Editha zu Magdeburg

public profile

Is your surname Kaiserin des HRR?

Research the Kaiserin des HRR family

Editha zu Magdeburg's Geni Profile

Records for Ēadgyð Kaiserin des HRR

980 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Related Projects

Ēadgyð Kaiserin des HRR (of England), Holy Roman Empress

Nicknames: "Also known as ‘Princess Edith of England’", "‘Edgitha’", "‘Editha’", "‘Edith’", "‘Ēadgȳð’", "‘Eadgyth’", "‘Ēadgith’", "also Ædgyth", "Princess of England /Edgitha/", "Eadgyth", "Edith", "Ēadgy", "Eadgdith"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Wessex, England
Death: Died in Magdeburg, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany
Place of Burial: Cathedral of Saints Catherine and Maurice (Magdeburger Dom), Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Edward I "The Elder", King of the Anglo-Saxons; Edward (Eadward) the Elder King of Wessex; Ælfflæd and Elfleda King of Wessex
Wife of Otto I "der Große" von Sachsen, Römischer Kaiser
Mother of Liutgarde von Schwaben; Liudolf (930-957) von Sachsen, Herzog von Schwaben and Regelindis von Sachsen-Ludolf, Countess of Öhningen
Sister of Aelfgifu of England, Duchess of Bohemia; Eadwin Edwin Æthling of Wessex; Ælfweard, King of the English; Ēadgifu Ogive of Wessex, Queen of France; Æthelhild, Nun at Wilton and 6 others
Half sister of Æthelstan 'the Glorious', 1st King of the English; Ælfred of Wessex; Eadgyth Edith of Dublin and York; Ædred, King of the English; Eadburgha Edburga of Wessex, Nun at Nunnaminster and 4 others

Occupation: Queen, Königin des Ostfrankenreiches, Prinsesse, Princess of England, Queen Consort of Germany, Duchess of Saxony, Impératrice, du Saint Empire Romain Germanique, Drottning och abbedissa som änka, Prinsesse av England
Managed by: Erin Spiceland
Last Updated:

About Ēadgyð Kaiserin des HRR (of England), Holy Roman Empress

Edith of England, wife of OTTO. NB: DO NOT CHANGE NAME!

(Old English: Ēadgȳð; 910 - 26 January 946), also spelt Eadgyth or Ædgyth, was the daughter of Edward the Elder, King of England and Ælfflæd, and the wife of Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor.

Life

Her paternal grandparents were Alfred the Great, King of Wessex and his wife Ealhswith.

In order to seal an alliance between two Saxon kingdoms, her half-brother, King Athelstan of England, sent two of his sisters to Germany, instructing the Duke of Saxony (later Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor) to choose whichever one pleased him best. Otto chose Edith and married her in 929. The remaining sister Algiva or Adiva was married to a "king near the Jupiter mountains" (the Alps). The precise identity of this sister is debated. She may have been Eadgifu of England, who married King Charles III of France, or another sister otherwise unknown to history.

Like her brother, Athelstan, Edith was devoted to the cult of Saint Oswald and was instrumental in introducing this cult into Germany after her marriage to the emperor. Her lasting influence may have caused certain monasteries and churches in Saxony to be dedicated to this saint.[1]

[edit] Children

Edith and Otto's children were:

  1. Liutgarde, married Conrad the Red
  2. Liudolf, Duke of Swabia (930-September 6 957)

[edit] Tomb

Her tomb is located in the Cathedral of Magdeburg. A lead coffin inside a stone sarcophagus with her name on it was found and opened in 2008 by archaeologists during work on the building. An inscription recorded that it was the body of Eadgyth, reburied in 1510. It was examined in 2009, then brought to Bristol, England, for tests in 2010. Professor Mark Horton of Bristol University said that "this may prove to be the oldest complete remains of an English royal." The tests at Bristol will check, via isotope tests on tooth enamel, whether she was born and brought up in Wessex and Mercia, as history has suggested.

Edith of England (Old English: Ēadgȳð; 910 - 26 January 946), also spelt Eadgyth or Ædgyth, was the daughter of Edward the Elder, King of England and his second wife Ælfflæd, and the wife of Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor.

NB: Keep name as Eadgyth (Otto's wife) Edith von Sachsen (West Seaxe) to avoid mix-ups with her sisters.

Married Otto von Sachsen.

Two children:

1. Liudolf

2. Liutgarde

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eadgyth

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm

EADGYTH ([908/12][1680]-26 Jan 946, bur Magdeburg Cathedral). The Book of Hyde names "Edgitham et Elgimam" as fifth and sixth of the six daughters of King Eadweard by his first wife "Elfelmi comitis filia Elfleda", specifying that they were both sent to "Henrico Alemanorum imperatori" and that the former married "filio sui Othoni"[1681]. Thietmar names "Edith…daughter of King Edmund of England" when recording her marriage during the lifetime of Otto's father, in a later passage stating that she urged her husband to begin establishing the city of Magdeburg[1682]. The Annalista Saxo records the wife of Otto as "Ediht filiam Ehtmundi regis Anglorum"[1683]. Thietmar records her death 26 Jan "in the eleventh year" of the reign of her husband, after 19 years of marriage, and her place of burial[1684].

m (Sep 929) as his first wife, OTTO of Germany, son of HEINRICH I "der Vogelsteller/the Fowler" King of Germany & his second wife Mathilde --- (23 Nov 912-Memleben 7 May 973, bur Magdeburg cathedral). Associate King of Germany, with his father, 930. He was elected OTTO I "der Große" King of Germany 7 Aug 936. Crowned Emperor at Rome 2 Feb 962.

OTTO, son of HEINRICH I "der Vogelsteller/the Fowler" King of Germany & his second wife Mathilde --- (23 Nov 912-Memleben 7 May 973, bur Magdeburg Cathedral). Widukind names (in order) "Oddonem, Heinricum, Brunonem" as sons of King Heinrich & his second wife[201]. Associate King of Germany, with his father, in 930. He was elected OTTO I "der Große" King of Germany 7 Aug 936, crowned at Aachen. After his accession, the Bohemians and the Abotrites withheld payment of tribute. A revolt in Bavaria was led by Duke Eberhard, whom King Otto deposed and banished. Otto's half-brother Thankmar rebelled in Saxony with other magnates dissatisfied with the king's distribution of offices. His brother Heinrich rebelled in 939, was joined by Louis IV King of the West Franks and Giselbert Duke of Lotharingia, but was defeated at Birten and Andernach[202]. He founded the monastery of Magdeburg (later Magdeburg Cathedral), encouraged by his first wife, to which the relics of St Innocent were brought[203]. He sent armed forces which were unsuccessful in taking reprisals against Rouen in 945, after members of the local nobility had arranged the escape of Richard I Comte [de Normandie] from his captivity by Louis IV King of the Franks, his brother-in-law, a nepos (unidentified) of King Otto being killed in the battle[204]. He invaded Italy in 951, using the ill-treatment of his future second wife as an excuse, entered Pavia 23 Sep 951 and proclaimed himself king of Italy. His predecessor Berengario di Ivrea proposed himself as Otto's viceroy in Italy, which was accepted by the Council of Augsburg in Aug 952. King Otto's son Liudolf rebelled in 953, but was pardoned in 954. King Otto defeated the Magyars in battle at Lechfeld near Augsburg in 955[205], which marked the end of their marauding in Europe. Berengario King of Italy abused his position, and Otto sent Liudolf to Italy to restore order. After several further years of Berengario's tyrannical rule in Italy, Otto invaded in Aug 961 in response to requests for intervention from Pope John XII and Hubert [de Provence] Duke of Spoleto, one of Berengario's main vassals. King Otto forced Berengario's retreat to the fortress of San Leo near Montefeltro 962, finally capturing him in 963. He was crowned Emperor at Rome 2 Feb 962 by Pope John XII[206]. The necrology of Fulda records the death "973 Non Mai" of "Otto imp"[207]. Thietmar records his death at Memleben on 7 May in the thirty-eighth year after his consecration and his burial at Magdeburg[208]. The necrology of Merseburg records the death "7 May" of "Otto maior magnus imperator"[209].

m firstly (Sep 929) EADGYTH of Wessex, daughter of EDWARD "the Elder" King of Wessex & his second wife Ælfleda --- (-26 Jan 946[210], bur Magdeburg Cathedral). The Book of Hyde names "Edgitham et Elgimam" as fifth and sixth of the six daughters of King Eadweard by his first wife "Elfelmi comitis filia Elfleda", specifying that they were both sent to "Henrico Alemanorum imperatori" and that the former married "filio sui Othoni"[211]. Thietmar names "Edith…daughter of King Edmund of England" when recording her marriage during the lifetime of Otto's father, in a later passage stating that she urged her husband to begin establishing the city of Magdeburg[212]. The Annalista Saxo records the wife of Otto as "Ediht filiam Ehtmundi regis Anglorum"[213]. Thietmar records her death 26 Jan "in the eleventh year" of the reign of her husband, after 19 years of marriage, and her place of burial[214].

m secondly (Pavia [Oct/Nov] 951) as her second husband, ADELAIS of Burgundy, widow of LOTHAR King of Italy, daughter of RUDOLF II King of Burgundy [Welf] & his wife Bertha of Swabia ([928/33]-Kloster Selz, Alsace 16 Dec 999, bur Kloster Selz). Luitprand names "Adelegidam" daughter of Rudolf & Berta, when recording her marriage to "regi Lothario"[215]. Her birth date range is estimated from having given birth to one child by her first marriage before the death of her husband in 950. She claimed the kingdom of Italy on the death of her husband, as the daughter of one of the rival claimants for the throne earlier in the century. Willa, wife of Berengario di Ivrea who had been proclaimed king at Pavia 15 Dec 950, ordered Adelais's imprisonment at Como 20 Apr 951 and "afflicted her with imprisonment and hunger" according to Flodoard[216]. Otto I King of Germany used her ill-treatment as an excuse to invade Italy in Sep 951, although Adelais had succeeded in escaping 20 Aug 951 to Reggio[217]. King Otto entered Pavia 23 Sep 951, proclaimed himself King of Italy, and married Adelais as her second husband. The Annalista Saxo records "Adelheidam reginam" as "coniuge rege Lothario" when she married Otto[218]. Flodoard refers to "uxorem quoque Lotharii regis defuncti, filii Hugonis, sororem Chonradi regis" when recording her second marriage[219]. She was crowned empress at Rome with her husband 2 Feb 962[220]. "Aleidis sororis" is named in the charter of "Chuonradus rex" dated 8 Apr 962[221]. "Adelheidis imperatrix cum filia Athelheidhe abbatissa in Italiam profecta est propter quasdam discordias inter se et filium factas", although it is unclear to whom "filia Athelheidhe" refers unless this is an error for Mathilde[222]. She replaced her daughter-in-law as regent for her grandson King Otto III in 991[223]. The necrology of Fulda records the death "999 17 Kal Ian" of "Adalheid imperatrix"[224].

Mistress (1): (before 929) --- [of the Hevelli], daughter of [BAÇLABIČ [Václav] Fürst der Stodoranen & his wife ---]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[225], she was the daughter of Baçlabić. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. She was a "captured Slavic noblewoman" according to Thietmar, who gives neither her name nor her parentage[226].

King Otto I & his first wife had two children:

1. LIUDOLF ([930]-Piomba 6 Sep 957, bur St Alban, near Mainz[227]). The Annales Quedlingburgenes name "Liudolfo et Liutgarde" as the two children of King Otto I and Eadgyth[228]. His birth date is estimate from Widukind stating that he "was still a tender youth no more than seventeen years of age" when his mother died[229]. His father installed him as Duke of Swabia in 950, in succession to Liudolf's father-in-law[230]. "Otto…rex" donated property "in pago Brisehguue in comitatu filii nostri Liutolfi" to Kloster Einsiedeln by charter dated 9 Aug 952[231]. He rebelled against his father, together with his brother-in-law Konrad Duke of Lotharingia, was besieged at Mainz, but escaped to capture Regensburg and expel his uncle Heinrich Duke of Bavaria[232]. His father deposed him in 954 as Duke of Swabia, but ultimately forgave his rebellion[233]. His father sent him to Italy to control Berengario di Ivrea, Viceroy in Italy, who was attempting to reassert his independence, but Liudolf died there of a fever. Thietmar places a different slant on the event, stating that Liudolf had once more rebelled against his father and left for Italy[234]. Thietmar records the death of Liudolf in Italy 6 Sep, "after scarcely a year" following his departure from his homeland, but does not specify the year[235]. The Annales Necrologici Fuldenses record the death "957 VIII Id Sep" of "Liutolf filius regis"[236]. The necrology of Lüneburg records the death "6 Sep" of "Liuidolfus regis filius"[237]. Regino specifies that he died in Italy and was buried in Mainz St Alban[238]. m ([27 Oct 947/7 Apr 948][239]) IDA of Swabia, daughter of HERMANN I Duke of Swabia [Konradiner] & his wife Regelinda of Swabia (-17 May 986). Widukind names "ducis Herimanni filiam Idam" as wife of Liudolf[240]. Regino records the marriage of "filiam Herimanni ducis" and "Liutolfus filius regis" in 947[241]. "Otto…rex" granted property "in comitatu Herimanni ducis Rehzia" to "abbati nostro Hartberto" at the request of "filie nostre Ite…et Hermanni comitis" by charter dated 7 Apr 948[242]. "Otto…rex" confirmed a donation by "Liutolfo nostro filio eiusque…coniuge Ita" to Kloster Reichenau for the soul of "ducis nostri beate memorie Herimanni" by charter dated 1 Jan 950[243]. The Liber Anniversariorum of Einsiedeln records in May the donation of "Siernza" by "domina Ita…uxor Luitolfi ducis"[244]. Liudolf & his wife had [three] children:

a) MATHILDE (end 949-6 Nov 1011, bur Rellinghausen). Regino records the birth of "Mathildis filia Liutolfo" at the end of 949[245]. Abbess of Essen [965]. The Liber Anniversariorum of Einsiedeln records in May the donation of "Gruonowa" by "domina Mechthilt ducissa, Liutolfi ducis et Itæ ducisse filia"[246].

b) OTTO (954-Lucca 31 Oct 982, bur Aschaffenburg St Peter and Alexander). Regino records the birth of "Liutolfo filius Otto" in 954[247]. He was appointed OTTO Duke of Swabia in 973 by his uncle King Otto II in succession to Duke Burkhard III. "Otto…imperator augustus" confirmed donations of property "de locis Ozenheim, Tetingen…in pago Moiinegouwe in comitatu Eberhardi comitis" by "nobis nepos et equivocus noster Otto dux Sweuorum" to "sancti Petri Ascaffaburg" by charter dated 29 Aug 975[248]. King Otto installed him as OTTO Duke of Bavaria in [976], after confiscating it from his cousin Heinrich II "der Zänker" Duke of Bavaria[249], although Carinthia and the Italian marches were taken from the duchy and made into the new duchy of Carinthia. "Otto…imperator augustus" donated property in Regensburg to Friedrich Archbishop of Salzburg by charter dated 21 Jul 976 after consulting "Ottonis Bauariorum ducis, nostri…fratris filii"[250]. He campaigned in Italy with his uncle King Otto II. He took part in the capture of Tarento, and in the battle 13 Jul 982 at which the German army was defeated by a Byzantine/Muslim alliance near Stilo in Calabria[251]. The death of "Otto dux egregius, filius Liudolfi, fratruelis Ottonis secundi", soon after this defeat, is recorded in the Annalista Saxo[252]. The necrology of St Gall records the death "II Kal Nov" of "Ottonis ducis Alamannie"[253]. He is presumably the "Otto dux Sueuorum" whose death is recorded "1 Nov" in The necrology of Merseburg[254].

2. LIUTGARD ([931]-18 Nov 953, bur St Alban, near Mainz). The Annales Quedlingburgenes name "Liudolfo et Liutgarde" as the two children of King Otto I and Eadgyth[255]. Widukind records her marriage to "Conrado"[256]. According to Thietmar of Merseburg, Liutgard was accused by "a certain Cono" of adultery but her name was cleared after Graf Burkhard fought her accuser in combat in her name[257]. "Otto…rex" granted property confiscated from "Hatto Aladramque fratres…in villis Bechi et Auici situm in pago Ganipi in comitatu Arnulfi" to the church of St Florin, Koblenz at the request of "ducis nostri Cuonradi eius coniugis filiæ nostræ Liutgartæ" by charter dated 22 Nov 949[258]. Regino records the death of "Liutgarda filia regis" in 953[259]. The necrology of Merseburg records the death "18 Nov" of "Liudgard filia imperatoris Ottonis"[260]. Thietmar records her burial in "the church of…Alban at Mainz"[261].

m ([947]) KONRAD "der Rote" Graf in Franconia Duke of Lotharingia [Salian], son of WERNER Graf im Nahe-, Speyer- und Wormsgau & his wife --- [Konradiner] (-killed in battle Lechfeld 10 Aug 955, bur Worms Cathedral[262]). "Conradus dux" is named husband of Liutgard when recording their marriage in 949[263]. He rebelled against his father-in-law, together with his brother-in-law Liudolf Duke of Swabia, but was ultimately forgiven although deposed as Duke of Lotharingia. Thietmar records that Duke Konrad, son-in-law of Emperor Otto I, was killed fighting the Magyars near Augsburg and that he was buried at Worms[264].

--------------------------

Life

Her paternal grandparents were Alfred the Great, King of Wessex and his wife Ealhswith.

In order to seal an alliance between two Saxon kingdoms, her half-brother, King Athelstan of England, sent two of his sisters to Germany, instructing the Duke of Saxony (later Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor) to choose whichever one pleased him best. Otto chose Edith and married her in 929. The remaining sister Algiva or Adiva was married to a "king near the Jupiter mountains" (the Alps). The precise identity of this sister is debated. She may have been Eadgifu of England, who married King Charles III of France, or another sister otherwise unknown to history.

Like her brother, Athelstan, Edith was devoted to the cult of Saint Oswald and was instrumental in introducing this cult into Germany after her marriage to the emperor. Her lasting influence may have caused certain monasteries and churches in Saxony to be dedicated to this saint.[1]

Children

Edith and Otto's children were:

  1. Liutgarde, married Conrad the Red
  2. Liudolf, Duke of Swabia (930-September 6 957)

Tomb

Her tomb is located in the Cathedral of Magdeburg. A lead coffin inside a stone sarcophagus with her name on it was found and opened in 2008 by archaeologists during work on the building. An inscription recorded that it was the body of Eadgyth, reburied in 1510. It was examined in 2009, then brought to Bristol, England, for tests in 2010. Professor Mark Horton of Bristol University said that "this may prove to be the oldest complete remains of an English royal." The tests at Bristol will check, via isotope tests on tooth enamel, whether she was born and brought up in Wessex and Mercia, as history has suggested.

-----------------------------

Rather inconclusive piece about finding her remains (maybe) in Magdeburg Cathedral.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8467870.stm

--------------------

Eadgyth (?) (1)

F, #102451, d. 26 January 946

Last Edited=3 Dec 2005

    Eadgyth (?) was the daughter of Eadweard I, King of Wessex and Ælflæd (?). (2) She married Otto I von Sachsen, Holy Roman Emperor, son of Heinrich I von Sachsen, Holy Roman Emperor and Matilda of Ringelheim, between 925 and 930. (3) 

She died on 26 January 946 at Germany. (4), (1) She was buried at Cathedral of St. Maurice, Magdeburg, Germany. (3)

    Eadgyth (?) was also known as Edith (?). (3)

Children of Eadgyth (?) and Otto I von Sachsen, Holy Roman Emperor

-1. Richilde von Sachsen+

-2. Liudolf, Duke of Swabia+ (3) d. 957

-3. Liutgarde von Sachsen+ (3)

-4. Otto II von Sachsen, Holy Roman Emperor+ (5) d. 983

Forrás / Source:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10246.htm#i102451

--------------------

Edith of England (Old English: Ēadgȳð; 910 - 26 January 946), also spelt Eadgyth or Ædgyth, was the daughter of Edward the Elder, King of England and Ælfflæd, and the wife of Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor.

Her paternal grandparents were Alfred the Great, King of Wessex and his wife Ealhswith.

King Athelstan of England sent two of his sisters to Germany, instructing Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor to choose whichever one pleased him best. Otto chose Edith and married her in 929. The remaining sister Algiva or Adiva was married to a "king near the Jupiter mountains" (the Alps). The precise identity of this sister is debated. She may have been Eadgifu of England who married King Charles III of France, or another sister otherwise unknown to history. (According to the entry for Boleslaus II of Bohemia, Adiva was his wife.)

Like her brother, Athelstan, Edith was devoted to the cult of Saint Oswald, and was instrumental in introducing this cult into Germany after her marriage to the emperor.

--------------------

Eadgyth

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ædgyth or Edith of England (910 - 26 January 946) was the daughter of Edward the Elder, King of England and Ælfflæd.

Her paternal grandparents were Alfred the Great, King of Wessex and his wife Ealhswith.

King Athelstan of England sent two of his sisters to Germany, instructing Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor to choose whichever one pleased him best. Otto chose Edith and married her in 929. The remaining sister Algiva or Adiva was married to a "king near the Jupiter mountains" (the Alps). The precise identity of this sister is debated. She may have been Eadgifu of England who married King Charles III of France, or another sister otherwise unknown to history. (According to the entry for Boleslaus II of Bohemia, Adiva was his wife.)

Like her brother, Athelstan, Edith was devoted to the cult of Saint Oswald, and was instrumental in introducing this cult into Germany after her marriage to the emperor.

Edith and Otto's children were:

Liutgarde, married Conrad the Red

Liudolf, Duke of Swabia (930-September 6, 957)

Her tomb is located at the Cathedral of Magdeburg.

--------------------

Edith of England (910 - 26 January 946), also spelt Eadgyth or Ædgyth, was the daughter of Edward the Elder, King of England and Ælfflæd.

Her paternal grandparents were Alfred the Great, King of Wessex and his wife Ealhswith.

King Athelstan of England sent two of his sisters to Germany, instructing Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor to choose whichever one pleased him best. Otto chose Edith and married her in 929. The remaining sister Algiva or Adiva was married to a "king near the Jupiter mountains" (the Alps). The precise identity of this sister is debated. She may have been Eadgifu of England who married King Charles III of France, or another sister otherwise unknown to history. (According to the entry for Boleslaus II of Bohemia, Adiva was his wife.)

Like her brother, Athelstan, Edith was devoted to the cult of Saint Oswald, and was instrumental in introducing this cult into Germany after her marriage to the emperor.

Edith and Otto's children were:

Liutgarde, married Conrad the Red

Liudolf, Duke of Swabia (930-September 6, 957)

Her tomb is located at the Cathedral of Magdeburg.

--------------------

Edith of England (Old English: Ēadgȳð; 910 - 26 January 946), also spelt Eadgyth or Ædgyth, was the daughter of Edward the Elder, King of England and Ælfflæd, and the wife of Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor.

Life

Her paternal grandparents were Alfred the Great, King of Wessex and his wife Ealhswith.

In order to seal an alliance between two Saxon kingdoms, her half-brother, King Athelstan of England, sent two of his sisters to Germany, instructing the Duke of Saxony (later Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor) to choose whichever one pleased him best. Otto chose Edith and married her in 929. The remaining sister Algiva or Adiva was married to a "king near the Jupiter mountains" (the Alps). The precise identity of this sister is debated. She may have been Eadgifu of England, who married King Charles III of France, or another sister otherwise unknown to history.

Like her brother, Athelstan, Edith was devoted to the cult of Saint Oswald and was instrumental in introducing this cult into Germany after her marriage to the emperor. Her lasting influence may have caused certain monasteries and churches in Saxony to be dedicated to this saint.[1]

Children

Edith and Otto's children were:

Liutgarde, married Conrad the Red

Liudolf, Duke of Swabia (930-September 6 957)

Tomb

Her tomb is located in the Cathedral of Magdeburg. A lead coffin inside a stone sarcophagus with her name on it was found and opened in 2008 by archaeologists during work on the building. An inscription recorded that it was the body of Eadgyth, reburied in 1510. It was examined in 2009, then brought to Bristol, England, for tests in 2010. Professor Mark Horton of Bristol University said that "this may prove to be the oldest complete remains of an English royal." The tests at Bristol will check, via isotope tests on tooth enamel, whether she was born and brought up in Wessex and Mercia, as history has suggested

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eadgyth

Eadgyth

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

For other people named Eadgyth, see Eadgyth (disambiguation).

A statue in the Cathedral of Magdeburg that is often assumed to represent Otto and Edith

Edith of England (Old English: Ēadgȳð; 910 - 26 January 946), also spelt Eadgyth or Ædgyth, was the daughter of Edward the Elder, King of England and Ælfflæd, and the wife of Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor.

Contents

[show]

   * 1 Life
   * 2 Children
   * 3 Tomb
   * 4 Ancestry
   * 5 References
   * 6 Sources
   * 7 External links

[edit] Life

Her paternal grandparents were Alfred the Great, King of Wessex, and his wife Ealhswith.

In order to seal an alliance between two Saxon kingdoms, her half-brother, King Athelstan of England, sent two of his sisters to Germany, instructing the Duke of Saxony (later Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor) to choose whichever one pleased him best. Otto chose Edith and married her in 929. The remaining sister Algiva or Adiva was married to a "king near the Jupiter mountains" (the Alps). The precise identity of this sister is debated. She may have been Eadgifu of England, who married King Charles III of France, or another sister otherwise unknown to history.

In 936 King Henry I of Germany died and his eldest son, Eadgyth's husband, was crowned at Aachen as King Otto I. There is a surviving report of the ceremony by Widukind of Corvey which makes no mention of his wife having been crowned at this point, but according to Thietmar of Merseburg's chronicle Eadgyth was nevertheless anointed as queen, albeit in a separate ceremony. As queen, Eadgyth undertook the usual state duties of "First lady": when she turns up in the records it is generally in connection with gifts to the state's favoured monasteries or memorials to female holy women and saints. In this respect she seems to have been more diligent than her now widowed and subsequently sainted mother-in-law Queen Matilda whose own charitable activities only achieve a single recorded mention from the period of Eadgyth's time as queen. There was probably rivalry between the Benedictine Monastery of St Maurice founded at Magdeburg by Otto and Eadgyth in 937, a year after coming to the throne and Matilda's foundation at Quedlinburg Abbey, intended by her as a memorial to her husband, the late King Henry I.

Eadgyth accompanied her husband on his travels, though not during battles. She spent the hostilities of 939 at Lorsch Abbey

Like her brother, Athelstan, Edith was devoted to the cult of Saint Oswald and was instrumental in introducing this cult into Germany after her marriage to the emperor. Her lasting influence may have caused certain monasteries and churches in Saxony to be dedicated to this saint.[1]

Eadgyth's death at a relatively young age was unexpected.

[edit] Children

Edith and Otto's children were:

  1. Liutgarde, married Conrad the Red
  2. Liudolf, Duke of Swabia (930-September 6 957)

[edit] Tomb

Her tomb is located in the Cathedral of Magdeburg. A lead coffin inside a stone sarcophagus with her name on it was found and opened in 2008 by archaeologists during work on the building. An inscription recorded that it was the body of Eadgyth, reburied in 1510. It was examined in 2009, then brought to Bristol, England, for tests in 2010. Professor Mark Horton of Bristol University said that "this may prove to be the oldest complete remains of an English royal." The investigations at Bristol, applying isotope tests on tooth enamel, checked whether she was born and brought up in Wessex and Mercia, as written history has indicated.[1][2] Testing on the bones revealed that they are the remains of Eadgyth, from study made of the enamel of the teeth in her upper jaw.[3] Testing of the enamel revealed that the individual entombed at Magdeburg had spent time as a youth in the chalky uplands of Wessex.[4]

"Tests on these isotopes can give a precise record of where the person lived up to the age of 14," noted The Times of London in its story on the testing. "In this case they showed that the woman in the casket had spent the first years of her life drinking water that came from springs on the chalk hills of southern England. This matched exactly the historical records of Eadgyth’s early life."[5]

The bones "are the oldest surviving remains of an English royal burial," Bristol University announced in a press release.[6]

References

  1. ^ a b Kennedy, Maev (20 January 2010). "Remains of Alfred the Great's granddaughter returned / Coming home: the Saxon queen lost for 1,000 years". The Guardian (London): pp. 5. http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2010/jan/20/alfred-great-granddaughter-remains-wessex. Retrieved 20 January 2010. 
  2. ^ Satter, Raphael G. (20 Jan 2010). "Discovery News". Bones of early English princess found in Germany. http://news.discovery.com/archaeology/english-princess-bones.html. Retrieved 21 January 2010. 
  3. ^ German cathedral bones 'are Saxon queen Eadgyth, BBC News, 16 June 2010
  4. ^ Remains of first king of England's sister found in German cathedral, The Guardian, 17 June 2010
  5. ^ The Times, Simon de Bruxelles, 17 June 2010
  6. ^ Bones confirmed as those of Saxon Princess Eadgyth, University of Bristol, 17 June 2010

[edit] Sources

   * Freytag von Loringhoven, Baron. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 1965.
   * Klaniczay, Gábor. Holy Rulers and Blessed Princesses, 2002.

[edit] External links

Familypedia.jpg Eadgyth of Wessex (910-946) on Familypedia

   * The life of an Anglo-Saxon princess, Michael Wood, The Guardian, 17 June 2010
   * How the study of teeth is revealing our history, Mike Pitts, The Guardian, 17 June 2010

This page was last modified on 26 July 2010 at 18:28.

--------------------

Edith of England (Old English: Ēadgȳð; 910 - 26 January 946), also spelt Eadgyth or Ædgyth, was the daughter of Edward the Elder, King of England and Ælfflæd, and the wife of Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor.

Contents [hide]

1 Life

2 Children

3 Tomb

4 References

5 Sources

[edit]Life

Her paternal grandparents were Alfred the Great, King of Wessex, and his wife Ealhswith.

In order to seal an alliance between two Saxon kingdoms, her half-brother, King Athelstan of England, sent two of his sisters to Germany, instructing the Duke of Saxony (later Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor) to choose whichever one pleased him best. Otto chose Edith and married her in 929. The remaining sister Algiva or Adiva was married to a "king near the Jupiter mountains" (the Alps). The precise identity of this sister is debated. She may have been Eadgifu of England, who married King Charles III of France, or another sister otherwise unknown to history.

Like her brother, Athelstan, Edith was devoted to the cult of Saint Oswald and was instrumental in introducing this cult into Germany after her marriage to the emperor. Her lasting influence may have caused certain monasteries and churches in Saxony to be dedicated to this saint.[1]

[edit]Children

Edith and Otto's children were:

Liutgarde, married Conrad the Red

Liudolf, Duke of Swabia (930-September 6 957)

[edit]Tomb

Her tomb is located in the Cathedral of Magdeburg. A lead coffin inside a stone sarcophagus with her name on it was found and opened in 2008 by archaeologists during work on the building. An inscription recorded that it was the body of Eadgyth, reburied in 1510. It was examined in 2009, then brought to Bristol, England, for tests in 2010. Professor Mark Horton of Bristol University said that "this may prove to be the oldest complete remains of an English royal." The tests at Bristol will check, via isotope tests on tooth enamel, whether she was born and brought up in Wessex and Mercia, as history has suggested.[1][2]

[edit]References

^ a b Kennedy, Maev (20 January 2010). "Guardian.co.uk" (in English). Remains of Alfred the Great's granddaughter returned / Coming home: the Saxon queen lost for 1,000 years (Guardian): pp. 5. Retrieved 20 January 2010.

^ Satter, Raphael G. (20 Jan 2010). "Discovery News" (in English). Bones of early English princess found in Germany. Retrieved 21 January 2010.

[edit]Sources

Freytag von Loringhoven, Baron. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 1965.

Klaniczay, Gábor. Holy Rulers and Blessed Princesses, 2002.

Preceded by

Matilda of Ringelheim Queen consort of Germany

936 – 946 Succeeded by

Adelaide of Italy

Preceded by

Matilda of Ringelheim Duchess consort of Saxony

2 July 936 – 26 January 946 Succeeded by

Adelaide of Italy

--------------------

Edith of England (910 - 26 January 946), also spelt Eadgyth or Ædgyth, was the daughter of Edward the Elder, King of England and Ælfflæd.

Her paternal grandparents were Alfred the Great, King of Wessex and his wife Ealhswith.

King Athelstan of England sent two of his sisters to Germany, instructing Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor to choose whichever one pleased him best. Otto chose Edith and married her in 929. The remaining sister Algiva or Adiva was married to a "king near the Jupiter mountains" (the Alps). The precise identity of this sister is debated. She may have been Eadgifu of England who married King Charles III of France, or another sister otherwise unknown to history. (According to the entry for Boleslaus II of Bohemia, Adiva was his wife.)

Like her brother, Athelstan, Edith was devoted to the cult of Saint Oswald, and was instrumental in introducing this cult into Germany after her marriage to the emperor.

Edith and Otto's children were:

Liutgarde, married Conrad the Red

Liudolf, Duke of Swabia (930-September 6, 957)

Her tomb is located at the Cathedral of Magdeburg. -------------------- EadgythFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For other people named Eadgyth, see Eadgyth (disambiguation). A statue in the Cathedral of Magdeburg that is often assumed to represent Otto and Edith Edith of England (Old English: Ēadgȳð) (910 – 26 January 946), also spelt Eadgyth or Ædgyth, was the daughter of Edward the Elder, King of England and Ælfflæd, and the wife of Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor.

Contents [hide] 

1 Life

2 Children
3 Tomb
4 Ancestry
5 References
6 Sources
7 External links

[edit] Life Her paternal grandparents were Alfred the Great, King of Wessex, and his wife Ealhswith.

In order to seal an alliance between two Saxon kingdoms, her half-brother, King Athelstan of England, sent two of his sisters to Germany, instructing the Duke of Saxony (later Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor) to choose whichever one pleased him best. Otto chose Edith and married her in 929. The remaining sister Algiva or Adiva was married to a "king near the Jupiter mountains" (the Alps). The precise identity of this sister is debated. She may have been Eadgifu of England, who married King Charles III of France, or another sister otherwise unknown to history.
In 936 King Henry I of Germany died and his eldest son, Eadgyth's husband, was crowned at Aachen as King Otto I. There is a surviving report of the ceremony by Widukind of Corvey which makes no mention of his wife having been crowned at this point, but according to Thietmar of Merseburg's chronicle Eadgyth was nevertheless anointed as queen, albeit in a separate ceremony. As queen, Eadgyth undertook the usual state duties of "First lady": when she turns up in the records it is generally in connection with gifts to the state's favoured monasteries or memorials to female holy women and saints. In this respect she seems to have been more diligent than her now widowed and subsequently sainted mother-in-law Queen Matilda whose own charitable activities only achieve a single recorded mention from the period of Eadgyth's time as queen. There was probably rivalry between the Benedictine Monastery of St Maurice founded at Magdeburg by Otto and Eadgyth in 937, a year after coming to the throne and Matilda's foundation at Quedlinburg Abbey, intended by her as a memorial to her husband, the late King Henry I.
Eadgyth accompanied her husband on his travels, though not during battles. She spent the hostilities of 939 at Lorsch Abbey
Like her brother, Athelstan, Edith was devoted to the cult of Saint Oswald and was instrumental in introducing this cult into Germany after her marriage to the emperor. Her lasting influence may have caused certain monasteries and churches in Saxony to be dedicated to this saint.[1]
Eadgyth's death at a relatively young age was unexpected.
[edit] Children Edith and Otto's children were:
1.Liutgarde, married Conrad the Red
2.Liudolf, Duke of Swabia (930-September 6 957)
[edit] Tomb Her tomb is located in the Cathedral of Magdeburg. A lead coffin inside a stone sarcophagus with her name on it was found and opened in 2008 by archaeologists during work on the building. An inscription recorded that it was the body of Eadgyth, reburied in 1510. It was examined in 2009, then brought to Bristol, England, for tests in 2010. Professor Mark Horton of Bristol University said that "this may prove to be the oldest complete remains of an English royal." The investigations at Bristol, applying isotope tests on tooth enamel, checked whether she was born and brought up in Wessex and Mercia, as written history has indicated.[1][2] Testing on the bones revealed that they are the remains of Eadgyth, from study made of the enamel of the teeth in her upper jaw.[3] Testing of the enamel revealed that the individual entombed at Magdeburg had spent time as a youth in the chalky uplands of Wessex.[4]
"Tests on these isotopes can give a precise record of where the person lived up to the age of 14," noted The Times of London in its story on the testing. "In this case they showed that the woman in the casket had spent the first years of her life drinking water that came from springs on the chalk hills of southern England. This matched exactly the historical records of Eadgyth’s early life."[5]
The bones "are the oldest surviving remains of an English royal burial," Bristol University announced in a press release.[6]
Following the tests the bones shall be re-interred in Magdeburg Cathedral on 22 October 2010.

[edit] References 1.^ a b Kennedy, Maev (20 January 2010). "Remains of Alfred the Great's granddaughter returned / Coming home: the Saxon queen lost for 1,000 years". The Guardian (London): pp. 5. Retrieved 20 January 2010.

2.^ Satter, Raphael G. (20 January 2010). "Discovery News". Bones of early English princess found in Germany. Retrieved 21 January 2010.
3.^ German cathedral bones 'are Saxon queen Eadgyth, BBC News, 16 June 2010
4.^ Remains of first king of England's sister found in German cathedral, The Guardian, 17 June 2010
5.^ The Times, Simon de Bruxelles, 17 June 2010
6.^ Bones confirmed as those of Saxon Princess Eadgyth, University of Bristol, 17 June 2010
[edit] Sources Freytag von Loringhoven, Baron. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 1965.
Klaniczay, Gábor. Holy Rulers and Blessed Princesses, 2002.
[edit] External links Eadgyth of Wessex (910-946) on Familypedia 

The life of an Anglo-Saxon princess, Michael Wood, The Guardian, 17 June 2010

How the study of teeth is revealing our history, Mike Pitts, The Guardian, 17 June 2010
Preceded by
Matilda of Ringelheim Queen consort of Germany
936–946 Succeeded by
Adelaide of Italy 

Preceded by

Matilda of Ringelheim Duchess consort of Saxony
2 July 936 – 26 January 946 Succeeded by
Adelaide of Italy 

Categories: 910 births | 946 deaths | Anglo-Saxon women | Ottonian Dynasty | German queens consort | Women of medieval Germany | Burials at the Cathedral of Magdeburg | Duchesses of Saxony New features

Log in / create account

Article

Discussion

Read

Edit

View history

Main page

Contents

Featured content

Current events

Random article

Donate

InteractionAbout Wikipedia

Community portal

Recent changes

Contact Wikipedia

Help

Toolbox
This page was last modified on 28 September 2010 at 16:45.

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike LicenseTerms of Use for details.

Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

----------------------------------------

-------------------- Prinsesse av England.

Kilder:

Dictionary of National Biography. Mogens Bugge: Våre forfedre, nr. 215. Bent og Vidar Billing Hansen: Rosensverdslektens forfedre, side 67, 103. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eadgyth -------------------- Born in 910, died in 946.

Her Grandfather was Alfred of England and her ftaher was Edward, king of England. After the divorce of her parents 919 she moved into a convent in Salisbury.

Married in 929AC at age 19 to Otto of Germany, who gave her the City of Magdeburg in morning gift. Otto was crowned kejser by the Pope in 946 just after her death. Buried in the Dom of Magdeburg, Germany. To be reburied in a coffin of Titanium and Silver, designed by Kornelia Thümmel. Source: ritzau/dpa

view all 63

Editha zu Magdeburg's Timeline

908
908
Wessex, England
929
September 929
Age 21
Quedlinburg, Herzogtum Sachsen, Ostenfrankenreich (Present Germany)
929
- 946
Age 21
Germany
930
930
Age 22
Saxony, Germany
930
Age 22
Norway
930
Age 22
Wittenberg, Thuringia (present Saxony-Anhalt), Austrasia, Ostenfrankenreich (Present Germany)
945
945
Age 37
Sachsen, Germany (HRR)
946
January 26, 946
Age 38
Magdeburg, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany
January 946
Age 38
Cathedral of Saints Catherine and Maurice (Magdeburger Dom), Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany
955
955
Age 38
Sachsen