of marriage: Jamestown, Virginia
Date of marriage: 5 APR 1614
Divorced: No

WIFE…..
Place of birth: Werowocomoco village on Pamunkey River (York River, Virginia
Place of baptism: Grave is on the Thames in England
Place of death: Graves End on the Thames, England

Spouse name: John II
Place of marriage: Jamestown, Virginia
Date of marriage: 5 APR 1614
Divorced: No

==================================
Place of death: Kippax, Prince Georges County, Virginia
Notes: REFN: 54058 POCAHONTAS 1. Indian princess, daughter of Chief Powhatan. 2. “Unable to read or write English, though she could speak and understand a fair number of English words, Pocahontas memorized the Apostle’s Creed, the Lord’s Prayer, and the Ten Commandments...” In the spring of 1614, she renounced paganism and was welcomed into the fellowship of the Church of England, given the name Rebecca. “In Pocahontas’ conversion a major step had been taken in the colonists efforts to influence Powhatan to accept the fact of English settlement and to display a Christian Indian woman as a symbol of the cultural blending of Old and New Worlds.” (From the book Pocahontas by ) 3. Pocahontas and her husband, John Rolfe, were preparing to leave England for their return to Jamestown, Va. They were at Gravesend, “the treasurer and Council of the colony having provided them proper accommodations on board the ship ‘George’ commanded by Capt. Argall.

That Mr. Rolfe’s position might be in some degree assimilated to the rank and quality of his wife, he was made secretary and recorder-general of Va. But before embarking, Pocahontal fell sick with smallpox and after a brief illness died in her 22nd year.” The original entry in the register of the parish of Gravesend: “1616: March 21, Rebecca, wife of Thomas Rolfe, gentleman, a Virginia lady born, was buried in the chancel.” The present church at Gravesend was erected after 1616, and her grave can no longer be pointed out, “although the position of the chancel of the former edifice may be indicated with a sufficient degree of accuracy.” In the present St. George’s, built on the same site, is a memorial tablet placed in the chancel which reads: “This stone commemorates Princess Pocahontas or Metoaka daughter of the mighty Indian Chief Powhatan. Gentle and humane, she was the friend of the earliest struggling English colonists whom she nobly rescued, protected, and helped. On her conversion to Christianity in 1613, she received in baptism the name Rebecca, and shortly afterwards became the wife of Thomas Rolfe (error on the tablet), a settler in Virginia. She visited England with her husband in 1616, was graciously received by Queen Anne, wife of James I. In the twenty second year of her age she died at Gravesend, while preparing to revisit her native country, and was buried near this spot on March 21st 1617.” (New Style Calendar date--actually died in 1616) Two stained glass windows are also in her memory there.

There is also a bronze statue there. 4. “The infant son of Pocahontas, Thomas Rolfe, bereft of a mother’s care was left at Plymouth, his father judging it inexpedient to remove him to Virginia. His early education was directed by Sir Lewis Stukey, but as that gentleman was soon after beggared and disgraced by the treacherous part he took in the proceedings against Sir Walter Raleigh, young Rolfe was transferred to the care of his uncle Henry Rolfe of London. He afterwards settled in Virginia where he had inherited a large tract of land which belonged to Powhatan and where he attained to fortune and eminence.” 5. Shortly after hearing of Pocahontas’ death, Powhatan turned over his leadership to his brother and went to live with the Patawomekes, as far as possible from the English settlements and died a year later in 1618. 6. John Rolfe worked to develop the tobacco industry in Virginia and served as a member of the first representative legislative assembly in America. In 1622, an Indian uprising resulted in the death of more than 300 colonists, one of which was John Rolfe. 7. In 1635, Thomas Rolfe, at twenty, returned to Virginia. “The Powhatans had not forgotten that their royal princess had had a son who was in his own right a descendant of the Powhatan royal line. When Thomas arrived in Virginia, he found waiting for him not only ‘Varina’, the plantation on which he was born, but also thousands of acres of land in the provinces originally inherited by his grandfather, Chief Powhatan.” (ap. 1200 acres along the fertile south shore of the James River--Smith’s Fort. In the area extended a mile or so inland from the high bluff along Gray’s Creek directly opposite Jamestown.) Powhatan had also left him hundreds of acres scattered elsewhere within a 25-mi. radius of Jamestown.

Thomas remained in Virginia the rest of his life, becoming, like his father, a tobacco planter. “He married an Englishwoman, Jane Poythress, and from their union descended seven successive generations of educators, ministers, statesmen, and lawmakers, among who were the Blairs, the Bollings, the Lewises, and the Randolphs.” Thomas Rolfe was Pocahontas’ only child. Raised in England after his mother’s death, Thomas returned to Virginia in 1635, where he married and fathered a child named Jane Rolfe, Pocahontas’ granddaughter. Thomas died in 1675. Lieut. Thomas Rolfe, b. 1651, son of Capt. John Rolfe and Pocahontas, married Jane Poythress, daughter of Lieut. William Poythress, of Jamestown, Va. They had one child, a daughter, called Jane Rolfe, who married (1675) Col. Robert Bolling. «i»Volume IV Chapter XII Bolling Family. Pocahontas and Some of Her Descendants Through the Rolfe-Bollings.«/i» »THOMAS ROLFE«/b» Thomas Rolfe, the son of John Rolfe and Pocahontas was born in Virginia in 1615 and was taken to England by his parents. When his mother died and his father returned to Virginia, im March 1616-17 he was left at Plymouth under the care of sir Lewis Stukeley, who became so notoroious and generally detested for his treachery to Sir Walter Raleigh. Thomas Rolfe was afterwards removed to the care of his uncle Henry Rolfe, of London, who was a member of the Virginia Company. The boy remained with him for a number of years. On August 23rd 1618 the Virginia Company wrote to Governor Argall in Virginia. "We cannot imagine why you should give us warning that Opechankano and the natives have given the country to Mr. Rolfle's child and that they reserve it from all others until he comes of years." It would appear from this that the Indians were supposed to have intended that Thomas Rolfe should succeed to the chieftanship of the Powhattans. In October 1622 Mr. Henry Rolfe petitioned the Virginia Company requesting that he be paid out of the estate of his brother John Rolfe for having brought up the son of his brother and Pocahontas. In a grant of land in 1635 to Captain William Pierce the name of Thomas Rolfe appears among the head rights. This probably indicates the time that he came to Virginia. He was then about twenty years old "He afterwards," says Stith, "became a person of fortune and distinction in the Colony." In 1641 he petitioned the Governor for permission to visit his aunt "Cleopatre and his Kinsman Opecancanough." In 1646 as "Lieutenant Thomas Rolfe" he was granted Fort Chickahominy and 600 acres adjoining on condition of keeping a guard there. Between that date and 1663 he patented a number of other tracts of land. There is recorded in Surry Country, in 1673, a deed dated June 20, 1654, from Thomas Rolfe to William Corker, conveying 120 acres in Surry, lying between "Smiths fort old field" and "the Devils' Woodyard," which was the property of Thomas Rolfe "by gift from the Indian King." It appears from various depositions recorded in surry that he at one owned the plantation called "Smiths fort," 1200 acres, at the mouth of Gray's Creek which he sold to Thomas Warren. One of the deponents states that he was present in 1654 with Mr. Thomas Rolfe in Mr. Warren's "fifty foot brick house" on "Smiths Fort" plantation soon after it was completed. Warren's "Fifty foot brick house" is still standing, the oldest brick dwelling in Virginia to which a date can be assigned. The farm still called "Smiths Fort" now belongs to a prosperous negro farmer. In addition to the old house there is much of interest in the neighborhood. On John Smith's map of Virginia may be seen at the mouth of Gray's Creek opposite Jamestown, the inscription "The New Fort", Smith states that on 1608 or 1609 he built a fort as a place of refuge in case of being compelled to retreat from Jamestown "on a convenient river upon a high commanding eminence." It has been suggested foolishly, that this fort was the "Old Stone House" on Ware Creek in the upper part of James City County; but any retreat to this place would have been through dense forests which afforded ample cover for the Indians. It seems there can be no doubt that the fort Smith refers to was the "New Fort" on Gray's Creek, and that this was on the "Smith's Fort" tract. About a half mile from the brick house referred to is a high bluff, about the middle of a long bend in Gray's Creek. On the opposite side are wide marshes, and ravines at the sides of the bluff make it something of a promontory. Across the rear of the bluf traces of trenches can be distinctly seen, though the covering of leaves makes them, in the photograph, less distinct than they really are. There can be little doubt that we have here the remains of Smiths "New Fort."

Spouse name: Jane Poythress
Place of marriage: Virginia Colony
Date of marriage: ABT 1650

REFN: 54057 Convenional history teaches a "different account" compared to the Powhatan descendants thmselves. Powhatan Myth as told by "Chief Crazy Horse" Chief of the Powhatan Renape Nation. In 1995 Roy Disney decided to release an animated movie about a Powhatan woman known as "Pocahontas". In answer to a complaint by the Powhatan Nation, he calims the film is "Responsible, accurate and respectful" We f the Powhatan Nation disagree. The film distorts history beyond recognition. Our offers to assist Disney with cultural and historical accuracy were rejected. our efforts urging him to reconsider his misguided mission were spurred. "Pocahontas" was a nickname meaning "the naughty one" or "spoiled child". Her real Name was Matoaka. Thelegend is that she saved a heroic John Smith from being clubbed to death by her father in 1607-she would have been 10 or 11 at the time. The truth is that Smith's fellow colonists described him as abrasive, ambitious. self4-promoting mercenary soldier. Of all Powhatan's children, only "Pocahontas" is known, primarily because she became the hero of Euro-Americans as the "good Indiam", one who saved the life of a white man. Not only is the "good Indian/bad Indian theme" inevitably given new life by Disney, but the history, as recorded be the English themselvez, is badly falsified in the name of intertainment". The truthof the matter is that the first time John Smith told the story about his rescue was 17 years after it happened, but it was but one of three reported by the pretentious Smith that he was saved by a prominnet white woman. Yet is an account Smith wrote after his stay with Powhatan's people, he never mentioned such an incident. In fact the starving adventurer reported he had been kept comfortable and treated in a friendly fasion as an honored guest of Powhatan and Powhatan's brothers. Most scolars think the "Powhatan incident" would have been highly unlikely, especially since it was part of a longer account used as justification to wage war on the Powhatan's Nation. Euro-Americans must ask themselves why it has been so important to elevate Smith's fibbing to status as a national myth worthy of being recycled again by Disney. Disney even improves upon it by changing Pocahontas from a little girl into a young woman. The true Pocahontas story has a sad ending. In 1612 at the age of 17, Pocahontas was treacherously taken prisoner by the English while she was on a social visit, and was held hostage at Jamestown for over a year. During her captivity, a 28 year old widower named John Rolfe took a "special Intrest" in the attractive young prisoner. As a condition of her release, she agreed to mary Rolfe, who the world can thank for commercializing tobacco. Thus in April 1614 Matoaka also known as "Pocahontas" daughter of Chief Powhatan became "Rebecca Rolfe". Shortly after they had a son, whom they named Thomas Rolfe. The descendants of Pocahontas and John Rolfe were known as the "Red Rlofe's". Two years later on the spring of 1616, Rolfe took her to England where the Virginia Company of London used her in their propaganda campaign to support the colony. She was wined and dined and taken to theaters, It was recorded that on one occasion she encountered John Smith (who was also in London at the time), she was so furious with him that she turned her back on him, hid her face, and went off by herself for several hours. Later, in a second encounter, she called him a liar and showed him the door. Rolfe, his young wife, and their son set off for Virginia in March of 1617, but "Rebecca" had to be taken of the ship at Gravesend. She died there on March 21, 1617, at the age of 21. She was burried at Gravesend, but the grave was destroyed in a reconstruction of a church. It was only after her death and her fame in London cociety that Smith found it convient to invent the yarn that she had rescued him. History tells the rest. Chief Powhatan died the following spring of 1618. The people of Smith and Rolfe turned upon the people who had shared their resources with them and had shown them friendship. During Pocahontas's generation, Powhatan's people were decimated and dispersed and their lands were taken over. A clear pattern had bee set which would soon spread across the American cvontinent. Chief Roy Crazy Horse. It is unfortunate that this sad story, Which Euro-Amercians should find embarrassing Disney makes "entertainment" and perpetuates a dishonest and self-serving myth at the expense of the powhatan Nation
REFN: 54057 Convenional history teaches a "different account" compared to the Powhatan descendants themselves. Powhatan Myth as told by "Chief Crazy Horse" Chief of the Powhatan Renape Nation. In 1995 Roy Disney decided to release an animated movie about a Powhatan woman known as "Pocahontas". In answer to a complaint by the Powhatan Nation, he claims the film is "Responsible, accurate and respectful" We of the Powhatan Nation disagree. The film distorts history beyond recognition. Our offers to assist Disney with cultural and historical accuracy were rejected. our efforts urging him to reconsider his misguided mission were spurred. "Pocahontas" was a nickname meaning "the naughty one" or "spoiled child". Her real Name was Matoaka. Thelegend is that she saved a heroic John Smith from being clubbed to death by her father in 1607-she would have been 10 or 11 at the time. The truth is that Smith's fellow colonists described him as abrasive, ambitious. self4-promoting mercenary soldier. Of all Powhatan's children, only "Pocahontas" is known, primarily because she became the hero of Euro-Americans as the "good Indiam", one who saved the life of a white man. Not only is the "good Indian/bad Indian theme" inevitably given new life by Disney, but the history, as recorded be the English themselvez, is badly falsified in the name of intertainment". The truthof the matter is that the first time John Smith told the story about his rescue was 17 years after it happened, but it was but one of three reported by the pretentious Smith that he was saved by a prominnet white woman. Yet is an account Smith wrote after his stay with Powhatan's people, he never mentioned such an incident. In fact the starving adventurer reported he had been kept comfortable and treated in a friendly fasion as an honored guest of Powhatan and Powhatan's brothers. Most scolars think the "Powhatan incident" would have been highly unlikely, especially since it was part of a longer account used as justification to wage war on the Powhatan's Nation.

In The Words Of Chief Roy Crazy Horse......... We are the native natural people of this land, descendants of an ancient confederation that at one time included over 30 nations. Our people were placed here by the Creator and have maintained an unbroken history of thousands of years of settlement along the costal areas of the mid-Atlantic. Although most of our lands are now occupied by others, many of the nation of the original Powhatan Confederacy still survive. The oldest treaty written in this land is between the Powhatan Nations in the year 1646. Since the time we met the Europeans in the 1500s, our history has been charactrized as a struggle to survive was,disease,prejudice, and cultural disintegration. Foregin disease alone probally accounted for halving the Powhatan population by the end of the 17th century. Many of the survivors of those early epidemics were largely decimated by war and starvation. Yet against all odds , we the Renape (human beings) have survived. Escentially the term Renape referrs to us as an ethnic groupe, a people speaking a common language. However we are not all united in one Nation. Our people governed themselves freely and harmoniously as independant republics, which sometimes came together in alliances of confederations, such as the Powhatan Confederacy. Thus Powhatan refers to our ethnic/language identity. Reservation History shows that New Jersey's efforts to create a European cociety to the exclusion of the Origional Peoples resulted in an ethnic cleansing which eliminated almost the entire population in the early 19th century. Despite systematic attempte to destroy our Confederacy and our culture. the Powhatan's have endured, proving our Peoples' strong will to preserve our heritage. Tribal affinities remain strong, distinctive religious beliefs and economic traditions continue to be practiced, and in spite of efforts to force our people to speak only English, the Powhatan language is still alive! Powhatan's Today: Today, Most of the descendants of New Jery's Origional People are in Oklahoma and in Canada. The Powhatan Renape Nation's origins were in the late 19th century. were one by one, our people came in to settle a tiny subdivision known as Morrisville and Delair in Pennsauken Township. Our forefathers were mostly Rappahannocks from Virginia and Nanticokes from Deleware. Although they had taken tremendous losses in culture as the result of the racist society which surrounded them, they were abel to retain their identiti, they know who ther were and sought people like themselves as spouses for their sons and daughters. They were quiet, put down deep roots, brought in new members, consolidated their community. At one point, almost 99% of the population of Mooresville were Powhatan Renape people- some 42 homes. In the 1960s, we "went public" by establishing a center in Philadelphia and later in Moorestown....but we always kept quiet about our home neighborhood. In 1976 we moved to larger quarters in Medford. in 1980 the State of New Jersey by Resolution of its Senate with the concurrence of the General Assembly, recognized the Powhatan Renape Nation, The ressolution also called upon the Congress of the United States to recognize th Powhatan Renape Nation. In 1982the Powhatan Renape Nation negotiated an agreement with the State of New Jersey to take over 350 acres of state owned land in the town of Westampton. The property is now recognized by the state of New Jersy and the general public as the Rankokus Indian Reservation. The Nation's administrative Center is located here to manage its community, educational, cultural, social and other programs and services. We take on the responsibility of helping the people of the State of New Jersey-particulary school children-to understand our people, our ways,our history, and in the process, to help them understand their own history and their responsibility as Human Beings in the Creation. Thousands of children visit the Reservation annually to tour its museum, art gallery, and the many exibits and nature trails on the grounds. Annual events such as the Juried Amercian Indian Arts Festival, the largest of its kind east of the mississippi River. and held at the Reservation. As such the Reservation serves as a focal point not only for the Powhatan Renape Nation, but for Americans' of other nations located in the nation. We Invite You All To The Rankokus Indian Reservation: Copied by: Dave Burkhart
NOTE…. Off www re Heacham
Heacham
In 1585, John Rolfe was baptised in the font, still in use in the church. He left for America, and fell in love with the native American Princess, Pocahontas, when she was held hostage in Jamestown. Their marriage ensured peace between the Indians and settlers for several years. In 1616 they returned to England and Pocahontas was presented at Court. Unfortunately, the following year, just before their return to America she felt sick, died and was buried at Gravesend in Kent. Thomas Rolfe, the son of John and Pocahontas was brought up at Heacham Hall (little of the original building is left) by his uncle Henry. He left for Virginia aged 25, and his granddaughter married Robert Bolling, from which match several Virginian families claim descent

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