Lewis Reno (Abt 1676-1755)

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Lewis RENO (206)(4) (2) was born about 1676 in Valence, Dauphin, France. He died on Jan 27 1755 in Manassas, Prince Wm Co, Virginia. He has Ancestral File number 4NK6-PP.  

Parents: Louis DE REYNAUD and Anne DE LA CROIX.

It is believed he was married to Ann WATERS in 1702 in Of Stafford Co., VA.   Children were: Thomas RENO, Major Lewis RENO, Judith RENO, Francis RENO, John RENO.

May have been married to Margaret Faut. 

Lewis Reynaud, whose name appears as the anglicized version Renoe, Rennoe, or Reno in early Stafford County, Virginia records, had to have been under 21 years of age on October 10, 1688 when he was included in the Letter of Denization granted his parents, but he must have been at least 21 in February 1700 when he acquired land in Virginia, thus fixing his birth before 1678. He was still in London with his family in early April 1688, but was in Stafford County, Virginia by October 2, 1688, based on the documents described above for his father. The voyage to Virginia from London took about 13 weeks, so he probably arrived in the Northern Neck of Virginia between July and October, 1688 with his family and his uncle Benjamin and his family.

Lewis Reno acquired his first 100 acres of land from John Allen on February 25, 1700 for 2100 pounds of tobacco "to me in hand paid or promised to be paid" (Stafford County Deed Book Z, p. 73-74). This land had been purchased by John Allen and his brother William Allen from Augustine Kneaton, and was "situate and lying between the Rocky Run and Austins Run in Acquia". John and William Allen signed a Deed of Division for the parcel (witnessed by Lewis Reno) just prior to John Allen selling his portion to Lewis Reno. On March 9, 1705, John Allen confirmed the deed to Lewis Reno, "the 2100 pounds of tobacco having been fully paid" (Stafford Co. Book Z, p.309). A later land record by John Allen's brother, William Allen, mentions "a tract of land sold by my brother John Allen to Lewis Renoe a Frenchman of Westmoreland County". Stafford County was formed out of part of Westmoreland County, and Prince William County was later formed from part of Stafford County. 

On June 7, 1707, Ursula Allen, "wife of John Allen of the County of Stafford", granted power of attorney to Nathaniel Pope to "acknowledge in Stafford County Court a certain tract of land granted by sale by my said husband Lewis Renoe in the same County the 9th day of March 1705 giving and granting unto my said attorney my whole power of authority in and about the premis to acknowledge in Court my right of Dower of the said land…".  (Book Z p.372). James C. Reneau, in his 1989 article in the Virginia Genealogist, interpreted this document as saying that Ursula Allen was the widow of Lewis Renoe, who must have died between 1705 and 1707, but I believe that Ursula left out the word "to" and was actually referring to the tract of land granted by my said husband TO Lewis Renoe in March 1705.

On August 24, 1711 Lewis Renoe and Clement Chevalle were granted 968 acres in Overwharton Parish of Stafford County on the upper side of Broad Run just east of Bristow (Northern Neck Grant Bk. 4, p. 28), and four days later, on August 28, 1711, Lewis Reno and Lewis Tacquett acquired a grant of 486 acres on Cedar Run, presently located east of Brentsville and south of Manassas in the northern neck of Virginia. Lewis Reno was living on this land in 1715 (Northern Neck Grant Bk. 5, p. 67). The title to this Reno-Tackett grant was the subject of a lengthy suit between Thomas Stamps and Thomas Reno in 1752 wherein the Court held that Lewis Reno in 1711 had been "duly naturalized and capable of taking and holding lands as by a Copy of Record in the office of Prince William County dated the second day of October 1688". The Court held that Lewis Tackett was not then naturalized and that this grant was invalid as to him. In 1712, Lewis Reno and Lewis Tackett divided the original grant equally between themselves, and this division was confirmed by the Court on June 16, 1779 (Prince Wm. Co. Bk. U, p.49). On June 30, 1712, Lewis Reno and Philomen Waters acquired a proprietary grant of 466 acres on the east side of Cedar Run, adjoining the Reno-Tackett Grant (Bk. M, p. 176). Thus, Lewis Reno acquired numerous lands, most of which were planted in tobacco.

Lewis Reno's will was probated on November 27, 1754, with his sons Lewis Reno and Thomas Reno named as executors. They presented his will in Court on January 27, 1755 and signed a bond, both spelling their name Reno (PW Co. Court Order Book 1754-1755, p. 181). On August 26, 1755 they reported an inventory and appraisal of his estate, but the detailed records have been lost or destroyed as has his will and any record of his marriage. 

[Side Note: William L. Reno's 1975 manuscript and his published articles incorrectly showed this Lewis Reno as the son of Pierre Reynaud. Dr. Reno was unaware of the Stafford County records for Lewis and Benjamin Reynaud at the time, but court documents from the Thomas Stamps lawsuit in 1752 indicated that Lewis Reno was a naturalized citizen based on documents dated October 2, 1688, and Dr. Reno assumed that this Lewis Reno was Pierre Reynaud's son based on the following argument: "This date closely coincides with the Date (October 10, 1688) on which the Letter of Denization issued to his father, Peter Reynaud, was inscribed on the Patent Roll which was, of course, its effective date. The slight difference in dates was probably due to a clerical error in the many transcriptions which this court record has undergone; it probably said October 20, 1688, instead of October 2, 1688. If this be true, then October 20, 1688 would, under the New Style Calendar adopted in 1751, have been the equivalent of October 10, 1688 under the Old Style Calendar and would have precisely coincided with the date of the Letter of Denization."]

According to the 1723 Virginia Tobacco Lists, brothers Henry and Gabriel Moffett were living in the household of Lewis Reno in 1723 in Dettingen Parish. Frank Moffett wrote the following based on his research of these tobacco lists: "This was a census which was taken to allocate the number of tobacco plants which each male would be allowed to plant, as there was a tobacco glut, and the price was suffering. Sort of a colonial version of FDR's "Land Bank" program, wherein farmers were paid not to grow crops, etc. The brothers Henry (sometimes recorded as Heinrich) Moffett and Gabriel were listed in the household of Lewis Reno, a Huguenot, along with Reno sons, in Dettingen Parish, the location of which is now in Prince William County (then Stafford County). 

 http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~reneau/Reneau/reneau/d163.htm#P703


[Steve Fancy research] Lewis Reynaud, whose name appears as the anglicized version Renoe, Rennoe, or Reno in early Stafford County, Virginia, records, had to have been under 21 years of age on October 10, 1688, when he was included in the Letter of Denization granted his parents, but he must have been at least 21 in February 1700 when he acquired land in Virginia, thus fixing his birth before 1678. He was still in London with his family in early April 1688, but was in Stafford County, Virginia, by October 2, 1688, based on the documents described above for his father. The voyage to Virginia from London took about 13 weeks, so he probably arrived in the Northern Neck of Virginia between July and October 1688 with his family and his uncle Benjamin and his family. 
      Lewis Reno acquired his first 100 acres of land from John Allen on February 25, 1700, for 2100 pounds of tobacco "to me in hand paid or promised to be paid" (Stafford County Deed Book Z, p. 73-74). This land had been purchased by John Allen and his brother William Allen from Augustine Kneaton, and was "situate and lying between the Rocky Run and Austins Run in Acquia." John and William Allen signed a Deed of Division for the parcel (witnessed by Lewis Reno) just prior to John Allen selling his portion to Lewis Reno. 
      On March 9, 1705, John Allen confirmed the deed to Lewis Reno, "the 2100 pounds of tobacco having been fully paid" (Stafford Co. Book Z, p. 309). A later land record by John Allen's brother, William Allen, mentions "a tract of land sold by my brother John Allen to Lewis Renoe a Frenchman of Westmoreland County." Stafford County was formed out of part of Westmoreland County, and Prince William County was later formed from part of Stafford County. (Stafford County was established out of Westmoreland County in 1664; Prince William County was broken out of Stafford County in 1731; and Fairfax County was broken out of Prince William County in 1742.) 
      On June 7, 1707, Ursula Allen, "wife of John Allen of the County of Stafford," granted power of attorney to Nathaniel Pope to "acknowledge in Stafford County a certain tract of land granted by sale by my said husband Lewis Renoe in the same County the 9th day of March 1705 giving and granting unto my said attorney my whole power of authority in and about the premis to acknowledge in Court my right of Dower of the said land…" (Book Z, p. 372). James C. Reneau, in his 1989 article in the Virginia Genealogist, interpreted this document as saying that Ursula Allen was the widow of Lewis Renoe, who must have died between 1705 and 1707, but I (Steve Fancy) believe that Ursula left out the word "to" and was actually referring to the tract of land granted by my said husband TO Lewis Renoe in March 1705. 
      On August 24, 1711, Lewis Renoe and Clement Chevalle were granted 968 acres in Overwharton Parish of Stafford County on the upper side of Broad Run just east of Bristow (Northern Neck Grant Bk. 4, p. 28) and four days later, on August 28, 1711, Lewis Reno and Lewis Tacquett acquired a grant of 486 acres on Cedar Run, presently located east of Brentsville and south of Manassas in the Northern Neck of Virginia. Lewis Reno was living on this land in 1715 (Northern Neck Grant Bk. 5, p. 67). The title to this Reno-Tackett grant was the subject of a lengthy suit between Thomas Stamps and Thomas Reno in 1752 wherein the Court held that Lewis Reno in 1711 had been "duly naturalized and capable of taking and holding lands as by a Copy of Record in the office of Prince William County dated the second day of October 1688." The Court held that Lewis Tackett was not then naturalized and that this grant was invalid as to him. 
      In 1712, Lewis Reno and Lewis Tackett divided the original grant equally between themselves, and this division was confirmed by the Court on June 16, 1779 (Prince William County Bk. U, p. 49). 
      On June 30, 1712, Lewis Reno and Philomen Waters acquired a proprietary grant of 466 acres on the east side of Cedar Run, adjoining the Reno-Tackett Grant (Bk. M, p. 176). Thus, Lewis Reno acquired numerous lands, most of which were planted in tobacco. 
      In Deed Abstracts of Stafford County, Virginia, 1722-1728, Stafford County, Virginia, Deed Book J, p. 462, we find the following abstract: Know all men . . . We Lewis Renoe and Philemon Waters both of Stafford County do hereby covenant together for ourselves . . . heirs . . . Jointly to make a dividing line between us in a tract taken up between us in County Stafford and being on the south side of Occuquan River & beginning at a white oak standing upon the upside of a small branch extending to the fork of the run from the Run . . . to back line … Signed April 11th day of 1717. Lewis Renoe his mark LR; Philemon Waters, his mark; Voiltine Higgs, his mark. At Court held for Stafford County 13th September 1727 . . . Renoe and Waters acknowledged deed of Partition . . . admitted to record." 
      The Prince William County courthouse was built in 1742 on land donated by Lewis Renoe and Philomen Waters who had patented the land in 1712. Lewis Renoe and Rynhart de la Fayelle also patented another 950 acres near Broad Run in 1712. 
      Lewis Reno's will was probated on November 27, 1754, with his sons Lewis Reno and Thomas Reno named as executors. They presented his will in Court on January 27, 1755, [Prince William County Minute Books, Order Book 1754-1755, p. 181] and signed a bond, both spelling their name Reno (Prince William County Cord Order Book 1754-1755, p. 181). On August 26, 1755 (Prince William County Order Book 1754-1755, p. 279, "The inventory and appraisement of the estate of LEWIS RENO decreased was returned and ordered to be recorded." 
      [Side Note: William L. Reno's 1975 manuscript and his published articles incorrectly showed this Lewis Reno as the son of Pierre Reynaud. Dr. Reno was unaware of the Stafford County records for Lewis and Benjamin Reynaud at the time, but court documents from the Thomas Stamps lawsuit in 1752 indicated that Lewis Reno was a naturalized citizen based on documents dated October 2, 1688, and Dr. Reno assumed that this Lewis Reno was Pierre Reynaud's son based on the following argument: "This date closely coincides with the date (October 10, 1688) on which the Letter of Denization issued to his father, Peter Reynaud, was inscribed on the Patent Roll which was, of course, its effective date. The slight difference in dates was probably due to a clerical error in the many transcriptions which this court record has undergone; it probably said October 20, 1688, instead of October 2, 1688. If this be true, then October 20, 1688 would, under the New Style Calendar adopted in 1751, have been the equivalent of October 10, 1688 under the Old Style Calendar and would have precisely coincided with the date of the Letter of Denization."] 
      According to the 1723 Virginia Tobacco Lists, brothers Henry and Gabriel Moffett were living in the household of Lewis Reno in 1723 in Dettingen Parish. Frank Moffett wrote the following based on his research of these tobacco lists: "This was a census which was taken to allocate the number of tobacco plants which each male would be allowed to plant, as there was a tobacco glut, and the price was suffering. Sort of a colonial version of FDR's "Land Bank" program, wherein farmers were paid not to grow crops, etc. The brothers Henry (sometimes recorded as Heinrich) Moffett and Gabriel were listed in the household of Lewis Reno, a Huguenot, along with Reno sons, in Dettingen Parish, the location of which is now in Prince William County (then Stafford County)." 
      In Prince William County Deed Book 1731-1732, pg. 282-290, April 20, 1732, we find: John Creel of Prince William, planter to William Bland of same, Lewis Renoe of same, James French, of same, Thomas Renoe of same, James Bland of same . . . John Creel obtained a grant out of the office of the Proprietors for 870 a. land between Kettle Run and Broad Run . . . and hath agreed to enter into copartenership with William Bland, lewis Renoe, James Rench, Tho. Renoe, and James Bland to dig, work, search in and upon said land for a mine or mines of Iron, copper, tin, lead or any other metal or metals mines or minerals . . . in consideration of fidelity trust . . . for term of 1000 years. John Creel, William (W) Bland, Lewis (L) Renoe, James (E) French, Thomas Reno, James (J) Bland. Wit: Lewis Taskitt, John © Elliott." 
      Sherman Reno believed that Lewis Reno had three daughters: Margaret, who married an Anderton; Mary, who married a Davis; and Sarah. Sherman did not cite the source of his information, but it may be based on court records from Prince William County Will Book C, where Thomas Reno posts bonds with Margaret Anderton in one case, and Mary Davis, executor of Richard Davis' estate in another. On Feb. 26, 1738, p. 164-165, Margaret Anderton, Stephen Martin and Thomas Reno post 100 pounds bond to the court for unknown reasons. It says that Margaret is the admx. of Richard Anderton. On March 26, 1739, p. 168-169 is a bond of Mary Davis, Richard Higgins and Thomas Reno for 50 pounds, where Mary Davis is the admx. of Richard Davis' deed. My (Steve Fancy) interpretation of these and adjacent records are that Thomas Reno was simply a witness to these accounts, and was not necessarily related to Mary and Margaret. 
      Prior to 1759, Prince William County included most of what is now, Fairfax, Arlington, Alexandria, Loudoun, and Fauquier counties. 
      It is believed that Lewis made his home on the Reno portion of the Reno-Chevalle Grant of 1710 on Broad Run near Bristow. 
      Dettinger Parish Church was formed in 1744, and in 1752 the parishioners contracted for a building. As church warden, Lewis advertised for brick or stone for building the church. 
      In a book entitled "WPA Records, Prince William County, Virginia" by Hobbs, Kelley and Pusey (pages 348 and 349) there is an article concerning "More Green" located 3 miles north of Brentsville, Virginia, on Route #214, on North side of road. In a discussion of this property, it states that "This land was patented in 1711 by Clemont Chevaelle and Louis Renoe. In 1793 it came into the hands of Howison Hooe, who belonged to the numerous Hooe family that had settled at Occoquan, and operated the Ferry there for a number of years." 
      "The place was willed to James Hooe by his father, Howison Hooe, in 1841, and is described as a tract of land at the forks of Broad Run and Kettle Run, being a part of the old Bristow tract. It was bequeathed to Jane Hooe by her brother James Hooe, and she left it to her husband, Redmond Foster. The present owner was Mrs. J. B. Fletcher. Both the Hooes and the Fosters were large slave owneers. With Brentsville, the county seat, only three miles away, the place must have been the scene of much festivity and hospitality, although the place now seems but an echo of the past." 
      The 1952 Manassas, Virginia, Journal Messenger Newspaper had a very interesting descriptive article by Mary Anne Peters on Moor Green and a nice picture of it. The article reads as follows: "MOOR GREEN, MR. AND MRS. COX' HOME BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN A BLOCK HOUSE. The Georgian facade of Moor Green, well-known family home of Mr. and Mrs. John Watson Cox, with its somnulent aura of by-gone times and events, looks westward across softly rolling land that slopes gradually downward to Broad Run. Land that was once dotted with Indians coming and going to their villae situated across a field from the big house and at other times with the bitter fruit of war, is now sprinkled with quietly grazing dairy cows that peacefully keep the moorsward clipped like a lawn. 
      "The house of mellow brick stands three stories high, fronted by a terace outlined in handsome box. Its design of only one room deep, following the traditional medieval architecture found in the oldest English homes, allows maximum sunshine in all the rooms except where the kitchen ell interferes. 
      "A medallion on one of the outer walls establishes a firm date on the age of the house as 1756. However, parts of the house show evidence of an earlier history. The garden front and two end walls are Queen Anne as opposed to the later Georgian style on the front shown above, and are laid in common bond which was not generally used after 1738. It is believed that the place started life as a block house, the present fence marking the site of the stockade, and that when its front wall was damaged it was rebuilt to look as it does now. The interior panelling was installed in 1756. 
      "The wide, hospitable green door opens into a spacious hall which ends in a door opening onto the garden terrace. Off the hall to the left is the parlor, whose most striking feature is a handsome mantel. The mantel, basically Queen Anne in style, is overlaid with geometric designs of Indian origin, probably executed by a Indian on the place at the time the mantel was made. There are fireplaces in every room in the house. 
      "Across the hall and through the dining room to the rear is the kitchen ell, set several feet below the rest of the house, its ivy-wreathed windows looking out onto the garden terrace. It was once the plantation office and library, and the small between – stories room above it was once the weaving room, now used as a study. 
      "The kitchen in other times was a separate building a few yards from the outside entrance to the dining room. Old flagstones that made up the walk leading to it can still be found sunk deep in the covering grass and overgrown by the roots of a hugh oak. This buildingalso sheltered the house slaves, and since it was the Union Army's practice to force the slaves to leave by burning their quarters, in this case the whole building was demolished. 
      "The charming stair case in the main hall leads to bedrooms on the second floor and finally winds it way up to more on the third. Heavy blood stains on the wide old flooring of the third floor recall the time during the Civil War when the place was used as a hospital, probably by both sides. 
      "Another interesting, but no longer visible, feature of the house is a hidden stairway leading from the floor of the cellar to the water level of an old well, which was evidently used by members of the household to obtain water without exposing themselves to possible attack from Indiana by going outside. Access to the stair was sealed off when the present owner in rehabilitating the place had to lay a concrete floor in the cellar to protect it from the inroads of moisture. 
      "Away from the house but within the fence-stockade is the old family cemetery studded with sunken slabs, half-hidden by masses of myrtle, which time and weather have unfortunately rubbed bare of markings. A large rectangular depression marks the place where are buried those who died in the house during its service as a hospital during the Civil War. Over the fence beyond the cemetery is a deep pit which not many years ago still held the ruins of what gave evidence as being an ice house. 
      "The slave burial ground is several slopes away but can be clearly marked from the house by the tops of the dark sentinel cedars, one of which was planted at the head of the grave of each male slave. Slabs of the same material as those in the family cemetery were put next to the cedars, and now several are almost completely enveloped by the base of the trees. It is interesting to note the lapse of time between the deaths of the slaves by the progress of growth or decay of the trees. 
      "There is a touching story of an old slave thought to have been named Raphael, who played the fiddle and organized a small dance band which catered to the balls given in the house and events around Brentsville, then a thriving social center. He must have been beloved by the family, since when he died he was buried apart from the grave of the other slaves, and in the spring his grave still bloosoms with narcissus that was supposedly planted by the "white folks". Myrtle planted by slaves also covers the spot. In place of the usual marker his old fiddle was put at the head of his grave, the top of which was still visible within the personal memory of the present owner. 
      "The old approach to the house was the logging road that went South through the woods toward manassas and westward across the green oward Brentsville, fording Broad Run. At a vantage spot above the ford the ruins of triangularly-shaped earthworks of a redoubt still remain to mark the place where Confederates guarded the ford. Shells, bayonets and bullets have been found on and about the spot. It was this road which Jeb Stewart took to get to Manassas after Bristow Station. 
      "The story of the land, which is also the story of the general area of Moor Green, seems to date from 1689, when it belonged to the daughter of Lord Culpeper who married Lord Fairfax. Surveyed in 1694 and again in 1699, the land was divided and after passing through several hands was finally bought by Luis Renault (Reno) in 1711. The land remained in the family until 1990 when it was sold. In 1941 it returned to a branch of the family when Mr. Cox bought it, he being descended on his mother's wide from the original owners. 
      "Mrs. Viola D. Proffitt of Manassas recollects that her grandfather, Lucian Alexander Davis, who was a Captain in the Prince William Cavalry during the War Between the States, had a narrow escape at Moor Green. 
      "Captain and Mrs. Davis were stopping momentarily at Moor Green when a slave reported that yankee infantrymen were fast approaching the estate. Thinking the Union men were looking for him, Captain Davis escaped. 
      "Mrs. Davis was resting at the home before journeying to Bowling Green to be attended by an uncle who was a physicial there. Believing her to be a Confederate spy, she was captured by the North and taken to Alexandria. She was rescued by a Mrs. Holland who moved under the cloak of British protection and taken to Mrs. Holland's home in Alexandria where a son was born to the Davis'. However, the birth was premature and the son died shortly after birth. 
      "Following the war, Captain Davis was Clerk of the Circuit Court in Prince William for 16 years." 

Links
http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/d/a/m/Sue-Reneau-Damewood/BOOK-0001/0004-0003.html#CHILD7

http://www.geni.com/people/Lewis-Reno/6000000006369567139

Immigration - uploaded by Private User on October 20, 2011

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Person
Facts
Values
Note
Lewis Reno First Name Lewis
Lewis Reno Last Name Reno
Lewis Reno Birth Surname Reynaud
Lewis Reno Also Known As Renoe, Rennoe, Reneau
Lewis Reno Date of Birth c. 1676
Lewis Reno Place of Birth Valence, Rhône-Alpes, France
Lewis Reno Date of Death 1/27/1755
Lewis Reno Place of Death Manassas, Prince William, Virginia, USA
Lewis Reno Living Status Deceased
Lewis Reno Gender Male
Lewis Reno Occupation Planter
Lewis Reno Ethnicity

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