Gillet Family Story

Started by Sharon Doubell on Wednesday, October 19, 2011

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10/19/2011 at 1:29 AM

http://www.genyourway.com/gt-hist.html
SUMMARY of the HISTORY of the GILLETT FAMILY

The first known member of the family was believed to have come from the town of Bergerac, Guyenne Province, France with introduction of the Rev. Jacques de Gylet. The Rev. de Gylet was born about 1520. He was banished from France and his property confiscated when he continued to preach the Gospel. He was at the massacre of the French Protestants on St. Bartholomew’s Day, August 24, 1572. Gylet is a Bergerac name.

The Rev. de Gylet fled to Scotland with his family where they resided for almost 57 years. This was during the reign of King Henry II. The family, after almost thirty years, started an exodus to England.

10/19/2011 at 1:51 AM

There seem to be some very active genealogy groups in and around Bergerac... http://christine.fagalde.free.fr/dordogne.htm#ass
I'll try and see if there's anyone local who can give some extra information.

10/19/2011 at 2:08 AM

Thanks George

10/19/2011 at 7:51 AM

It looks like the major settlements were in the southern part of the US - the Carolinas and Virginia, but there were Huguenots who had fled to Scotland and England like the Gilletts, and then came in the Great Migration individually it appears.

Paul Revere and John Jay were among them.

10/20/2011 at 1:17 PM
10/20/2011 at 2:05 PM

Thanks Sharon. I'll see how this site compares to the one above. I suspect there is very little information available on the earliest generations.

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10/18/2012 at 9:39 AM

http://www.huguenot.netnation.com/Cross_of_Languedoc/Spring2002.pdf

I am heavily involved in the South Carolina Huguenot projects and slightly involved in the Virginia project. I don't have time right now to work on Ireland. I came across the above-linked article and knew it would be useful when someone was ready to work on the Irish Huguenots. I'm posting the link here so that it does not get lost.

Pasteur Jacques Gillet is mentioned in the article.

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