Úgaine Mór mac Echach, 66th High King of Ireland

Is your surname mac Echach?

Research the mac Echach family

Úgaine Mór mac Echach, 66th High King of Ireland's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Úgaine Mór mac Echach, Ard Rí na h'Éireann

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ireland
Death: Died in Ireland
Place of Burial: Cruachan, Ireland
Immediate Family:

Son of Eochaid Buaidhaig mac Duach and Tamar Tephi, Queen of Ireland (Fictional)
Husband of Caesair Cruthach (Fictitious)
Father of Cobhthach Cóel Breg, High King of Ireland; Lóegaire Lorc, High King of Ireland; Fuilne; Nar; Raighne and 20 others
Brother of Badhbhchadh

Occupation: 66th High King of Ireland
Managed by: Jocelynn Elaine Oakes
Last Updated:

About Úgaine Mór mac Echach, 66th High King of Ireland

Ugaine Magaus, King of Ireland & Caesair Cruthach, Princess of the West Franks,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%9Againe_M%C3%B3r

Based on merged profiles,

Death date 593 or 594 BC

"The Great", a High King of Ireland -SPF -------------------- http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cnoelldunc/Ancient/Heremon/D1.htm

   Ugaine "the Great" was the 66th Monarch of Ireland. Was called Mór on account of his extensive dominions, being sovereign of all the Islands of Western Europe. Was married to Cæsair, daughter. to the King of France, and by her had issue, twenty-two sons and three daughters. 
   In order to prevent these children encroaching on each other he divided the Kingdom into twenty-five portions, allotting to each his (or her) distinct inheritance. By means of this division the taxes of the country were collected during the succeeding 300 years. All the sons died without issue except two, Laeghaire Lorc, ancestor of all the Leinster Heremonians; and Cobthach Caolbhreagh, from whom the Heremonians of Leath Cuinn, Meath, Ulster, and Conacht derive their pedigree. 
   In the early ages the Irish Kings made many military expeditions into foreign countries. Ugaine Mór, called by O'Flaherty, in his Ogygia, "Hugonius Magnus," was contemporary with Alexander the Great; and is stated to have sailed with a fleet into the Mediterranean, landed his forces in Africa, and also attacked Sicily; and having proceeded to Gaul, was married to Cæsair, daughter of the King of the Gauls. 
   Hugonius was buried at Cruachan. The Irish sent, during the Punic wars, auxiliary troops to their Celtic Brethren, the Gauls; who in their alliance with the Carthaginians under Hannibal, fought against the Roman armies in Spain and Italy. 
   Ugaine was at length, B.C. 593, slain by Badhbhchadh, who failed to secure the fruits of his murder, the Irish Throne, as he was executed by order of Laeghaire Lorc, the murdered Monarch's son, who became the 68th Monarch.

-------------------- Ugaine Mor the Great, King of Ireland, m. Caer (Cesair Cruthach, Kesair III) in Gaul, d. ca. 594 BC in Magh Muireadh, Ireland, cause of death was murder by Badhbhchadh, his brother.

Father: Eochaidh Buadhach

He became the sixty-sixth monarch of Ireland ca. 633 BC and reigned for forty years. He was the foster son of Macha Mong Ruadh (Macha the Red Haired) and Cimbaeth. After Cimbaeth died Macha ruled as the first Queen of Ireland. She ruled for seven years before she was slain by Reachtaidh Righdhearg. Ugaine slew Reachtaidh in revenge.

According to some historians Ugaine Mor commanded a fleet to the Mediterranean, landed in Africa, and attacked Sicily. Afterward he went to Gaul, where he married Cesair. They had twenty one sons and three daughters. He supposedly conquered western Europe.

Ugaine extracted oaths from the men of Ireland by "all the elements visible and invisible" that they would never contend with his children or race for the sovereinty of Ireland.

After Ugaine's murder his son, Laeghaire Lorc, became king.

Spouse: Eithne Amlabur

Married.

Children:

Cobhthach Cael Breagh, King of Ireland, d. ca. 542 BC in Dinn Righ, Ireland, cause of death was roasting alive in a metal building at the burning of Dinn Righ.

Loegaire Lorc, d. ca. 592 BC in Carman, Wexford, Ireland, cause of death was muder by his brother, Cobhthach.

-------------------- Title: King of Ireland -------------------- Augaine (Ugaine) Mór Monarch of Ireland

Death

593 BC

Father

Eochaid Buaid mac Duach

Mother

Tamar Tephi ha-David

Misc. Notes

In the early ages the Irish Kings made many military expeditions into foreign countries. Ugaine Mór, called by O'Flaherty, in his Ogygia, "Hugonius Magnus," was contemporary with Alexander the Great; and is stated to have sailed with a fleet into the Mediterranean, landed his forces in Africa, and also attacked Sicily; and. having proceeded to Gaul, was married to Cæsair, daughter of the King of the Gauls. Hugonius was buried at Cruachan. The Irish sent, during the Punic wars, auxiliary troops to their Celtic Brethren, the Gauls; who in their alliance with the Carthaginians under Hannibal, fought against the Roman armies in Spain and Italy. —CONNELLAN.

This Ugaine, (or Hugony) the Great was the 66th Monarch of Ireland. Was called Mór on account of his extensive dominions, — being sovereign of all the Islands of Western Europe. Was married to Cæsair, dau. to the King of France, and by her had issue-twenty-two sons and three daughters. In order to prevent these children encroaching on each other he divided the Kingdom into twenty-five portions, allotting to each his (or her) distinct inheritance. By means of this division the taxes of the country were collected during the succeeding 300 years. All the sons died without issue except two, viz: — Laeghaire Lorc, ancestor of all the Leinster Heremonians; and Cobthach Caolbhreagh, from whom the Heremonians of Leath Cuinn, viz., Meath, Ulster, and Conacht derive their pedigree. Ugaine was at length, B.C. 593, stain by Badhbhchadh, who failed to secure the fruits of his murder — the Irish Throne, as he was executed by order of Laeghaire Lorc, the murdered Monarch's son, who became the 68th Monarch.

Part III, Chapter IV of Irish Pedigrees, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 351-9, 664-8 and 708-9.

-------------------- He became the sixty-sixth monarch of Ireland ca. 633 BC and reigned for forty years. He was the foster son of Macha Mong Ruadh (Macha the Red Haired) and Cimbaeth. After Cimbaeth died Macha ruled as the first Queen of Ireland. She ruled for seven years before she was slain by Reachtaidh Righdhearg. Ugaine slew Reachtaidh in revenge.

+++++++++++++++

According to some historians Ugaine Mor commanded a fleet to the Mediterranean, landed in Africa, and attacked Sicily. Afterward he went to Gaul, where he married Cesair. They had twenty one sons and three daughters. He supposedly conquered western Europe.

++++++++++++++++++++

Úgaine Mór ("the great"), son of Eochu Buadach, son of Dui Ladrach, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland. He was the foster-son of Cimbáeth and Macha Mong Ruad, and took power by killing his predecessor, and his foster-mother's killer, Rechtaid Rígderg. The Lebor Gabála Érenn says that, as well as Ireland, he ruled "Alba to the Sea of Wight" – i.e. the whole of the island of Britain – and that "some say" he ruled all of Europe. He married Cessair Chrothach, daughter of the king of the Gauls, who bore him twenty-two sons and three daughters. He is said to have divided Ireland into twenty-five shares, one for each of his children, which stood for three hundred years, until the establishment of the provinces under Eochu Feidlech. He ruled for thirty or forty years, until he was killed by his brother Bodbchad. According to the Lebor Gabála[1] he was succeeded directly by his son Lóegaire Lorc, although the Annals of the Four Masters[2] and Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éirinn[3] say Bodbchad was king for a day and a half until Lóegaire killed him. The Lebor Gabála synchronises his reign to that of Ptolemy II Philadelphus (281-246 BC). The chronology of Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éirinn dates his reign to 441-411 BC, the Annals of the Four Masters to 634-594 BC.




Ugaine extracted oaths from the men of Ireland by "all the elements visible and invisible" that they would never contend with his children or race for the sovereinty of Ireland.


After Ugaine's murder his son, Laeghaire Lorc, became king.3

view all 29

Úgaine Mór mac Echach, 66th High King of Ireland's Timeline

-669
-669
Ireland
-634
-634
Age 34
Ireland
-630
-630
Age 38
Dundonald, , Down, Northern Ireland
-593
-593
Age 75
Ireland
????
????
????
????
????
????