Ælfthryth

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Ælfthryth

Also Known As: "Ælfthryth of Devon", "Eelfthryth", "Elfrida", "Elfrida of Devon", "Ælfðryð Defenascires", "The Fair", "Aelfthryth //", "Elfrida of /Devon/", "Elfrida //", "Aethelflaeda the /Fair/", "Ælfthryth of Wessex \ /"Elfrida"/", "also Alfrida", "Elfrida or Elfthryth", "Ælfthryth", "Quee", "A..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Lydford Castle, Devonshire, England
Death: Died in Wherwall, South Stonham, Hampshire, England
Place of Burial: Wilton Abbey, Wiltshire, England
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Ordgar, Ealdorman of Devon and Wulfthryth
Wife of Edgar I "The Peaceful", King of the English and Æthelwold, Ealdorman of East Anglia
Mother of Edmund; Æthelred "the Unready", King of the English and Edmund Atheling
Sister of Ordulf, Ealdorman of Devon

Occupation: Ælfthryth was the first king's wife known to have been crowned and anointed as Queen of the Kingdom of England., Queen of England, Queen of the English, She became a nun in 986., Queen Consort to England, Queen Consort of England
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Ælfthryth

Ælfthryth (c. 945-1000, also Alfrida, Elfrida or Elfthryth) was the second or third wife of King Edgar of England. Ælfthryth was the first king's wife known to have been crowned and anointed as Queen of the Kingdom of England. Mother of King Ethelred the Unready, she was a powerful political figure. She was linked to the murder of her stepson King Edward the Martyr and appeared as a stereotypical bad Queen and evil stepmother in many medieval histories.

Ælfthryth of Devon

Married

1. Æthelwold (no children)

2. Edgar "the Peaceable" King of England (his second wife), two sons: Edmund and Æthelred

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86lfthryth,_Queen_of_England

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#AelfthrythM2Edgar

ÆLFTHRYTH (Lydford Castle, Devon ([945]-Wherwell Abbey, Hampshire [999/1002], bur Wherwell Abbey). The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the marriage in 965 of King Edgar and Ælfthryth, stating that she was the daughter of ealdorman Ordgar[32]. Simeon of Durham records the marriage of King Eadgar and "the daughter of Ordgar duke of Devonshire after the death of her husband Elfwold…duke of the East Angles" in 964[33]. Roger of Hoveden names her, her father and her first husband, when recording her second marriage[34]. Geoffrey Gaimar records a lengthy account of King Edgar having sent "Edelwoth" to woo "Estrueth la fille Orgar" on his behalf, and Æthelwold having married her without the king´s knowledge[35]. King Edgar granted land in Buckinghamshire to "Ælfgifu que mihi afinitate mundialis cruoris coniuncta" in 966[36]. "Ælfthryth regina" subscribed charters of King Edgar dated between 964 and 974[37]. William of Malmesbury recounts that King Edgar killed Ælfthryth's first husband to enable him to marry her[38]. She was crowned with her husband in 973, apparently the first recorded instance of the coronation of a queen in England. It was alleged that she was involved in the plot to kill her stepson so her own son could succeed as king[39]. "Ælfthryth regina" subscribed charters of King Æthelred II between 979 and 983[40], and "Ælfthryth regis mater" between 981 and 999[41]. She became a nun at Wherwell Abbey, Hampshire in [985]. Her son King Æthelred II granted privileges to Wherwell Abbey in 1002 for the benefit of her soul[42].

m firstly [as his second wife,] ÆTHELWOLD Ealdorman of the East Angles, son of --- (-before 964). The Vita Oswaldi names Æthelwald as husband of Ælfthryth[43].

m secondly ([965]) as his second wife, EDGAR "the Peaceable" King of England, son of EDMUND King of Wessex & his first wife Ælfgifu --- (943-Winchester 8 Jul 975, bur Glastonbury Abbey).

m secondly (965) as her second husband, ÆLFTHRYTH, widow of ÆTHELWOLD Ealdorman of the East Angles, daughter of ORDGAR Ealdorman of Devon & his wife --- (Lydford Castle, Devon ([945]-Wherwell Abbey, Hampshire [999/1002], bur Wherwell Abbey). The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the marriage in 965 of King Edgar and Ælfthryth, stating that she was the daughter of ealdorman Ordgar[1736]. Simeon of Durham records the marriage of King Eadgar and "the daughter of Ordgar duke of Devonshire after the death of her husband Elfwold…duke of the East Angles" in 964[1737]. Roger of Hoveden names her, her father and her first husband, when recording her second marriage[1738]. Geoffrey Gaimar records a lengthy account of King Edgar having sent "Edelwoth" to woo "Estrueth la fille Orgar" on his behalf, and Æthelwold having married her without the king´s knowledge[1739]. King Edgar granted land in Buckinghamshire to "Ælfgifu que mihi afinitate mundialis cruoris coniuncta" in 966[1740]. "Ælfthryth regina" subscribed charters of King Edgar dated between 964 and 974[1741]. William of Malmesbury recounts that King Edgar killed Ælfthryth's first husband to enable him to marry her[1742]. She was crowned queen with her husband in 973, which was the first instance of the coronation of a queen in England. It was alleged that she was involved in the plot to kill her stepson so her own son could succeed as King[1743]. "Ælfthryth regina" subscribed charters of King Æthelred II between 979 and 983[1744], and "Ælfthryth regis mater" between 981 and 999[1745]. She became a nun at Wherwell Abbey, Hampshire in [985]. Her son King Æthelred II granted privileges to Wherwell Abbey in 1002 for the benefit of her soul[1746].

Mistress (1): WULFTHRYTH, daughter of --- ([945]-1000). Simeon of Durham names "the holy Wlthirtha" as the mother of King Eadgar's daughter "Eagitha"[1747]. Roger of Hoveden names her "Sancta Elfthritha"[1748]. Florence of Worcester records that "sancta Wlfthrytha" was the mother of King Eadgar´s daughter "Eadgitham"[1749]. Abbess of Wilton. King Edgar granted "Wulfthryth abbess" land at Chalke, Wiltshire by charter dated 974[1750].

King Edgar & his second wife had two children:

2. EADMUND (-970, bur Romsey Abbey[1761]). Simeon of Durham names "Eadmuind and Egelræd" as the sons of King Eadgar and his wife "the daughter of Ordgar duke of Devonshire…"[1762]. Roger of Hoveden gives his parentage[1763]. According to William of Malmesbury, Edmund was King Edgar's son by his first marriage[1764]. Florence of Worcester says that he was the son of the king's second marriage[1765]. "Edmundus clito legitimus prefati regis filius" subscribed a charter of King Edgar dated 966[1766]. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death in 970 of "Prince Edmund"[1767].

3. ÆTHELRED ([966]-London 23 Apr 1016, bur Old St Paul's Cathedral). Roger of Hoveden gives his parentage[1768]. He succeeded after the murder of his half-brother in 978 as ÆTHELRED II "the Unready/Unræd/Redeles" King of England, crowned 4 Apr or 4 May 978 at Kingston-upon-Thames.

----------------------------

Ælfthryth was the daughter of Ealdorman Ordgar. Her mother was a member of the royal family of Wessex. The family's power lay in the west of Wessex. Ordgar was buried in Exeter and his son Ordwulf founded, or refounded, Tavistock Abbey.[1]

Ælfthryth was first married to Æthelwald, son of Æthelstan Half-King as recorded by Byrhtferth of Ramsey in his Life of Saint Oswald of Worcester.[2] Later accounts, such as that preserved by William of Malmesbury, add vivid detail of unknown reliability.

According to William, the beauty of Ordgar's daughter Ælfthryth was reported to King Edgar. Edgar, looking for a Queen, sent Æthewald to see Ælfthryth, ordering him "to offer her marriage [to Edgar] if her beauty were really equal to report." When she turned out to be just as beautiful as was said, Æthelwald married her himself and reported back to Edgar that she was quite unsuitable. Edgar was eventually told of this, and decided to repay Æthelwald's betrayal in like manner. He said that he would visit the poor woman, which alarmed Æthelwald. He asked Ælfthryth to make herself as unattractive as possible for the king's visit, but she did the opposite. Edgar, quite besotted with her, killed Æthelwald during a hunt.

-----------------------------

Ælfthryth (c. 945-1000, also Alfrida, Elfrida or Elfthryth) was the second or third wife of King Edgar of England. Ælfthryth was the first king's wife known to have been crowned and anointed as Queen of the Kingdom of England. Mother of King Ethelred the Unready, she was a powerful political figure. She was linked to the murder of her stepson King Edward the Martyr and appeared as a stereotypical bad Queen and evil stepmother in many medieval histories.

--------------------

Elfrida was the second or third wife of King Edgar of England. Ælfthryth was the first king's wife known to have been crowned and anointed as Queen of the Kingdom of England. Mother of King Ethelred the Unready, she was a powerful political figure. She was linked to the murder of her stepson King Edward the Martyr and appeared as a stereotypical bad Queen and evil stepmother in many medieval histories.


Ælfthryth was the daughter of Ealdorman Ordgar. Her mother was a member of the royal family of Wessex. The family's power lay in the west of Wessex. Ordgar was buried in Exeter and his son Ordwulf founded, or refounded, Tavistock Abbey.

Ælfthryth was first married to Æthelwald, son of Æthelstan Half-King as recorded by Byrhtferth of Ramsey in his Life of Saint Oswald of Worcester. Later accounts, such as that preserved by William of Malmesbury, add vivid detail of unknown reliability.

According to William, the beauty of Ordgar's daughter Ælfthryth was reported to King Edgar. Edgar, looking for a Queen, sent Æthewald to see Ælfthryth, ordering him "to offer her marriage [to Edgar] if her beauty were really equal to report." When she turned out to be just as beautiful as was said, Æthelwald married her himself and reported back to Edgar that she was quite unsuitable. Edgar was eventually told of this, and decided to repay Æthelwald's betrayal in like manner. He said that he would visit the poor woman, which alarmed Æthelwald. He asked Ælfthryth to make herself as unattractive as possible for the king's visit, but she did the opposite. Edgar, quite besotted with her, killed Æthelwald during a hunt.

The historical record does not record the year of Æthelwald's death, let alone its manner. No children of Æthelwald and Ælfthryth are known.

Edgar had previously been married to Æthelflæd, by whom he had a son named Edward, and perhaps to Wulfthryth, with whom he had a daughter named Eadgifu—later known as Saint Edith of Wilton. Sound political reasons encouraged the match between Edgar, whose power base was centred in Mercia, and Ælfthryth, whose family were powerful in Wessex. In addition to this, and her link with the family of Æthelstan Half-King, Ælfthryth also appears to have been connected to the family of Ælfhere, Ealdorman of Mercia.

Edgar married Ælfthryth in either 964 or 965. In 966 Ælfthryth gave birth to a son who was named Edmund. In King Edgar's charter (S 745) regranting privileges to New Minster, Winchester that same year, the infant Edmund is called "clito legitimus" (legitimate ætheling), and appears before Edward in the list of witnesses. Edmund died young, circa 970, but in 968 Ælfthryth had given birth to a second son who was called Æthelred.

King Edgar organised a second coronation, perhaps to bolster his claims to be ruler of all of Britain at Bath on 11 May 973. Here Ælfthryth was also crowned and anointed, granting her a status higher than any recent queen.

Edgar died in 975 leaving two sons, Edward and Æthelred. Edward was almost an adult, and was supported by many key figures including Archbishops Dunstan and Oswald and the brother of Ælfthryth's first husband, Ælfwine, Ealdorman of East Anglia. Supporting the claims of the child Æthelred were the Queen dowager, Bishop Æthelwold of Winchester, and Ælfhere, Ealdorman of Mercia.

On 18 March 978, while visiting Ælfthryth at Corfe, King Edward was killed by servants of the Queen, leaving the way clear for Æthelred to be installed as king. Edward was soon considered a martyr, and Ælfthryth blamed for his murder. Due to Æthelred's youth, Ælfthryth served as regent for her son until his coming of age in 984. By then her earlier allies Æthelwold and Ælfhere had died, and she withdrew from the court at this time. However, she remained an important figure, being responsible for the care of Æthelred's children by Aelgifu of Northampton.

Although her reputation was marked by the murder of her stepson, Ælfthryth was a religious woman, taking an especial interest in monastic reform when Queen. Late in life she retired to Wherwell where she died on 17 November, between 999 and 1001.

Notes

  1. ^ Stafford, Unification, pp. 52–53.
  2. ^ PASE; Stafford, Unification, pp. 52–53.
  3. ^ Malmesbury, pp. 139–140 (Book 2, § 139.
  4. ^ Higham, pp. 6–7; Stafford, Unification, pp. 52–53.
  5. ^ Higham, pp. 6–7; Miller, "Edgar"; Stafford, "Ælfthryth".
  6. ^ Miller, "Edgar"; Stafford, "Ælfthryth".
  7. ^ Higham, pp. 7–14; Stafford, Unification, pp. 57–59.
  8. ^ Higham, pp. 7–14; Stafford, "Ælfthryth"; Stafford, Unification, pp. 57–59.
  9. ^ Stafford, "Ælfthryth"

References

   * "Ælfthryth 8 (Female) Queen of King Edgar, 964-975, d.999x1001; daughter of Ordgar". Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England. http://www.pase.ac.uk/pase/apps/persons/CreatePersonFrames.jsp?personKey=8094. Retrieved on 2007-09-06. 
   * Higham, Nick, The Death of Anglo-Saxon England. Stroud: Sutton, 1997. ISBN 0-7509-2469-1
   * Miller, Sean, "Edgar" in Michael Lapidge (ed.), The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England. Oxford: Blackwell, 1999. ISBN 0-631-22492-0
   * Stafford, Pauline, "Ælfthryth" in Michael Lapidge (ed.), The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England. Oxford: Blackwell, 1999. ISBN 0-631-22492-0
   * Stafford, Pauline, Unification and Conquest: A Political and Social History of England in the Tenth and Eleventh Centuries. London: Edward Arnold, 1989. ISBN 0-7131-6532-4
   * William of Malmesbury. "Malmesbury's History of the Kings". The Church Historians of England, volume 3, part 1. http://books.google.com/books?id=mxy_gvWgEQUC. Retrieved on 2007-09-08.

--------------------

Ælfthryth (c. 945-1000, also Alfrida, Elfrida or Elfthryth) was the second or third wife of King Edgar of England. Ælfthryth was the first king's wife known to have been crowned and anointed as Queen of the Kingdom of England. Mother of King Ethelred the Unready, she was a powerful political figure. She was linked to the murder of her stepson King Edward the Martyr and appeared as a stereotypical bad Queen and evil stepmother in many medieval histories.

Early life

Ælfthryth was the daughter of Ealdorman Orgar. Her mother was a member of the royal family of Wessex. The family's power lay in the west of Wessex. Ordgar was buried in Exeter and his son Ordwulf founded, or refounded, Tavistock Abbey.[1]

Ælfthryth was first married to Æthelwald, son of Æthelstan Half-King as recorded by Byrhtferth of Ramsey in his Life of Saint Oswald of Worcester.[2] Later accounts, such as that preserved by William of Malmesbury, add vivid detail of unknown reliability.

According to William, the beauty of Ordgar's daughter Ælfthryth was reported to King Edgar. Edgar, looking for a Queen, sent Æthewald to see Ælfthryth, ordering him "to offer her marriage [to Edgar] if her beauty were really equal to report." When she turned out to be just as beautiful as was said, Æthelwald married her himself and reported back to Edgar that she was quite unsuitable. Edgar was eventually told of this, and decided to repay Æthelwald's betrayal in like manner. He said that he would visit the poor woman, which alarmed Æthelwald. He asked Ælfthryth to make herself as unattractive as possible for the king's visit, but she did the opposite. Edgar, quite besotted with her, killed Æthelwald during a hunt.[3]

The historical record does not record the year of Æthelwald's death, let alone its manner. No children of Æthelwald and Ælfthryth are known.

Edgar's queen

Edgar had previously been married to Æthelflæd, by whom he had a son named Edward, and perhaps to Wulfthryth, with whom he had a daughter named Eadgifu—later known as Saint Edith of Wilton. Sound political reasons encouraged the match between Edgar, whose power base was centred in Mercia, and Ælfthryth, whose family were powerful in Wessex. In addition to this, and her link with the family of Æthelstan Half-King, Ælfthryth also appears to have been connected to the family of Ælfhere, Ealdorman of Mercia.[4]

Edgar married Ælfthryth in either 964 or 965. In 966 Ælfthryth gave birth to a son who was named Edmund. In King Edgar's charter (S 745) regranting privileges to New Minster, Winchester that same year, the infant Edmund is called "clito legitimus" (legitimate ætheling), and appears before Edward in the list of witnesses. Edmund died young, circa 970, but in 968 Ælfthryth had given birth to a second son who was called Æthelred.[5]

King Edgar organised a second coronation, perhaps to bolster his claims to be ruler of all of Britain at Bath on 11 May 973. Here Ælfthryth was also crowned and anointed, granting her a status higher than any recent queen.[6]

Queen dowager

Edgar died in 975 leaving two sons, Edward and Æthelred. Edward was almost an adult, and was supported by many key figures including Archbishops Dunstan and Oswald and the brother of Ælfthryth's first husband, Æthelwine, Ealdorman of East Anglia. Supporting the claims of the child Æthelred were the Queen dowager, Bishop Æthelwold of Winchester, and Ælfhere, Ealdorman of Mercia.[7]

On 18 March 978, while visiting Ælfthryth at Corfe, King Edward was killed by servants of the Queen, leaving the way clear for Æthelred to be installed as king. Edward was soon considered a martyr, and Ælfthryth blamed for his murder. Due to Æthelred's youth, Ælfthryth served as regent for her son until his coming of age in 984. By then her earlier allies Æthelwold and Ælfhere had died, and she withdrew from the court at this time. However, she remained an important figure, being responsible for the care of Æthelred's children by his first wife, Ælfgifu.[8]

Although her reputation was marked by the murder of her stepson, Ælfthryth was a religious woman, taking an especial interest in monastic reform when Queen. Late in life she retired to Wherwell where she died on 17 November, between 999 and 1001.[9]

Notes

  1. ^ Stafford, Unification, pp. 52–53.
  2. ^ PASE; Stafford, Unification, pp. 52–53.
  3. ^ Malmesbury, pp. 139–140 (Book 2, § 139.
  4. ^ Higham, pp. 6–7; Stafford, Unification, pp. 52–53.
  5. ^ Higham, pp. 6–7; Miller, "Edgar"; Stafford, "Ælfthryth".
  6. ^ Miller, "Edgar"; Stafford, "Ælfthryth".
  7. ^ Higham, pp. 7–14; Stafford, Unification, pp. 57–59.
  8. ^ Higham, pp. 7–14; Stafford, "Ælfthryth"; Stafford, Unification, pp. 57–59.
  9. ^ Stafford, "Ælfthryth"

References

   * "Ælfthryth 8 (Female) Queen of King Edgar, 964-975, d.999x1001; daughter of Ordgar". Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England. http://www.pase.ac.uk/pase/apps/persons/CreatePersonFrames.jsp?personKey=8094. Retrieved 2007-09-06. 
   * Higham, Nick, The Death of Anglo-Saxon England. Stroud: Sutton, 1997. ISBN 0-7509-2469-1
   * Miller, Sean, "Edgar" in Michael Lapidge (ed.), The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England. Oxford: Blackwell, 1999. ISBN 0-631-22492-0
   * Stafford, Pauline, "Ælfthryth" in Michael Lapidge (ed.), The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England. Oxford: Blackwell, 1999. ISBN 0-631-22492-0
   * Stafford, Pauline, Unification and Conquest: A Political and Social History of England in the Tenth and Eleventh Centuries. London: Edward Arnold, 1989. ISBN 0-7131-6532-4
   * William of Malmesbury. "Malmesbury's History of the Kings". in Joseph Stevenson. The Church Historians of England, volume 3, part 1. http://books.google.com/books?id=mxy_gvWgEQUC. Retrieved 2007-09-08.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86lfthryth,_Queen_of_England

--------------------

Ælfthryth (?) (1)

F, #102422, b. circa 945, d. circa 17 November 1002

Last Edited=4 Dec 2005

    Ælfthryth (?) was born circa 945 at Lydford Castle, Devon, England. (2) 

She was the daughter of Ordgar, Ealdorman of Devon.

She married, firstly, Æthelwold, Ealdorman of East Anglia, son of Æthelstan, Ealdorman, between 962 and 963. (3)

She married, secondly, Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England, son of Eadmund I, King of England and Ælfgifu (?), between 964 and 965. (2)

She died circa 17 November 1002 at Wherwell Abbey, Hampshire, England. (3)

    Ælfthryth (?) was also known as Alstrita (?). (2) She was also known as Elstrudis (?). (3) From 11 May 973, her married name became Queen Elfrida of England. (3) She was a nun circa 986 at Wherwell Abbey, Hampshire, England. (3)

Children of Ælfthryth (?) and Æthelwold, Ealdorman of East Anglia

-1. Edgar (?) b. bt 962 - 9643

-2. Ethelfleda (?) b. c 963, d. c 10163

Children of Ælfthryth (?) and Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England

-1. Edmund Atheling (?) b. c 965, d. bt 970 - 9724

-2. Æthelred II 'the Unready', King of England+ b. bt 966 - 969, d. 23 Apr 1016 (4)

Forrás / Source:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10243.htm#i102422

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Wulfthryth (?) (1)

F, #161322

Last Edited=8 Sep 2005

    Wulfthryth (?) married Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England, son of Eadmund I, King of England and Ælfgifu (?). (1)

Child of Wulfthryth (?) and Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England

-1. Eadgyth (?) (1) d. b 988

Forrás / Source:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p16133.htm#i161322

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86lfthryth,_Queen_of_England

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Though Elfrida was the second or third wife of King Edgar, she was the first king's wife known to have crowned and annointed Queen of the Kingdom of England. She was a powerful political figure and linked to the murder of her stepson King Edward the Martyr and appeared as the evil Queen and evil stepmother in many medieval histories.

Aelfrida was of royal blood on both sides of her family. She was reputed to be so lovely that it is said that the great King Edgar sent Aethelwald, a trusted ally, to go and see for himself if the stories were true, to make an offer for her hand on the behalf of the king. Aethelwald, discovering just how beautiful she was, married her himself. He wrote to King Edgar and told him the woman was a hideous beast. Edgar was no fool, and he sent word that he would come to console Aelfthryth for her affliction. Aethelwald begged his new wife to make herself appear as ugly as possible for the king, but she did the opposite. King Edgar fell madly in love with her and murdered Aethelwald during a hunt. That a marriage with so high a noblewoman helped his own standing was icing on the cake.

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About Aelfthryth:

Her father was Earl of Devon, Ordgar. She married Edgar who died in 975, and was his second wife. Aelfthryth is sometimes credited with organizing, or being part of, a 978 assassination of her stepson Edward "the Martyr" so that her 10-year-old son Ethelred II "the Unready" could succeed.Her daughter, Aethelfleda or Ethelfleda, was abbess at Romsey.Another woman by the name of Aelfthryth was the daughter of King Alfred "the Great" and wife of Baldwin II, Count of Flanders and Artois. This Aelfthryth lived from about 877-929.

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Ælfthryth, Queen of England

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For other persons of the same name, see Ælfthryth.

Ælfthryth (c. 945-1000, also Alfrida, Elfrida or Elfthryth) was the second or third wife of King Edgar of England. Ælfthryth was the first king's wife known to have been crowned and anointed as Queen of the Kingdom of England. Mother of King Ethelred the Unready, she was a powerful political figure. She was linked to the murder of her stepson King Edward the Martyr and appeared as a stereotypical bad Queen and evil stepmother in many medieval histories.

Early life

Ælfthryth was the daughter of Ealdorman Ordgar. Her mother was a member of the royal family of Wessex. The family's power lay in the west of Wessex. Ordgar was buried in Exeter and his son Ordwulf founded, or refounded, Tavistock Abbey.[1]

Ælfthryth was first married to Æthelwald, son of Æthelstan Half-King as recorded by Byrhtferth of Ramsey in his Life of Saint Oswald of Worcester.[2] Later accounts, such as that preserved by William of Malmesbury, add vivid detail of unknown reliability.

According to William, the beauty of Ordgar's daughter Ælfthryth was reported to King Edgar. Edgar, looking for a Queen, sent Æthewald to see Ælfthryth, ordering him "to offer her marriage [to Edgar] if her beauty were really equal to report." When she turned out to be just as beautiful as was said, Æthelwald married her himself and reported back to Edgar that she was quite unsuitable. Edgar was eventually told of this, and decided to repay Æthelwald's betrayal in like manner. He said that he would visit the poor woman, which alarmed Æthelwald. He asked Ælfthryth to make herself as unattractive as possible for the king's visit, but she did the opposite. Edgar, quite besotted with her, killed Æthelwald during a hunt.[3]

The historical record does not record the year of Æthelwald's death, let alone its manner. No children of Æthelwald and Ælfthryth are known.

[edit]Edgar's queen

Edgar had previously been married to Æthelflæd, by whom he had a son named Edward, and perhaps to Wulfthryth, with whom he had a daughter named Eadgifu—later known as Saint Edith of Wilton. Sound political reasons encouraged the match between Edgar, whose power base was centred in Mercia, and Ælfthryth, whose family were powerful in Wessex. In addition to this, and her link with the family of Æthelstan Half-King, Ælfthryth also appears to have been connected to the family of Ælfhere, Ealdorman of Mercia.[4]

Edgar married Ælfthryth in either 964 or 965. In 966 Ælfthryth gave birth to a son who was named Edmund. In King Edgar's charter (S 745) regranting privileges to New Minster, Winchester that same year, the infant Edmund is called "clito legitimus" (legitimate ætheling), and appears before Edward in the list of witnesses. Edmund died young, circa 970, but in 968 Ælfthryth had given birth to a second son who was called Æthelred.[5]

King Edgar organised a second coronation, perhaps to bolster his claims to be ruler of all of Britain at Bath on 11 May 973. Here Ælfthryth was also crowned and anointed, granting her a status higher than any recent queen.[6]

[edit]Queen dowager

Edgar died in 975 leaving two sons, Edward and Æthelred. Edward was almost an adult, and was supported by many key figures including Archbishops Dunstan and Oswald and the brother of Ælfthryth's first husband, Ælfwine, Ealdorman of East Anglia. Supporting the claims of the child Æthelred were the Queen dowager, Bishop Æthelwold of Winchester, and Ælfhere, Ealdorman of Mercia.[7]

On 18 March 978, while visiting Ælfthryth at Corfe, King Edward was killed by servants of the Queen, leaving the way clear for Æthelred to be installed as king. Edward was soon considered a martyr, and Ælfthryth blamed for his murder. Due to Æthelred's youth, Ælfthryth served as regent for her son until his coming of age in 984. By then her earlier allies Æthelwold and Ælfhere had died, and she withdrew from the court at this time. However, she remained an important figure, being responsible for the care of Æthelred's children by Aelgifu of Northampton.[8]

Although her reputation was marked by the murder of her stepson, Ælfthryth was a religious woman, taking an especial interest in monastic reform when Queen. Late in life she retired to Wherwell where she died on 17 November, between 999 and 1001.[9]

[edit]Notes

^ Stafford, Unification, pp. 52–53.

^ PASE; Stafford, Unification, pp. 52–53.

^ Malmesbury, pp. 139–140 (Book 2, § 139.

^ Higham, pp. 6–7; Stafford, Unification, pp. 52–53.

^ Higham, pp. 6–7; Miller, "Edgar"; Stafford, "Ælfthryth".

^ Miller, "Edgar"; Stafford, "Ælfthryth".

^ Higham, pp. 7–14; Stafford, Unification, pp. 57–59.

^ Higham, pp. 7–14; Stafford, "Ælfthryth"; Stafford, Unification, pp. 57–59.

^ Stafford, "Ælfthryth"

[edit]References

Ælfthryth 8 (Female) Queen of King Edgar, 964-975, d.999x1001; daughter of Ordgar. Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England. Retrieved on 2007-09-06.

Higham, Nick, The Death of Anglo-Saxon England. Stroud: Sutton, 1997. ISBN 0-7509-2469-1

Miller, Sean, "Edgar" in Michael Lapidge (ed.), The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England. Oxford: Blackwell, 1999. ISBN 0-631-22492-0

Stafford, Pauline, "Ælfthryth" in Michael Lapidge (ed.), The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England. Oxford: Blackwell, 1999. ISBN 0-631-22492-0

Stafford, Pauline, Unification and Conquest: A Political and Social History of England in the Tenth and Eleventh Centuries. London: Edward Arnold, 1989. ISBN 0-7131-6532-4

William of Malmesbury. Joseph Stevenson:Malmesbury's History of the Kings. The Church Historians of England, volume 3, part 1. Retrieved on 2007-09-08.

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Ælfthryth (c. 945-1000, also Alfrida, Elfrida or Elfthryth) was the second or third wife of King Edgar of England. Ælfthryth was the first king's wife known to have been crowned and anointed as Queen of the Kingdom of England. Mother of King Ethelred the Unready, she was a powerful political figure. She was linked to the murder of her stepson King Edward the Martyr and appeared as a stereotypical bad Queen and evil stepmother in many medieval histories.

Contents [hide]

1 Early life

2 Edgar's queen

3 Queen dowager

4 Notes

5 References


[edit] Early life

Ælfthryth was the daughter of Ealdorman Orgar. Her mother was a member of the royal family of Wessex. The family's power lay in the west of Wessex. Ordgar was buried in Exeter and his son Ordwulf founded, or refounded, Tavistock Abbey.[1]

Ælfthryth was first married to Æthelwald, son of Æthelstan Half-King as recorded by Byrhtferth of Ramsey in his Life of Saint Oswald of Worcester.[2] Later accounts, such as that preserved by William of Malmesbury, add vivid detail of unknown reliability.

According to William, the beauty of Ordgar's daughter Ælfthryth was reported to King Edgar. Edgar, looking for a Queen, sent Æthewald to see Ælfthryth, ordering him "to offer her marriage [to Edgar] if her beauty were really equal to report." When she turned out to be just as beautiful as was said, Æthelwald married her himself and reported back to Edgar that she was quite unsuitable. Edgar was eventually told of this, and decided to repay Æthelwald's betrayal in like manner. He said that he would visit the poor woman, which alarmed Æthelwald. He asked Ælfthryth to make herself as unattractive as possible for the king's visit, but she did the opposite. Edgar, quite besotted with her, killed Æthelwald during a hunt.[3]

The historical record does not record the year of Æthelwald's death, let alone its manner. No children of Æthelwald and Ælfthryth are known.

[edit] Edgar's queen

Edgar had previously been married to Æthelflæd, by whom he had a son named Edward, and perhaps to Wulfthryth, with whom he had a daughter named Eadgifu—later known as Saint Edith of Wilton. Sound political reasons encouraged the match between Edgar, whose power base was centred in Mercia, and Ælfthryth, whose family were powerful in Wessex. In addition to this, and her link with the family of Æthelstan Half-King, Ælfthryth also appears to have been connected to the family of Ælfhere, Ealdorman of Mercia.[4]

Edgar married Ælfthryth in either 964 or 965. In 966 Ælfthryth gave birth to a son who was named Edmund. In King Edgar's charter (S 745) regranting privileges to New Minster, Winchester that same year, the infant Edmund is called "clito legitimus" (legitimate ætheling), and appears before Edward in the list of witnesses. Edmund died young, circa 970, but in 968 Ælfthryth had given birth to a second son who was called Æthelred.[5]

King Edgar organised a second coronation, perhaps to bolster his claims to be ruler of all of Britain at Bath on 11 May 973. Here Ælfthryth was also crowned and anointed, granting her a status higher than any recent queen.[6]

[edit] Queen dowager

Edgar died in 975 leaving two sons, Edward and Æthelred. Edward was almost an adult, and was supported by many key figures including Archbishops Dunstan and Oswald and the brother of Ælfthryth's first husband, Æthelwine, Ealdorman of East Anglia. Supporting the claims of the child Æthelred were the Queen dowager, Bishop Æthelwold of Winchester, and Ælfhere, Ealdorman of Mercia.[7]

On 18 March 978, while visiting Ælfthryth at Corfe Castle, King Edward was killed by servants of the Queen, leaving the way clear for Æthelred to be installed as king. Edward was soon considered a martyr, and Ælfthryth blamed for his murder. Due to Æthelred's youth, Ælfthryth served as regent for her son until his coming of age in 984. By then her earlier allies Æthelwold and Ælfhere had died, and she withdrew from the court at this time. However, she remained an important figure, being responsible for the care of Æthelred's children by his first wife, Ælfgifu.[8]

Although her reputation was marked by the murder of her stepson, Ælfthryth was a religious woman, taking an especial interest in monastic reform when Queen. Late in life she retired to Wherwell where she died on 17 November, between 999 and 1001.[9]

[edit] Notes

1.^ Stafford, Unification, pp. 52–53.

2.^ PASE; Stafford, Unification, pp. 52–53.

3.^ Malmesbury, pp. 139–140 (Book 2, § 139.

4.^ Higham, pp. 6–7; Stafford, Unification, pp. 52–53.

5.^ Higham, pp. 6–7; Miller, "Edgar"; Stafford, "Ælfthryth".

6.^ Miller, "Edgar"; Stafford, "Ælfthryth".

7.^ Higham, pp. 7–14; Stafford, Unification, pp. 57–59.

8.^ Higham, pp. 7–14; Stafford, "Ælfthryth"; Stafford, Unification, pp. 57–59.

9.^ Stafford, "Ælfthryth"

[edit] References

"Ælfthryth 8 (Female) Queen of King Edgar, 964-975, d.999x1001; daughter of Ordgar". Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England. http://www.pase.ac.uk/pase/apps/persons/CreatePersonFrames.jsp?personKey=8094. Retrieved 2007-09-06.

Higham, Nick, The Death of Anglo-Saxon England. Stroud: Sutton, 1997. ISBN 0-7509-2469-1

Miller, Sean, "Edgar" in Michael Lapidge (ed.), The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England. Oxford: Blackwell, 1999. ISBN 0-631-22492-0

Stafford, Pauline, "Ælfthryth" in Michael Lapidge (ed.), The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England. Oxford: Blackwell, 1999. ISBN 0-631-22492-0

Stafford, Pauline, Unification and Conquest: A Political and Social History of England in the Tenth and Eleventh Centuries. London: Edward Arnold, 1989. ISBN 0-7131-6532-4

William of Malmesbury. Joseph Stevenson. ed. Malmesbury's History of the Kings. http://books.google.com/books?id=mxy_gvWgEQUC. Retrieved 2007-09-08.

Preceded by

Ælfgifu, wife of Eadwig Queen Consort of England

965 - 975 Succeeded by

Ælfgifu of York

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86lfthryth,_wife_of_Edgar"

Categories: 10th-century births | 1000 deaths | Anglo-Saxon royal consorts | Anglo-Saxon nuns | 10th-century English people

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Ælfthryth was born circa 945 in Lydford Castle, Devon, England.2 She was the daughter of Ordgar, Ealdorman of Devon. She married, firstly, Æthelwold, Ealdorman of East Anglia, son of Æthelstan, Ealdorman, between 962 and 963.3 She married, secondly, Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England, son of Eadmund I, King of England and Ælfgifu, between 964 and 965.2 She died circa 17 November 1002 in Wherwell Abbey, Hampshire, England.3

    Ælfthryth was also known as Alstrita.2 She was also known as Elstrudis.3 From 11 May 973, her married name became Queen Elfrida of England.3 She was a nun circa 986 Wherwell Abbey, Hampshire.3 

Family 1 Æthelwold, Ealdorman of East Anglia d. 963

Children Edgar b. bt 962 - 9643

Ethelfleda b. c 963, d. c 10163


Family 2 Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England b. between 942 and 944, d. 8 July 975

Children Edmund Atheling b. c 965, d. bt 970 - 9724

Æthelred II 'the Unready', King of England+ b. bt 966 - 969, d. 23 Apr 10164


Citations [S58] E. B. Fryde, D. E. Greenway, S. Porter and I. Roy, editors, Handbook of British Chronology, 3rd edition (London, U.K.: Royal Historical Society, 1986), page 27. Hereinafter cited as Handbook of British Chronology.

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 19. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 20.

[S52] G. S. P. Freeman-Grencville, The Queen's Lineage: from A.D. 495 to the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (London , U.K.: Rex Collings, 1977), page 4. Hereinafter cited as The Queen's Lineage

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86lfthryth%2C_Queen_of_England

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86lfthryth,_Queen_of_England

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the Fair

Death: 17 NOV 1002 in Wherwell Abbey, Hampshire, England

Death: 1000 in Died a nun at Wherwell

Burial: Wherwell Abbey, Hampshire, England

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Her first marriage was to Ethelwald, Ealdorman of East Anglia around 962-963. She is said to have had an affair with King Edgar while married to Ethelwald. Some sources assert that Ethelwald was murdered on Edgar's orders. She was crowned with Edgar on 5/11/973 at Bath Abbey. This was the first instance of the coronation of a Queen in England.

She became a nun circa 986 at Wherwell Abbey in Hampshire where she died possibly on 11/17/1002 (she was alive in 999 but had died before the end of 1002).

It is probable that her husband's successor, Edward (his son by his first wife, Ethelfleda the Fair) was murdered on her orders at Corfe Castle, Dorset, thus enabling her son, Ethelred, to assume the throne.

973-75 Joint Ruler Queen Ælfthryth of England

978-84 Regent Dowager Queen

Sources indicated that after her consecration she was considered to been sharing the royal lordship with her husband, King Edgar, who was first succeeded by his son of the first marriage, Edward, then by a brother, and finally by his son by Ælfthryth, Edmund II Ironside (968-78-1016), and was in charge of the government during his minority, and continued to be a dominant force after he came of age [http://www.guide2womenleaders.com/womeninpower/Womeninpowe-chronological1.htm]. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86lfthryth,_Queen_of_England

Ælfthryth (c.945 to c.1000, also Alfrida, Elfrida or Elfthryth) was the second or third wife of King Edgar of England. Ælfthryth was the first king's wife known to have been crowned and anointed as Queen of the Kingdom of England. Mother of King Æthelred the Unready, she was a powerful political figure. She was linked to the murder of her stepson King Edward the Martyr and appeared as a stereotypical bad queen and evil stepmother in many medieval histories.

view all 29

Ælfthryth's Timeline

945
945
Lydford Castle, Devonshire, England
947
947
Age 2
[alternate birth date]
962
962
Age 17
965
965
Age 20
965
Age 20
Wessex, England
966
966
Age 21
Wessex, England
966
Age 21
Wessex, England
1002
November 17, 1002
Age 57
Wherwall, South Stonham, Hampshire, England
1002
Age 57
Wilton Abbey, Wiltshire, England
1934
July 23, 1934
Age 57