Geza II. Géza - Gejza of Hungary ÁRPÁD(házi) (Magyar király), King (c.1130 - 1162) MP

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Birthplace: Tolna, Hungary
Death: Died in Székesfehérvár, Fejér , Hungary
Occupation: Rey de Hungría y Croacia, KING OF HUNGARY, King of Hungary, Konge, Roi, de Hongrie, de Croatie, 1141 König von Ungarn, Kroatien, Dalmatien und Rama, Konge av Ungarn 1141-1162, magyar király
Managed by: FARKAS Mihály László
Last Updated:

About Geza II. Géza - Gejza of Hungary ÁRPÁD(házi) (Magyar király), King

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_GÉZA_II_1141-1162,

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GÉZA, son of BÉLA II "the Blind" King of Hungary & his wife Jelena of Serbia ([1130]-3 or 31 May 1162, bur Székesfehérvár). The Chronicon Dubnicense names "Geysam, Ladizlaum, Stephanum et Almus" as the four sons of "Bela cecus"[684]. The Annales Gradicenses record the death in 1141 of "Bela rex Ungarorum" and the accession of his son[685]. He succeeded his father in 1141 as GÉZA II King of Hungary, under the regency from 1142 of his maternal uncle Beloš of Serbia during which time Hungarian ties with Serbia were strengthened[686]. "Geica rex Ungariæ" restored "abbatiæ montis Pannoniæ", founded by "Sancti regis Stephani" and withdrawn by "rege Colomano et filio suo rege Stephano", by charter dated 1142, subscribed by "Belus dux, Calanus comes, Gereon comes, Paulus, Vamoldus comes, Cadas comes"[687]. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Geyza rex" invaded "Theotonicorum terram" in 1145 and expelled "Herzog", whose army fled[688]. The person to whom "Herzog" refers has not yet been identified. "Geisa secundus secundi Belæ regis filius" confirmed the possessions of the church of Buda by charter dated 1148 in the presence of "Ioanus comitis, Appa comitis, Zaith [Zasit] comitis, Gabrielis dapiferi, Caiphæ magistri pincernarum, Bogislai regiæ cameræ presidentis"[689]. Hungarian troops assisted Géza's maternal uncle Uroš II Grand Župan of Serbia in his defence against Byzantium, but the latter won a decisive victory on the River Tara in 1150. The following year, Emperor Manuel Komnenos declared war on Hungary, besieged Zemun but withdrew without occupying Hungarian territory[690]. Peace was negotiated with Manuel I Emperor of Byzantium in 1156[691]. During the reign of Géza II, large-scale German colonisation took place in Transylvania[692]. The necrology of Salzburg St Rudpert records the death "II Kal Jun" of "Geutse Ungarorum rex"[693]. The Chronicon Posoniense records the death in 1162 of "Geyza rex"[694]. The Chronicon Dubnicense records the death "Kal Jun" in 1161 of "Geysa" and his burial "Albe"[695]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King Géza reigned for twenty years and was buried at Székesfehérvár[696].

m (1146) IEVFROSINA Mstislavna of Kiev, daughter of MSTISLAV II Vladimirovich "the Great" Grand Prince of Kiev & his second wife [Liubava] Dmitrievna ([1130]-1186 or before). Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 1194/95, reciting the consanguinity between Philippe II King of France and his second wife Ingebjörg of Denmark on which their divorce was based, which names “Ingiburgh filia Rizlavi…Ruthenorum Regis et Cristinæ Reginæ…filia…Ingonis Suevorum Regis et Helena Reginæ” as mother of “Waldemarum Regem” and refers to “prædictæ Ingeborgis soror” as mother of “Belæ Regis Hungariæ” who married “sororem Philippi Regis Francorum”[697]. Baumgarten names the wife of King Géza as the daughter of Prince Mstislav but only cites one secondary source in support[698]. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "mater regis" was exiled to Greece "eodem tempore"[699], listed under 1187 in the paragraph which records the exile of her son Géza. Her name and date of death are confirmed by the charter dated 1186 under which her daughter "Elisabeth ducis Bohemie uxor" founded a church in Bohemia for the Knights Hospitallers, who had been favoured by "Eurosine matre mee"[700].

King Géza & his wife had eight children:

1. ELISABETH ([1144/45]-12 Jan after 1189). The Continuatio Cosmæ records the marriage in 1157 of "Friderico filio eiusdem ducis [=Wladizlai ducis]" and "filiam Ungarici regis" but does not name her, specifying that "Heinricus frater Wladizlai ducis" brought her back to Bohemia for the marriage "XIII Kal Feb"[701]. "Elisabeth ducis Bohemie uxor" founded a church in Bohemia for the Knights Hospitallers, who had been favoured by "Eurosine matre mee", by charter dated 1186 which names "frater meus Henricus Pragensis episcopus" [identified as her husband´s paternal first cousin, who succeeded in 1193 as Heinrich Břetislav Duke of Bohemia, indicating that "frater" in this passage was probably used in an ecclesiastical sense][702]. m (after 1157) FRIEDRICH of Bohemia, son of VLADISLAV II Duke [King from 1158] of Bohemia & his first wife Gertrud of Austria ([1142]-25 May 1189). Duke of Olmütz 1169. He succeeded in 1172 as FRIEDRICH Duke of Bohemia, deposed 1173, restored briefly in 1178

2. ISTVÁN (1147-murdered Gran 4 Mar 1172, bur Esztergom). The Chronicon Dubnicense names "Stephanum et Belam, Arpad et Geysam" as the four sons of "Geysa"[703]. The Chronicon Zagrabiense names "dux Stephanus postea rex, secundus…rex Wela, tertius…dux Arpad, quartus…dux Geyza" as the four sons of "Gexcha rex"[704]. Niketas Choniates names "Stephanum et Belam" as the two sons of "Hunnorum princeps Iazas"[705]. The Chronicon Posoniense records the death in 1162 of "Geyza rex" and the accession of "filius eius Stephanus"[706]. He succeeded his father in 1162 as ISTVÁN III King of Hungary. "Stephanus…rex Hungarie, beate memorie Geyse regis filius" granted property to "hominem in Supruniensis castri…Forcos", in the presence of "Heidrico palatino comite, Gabriele curiale comite, Ampudino comite, Laurencio comite, Rubeno comite, F--- comite, Dionisio comite, Vidone Pristaldo", by charter dated 1162[707]. His uncles were supported by Emperor Manuel I and succeeded in turn as kings of Hungary. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Ladizlaus et Stephanus fratres Geyze" returned from Greece and deposed István who fled "in Poson"[708]. István III was restored in 1164 by Beloš of Serbia, previously regent for his father. Emperor Manuel marched on Hungary with a view to restoring King István IV, but changed his mind at the border and negotiated a peace treaty under which he recognised István III as king and confirmed István's younger brother as Duke of Croatia and Dalmatia and his successor[709]. Further disputes with Byzantium followed, but Hungary was finally defeated by Byzantine forces at Zemun in 1167, after which it was forced to accept the loss of Srem, Dalmatia and part of Croatia[710]. István III King of Hungary granted "villam Luchman" to "nobiles Godefridus et Albertus" Teutonic knights who had left "terra natalis Patriæ" during the reign of King Géza II by charter dated 1171[711]. This charter represents the earliest reference so far found to the presence of Teutonic Knights in Hungary. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King István reigned for eleven years and nine months and was buried at Székesfehérvár[712]. The Chronicon Dubnicense records the death "IV Non Mar" in 1173 of "Stephanus filius Geyse" and his burial "Strigony"[713]. Betrothed (1167, repudiated 1168) --- Iaroslavna of Galich, daughter of IAROSLAV Vladimirkovich "Osmomysl" Prince of Galich & his first wife Olga Iurievna of Kiev. Baumgarten mentions the betrothal of King István and the daughter of Prince Iaroslav, citing secondary sources in support, but comments that the marriage was not finalised and that she was sent back from Hungary in 1169[714]. Europäische Stammtafeln refers to this as King István's first marriage, stating that she was repudiated in 1168, but it is not known whether this is based on other sources[715]. m (1168) as her first husband, AGNES of Austria, daughter of HEINRICH II "Jasomirgott" Duke of Austria [Babenberg] & his second wife Theodora Komnene ([1154]-13 Jan 1182, bur Vienna Schottenkloster). A manuscript Genealogia marchionum Austrie, written [1181/92], names "Liupoldum et Hainricum filios et filiam Agnetem" as the children of "Hainricus dux ex coniuge Theodora Greca", adding that Agnes married firstly "Stephano regi Ungarorum" and secondly "Herimanno duci Karinthie"[716]. She married secondly Hermann II Duke of Carinthia.

3. BÉLA (1149-23 Apr 1196, bur Székesfehérvár, transferred to Coronation Church Budapest). The Chronicon Dubnicense names "Stephanum et Belam, Arpad et Geysam" as the four sons of "Geysa"[717]. Niketas Choniates names "Stephanum et Belam" as the two sons of "Hunnorum princeps Iazas"[718]. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Bela frater eius" returned from Greece and succeeded King István[719]. He succeeded his brother in 1172 as BÉLA III King of Hungary.

- see below.

4. ÁRPÁD . The Chronicon Dubnicense names "Stephanum et Belam, Arpad et Geysam" as the four sons of "Geysa"[720]. The Chronicon Varadiense names "primus…rex Bela, tertius…dux Arpad, quartus…dux Geysa" as the four sons of "Geysa rex" (omitting reference to the second son)[721]. The Chronicon Zagrabiense names "dux Stephanus postea rex, secundus…rex Wela, tertius…dux Arpad, quartus…dux Geyza" as the four sons of "Gexcha rex"[722].

5. GÉZA (-before 1209). The Chronicon Varadiense names "primus…rex Bela, tertius…dux Arpad, quartus…dux Geysa" as the four sons of "Geysa rex" (omitting reference to the second son)[723]. The Chronicon Zagrabiense names "dux Stephanus postea rex, secundus…rex Wela, tertius…dux Arpad, quartus…dux Geyza" as the four sons of "Gexcha rex"[724]. The Chronicon Dubnicense names "Stephanum et Belam, Arpad et Geysam" as the four sons of "Geysa"[725]. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "dux Geyza" left Hungary "cum Laurencio comite" and entered Austria in 1186, in 1187 travelled on to Bohemia from where "rege fratre suo" brought him back to Hungary[726]. He and is children are shown in Europäische Stammtafeln which states that he was in Byzantium named IOANNES[727], but the source on which this is based has not been identified. m ---, from Byzantium.

a) ALEXIOS. He returned to Hungary after 1209. 1217.

b) son. He returned to Hungary after 1209.

c) other children.

6. ODOLA . She is named as the wife of Svatopluk in Europäische Stammtafeln[728], but the source on which this is based has not been identified. m ([1164]) SVATOPLUK of Bohemia, son of son of VLADISLAV II King of Bohemia & his first wife Gertrud of Austria (-after 15 Oct 1169).

7. ILONA ([1158]-25 May 1199). The Annales Mellicenses record the marriage in 1174 of "Helenam sororem regis Avarorum" and "Liupoldus…de Austria"[729]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the wife of "dux Austrie Leopoldus" as "sorore regis Bele Hungarie"[730]. The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the death in 1199 of "Helena ducissa Austrie"[731]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "VIII Kal Jan" of "Helena ducissa Austrie"[732], although this date is inconsistent with other records. m (12 May 1172) LEOPOLD of Austria, son of HEINRICH II "Jasomirgott" Duke of Austria & his second wife Theodora Komnene (1157-Graz 31 Dec 1194, bur Heiligenkreuz). He succeeded his father in 1177 as LEOPOLD V Duke of Austria.

8. MARGIT (posthumously 1162-before 1208). The Chronicon Posoniense records that "dux Geyza…soror eius" married in Greece but does not name her[733]. The primary source which confirms her name and the precise identity of her first husband has not yet been identified. Her second marriage is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[734], but the source on which this is based has not yet been identified. m firstly ([1177]) ISAAKIOS Dukas "Makrodukas", son of KONSTANTINOS Dukas "Makrodukas", pansebastos, panhypersebastos & his wife Anna Komnene (-executed 1185). m secondly (after 1186) ANDRÁS Gespan of Somogy (-after 1208).

--------------------------------------------

Geisa II Arpád, King of Hungary (1)

M, #113939, b. circa 1130, d. 1161

Last Edited=27 May 2003

    Geisa II Arpád, King of Hungary was born circa 1130. (2) He was the son of Béla II Arpád, King of Hungary and Helen of Serbia. (2) He married Euphrosine of Novgorod, daughter of Mstislaw I, Grand Prince of Kiev, in 1146. (2) 

He died in 1161. (2)

    Geisa II Arpád, King of Hungary gained the title of King Geisa II of Hungary in 1141. (2)

Children of Geisa II Arpád, King of Hungary and Euphrosine of Novgorod

-1. Elisabeth Arpád+ d. a 1190 (2)

-2. Helen Arpád+ d. 1199 (3)

-3. Stephen III Arpád, King of Hungary b. 1147, d. 1172 (2)

-4. Béla III Arpád, King of Hungary+ b. 1148, d. c 1196 (2)

Forrás / Source:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p11394.htm#i113939

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Géza II (Hungarian: II. Géza, Croatian: Gejza I, Slovak: Gejza II), (1130, Tolna – 31 May 1162), King of Hungary and Croatia (1141–1162). He ascended the throne as a child and during his minority the kingdom was governed by his mother. He was one of the most powerful monarchs of Hungary, who could intervene successfully in the internal affairs of the neighbouring countries.

Géza was the eldest son of King Béla II of Hungary and his wife, Helena of Raška. He was only a baby when his mother introduced him and his brother, Ladislaus to the barons assembled in Arad in order to persuade them to massacre her husband's opponents.

He was crowned three days after his father's death on 13 February 1141. As he was still a minor, his mother served as regent of the kingdom helped by her brother, Beloš. She faced challenges from Boris, the son of King Coloman's adulterous queen, who disputed Géza's claim to the throne.

Marriage and children

Euphrosyne of Kiev (c. 1130 – c. 1193), daughter of Grand Prince Mstislav I of Kiev and his second wife, Liubava Dmitrievna

King Stephen III of Hungary (1147 – 4 March 1172).

King Béla III of Hungary (1148 – 23 April 1196).

Elisabeth (c. 1149 – after 1189), wife of Duke Frederick of Bohemia.

Duke Géza (c. 1150 – before 1210).

Arpad, died young.

Odola (1156 – 1199), wife of Duke Sviatopluk of Bohemia.

Helena (c. 1158 – 25 May 1199), wife of Duke Leopold V of Austria.

Margaret (Margit) (1162 – ?), born posthumously; wife firstly of Isaac Macrodukas and secondly of András, Obergespan of Somogy.

--------------------

Géza II of Hungary

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Géza II (Hungarian: II. Géza, Croatian: Gejza I, Slovak: Gejza II), (1130, Tolna – 31 May 1162), King of Hungary and Croatia (1141–1162). He ascended the throne as a child and during his minority the kingdom was governed by his mother. He was one of the most powerful monarchs of Hungary, who could intervene successfully in the internal affairs of the neighbouring countries.

Early years

Géza was the eldest son of King Béla II of Hungary and his wife, Helena of Raška. He was only a baby when his mother introduced him and his brother, Ladislaus to the barons assembled in Arad in order to persuade them to massacre her husband's opponents.

He was crowned three days after his father's death on 13 February 1141. As he was still a minor, his mother served as regent of the kingdom helped by her brother, Beloš. She faced challenges from Boris, the son of King Coloman's adulterous queen, who disputed Géza's claim to the throne.

In April 1146, Boris managed to occupy the fortress of Pozsony. Although the Hungarian troops could reoccupy the fortress, but Henry II, Duke of Austria intervened in the struggles on behalf of the pretender. Géza lead personally his armies against the Austrian troops and defeated them on 11 September.

[edit]King of Hungary

As an adult, Géza had a reputation as a well-respected king, whose nobles did not dare to scheme against him. The power and valor of his army was also commented upon, and Géza did not hesitate to involve himself in politics.

In 1146, Géza married Euphrosyne, sister of Grand Prince Iziaslav II of Kiev.

In June 1147, the Crusader Army of King Conrad III of Germany passed through Hungary without major conflicts, then King Louis VII of France arrived to the country, followed by the pretender Boris, who had secretly joined to the French Crusaders. Although King Louis VII denied to extradite the pretender to Géza, but he promised to take him under close custody abroad.

In 1148, Géza sent troops to his brother-in-law, Iziaslav II against Prince Vladimir of Chernihiv. In 1149, he assisted his maternal uncle, Duke Uroš II of Raška against the Byzantine Empire. In 1150, Géza sent new troops to Iziaslav, who had been struggling against Prince Yuri I of Suzdal, but his brother-in-law was not able to maintain his rule in Kiev. In the same year, the Serbian and Hungarian armies were defeated by the Byzantine troops; therefore Duke Uroš II had to accept the Byzantine supremacy over Raška.

In the autumn of 1150, Géza lead his armies against Prince Volodymyrko of Halych, but the prince managed to persuade Géza's advisors to convince their king to give up the campaign. In 1152, Géza and Iziaslav II went together against Halych, and they defeated Volodymyrko's armies at the San River. Géza had to return to his kingdom, because during his campaign, Boris attacked the Southern territories of Hungary supported by Byzantine troops. However, Géza could defeat the pretender and made a truce with the Byzantine Empire.

In 1154, he supported the rebellion of Andronikos Komnenos against the Emperor Manuel I and laid siege to Barancs, but the Emperor had overcome his cousin's conspiracy and liberated the fortress.

In 1157, his younger brother, Stephen conspired against him supported by their uncle, Beloš. Although Géza could overcome their conspiracy, but Stephen fled to the court of Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor. Géza sent his envoys to the emperor and promised to assist him with troops against Milan; therefore Frederick I denied any support from Stephen who fled to Constantinople. Stephen was followed, in 1159, by their brother, Ladislaus, who also had conspired against Géza.

In 1161, inspired by the new Archbishop of Esztergom, Lukas, Géza not only acknowledged the legitimacy of Pope Alexander III instead of Antipope Victor IV, who had been supported by Emperor Frederick I., but he also renounced of the right of investiture.

He was burried in Székesfehérvár.

[edit]Marriage and children

  1. 1146: Euphrosyne of Kiev (c. 1130 – c. 1193), daughter of Grand Prince Mstislav I of Kiev and his second wife, Liubava Dmitrievna

King Stephen III of Hungary (1147 – 4 March 1172)

King Béla III of Hungary (1148 – 23 April 1196)

Elisabeth (c. 1149 – after 1189), wife of Duke Frederick of Bohemia

Duke Géza (c. 1150 – before 1210)

Odola (? – ?), wife of Duke Sviatopluk of Bohemia

Helena (c. 1158 – 25 May 1199), wife of Duke Leopold V of Austria

--------------------

Géza II (Hungarian: II. Géza, Slovak: Gejza II, Croatian: Gejza II), (1130, Tolna – 31 May 1162), King of Hungary(1141–1162).[1][2][3] He ascended the throne as a child and during his minority the kingdom was governed by his mother. He was one of the most powerful monarchs of Hungary, who could intervene successfully in the internal affairs of the neighbouring countries.

Contents [hide]

1 Early years

2 King of Hungary

3 Marriage and children

4 Ancestors

5 Titles

6 Sources

7 References


[edit] Early years

Géza was the eldest son of King Béla II of Hungary and his wife, Helena of Raška. He was only a baby when his mother introduced him and his brother Ladislaus to the barons assembled in Arad in order to persuade them to massacre her husband's opponents.

He was crowned three days after his father's death on 13 February 1141. As he was still a minor, his mother served as regent of the kingdom helped by her brother, Beloš. She faced challenges from Boris, the son of King Coloman's adulterous queen, who disputed Géza's claim to the throne.

In April 1146, Boris managed to occupy the fortress of Pozsony. Although the Hungarian troops would reoccupy the fortress, but Henry II, Duke of Austria, intervened in the struggles on behalf of the pretender. Géza personally led his armies against the Austrian troops and defeated them on 11 September.

[edit] King of Hungary

As an adult, Géza had a reputation as a well-respected king, whose nobles did not dare to scheme against him. The power and valor of his army was also commented upon, and Géza did not hesitate to involve himself in politics.

In 1146, Géza married Euphrosyne, sister of Grand Prince Iziaslav II of Kiev.

In June 1147, the Crusader Army of King Conrad III of Germany passed through Hungary without major conflicts, then King Louis VII of France arrived in the country, followed by the pretender Boris, who had secretly joined the French Crusaders. Although King Louis VII refused to extradite the pretender to Géza, he did promise to take him abroad under close custody.

In 1148, Géza sent troops to his brother-in-law Iziaslav II against Prince Vladimir of Chernihiv. In 1149, he assisted his maternal uncle, Duke Uroš II of Raška against the Byzantine Empire. In 1150, Géza sent new troops to Iziaslav, who had been struggling against Prince Yuri I of Suzdal, but his brother-in-law was not able to maintain his rule in Kiev. In the same year, the Serbian and Hungarian armies were defeated by the Byzantine troops, therefore Duke Uroš II had to accept the Byzantine rule over Raška.

In the autumn of 1150, Géza lead his armies against Prince Vladimirko of Halicz (son-in-law of the late King Coloman), but the prince managed to persuade Géza's advisors to convince their king to give up the campaign. It can be found in a Ruthenian chronicle Hypatian Codex, where at the date of 1150 one can read: The Hungarian King Géza II crossed the mountains and seized the stronghold of Sanok with its governor as well as many villages in Przemyśl area. In 1152, Géza and Iziaslav II went together against Halych, and they defeated Volodymyrko's armies at the San River. Géza had to return to his kingdom because, during his campaign, Boris attacked the southern territories of Hungary supported by Byzantine troops. However, Géza would defeat the pretender and made a truce with the Byzantine Empire.

In 1154, he supported the rebellion of Andronikos Komnenos against Emperor Manuel I and laid siege to Barancs, but the emperor had overcome his cousin's conspiracy and liberated the fortress.

In 1157, his younger brother, Stephen conspired against him supported by their uncle, Beloš. Although Géza would overcome their conspiracy, Stephen fled to the court of Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor. Géza sent his envoys to the emperor and promised to assist him with troops against Milan. Therefore Frederick I refused any support from Stephen who then fled to Constantinople. Stephen was followed, in 1159, by their brother, Ladislaus, who also had conspired against Géza.

In 1161, inspired by the new Archbishop of Esztergom, Lukács, Géza not only acknowledged the legitimacy of Pope Alexander III instead of Antipope Victor IV, who had been supported by Emperor Frederick I, but he also renounced the right of investiture.

He was buried in Székesfehérvár.

[edit] Marriage and children

  1. 1146: Euphrosyne of Kiev (c. 1130 – c. 1193), daughter of Grand Prince Mstislav I of Kiev and his second wife, Liubava Dmitrievna

King Stephen III of Hungary (1147 – 4 March 1172).

King Béla III of Hungary (1148 – 23 April 1196).

Elisabeth (c. 1149 – after 1189), wife of Duke Frederick of Bohemia.

Duke Géza (c. 1150 – before 1210).

Arpad, died young.

Odola (1156 – 1199), wife of Duke Sviatopluk of Bohemia.

Helena (c. 1158 – 25 May 1199), wife of Duke Leopold V of Austria.

Margaret (Margit) (1162 – ?), born posthumously; wife firstly of Isaac Macrodukas and secondly of András, Obergespan of Somogy.

[edit] Ancestors

Ancestors of Géza II of Hungary[show]


 16. Béla I of Hungary 
 
         

 8. Géza I of Hungary   
 
               

 17. Adelaide/Rixa of Poland 
 
         

 4. Duke Álmos   
 
                     





 9. Sophia   
 
               





 2. Béla II of Hungary   
 
                           

 20. Grand Prince Iziaslav I of Kiev 
 
         

 10. Grand Prince Sviatopolk of Kiev   
 
               

 21. Gertrude of Poland 
 
         

 5. Predslava of Kiev   
 
                     













 1. Géza II of Hungary   
 
                                 













 6. Uroš I of Raška   
 
                     













 3. Helena of Raška   
 
                           













 7. Anna   
 
                     













[edit] Titles

King of Hungary, Dalmatia, Croatia and Rama

[edit] Sources

Engel, Pat. Realm of St. Stephen : A History of Medieval Hungary, 2001

Kristó Gyula - Makk Ferenc: Az Árpád-ház uralkodói (IPC Könyvek, 1996)

Korai Magyar Történeti Lexikon (9–14. század), főszerkesztő: Kristó Gyula, szerkesztők: Engel Pál és Makk Ferenc (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1994)

Magyarország Történeti Kronológiája I. – A kezdetektől 1526-ig, főszerkesztő: Benda Kálmán (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1981)

Géza II of Hungary

House of Árpád

Born: 1130 Died: 31 May 1162

Regnal titles

Preceded by

Béla II King of Hungary

1141 – 1162 Succeeded by

Stephen III

[edit] References

1.^ a b c Britannica 2009

2.^ a b http://www.thepeerage.com/p11394.htm#i113939

3.^ Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 86. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%A9za_II_of_Hungary"

Categories: 1130 births | 1162 deaths | People from Tolna County | Roman Catholic monarchs | House of Árpád | Hungarian monarchs | Medieval child rulers | Burials at Székesfehérvár Cathedral | Hungarian princes

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Géza II (Hungarian : II. Géza, Slovak : Gejza II, Croatian : Gejza II), (1130, Tolna – 31 May 1162), King of Hungary (1141–1162). He ascended the throne as a child and during his minority the kingdom was governed by his mother. He was one of the most powerful monarchs of Hungary, who could intervene successfully in the internal affairs of the neighbouring countries.

Early years

Géza was the eldest son of King Béla II of Hungary and his wife, Helena of Raška . He was only a baby when his mother introduced him and his brother Ladislaus to the barons assembled in Arad in order to persuade them to massacre her husband's opponents.

He was crowned three days after his father's death on 13 February 1141. As he was still a minor, his mother served as regent of the kingdom helped by her brother, Beloš. She faced challenges from Boris , the son of King Coloman's adulterous queen, who disputed Géza's claim to the throne.

In April 1146, Boris managed to occupy the fortress of Pozsony. Although the Hungarian troops would reoccupy the fortress, but Henry II, Duke of Austria , intervened in the struggles on behalf of the pretender. Géza personally led his armies against the Austrian troops and defeated them on 11 September.

King of Hungary

As an adult, Géza had a reputation as a well-respected king, whose nobles did not dare to scheme against him. The power and valor of his army was also commented upon, and Géza did not hesitate to involve himself in politics.

In 1146, Géza married Euphrosyne , sister of Grand Prince Iziaslav II of Kiev.

In June 1147, the Crusader Army of King Conrad III of Germany passed through Hungary without major conflicts, then King Louis VII of France arrived in the country, followed by the pretender Boris, who had secretly joined the French Crusaders. Although King Louis VII refused to extradite the pretender to Géza, he did promise to take him abroad under close custody.

In 1148, Géza sent troops to his brother-in-law Iziaslav II against Prince Vladimir of Chernihiv . In 1149, he assisted his maternal uncle, Duke Uroš II of Raška against the Byzantine Empire. In 1150, Géza sent new troops to Iziaslav, who had been struggling against Prince Yuri I of Suzdal , but his brother-in-law was not able to maintain his rule in Kiev. In the same year, the Serbian and Hungarian armies were defeated by the Byzantine troops, therefore Duke Uroš II had to accept the Byzantine rule over Raška .

In the autumn of 1150, Géza lead his armies against Prince Vladimirko of Halicz (son-in-law of the late King Coloman), but the prince managed to persuade Géza's advisors to convince their king to give up the campaign. It can be found in a Ruthenian chronicle Hypatian Codex , where at the date of 1150 one can read: The Hungarian King Géza II crossed the mountains and seized the stronghold of Sanok with its governor as well as many villages in Przemysl area. In 1152, Géza and Iziaslav II went together against Halych, and they defeated Volodymyrko's armies at the San River. Géza had to return to his kingdom because, during his campaign, Boris attacked the southern territories of Hungary supported by Byzantine troops. However, Géza would defeat the pretender and made a truce with the Byzantine Empire.

In 1154, he supported the rebellion of Andronikos Komnenos against Emperor Manuel I and laid siege to Barancs , but the emperor had overcome his cousin's conspiracy and liberated the fortress.

In 1157, his younger brother, Stephen conspired against him supported by their uncle, Beloš. Although Géza would overcome their conspiracy, Stephen fled to the court of Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor . Géza sent his envoys to the emperor and promised to assist him with troops against Milan . Therefore Frederick I refused any support from Stephen who then fled to Constantinople . Stephen was followed, in 1159, by their brother, Ladislaus, who also had conspired against Géza.

In 1161, inspired by the new Archbishop of Esztergom, Lukács , Géza not only acknowledged the legitimacy of Pope Alexander III instead of Antipope Victor IV , who had been supported by Emperor Frederick I, but he also renounced the right of investiture

He was buried in Székesfehérvár. Wikipedia

--------------------

Géza II (Hungarian : II. Géza, Slovak : Gejza II, Croatian : Gejza II), (1130, Tolna – 31 May 1162), King of Hungary (1141–1162). He ascended the throne as a child and during his minority the kingdom was governed by his mother. He was one of the most powerful monarchs of Hungary, who could intervene successfully in the internal affairs of the neighbouring countries.

Early years

Géza was the eldest son of King Béla II of Hungary and his wife, Helena of Raška . He was only a baby when his mother introduced him and his brother Ladislaus to the barons assembled in Arad in order to persuade them to massacre her husband's opponents.

He was crowned three days after his father's death on 13 February 1141. As he was still a minor, his mother served as regent of the kingdom helped by her brother, Beloš. She faced challenges from Boris , the son of King Coloman's adulterous queen, who disputed Géza's claim to the throne.

In April 1146, Boris managed to occupy the fortress of Pozsony. Although the Hungarian troops would reoccupy the fortress, but Henry II, Duke of Austria , intervened in the struggles on behalf of the pretender. Géza personally led his armies against the Austrian troops and defeated them on 11 September.

King of Hungary

As an adult, Géza had a reputation as a well-respected king, whose nobles did not dare to scheme against him. The power and valor of his army was also commented upon, and Géza did not hesitate to involve himself in politics.

In 1146, Géza married Euphrosyne , sister of Grand Prince Iziaslav II of Kiev.

In June 1147, the Crusader Army of King Conrad III of Germany passed through Hungary without major conflicts, then King Louis VII of France arrived in the country, followed by the pretender Boris, who had secretly joined the French Crusaders. Although King Louis VII refused to extradite the pretender to Géza, he did promise to take him abroad under close custody.

In 1148, Géza sent troops to his brother-in-law Iziaslav II against Prince Vladimir of Chernihiv . In 1149, he assisted his maternal uncle, Duke Uroš II of Raška against the Byzantine Empire. In 1150, Géza sent new troops to Iziaslav, who had been struggling against Prince Yuri I of Suzdal , but his brother-in-law was not able to maintain his rule in Kiev. In the same year, the Serbian and Hungarian armies were defeated by the Byzantine troops, therefore Duke Uroš II had to accept the Byzantine rule over Raška .

In the autumn of 1150, Géza lead his armies against Prince Vladimirko of Halicz (son-in-law of the late King Coloman), but the prince managed to persuade Géza's advisors to convince their king to give up the campaign. It can be found in a Ruthenian chronicle Hypatian Codex , where at the date of 1150 one can read: The Hungarian King Géza II crossed the mountains and seized the stronghold of Sanok with its governor as well as many villages in Przemysl area. In 1152, Géza and Iziaslav II went together against Halych, and they defeated Volodymyrko's armies at the San River. Géza had to return to his kingdom because, during his campaign, Boris attacked the southern territories of Hungary supported by Byzantine troops. However, Géza would defeat the pretender and made a truce with the Byzantine Empire.

In 1154, he supported the rebellion of Andronikos Komnenos against Emperor Manuel I and laid siege to Barancs , but the emperor had overcome his cousin's conspiracy and liberated the fortress.

In 1157, his younger brother, Stephen conspired against him supported by their uncle, Beloš. Although Géza would overcome their conspiracy, Stephen fled to the court of Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor . Géza sent his envoys to the emperor and promised to assist him with troops against Milan . Therefore Frederick I refused any support from Stephen who then fled to Constantinople . Stephen was followed, in 1159, by their brother, Ladislaus, who also had conspired against Géza.

In 1161, inspired by the new Archbishop of Esztergom, Lukács , Géza not only acknowledged the legitimacy of Pope Alexander III instead of Antipope Victor IV , who had been supported by Emperor Frederick I, but he also renounced the right of investiture

He was buried in Székesfehérvár. Wikipedia

--------------------

Géza II (Hungarian: II. Géza, Slovak: Gejza II, Croatian: Gejza II), (1130, Tolna – 31 May 1162), King of Hungary(1141–1162). He ascended the throne as a child and during his minority the kingdom was governed by his mother. He was one of the most powerful monarchs of Hungary, who could intervene successfully in the internal affairs of the neighbouring countries.

Early years

Géza was the eldest son of King Béla II of Hungary and his wife, Helena of Raška. He was only a baby when his mother introduced him and his brother Ladislaus to the barons assembled in Arad in order to persuade them to massacre her husband's opponents.

He was crowned three days after his father's death on 13 February 1141. As he was still a minor, his mother served as regent of the kingdom helped by her brother, Beloš. She faced challenges from Boris, the son of King Coloman's adulterous queen, who disputed Géza's claim to the throne.

In April 1146, Boris managed to occupy the fortress of Pozsony. Although the Hungarian troops would reoccupy the fortress, but Henry II, Duke of Austria, intervened in the struggles on behalf of the pretender. Géza personally led his armies against the Austrian troops and defeated them on 11 September.

King of Hungary

As an adult, Géza had a reputation as a well-respected king, whose nobles did not dare to scheme against him. The power and valor of his army was also commented upon, and Géza did not hesitate to involve himself in politics.

In 1146, Géza married Euphrosyne, sister of Grand Prince Iziaslav II of Kiev.

In June 1147, the Crusader Army of King Conrad III of Germany passed through Hungary without major conflicts, then King Louis VII of France arrived in the country, followed by the pretender Boris, who had secretly joined the French Crusaders. Although King Louis VII refused to extradite the pretender to Géza, he did promise to take him abroad under close custody.

In 1148, Géza sent troops to his brother-in-law Iziaslav II against Prince Vladimir of Chernihiv. In 1149, he assisted his maternal uncle, Duke Uroš II of Raška against the Byzantine Empire. In 1150, Géza sent new troops to Iziaslav, who had been struggling against Prince Yuri I of Suzdal, but his brother-in-law was not able to maintain his rule in Kiev. In the same year, the Serbian and Hungarian armies were defeated by the Byzantine troops, therefore Duke Uroš II had to accept the Byzantine rule over Raška.

In the autumn of 1150, Géza lead his armies against Prince Vladimirko of Halicz (son-in-law of the late King Coloman), but the prince managed to persuade Géza's advisors to convince their king to give up the campaign. It can be found in a Ruthenian chronicle Hypatian Codex, where at the date of 1150 one can read: The Hungarian King Géza II crossed the mountains and seized the stronghold of Sanok with its governor as well as many villages in Przemyśl area. In 1152, Géza and Iziaslav II went together against Halych, and they defeated Volodymyrko's armies at the San River. Géza had to return to his kingdom because, during his campaign, Boris attacked the southern territories of Hungary supported by Byzantine troops. However, Géza would defeat the pretender and made a truce with the Byzantine Empire.

In 1154, he supported the rebellion of Andronikos Komnenos against Emperor Manuel I and laid siege to Barancs, but the emperor had overcome his cousin's conspiracy and liberated the fortress.

In 1157, his younger brother, Stephen conspired against him supported by their uncle, Beloš. Although Géza would overcome their conspiracy, Stephen fled to the court of Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor. Géza sent his envoys to the emperor and promised to assist him with troops against Milan. Therefore Frederick I refused any support from Stephen who then fled to Constantinople. Stephen was followed, in 1159, by their brother, Ladislaus, who also had conspired against Géza.

In 1161, inspired by the new Archbishop of Esztergom, Lukács, Géza not only acknowledged the legitimacy of Pope Alexander III instead of Antipope Victor IV, who had been supported by Emperor Frederick I, but he also renounced the right of investiture.

He was buried in Székesfehérvár.

Marriage and children

  1. 1146: Euphrosyne of Kiev (c. 1130 – c. 1193), daughter of Grand Prince Mstislav I of Kiev and his second wife, Liubava Dmitrievna

King Stephen III of Hungary (1147 – 4 March 1172).

King Béla III of Hungary (1148 – 23 April 1196).

Elisabeth (c. 1149 – after 1189), wife of Duke Frederick of Bohemia.

Duke Géza (c. 1150 – before 1210).

Arpad, died young.

Odola (1156 – 1199), wife of Duke Sviatopluk of Bohemia.

Helena (c. 1158 – 25 May 1199), wife of Duke Leopold V of Austria.

Margaret (Margit) (1162 – ?), born posthumously; wife firstly of Isaac Macrodukas and secondly of András, Obergespan of Somogy.

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Konge av Ungarn 1141-1162.

Geza seiret i kamp mot russere og greker. I hans regjeringstid utvandret tallrike Sachsere til Ungarn. Han lot dem i 1143 bosette seg i grevskapeet Scepuze (Szepes, Zeps) og flere områder i Transylvanien, hvor deres etterkommere levere ennu idag.

Tekst: Tore Nygaard

Kilder:

Erich Brandenburg: Die Nachkommen Karls des Grossen, Leipzig 1935. N. de Baumgarten: Généalogie et Mariage occidenteaux des Rurikides Russes du Xe au XIIIe Siècle. Mogens Bugge: Våre forfedre, nr. 1153. Bent og Vidar Billing Hansen: Rosensverdslektens forfedre, side 18.

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Géza II (Hungarian: II. Géza, Croatian: Gejza I, Slovak: Gejza II), (1130, Tolna – 31 May 1162), King of Hungary and Croatia (1141–1162). He ascended the throne as a child and during his minority the kingdom was governed by his mother. He was one of the most powerful monarchs of Hungary, who could intervene successfully in the internal affairs of the neighbouring countries.

Géza was the eldest son of King Béla II of Hungary and his wife, Helena of Raška. He was only a baby when his mother introduced him and his brother, Ladislaus to the barons assembled in Arad in order to persuade them to massacre her husband's opponents.

He was crowned three days after his father's death on 13 February 1141. As he was still a minor, his mother served as regent of the kingdom helped by her brother, Beloš. She faced challenges from Boris, the son of King Coloman's adulterous queen, who disputed Géza's claim to the throne.

Marriage and children

Euphrosyne of Kiev (c. 1130 – c. 1193), daughter of Grand Prince Mstislav I of Kiev and his second wife, Liubava Dmitrievna

King Stephen III of Hungary (1147 – 4 March 1172).

King Béla III of Hungary (1148 – 23 April 1196).

Elisabeth (c. 1149 – after 1189), wife of Duke Frederick of Bohemia.

Duke Géza (c. 1150 – before 1210).

Arpad, died young.

Odola (1156 – 1199), wife of Duke Sviatopluk of Bohemia.

Helena (c. 1158 – 25 May 1199), wife of Duke Leopold V of Austria.

Margaret (Margit) (1162 – ?), born posthumously; wife firstly of Isaac Macrodukas and secondly of András, Obergespan of Somogy.

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ÁRPÁD(házi) Geza - Gejza II. Géza, King of Hungary's Timeline

1130
1130
Tolna, Hungary
1145
1145
Age 15
Esztergom, 1144/45, Komárom-Esztergom, Hungary
1146
1146
Age 16
Tolna, Tolna, Hungary
1147
1147
Age 17
Esztergom, Komarom-Esztergom, Hungary
1148
1148
Age 18
Esztergom, Komárom-Esztergom, Magyarország - Hungary
1151
1151
Age 21
Esztergom, Komárom-Esztergom, Fejér, Hungary
1154
1154
Age 24
Esztergom, Komárom-Esztergom, Hungary
1156
1156
Age 26
Esztergom, Komárom-Esztergom, Hungary
1158
1158
Age 28
Esztergom, Komárom-Esztergom, Hungary
1162
1162
Age 32
Esztergom, Komárom-Esztergom, Hungary