V. István - Stephen V of Hungary and Croatia ÁRPÁD(házi) (a Hungary), King (1239 - 1272) MP

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Nicknames: "The Great", "King Istvan V of /Hungary/", "Ищван Арпад", "Ищван V Арпад", "Стефан V Арпад", "Ищван V", "V. István", "Стефан V", "Stjepan VI.", "Štefan V"
Birthplace: Buda, Pest, Hungary
Death: Died in Csepel sziget / Island, Hungary
Occupation: King of Hungary 1270-1272, King of Hungary and Croatia, Duke of Styria, KING OF HUNGARY, King of Hungary, крал на Унгария, Kung i Ungern 1270-1272
Managed by: FARKAS Mihály László
Last Updated:

About V. István - Stephen V of Hungary and Croatia ÁRPÁD(házi) (a Hungary), King

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#IstvanVB

ISTVÁN, son of BÉLA IV King of Hungary & his wife Maria Laskarina of Nikaia (18 Oct 1239-1 Aug 1272, Csepel Island, Dominican Monastery). The Chronicon Varadiense names "dux Stephanus postea rex, secundus…dux Bela" as the two sons of "rex Bela quartus"[970]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the birth "in festo beati Luce 1239" of "regi Hungarie filius masculus…Stephanum"[971]. The Altahenses Annales name "Stephanum filium [Belæ regis Ungarie]" when recording his succession to his father[972]. His father appointed him Prince of Transylvania in 1257. He led the Hungarian troops which invaded Bulgaria in 1261, restoring his brother-in-law Rostislav, who was one of the claimants to the Bulgarian throne after Tsar Koloman II was deposed in 1258, at Vidin. Duke of Slavonia, Dalmatia and Croatia, his father transferred these territories to his younger brother Béla in 1262, whereupon István revolted, although peace was concluded 5 Dec 1262 under which the country was divided and István retained the territory north of the Danube along the border with Bulgaria with the titles "rex iunior" and "dominus Cumanorum". Civil war broke out again in 1264, peace once more being confirmed in István's favour in 1266[973]. He succeeded his father in 1270 as ISTVÁN V King of Hungary. The Altahenses Annales record the death "1272 circa Kal Aug" of "Stephanus rex Ungarie"[974]. The Chronicon Dubnicense records the death "in magna insula" of "Stephanus" and his burial "in ecclesia beate Virginis in insula Budensi in loco Beginarum"[975]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King István was buried "in insula…Beatæ Virginis"[976]. m (1253) --- of the Kumans, daughter of --- Khan of the Kumans (1240-after 1290). This marriage was agreed as part of King Béla's arrangements for settling the Kumans on empty land on either side of the River Tisza[977]. She was baptised with the name ELISABETH. Regent for her son King László IV in 1272, she was hated by the Hungarians[978]. King István V & his wife had six children:

  • 1. ELISABETH (1255-[1313/26]). m firstly (1287) as his third wife, ZAVIŠ von Rosenberg zu Skalitz und Falkenstein m secondly ([1295], repudiated [1298/99]) as his third wife, STEFAN UROŠ II MILUTIN King of Serbia
  • 2. KATALIN ([1255/57]-). m ([1267/68]) STEFAN DRAGUTIN of Serbia
  • 3. MÁRIA ([1257]-25 Mar 1324, bur Naples, Santa Maria Donna Regina). m (Naples [May/Jun] 1270) CHARLES of Sicily Principe di Salerno. Maria & her husband had fourteen children: ...
  • 4. ANNA ([1260]-[1281]). m (1274) as his first wife, co-Emperor ANDRONIKOS Palaiologos He succeeded his father in 1282 as Emperor ANDRONIKOS II.
  • 5. LÁSZLÓ (1262-murdered Kereczeg [Körösszeg] Castle 10 Jul 1290, bur Csanad Cathedral). m (5 Sep 1272) ISABELLE of Sicily
  • 6. ANDRÁS (1268-1278).

King Stephen V of Hungary (Hungarian: V. István, Slovak: Štefan V, Croatian: Stjepan VI.) (December 1239, Buda, Hungary – August 6, 1272, Csepel Island, Hungary), was the son of Bela IV of Hungary, whom he succeeded in 1270.

His mother was Maria Laskarina, a daughter of Theodore I Lascaris of the Empire of Nicaea and Anna Angelina. Anna was a daughter of Alexius III Angelus and Euphrosyne Doukaina Kamaterina.

As crown prince Stephen had exhibited considerable ability, but also a disquieting restlessness and violence. He was appointed duke of Transylvania, then duke of Styria. After the loss of Styria he became duke of Transylvania again. In 1262 Stephen convinced his father Béla to give him twenty-nine counties as a reward of assistance in the war against Bohemia; hence Hungary was virtually divided into two kingdoms. Stephen was crowned junior king of Hungary. Though Hungary was de facto divided into two kingdoms the legal unity remained, because Stephen theoretically ruled by the grace of God and his father. He subsequently seized the southern banate of Macsó and defeated his father in the ensuing civil war. In 1268 he undertook an expedition against the Bulgarians, penetrating as far as Veliko Tarnovo and styling himself as king of Bulgaria.

Stephen's father, attempting to bind the powerful but pagan Cuman tribe more closely to the dynasty, arranged for Stephen's marriage, as a youth (about 1255), to Elizabeth, the daughter of the Cuman chieftain (named Koteny or Kuthens). Though Elizabeth, in preparation for the marriage, had been baptized and remained a Christian, Western Europe almost universally considered Stephen as a semi-pagan. This hostility was felt as Stephen declared himself that everyone was his enemy for his accession to the Hungarian throne.

To secure foreign support, he formed a double matrimonial alliance with the Angevins, chief partisans of the pope. The first of these was the marriage in 1270 of his daughter Maria of Hungary to Charles II of Naples (they became grandparents of Charles I of Hungary). The second alliance was the marriage of Stephen's infant son Ladislaus to Charles II's sister Elisabeth.

Byzantine Emperor Andronicus II Palaeologus married Anna, another of Stephen's daughters. Serbian king Stefan Dragutin married Katerina, yet another of Stephan's daughters.

Adversaries of Stephen, especially Ottokar II of Bohemia, believed that Stephen was too great a friend of the mighty Cumans (who could field 16,000 men) to be a true Catholic. Ottokar endeavoured with the aid of the Hungarian malcontents to conquer the western provinces of Hungary but they were utterly routed by Stephen in 1271 near Mosony. Ottokar relinquished all his conquests the same year in the peace of Pressburg.

Stephen died suddenly as he was raising an army to rescue his kidnapped infant son Ladislaus from his rebellious vassals.

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Stephen V of Hungary

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Stephen V (Hungarian: V. István, Croatian: Stjepan VI., Slovak: Štefan V) (before October 18 1239, Buda, Hungary – August 6 1272, Csepel Island, Hungary), King of Hungary and Croatia (1246-1272), and Duke of Styria (1258-1260).

Early years

He was the elder son of King Béla IV of Hungary and his queen, Maria Laskarina, a daughter of the Emperor Theodore I Lascaris of Nicaea.

In the second year following his birth, on April 11, 1241, the Mongolian troops defeated his father's army in the Battle of Mohi. After the disastrous battle, the royal family had to escape to Trau, a well-fortified city in Dalmatia. They could only return to Hungary after the unexpected withdrawal of the Mongol forces from Europe.

Junior King of Hungary

In 1246 Stephen was crowned as junior King and his father entrusted him with the government of Croatia, Slavonia and Dalmatia, but the three provinces were de facto governed by the Ban Stephen Gut-Keled. Stephen's father, attempting to bind the powerful but pagan Cuman tribes more closely to the dynasty, arranged for Stephen's marriage, as a youth (about 1253), to Elizabeth, the daughter of a Cuman chieftain Köten.

In 1257, Stephen demanded his father to divide the kingdom between themselves and recruited an army against the senior king. Finally, in 1258, King Béla IV was obliged to cede him the government of Transylvania.

[edit]Duke of Styria

Stephen took part in his father's military campaign against the Styrians, who had rebelled against the rule of the King of Hungary, in 1258. After the successful campaign, King Béla IV appointed him to Duke of Styria.

His government, however, was unpopular among his new subjects, who rebelled against him with the support of King Otakar II of Bohemia. Stephen and his father started an attack against Otakar II's lands, but their troops were defeated on July 12, 1260 in the Battle of Kroissenbrunn. Following the battle, the two Kings of Hungary ceded the Duchy of Styria to the King of Bohemia in the Peace of Pozsony (Slovak: Bratislava).

[edit]Struggles with his father

Shortly after the peace, Stephen took over again the government of Transylvania. In 1261, Stephen and his father made a joint military campaign against Bulgaria, but their relationship became more and more tense, because the senior king had been favouring his younger son, Duke Béla of Slavonia and his daughter, Anna, the mother-in-law of the King of Bohemia.

Finally, with the mediation of Archbishops Fülöp of Esztergom and Smaragd of Kalocsa, Stephen and his father signed an agreement in the summer of 1262 in Pozsony. Based on their agreement, Stephen took over the government of the parts of the kingdom East of the Danube. However, the two kings' reconciliation was only temporary, because their partisans were continuously inciteting them against each other. In 1264, Stephen seized his mother's and sister's estates in his domains, but his father sent troops against him. Stephen's wife and son was captured by his father's partisans, and he had to retreat to the castle of Feketehalom. However, he managed to repeal the siege and to commence a counter-attack.

In March 1265, he gained a strategic victory over his father's army in the Battle of Isaszeg. After his victory, he concluded a peace with King Béla IV. Based on the provisions of the peace, he received back the government of the Eastern parts of the kingdom. On March 23, 1266, father and son confirmed the peace in the Convent of the Blessed Virgin on the Nyulak szigete ('Rabbits' Island'). Shortly afterwards, Stephen V lead his army to Bulgaria and forced Despot Jakov Svetoslav of Vidin to accept his overlordship.

In 1267, the "prelates and nobles" of the Kingdom of Hungary held a joint assembly in Esztergom, and their decisions were confirmed by both Stephen and his father.

To secure foreign support, he formed a double matrimonial alliance with the Angevins, chief partisans of the pope. The first of these was the marriage, in 1270, of his daughter Maria to the future King Charles II of Naples[1] The second alliance was the marriage of Stephen's infant son, Ladislaus to Charles II's sister Elisabeth.

[edit]King of Hungary

After his father's death (May 3, 1270), Stephen inherited the whole Kingdom of Hungary, although the deceased senior king had entrusted his daughter, Anna and his followers to King Otakar II of Bohemia in his last will, and they had escaped to Prague before Stephen arrived to Esztergom.

Before his (second) coronation, Stephen granted the County of Esztergom to the Archbishop. In August 1270, Stephen had a meeting with his brother-in-law, Prince Bolesław V of Poland in Cracow where they concluded an alliance against the King of Bohemia. Stephen also had a meeting with King Otakar II on 16 October on an island of the Danube near to Pozsony where they concluded a truce for two years.

However, following smaller skirmishes on the border, the war broke out soon and the King of Bohemia lead his armies against Hungary. Stephen was defeated in two smaller battles, but finally he won a decisive victory on 21 May 1271 over the Czech and Austrian troops of Otakar II. In the subsequent peace the King of Bohemia handed back the fortresses occupied during its campaign, while Stephen renounced its claim for the Hungarian royal treasury that his sister, Anna had brought to Prague after their father's death.

In the summer of 1272, Stephen left for Dalmatia, where he wanted to meet King Charles I of Sicily, when he was informed that Joachim Gut-Keled kidnapped his infant son, Ladislaus. Stephen was planning to raise an army to rescue his infant son, when he died suddenly.

[edit]Marriage and children

  1. around 1253: Elisabeth (1240 – after 1290), daughter of a chieftain of the Cuman tribes settled down in Hungary

Elisabeth (1255 – 1313/1326), wife firstly of Záviš of Falkenštejn and secondly of King Stefan Uroš II Milutin of Serbia

Katarina (1255/1257 – after 1314), wife of King Stefan Dragutin of Serbia

Mary (c. 1257 – 25 March 1325), wife of King Charles II of Naples

Anna (c. 1260 – c. 1281), wife of the Emperor Andronikos II Palaiologos

King Ladislaus IV (August 1262 – 10 July 1290)

Duke Andrew of Slavonia (1268 – 1278)

--------------------

Stephen V (Hungarian: V. István, Croatian: Stjepan VI., Slovak: Štefan V) (before 18 October 1239, Buda, Hungary – 6 August 1272, Csepel Island, Hungary), King of Hungary and Croatia (1246-1272), and Duke of Styria (1258-1260).

He was the elder son of King Béla IV of Hungary and his queen, Maria Laskarina, a daughter of the Emperor Theodore I Lascaris of Nicaea.

In the second year following his birth, on 11 April 1241, the Mongolian troops defeated his father's army in the Battle of Mohi. After the disastrous battle, the royal family had to escape to Trau, a well-fortified city in Dalmatia. They could only return to Hungary after the unexpected withdrawal of the Mongol forces from Europe..

Marriage and children

Around 1253: Elisabeth (1240 – after 1290), daughter of a chieftain of the Cuman tribes settled down in Hungary

Elisabeth (1255 – 1313/1326), wife firstly of Záviš of Falkenštejn and secondly of King Stefan Uroš II Milutin of Serbia

Katarina (1255/1257 – after 1314), wife of King Stefan Dragutin of Serbia

Mary (c. 1257 – 25 March 1325), wife of King Charles II of Naples

Anna (c. 1260 – c. 1281), wife of the Emperor Andronikos II Palaiologos

King Ladislaus IV (August 1262 – 10 July 1290)

Duke Andrew of Slavonia (1268 – 1278)

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_V_of_Hungary

Stephen V (Hungarian: V. István, Croatian: Stjepan VI., Slovak: Štefan V) (before 18 October 1239, Buda, Hungary – 6 August 1272, Csepel Island, Hungary), King of Hungary [1] from 1270[1] to 1272.

Contents [hide]

1 Early years

2 Junior King of Hungary

3 Duke of Styria

4 Struggles with his father

5 King of Hungary

6 Marriage and children

7 Ancestry

8 Sources

9 Titles

10 External links

11 References


[edit] Early years

He was the elder son of King Béla IV of Hungary and his queen, Maria Laskarina, a daughter of the Emperor Theodore I Lascaris of Nicaea.

In the second year following his birth, on 11 April 1241, the Mongolian troops defeated his father's army in the Battle of Mohi. After the disastrous battle, the royal family had to escape to Trau, a well-fortified city in Dalmatia. They could only return to Hungary after the unexpected withdrawal of the Mongol forces from Europe..

[edit] Junior King of Hungary

In 1246 Stephen was crowned as junior King and his father entrusted him with the government of Croatia, Slavonia and Dalmatia, but the three provinces were de facto governed by the Ban Stephen Gut-Keled. Stephen's father, attempting to bind the powerful but pagan Cuman tribes more closely to the dynasty, arranged for Stephen's marriage, as a youth (about 1253), to Elizabeth, the daughter of a Cuman chieftain Köten.

In 1257, Stephen demanded that his father divide the kingdom between themselves and recruited an army against the senior king. Finally, in 1258, King Béla IV was obliged to cede to him the government of Transylvania.

[edit] Duke of Styria

Stephen took part in his father's military campaign against the Styrians, who had rebelled against the rule of the King of Hungary, in 1258. After the successful campaign, King Béla IV appointed him to Duke of Styria.

His government, however, was unpopular among his new subjects, who rebelled against him with the support of King Otakar II of Bohemia. Stephen and his father started an attack against Otakar II's lands, but their troops were defeated on 12 July 1260 in the Battle of Kroissenbrunn. Following the battle, the two Kings of Hungary ceded the Duchy of Styria to the King of Bohemia in the Peace of Pressburg.

[edit] Struggles with his father

Shortly after the peace, Stephen took over the government of Transylvania again. In 1261, Stephen and his father conducted a joint military campaign against Bulgaria, but their relationship became more and more tense, because the senior king had been favouring his younger son, Duke Béla of Slavonia and his daughter, Anna, the mother-in-law of the King of Bohemia.

Finally, with the mediation of Archbishops Fülöp of Esztergom and Smaragd of Kalocsa, Stephen and his father signed an agreement in the summer of 1262 in Pozsony. Based on their agreement, Stephen took over the government of the parts of the kingdom East of the Danube. However, the two kings' reconciliation was only temporary, because their partisans were continuously inciting them against each other. In 1264, Stephen seized his mother's and sister's estates in his domains, but his father sent troops against him. Stephen's wife and son were captured by his father's partisans, and he had to retreat to the castle of Feketehalom. However, he managed to repeal the siege and to commence a counter-attack.

In March 1265, he gained a strategic victory over his father's army in the Battle of Isaszeg. After his victory, he concluded a peace with King Béla IV. Based on the provisions of the peace, he received back the government of the Eastern parts of the kingdom. On 23 March 1266, father and son confirmed the peace in the Convent of the Blessed Virgin on the Nyulak szigete ('Rabbits' Island'). Shortly afterwards, Stephen V led his army to Bulgaria and forced Despot Jakob Svetoslav of Vidin to accept his overlordship.

In 1267, the "prelates and nobles" of the Kingdom of Hungary held a joint assembly in Esztergom, and their decisions were confirmed by both Stephen and his father.

To secure foreign support, he formed a double matrimonial alliance with the Angevins, chief partisans of the pope. The first of these was the marriage, in 1270, of his daughter Maria to the future King Charles II of Naples[2] The second alliance was the marriage of Stephen's infant son, Ladislaus to Charles II's sister Elisabeth.

[edit] King of Hungary

After his father's death (3 May 1270), Stephen inherited the whole Kingdom of Hungary, although the deceased senior king had entrusted his daughter, Anna and his followers to King Otakar II of Bohemia in his last will, and they had escaped to Prague before Stephen arrived to Esztergom.

Before his (second) coronation, Stephen granted the County of Esztergom to the Archbishop. In August 1270, Stephen had a meeting with his brother-in-law, Prince Bolesław V of Poland in Kraków where they concluded an alliance against the King of Bohemia. Stephen also had a meeting with King Otakar II on 16 October on an island of the Danube near Pozsony where they concluded a truce for two years.

However, following smaller skirmishes on the border, the war broke out soon after and the King of Bohemia lead his armies against Hungary. Stephen was defeated in two smaller battles, but finally won a decisive victory on 21 May 1271 over the Czech and Austrian troops of Otakar II. In the subsequent peace the King of Bohemia handed back the fortresses occupied during his campaign, while Stephen renounced his claim to the Hungarian royal treasury that his sister, Anna had brought to Prague after their father's death.

In the summer of 1272, Stephen left for Dalmatia, where he wanted to meet King Charles I of Sicily, when he was informed that Joachim Gut-Keled had kidnapped his infant son, Ladislaus. Stephen was planning to raise an army to rescue his infant son when he died suddenly.

Marriage and children

around 1253: Elisabeth (1240 – after 1290), daughter of a chieftain of the Cuman tribes settled down in Hungary

Elisabeth (1255 – 1313/1326), wife firstly of Záviš of Falkenštejn and secondly of King Stefan Uroš II Milutin of Serbia

  1. Catherine (1255/1257 – after 1314), wife of King Stefan Dragutin of Serbia
  2. Maria (c. 1257 – 25 March 1325), wife of King Charles II of Naples
  3. Anna (c. 1260 – c. 1281), wife of the Emperor Andronikos II Palaiologos
  4. King Ladislaus IV (August 1262 – 10 July 1290)

Andrew, Duke of Slavonia (1268 – 1278)

Ancestry

1(he) Stephen V of Hungary 2(f) Béla IV of Hungary 3(m) Maria Laskarina 4(ff) Andrew II of Hungary 5(fm) Gertrude of Merania 6(mf) Theodore I Laskaris 7(mm) Anna Komnena Angelina 8(fff) Béla III of Hungary 9(ffm) Agnes of Antioch 10(fmf) Berthold IV, Duke of Merania 11(fmm) Agnes of Wettin and Rochlitz 12(mff) Manuel Laskaris 13(mfm) Ioanna Karatzaina 14(mmf) Byzantine Emperor Alexios III Angelos 15(mmm) Euphrosyne Doukaina Kamatera 16(ffff) Géza II of Hungary 17(fffm) Euphrosyne of Kiev 18(ffmf) Raynald of Châtillon 19(ffmm) Constance of Antioch 20(fmff) Berthold III of Andechs 21(fmfm) Hedwig of Wittelsbach 22(fmmf) Dedo V, Count of Wettin 23(fmmm) Matilda of Heinsberg 24(mfff) ?N 25(mffm) ?N 26(mfmf) ?N 27(mfmm) ?N 28(mmff) Andronicos Dukas Angelos 29(mmfm) Euphrosyne Castamonitissa 30(mmmf) Andronikos Doukas Kamateros 31(mmmm) ?N

 
         


Sources

Kristó, Gyula - Makk, Ferenc: Az Árpád-ház uralkodói (IPC Könyvek, 1996)

Korai Magyar Történeti Lexikon (9-14. század), főszerkesztő: Kristó, Gyula, szerkesztők: Engel, Pál és Makk, Ferenc (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1994)

Magyarország Történeti Kronológiája I. – A kezdetektől 1526-ig, főszerkesztő: Benda, Kálmán (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1981)

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Stephen V of Hungary

House of Árpád

Born: before 18 October 1239 Died: 6 August 1272

Regnal titles

Preceded by

Béla IV King of Hungary

1270[1]–1272 Succeeded by

Ladislaus IV

Preceded by

Béla I Duke of Styria

1258–1260 Succeeded by

Ottokar V

Titles in pretence

Preceded by

Béla IV — TITULAR —

King of Serbia

1270 – 1272 Succeeded by

Ladislaus IV

[edit] Titles

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Wikipedia Deutsch:

Stephan V. (Ungarn)

Stephan V., ungarisch V. István, kroatisch Stjepan VI., (* 1239; † 6. August 1272) war von 1270 bis 1272 König von Ungarn aus dem Haus der Árpáden.

Stephan war ein Sohn von Béla IV. und Maria Laskaris, einer byzantinischen Königstochter. Er trug zunächst den Titel eines Herzogs von Transsylvanien, dann den eines steirischen Herzogs.

Der Krieg zwischen Béla IV. und dem böhmischen König Ottokar II. Přemysl endete 1254 mit dem Budaer Pakt. Dadurch erwarb Béla den Großteil der Steiermark, während das restliche Österreich an Ottokar fiel. Die Steiermark rebellierte und der von Béla ernannte ungarische Gouverneur wurde vertrieben. Danach wurde Stephan Prinz der Steiermark. Seine Herzogswürde endete, als Ottokar die Steiermark angriff und der böhmische König als Sieger der Schlacht bei Kressenbrunn 1260 verlangte im Frieden von Wien (1261), dass Béla auf seine westlichen Gebiete verzichte. Stephan wurde wieder Herzog von Transsylvanien.

1255 arrangierte sein Vater die Hochzeit mit Elisabeth, der Tochter des kyptschakischen Häuptlings. Obwohl Elisabeth vor der Ehe getauft worden war, betrachtete man das Paar als halb-heidnisch. Die Bindungen zu den Kyptschaken belasteten auch die Beziehungen zu Ottokar II. nachhaltig.

1261 konnte Stephan seinen Vater überzeugen, ihm 29 Grafschaften als Belohnung für die Unterstützung im Krieg gegen Böhmen zu geben. Er wurde zum Juniorkönig gekrönt, und Ungarn de facto in zwei Teile gespalten, obwohl Stephan formal seinem Vater untergeordnet blieb. Dies endete im Bürgerkrieg, der mit einem Friedenspakt auf der Haseninsel (heute Margareteninsel) 1266 beigelegt wurde.

Stephan wurde 1270 gekrönt. Seine Kontakte zum böhmischen König verschlechterten sich infolge des Todes von Ulrich III., Herzog von Kärnten. Stephan und Ottokar schlossen zwar einen Waffenstillstand bei Pozsony (heute Bratislava) für zwei Jahre, doch die ungarischen Truppen attackierten Österreich und die Steiermark, dem 1271 der böhmische Angriff auf Ungarn folgte. Die Kämpfe unterschiedlichen Ausgangs wurden am 7. Februar 1271 durch den Pozsonyer Frieden beendet, der den Status Quo wiederherstellte.

Stephan schloss einen Heiratspakt mit Karl II.. Durch die Heirat seiner Kinder mit dem Haus Anjou sicherte er seine Dynastie ab, was nach dem Aussterben der Árpáden im Jahre 1301 für die weitere ungarische Geschichte von Bedeutung war.

Literatur [Bearbeiten]

   * Franz von Krones: Stephan V., König von Ungarn. In: Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (ADB). Band 36. Duncker & Humblot, Leipzig 1893, S. 78 f.
   * Vratislav Vanicek in Európa uralkodói (Europäische Herrscher). Maecenas Verlag 1999, ISBN 963-645-053-6.
   * Janos M. Bak in Lexikon des Mittelalters, Band 8, Spalte 114-115, 1997, ISBN 3-89659-908-9 .

Vorgänger Amt Nachfolger

Béla IV./III. König von Ungarn

1270-1272 Ladislaus IV./III.

König von Kroatien, Dalmatien und Rama

1270-1272

Normdaten: Personennamendatei (PND): 137409346

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1270-72 magyar kiraly

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Stephen V (Hungarian: V. István, Croatian: Stjepan VI., Slovak: Štefan V) (before 18 October 1239, Buda, Hungary – 6 August 1272, Csepel Island, Hungary), King of Hungary from 1270 to 1272.

Early years

He was the elder son of King Béla IV of Hungary and his queen, Maria Laskarina, a daughter of the Emperor Theodore I Lascaris of Nicaea.

In the second year following his birth, on 11 April 1241, the Mongolian troops defeated his father's army in the Battle of Mohi. After the disastrous battle, the royal family had to escape to Trau, a well-fortified city in Dalmatia. They could only return to Hungary after the unexpected withdrawal of the Mongol forces from Europe..

[edit] Junior King of Hungary

In 1246 Stephen was crowned as junior King and his father entrusted him with the government of Croatia, Slavonia and Dalmatia, but the three provinces were de facto governed by the Ban Stephen Gut-Keled. Stephen's father, attempting to bind the powerful but pagan Cuman tribes more closely to the dynasty, arranged for Stephen's marriage, as a youth (about 1253), to Elizabeth, the daughter of a Cuman chieftain Köten.

In 1257, Stephen demanded that his father divide the kingdom between themselves and recruited an army against the senior king. Finally, in 1258, King Béla IV was obliged to cede to him the government of Transylvania.

Duke of Styria

Stephen took part in his father's military campaign against the Styrians, who had rebelled against the rule of the King of Hungary, in 1258. After the successful campaign, King Béla IV appointed him to Duke of Styria.

His government, however, was unpopular among his new subjects, who rebelled against him with the support of King Otakar II of Bohemia. Stephen and his father started an attack against Otakar II's lands, but their troops were defeated on 12 July 1260 in the Battle of Kroissenbrunn. Following the battle, the two Kings of Hungary ceded the Duchy of Styria to the King of Bohemia in the Peace of Pressburg.

Struggles with his father

Shortly after the peace, Stephen took over the government of Transylvania again. In 1261, Stephen and his father conducted a joint military campaign against Bulgaria, but their relationship became more and more tense, because the senior king had been favouring his younger son, Duke Béla of Slavonia and his daughter, Anna, the mother-in-law of the King of Bohemia.

Finally, with the mediation of Archbishops Fülöp of Esztergom and Smaragd of Kalocsa, Stephen and his father signed an agreement in the summer of 1262 in Pozsony. Based on their agreement, Stephen took over the government of the parts of the kingdom East of the Danube. However, the two kings' reconciliation was only temporary, because their partisans were continuously inciting them against each other. In 1264, Stephen seized his mother's and sister's estates in his domains, but his father sent troops against him. Stephen's wife and son were captured by his father's partisans, and he had to retreat to the castle of Feketehalom. However, he managed to repeal the siege and to commence a counter-attack.

In March 1265, he gained a strategic victory over his father's army in the Battle of Isaszeg. After his victory, he concluded a peace with King Béla IV. Based on the provisions of the peace, he received back the government of the Eastern parts of the kingdom. On 23 March 1266, father and son confirmed the peace in the Convent of the Blessed Virgin on the Nyulak szigete ('Rabbits' Island'). Shortly afterwards, Stephen V led his army to Bulgaria and forced Despot Jakob Svetoslav of Vidin to accept his overlordship.

In 1267, the "prelates and nobles" of the Kingdom of Hungary held a joint assembly in Esztergom, and their decisions were confirmed by both Stephen and his father.

To secure foreign support, he formed a double matrimonial alliance with the Angevins, chief partisans of the pope. The first of these was the marriage, in 1270, of his daughter Maria to the future King Charles II of Naples[2] The second alliance was the marriage of Stephen's infant son, Ladislaus to Charles II's sister Elisabeth.

King of Hungary

After his father's death (3 May 1270), Stephen inherited the whole Kingdom of Hungary, although the deceased senior king had entrusted his daughter, Anna and his followers to King Otakar II of Bohemia in his last will, and they had escaped to Prague before Stephen arrived to Esztergom.

Before his (second) coronation, Stephen granted the County of Esztergom to the Archbishop. In August 1270, Stephen had a meeting with his brother-in-law, Prince Bolesław V of Poland in Kraków where they concluded an alliance against the King of Bohemia. Stephen also had a meeting with King Otakar II on 16 October on an island of the Danube near Pozsony where they concluded a truce for two years.

However, following smaller skirmishes on the border, the war broke out soon after and the King of Bohemia lead his armies against Hungary. Stephen was defeated in two smaller battles, but finally won a decisive victory on 21 May 1271 over the Czech and Austrian troops of Otakar II. In the subsequent peace the King of Bohemia handed back the fortresses occupied during his campaign, while Stephen renounced his claim to the Hungarian royal treasury that his sister, Anna had brought to Prague after their father's death.

In the summer of 1272, Stephen left for Dalmatia, where he wanted to meet King Charles I of Sicily, when he was informed that Joachim Gut-Keled had kidnapped his infant son, Ladislaus. Stephen was planning to raise an army to rescue his infant son when he died suddenly.

[edit] Marriage and children

  1. around 1253: Elisabeth (1240 – after 1290), daughter of a chieftain of the Cuman tribes settled down in Hungary
   * Elisabeth (1255 – 1313/1326), wife firstly of Záviš of Falkenštejn and secondly of King Stefan Uroš II Milutin of Serbia
   * Catherine (1255/1257 – after 1314), wife of King Stefan Dragutin of Serbia
   * Maria (c. 1257 – 25 March 1325), wife of King Charles II of Naples
   * Anna (c. 1260 – c. 1281), wife of the Emperor Andronikos II Palaiologos
   * King Ladislaus IV (August 1262 – 10 July 1290)
   * Andrew, Duke of Slavonia (1268 – 1278)

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Stephen V (Hungarian: V. István, Croatian: Stjepan VI., Slovak: Štefan V) (before 18 October 1239, Buda, Hungary – 6 August 1272, Csepel Island, Hungary), King of Hungary and Croatia (1246-1272), and Duke of Styria (1258-1260).

He was the elder son of King Béla IV of Hungary and his queen, Maria Laskarina, a daughter of the Emperor Theodore I Lascaris of Nicaea.

In the second year following his birth, on 11 April 1241, the Mongolian troops defeated his father's army in the Battle of Mohi. After the disastrous battle, the royal family had to escape to Trau, a well-fortified city in Dalmatia. They could only return to Hungary after the unexpected withdrawal of the Mongol forces from Europe..

Marriage and children

Around 1253: Elisabeth (1240 – after 1290), daughter of a chieftain of the Cuman tribes settled down in Hungary

Elisabeth (1255 – 1313/1326), wife firstly of Záviš of Falkenštejn and secondly of King Stefan Uroš II Milutin of Serbia

Katarina (1255/1257 – after 1314), wife of King Stefan Dragutin of Serbia

Mary (c. 1257 – 25 March 1325), wife of King Charles II of Naples

Anna (c. 1260 – c. 1281), wife of the Emperor Andronikos II Palaiologos

King Ladislaus IV (August 1262 – 10 July 1290)

Duke Andrew of Slavonia (1268 – 1278)

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In 1246 Stephen was crowned as junior King and his father entrusted him with the government of Croatia, Slavonia and Dalmatia, but the three provinces were de facto governed by the Ban Stephen Gut-Keled. Stephen's father, attempting to bind the powerful but pagan Cuman tribes more closely to the dynasty, arranged for Stephen's marriage, as a youth (about 1253), to Elizabeth, the daughter of a Cuman chieftain Köten.

In 1257, Stephen demanded his father to divide the kingdom between themselves and recruited an army against the senior king. Finally, in 1258, King Béla IV was obliged to cede him the government of Transylvania.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_V_of_Hungary

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_V_of_Hungary

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ÁRPÁD(házi) V. István - Stephen V, King of Hungary and Croatia's Timeline

1239
October 18, 1239
Buda, Pest, Hungary
1239
Hungary - son of Bela IV
1255
June 1255
Age 15
1255
Age 15
Buda, Pest, Hungary
1257
1257
Age 17
Buda (present part of Budapest), Hungary
1260
1260
Age 20
Buda, Pest, Hungary
1261
1261
Age 21
Of, Buda, Pest, Hungary
1262
August 5, 1262
Age 22
Buda, Pest, Hungary
1266
1266
Age 26
Hungary
1268
1268
Age 28
Buda, Pest, Hungary