Ælfgar, Earl of Mercia

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Ælfgar

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Mercia, England, Lincolnshire
Death: Died in Coventry, Warwickshire, England
Place of Burial: Coventry, Warwickshire, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Leofric, Earl of Mercia; Leofric, Earl of Mercia; Lady Godiva and Lady Godiva of Mercia
Husband of AElfgifu and Ælfgifu . of Northumbria
Father of Ealdgyth of Mercia; Morcar, Earl of Northumbria; Hereward 'The Wake'; Eadwyne, Duke of Mercia and Burgheard
Brother of Leofwine and Erminhild Mercia,

Occupation: Earl of East Anglia and Mercia, Earl of Mercia, King of Mercia
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Ælfgar

Ælfgar of Mercia, son of Leofric and Godgifu (Lady Godiva)

Married Ælfgifu, daughter of Morcar

Three children:

1. Edwin

2. Morcar

3. Ealdgyth

Married secondly a daughter of Gruffydd ap Llywellyn, no children

ÆLFGAR (-[1062]). The Genealogia Fundatoris of Coventry Monastery names “Algarus tertius” as son of “Leofricus tertius”[236]. Florence of Worcester records that he was created Earl of the East Angles in 1053, in succession to Harold Godwinson who had succeeded his father as Earl of Wessex[237]. Florence of Worcester also records that Ælfgar was banished in 1055 by King Edward "without any just cause of offence"[238]. He went to Ireland, then to Wales where he allied himself with Gruffydd ap Llywellyn King of Gwynedd and Powys, and invaded England, sacking Hereford in Oct 1055[239]. He was reinstated in 1056 when Gruffydd accepted Edward's overlordship. Florence of Worcester records that Ælfgar was appointed to succeed his father in 1057 as Earl of Mercia[240], the earldom of the East Angles passing to Gyrth Godwinsson. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that in 1057 he was banished again[241], but Florence of Worcester states that he forced his restoration in 1058 with the help of Gruffydd and a Norwegian fleet[242]. His death removed from the scene the only potential challenger to Harold Godwinson Earl of Wessex.

m firstly ÆLFGIFU, daughter of MORCAR & his wife Ealdgyth ---. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.

m secondly ([1058]) --- of Gwynedd, daughter of GRUFFYDD ap Llywellyn Prince of Gwynedd and Powys & his first wife ---. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Earl Ælfgar & his first wife had three children:

a) EDWIN (-killed 1071). The Genealogia Fundatoris of Coventry Monastery names “Edwinum et Morcar postea comites” as sons of “Algarus tertius”[243]. He succeeded his father in 1062 as Earl of Mercia. With support from his brother, he expelled Tostig Godwinsson from Lindsay in 1066. John of Worcester records that they at first supported the claim of Edgar Atheling to succeed Harold II as King of England after the battle of Hastings, but soon withdrew their armies and swore allegiance to King William I at Berkhamsted[244]. Florence of Worcester records that "…comites Edwinum et Morkarum…" went with King William to Normandy 21 Feb [1067][245]. They rebelled against William in 1068, leaving court for Yorkshire, but were soon brought to submission. Orderic Vitalis says that the rebellion was triggered because King William broke his promise to give his daughter in marriage to Edwin[246], and in a later passage that Edwin was killed by his servants while on his way to relieve his brother in Ely[247]. Florence of Worcester records that "comites Edwinus et Morkarus" rebelled against King William in [1071], and that Edwin was killed[248].

b) MORCAR (-after 1087). The Genealogia Fundatoris of Coventry Monastery names “Edwinum et Morcar postea comites” as sons of “Algarus tertius”[249]. Snorre names “Earl Morukare”, although stating that he was the son of “Earl Gudin Ulfnadson” and “Earl Ulf´s sister Gyda”[250]. He was chosen by the Northumbrians as Earl of Northumbria in 1065 to replace Tostig, son of Godwin Earl of Wessex. With support from his brother, he expelled Tostig Godwinsson from Lindsay in 1066.

John of Worcester records that they at first supported the claim of Edgar Atheling to succeed Harold II as King of England after the battle of Hastings, but soon withdrew their armies and swore allegiance to King William I at Berkhamsted[251]. Florence of Worcester records that "…comites Edwinum et Morkarum…" went with King William to Normandy 21 Feb [1067][252]. They rebelled against William in 1068, leaving court for Yorkshire, but were soon brought to submission. Orderic Vitalis states that Morcar joined the resistance at Ely in 1071[253], but surrendered to the king. Florence of Worcester records that "comites Edwinus et Morkarus" rebelled against King William in [1071], and that "Morkarus…et Siwardus cognomento Barn" took refuge in Ely[254]. Florence of Worcester records that "comites Morkarum et Rogerum, Siwardum cognomento Barn, et Wlnothum regis Haroldi germanum" were released by King William on his deathbed in 1087[255]. He was taken to England by King William II but placed in confinement again in Winchester.

c) EALDGYTH. Florence of Worcester´s genealogies name "regina Aldgitha, comitis Ælfgari filia" as mother of King Harold´s son "Haroldum"[256]. Orderic Vitalis records that "Edwinus…et Morcarus comites, filii Algari…Edgivam sororem eorum" married firstly "Gritfridi…regis Guallorum" and secondly "Heraldo"[257]. Her parentage and marriage to King Harold are confirmed by Florence of Worcester who records that "earls Edwin and Morcar…sent off their sister Queen Elgitha to Chester" after the battle of Hastings[258].

m firstly as his second wife, GRUFFYDD ap Llywellyn Prince of Gwynedd and Powys, son of LLYWELLYN ap Seisyll King of Gwynedd & his wife Angharad of Gwynedd (-killed Snowdonia 5 Aug 1063).

m secondly ([1064/early 1066][259]) HAROLD Godwinson, son of GODWIN Earl of Wessex & his wife Gytha of Denmark ([1022/25]-killed in battle Hastings 14 Oct 1066, bur [Waltham Abbey]). He succeeded in 1066 as HAROLD II King of England.

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#Leofricdied1057A

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86lfgar,_Earl_of_Mercia

Ælfgar (died c.1062) was son of Leofric, Earl of Mercia, possibly by his well-known wife Godgifu (Lady Godiva), although more probably by an earlier marriage. He succeeded to his father's title and responsibilities on the latter's death in 1057.

Ælfgar gained from the exile of Earl Godwin of Wessex and his sons in 1051. He was given the Earldom of East Anglia, which had been that of Harold, son of Godwin. Earl Godwin and King Edward were reconciled the following year, so Harold was restored to his earldom - but not for long. At Easter 1053 Godwin died, so Harold became Earl of Wessex, and the earldom of East Anglia returned to Ælfgar. [1],[2]

Ælfgar seems to have learned from the tactics Godwin used to put pressure on King Edward. When he was himself exiled in 1055, he raised a fleet of 18 ships in Ireland and then turned to Wales, where King Gruffydd agreed to join forces with him against King Edward. Two miles from Hereford, on 24 October, they clashed with the army of the Earl of Herefordshire, Ralph the Timid. The Earl and his men eventually took flight, and Gruffydd and Ælfgar pursued them, killing and wounding as they went, and enacting savage reprisals on Hereford. They despoiled and burnt the town, killing many of its citizens. King Edward ordered an army mustered and put Earl Harold in charge of it. This was more formidable opposition, and Ælfgar and Gruffydd fled to South Wales. However the issue was resolved by diplomacy and Earl Ælfgar was reinstated.[3]

He married Aelfgifu, and was succeeded as Earl of Mercia by his eldest son by her, Edwin (also called Eadwine). His second son, Morcar (also called Morkere) was elected Earl of Northumbria when Tostig Godwinson was ejected by the Northumbrians. His daughter, Edith (Aldgyth) married firstly the Welsh prince Gruffyd (kd. 1063), by whom she had three children, and secondly 1064 Harold Godwinson (kd 1066 Hastings), by whom she had a posthumous son, Harold (died 1098).

Notes

  1. ^ Ann Williams, ‘Ælfgar, earl of Mercia (d. 1062?)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 , accessed 18 April 2008
  2. ^ The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
  3. ^ The Chronicle of John of Worcester ed. and trans. R.R. Darlington, P. McGurk and J. Bray (Clarendon Press: Oxford 1995), pp.576-79; The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.

--------------------

Ælfgar, Earl of Mercia

Ælfgar (died c.1062) was son of Leofric, Earl of Mercia, possibly by his well-known wife Godgifu (Lady Godiva), although more probably by an earlier marriage. He succeeded to his father's title and responsibilities on the latter's death in 1057.

Ælfgar gained from the exile of Earl Godwin of Wessex and his sons in 1051. He was given the Earldom of East Anglia, which had been that of Harold, son of Godwin. Earl Godwin and King Edward were reconciled the following year, so Harold was restored to his earldom - but not for long. At Easter 1053 Godwin died, so Harold became Earl of Wessex, and the earldom of East Anglia returned to Ælfgar. [1],[2]

Ælfgar seems to have learned from the tactics Godwin used to put pressure on King Edward. When he was himself exiled in 1055, he raised a fleet of 18 ships in Ireland and then turned to Wales, where King Gruffydd agreed to join forces with him against King Edward. Two miles from Hereford, on 24 October, they clashed with the army of the Earl of Herefordshire, Ralph the Timid. The Earl and his men eventually took flight, and Gruffydd and Ælfgar pursued them, killing and wounding as they went, and enacting savage reprisals on Hereford. They despoiled and burnt the town, killing many of its citizens. King Edward ordered an army mustered and put Earl Harold in charge of it. This was more formidable opposition, and Ælfgar and Gruffydd fled to South Wales. However the issue was resolved by diplomacy and Earl Ælfgar was reinstated.[3]

He married Aelfgifu, and was succeeded as Earl of Mercia by his eldest son by her, Edwin (also called Eadwine). His second son, Morcar (also called Morkere) was elected Earl of Northumbria when Tostig Godwinson was ejected by the Northumbrians. His daughter, Edith (Aldgyth) married firstly the Welsh prince Gruffyd (kd. 1063), by whom she had three children, and secondly 1064 Harold Godwinson (kd 1066 Hastings), by whom she had a posthumous son, Harold (died 1098).

Notes

  1. ^ Ann Williams, ‘Ælfgar, earl of Mercia (d. 1062?)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 , accessed 18 April 2008
  2. ^ The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
  3. ^ The Chronicle of John of Worcester ed. and trans. R.R. Darlington, P. McGurk and J. Bray (Clarendon Press: Oxford 1995), pp.576-79; The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.

--------------------

Ælfgar (died c.1062) was son of Leofric, Earl of Mercia, possibly by his well-known wife Godgifu (Lady Godiva), although more probably by an earlier marriage. He succeeded to his father's title and responsibilities on the latter's death in 1057.

Ælfgar gained from the exile of Earl Godwin of Wessex and his sons in 1051. He was given the Earldom of East Anglia, which had been that of Harold, son of Godwin. Earl Godwin and King Edward were reconciled the following year, so Harold was restored to his earldom - but not for long. At Easter 1053 Godwin died, so Harold became Earl of Wessex, and the earldom of East Anglia returned to Ælfgar. [1],[2]

Ælfgar seems to have learned from the tactics Godwin used to put pressure on King Edward. When he was himself exiled in 1055, he raised a fleet of 18 ships in Ireland and then turned to Wales, where King Gruffydd agreed to join forces with him against King Edward. Two miles from Hereford, on 24 October, they clashed with the army of the Earl of Herefordshire, Ralph the Timid. The Earl and his men eventually took flight, and Gruffydd and Ælfgar pursued them, killing and wounding as they went, and enacting savage reprisals on Hereford. They despoiled and burnt the town, killing many of its citizens. King Edward ordered an army mustered and put Earl Harold in charge of it. This was more formidable opposition, and Ælfgar and Gruffydd fled to South Wales. However the issue was resolved by diplomacy and Earl Ælfgar was reinstated.[3]

He married Aelfgifu, and was succeeded as Earl of Mercia by his eldest son by her, Edwin (also called Eadwine). His second son, Morcar (also called Morkere) was elected Earl of Northumbria when Tostig Godwinson was ejected by the Northumbrians. His daughter, Edith (Aldgyth) married firstly the Welsh prince Gruffyd (kd. 1063), by whom she had three children, and secondly 1064 Harold Godwinson (kd 1066 Hastings), by whom she had a posthumous son, Harold (died 1098).

--------------------

Ælfgar

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ælfgar (died 1062) was son of Leofric, Earl of Mercia, possibly by his well-known wife Godgifu (Godiva), although more probably by an earlier marriage. He succeeded to his father's title and responsibilities on the latter's death in 1057.

Ælfgar gained from the exile of Earl Godwin of Wessex and his sons in 1051. He was given the Earldom of East Anglia, which had been that of Harold, son of Godwin. Earl Godwin and King Edward were reconciled the following year, so Harold was restored to his earldom - but not for long. At Easter 1053 Godwin died, so Harold became Earl of Wessex, and the earldom of East Anglia returned to Ælfgar.[1]

Ælfgar seems to have learned from the tactics Godwin used to put pressure on King Edward. When he was himself exiled in 1055, he raised a fleet of 18 ships in Ireland and then turned to Wales, where King Gruffydd agreed to join forces with him against King Edward. Two miles from Hereford, on 24 October, they clashed with the army of the Earl of Herefordshire, Ralph the Timid. The Earl and his men eventually took flight, and Gruffydd and Ælfgar pursued them, killing and wounding as they went, and enacting savage reprisals on Hereford. They despoiled and burnt the town, killing many of its citizens. King Edward ordered an army mustered and put Earl Harold in charge of it. This was more formidable opposition, and Ælfgar and Gruffydd fled to South Wales. However the issue was resolved by diplomacy and Earl Ælfgar was reinstated.[2]

He married Aelfgifu, daughter of Sigeferth, Thegn of the Seven Boroughs and Ealgyth of Mercia.

Ælfgar was succeeded as Earl of Mercia by his eldest son, Edwin (also called Eadwine). His second son, Morcar (also called Morkere) was elected Earl of Northumbria when Tostig Godwinson was ejected by the Northumbrians. His third son was Burchard.

His daughter, Edith (Aldgyth) married firstly the Welsh prince Gruffyd (kd. 1063), and secondly 1066 Harold Godwinson (kd 1066 Hastings). She had issue by each husband. -------------------- Earl of Mercia -------------------- http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/w/i/l/Lisa-A-Wilsonpennington/GENE3-0045.html

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Ælfgar, Earl of Mercia's Timeline

1002
1002
Lincolnshire
1025
1025
Age 23
England
1028
1028
Age 26
England
1028
Age 26
Mercia, England?
1030
1030
Age 28
Mercia, England
1034
1034
Age 32
Mercia, England
1035
1035
Age 33
1059
September 2, 1059
Age 57
Coventry, Warwickshire, England
1059
Age 57
Coventry, Warwickshire, England
1943
August 19, 1943
Age 57