Adélaïde la Blanche d'Anjou, Reine consort d'Aquitaine

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Adélaïde d'Anjou, Reine de France

Also Known As: "Blanche", "the White", "Adelaide "the White" d'Anjou", "Adela /d'Anjou/", "Blanca /d'Anjou/", "Adelaide /de Anjou/", "Blanche /de Anjou/", "Blanche /De Anjou/", "Adelais", "/Blanche/", "Arsinde d'Anjou", "Adelaide the White", "Blanche d'Anjou", "Blanca"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Anjou, now, Pays de la Loire, France
Death: Died in Arles, Bouches-du-Rhone, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Place of Burial: Abbaye Saint-Pierre de Montmajour, Arles, Bouches-du-Rhone, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Foulques II, comte d'Anjou; Fulco II van Anjou; Gerberge du Maine, comtesse d'Anjou and Gerberga van le Maine
Wife of Willem van Arles; Etienne I van Gevaudan; Wilhelm l. von Provence, Graf lV. Ehe; Étienne II de Brioude, comte de Gévaudan; Raymond IV, comte de Toulouse and 3 others
Mother of Pons, comte de Gévaudan; Ermengarde / Humberge de Limoges de Gévaudan, [daughter of Etienne II de Gévaudan and ADelais d'Anjou]; Almodis de Limoges de Gévaudan; Pons Raymond de Toulouse, V; Bertrand of de Gévaudan and 16 others
Sister of Humbert I Count of Bellay; Willa de Vienne; Guy d'Anjou, Bishop of Puy; Drogon de Puy, Bishop de le Puy; Geoffrey "Grisgonelle", comte d'Anjou and 5 others

Occupation: Countess d'Anjou, Countess of Provence, Condesa de Reims, Grevinne, Co-Monarch of Aquitaine, Viscountess of Gévaudan, Countess of Toulouse, Queen of Aquitaine and of the West Franks, Countess and Margravine de Provence, Countess de Burgundy
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Adélaïde la Blanche d'Anjou, Reine consort d'Aquitaine

Adélaïde 'Blanche' d'Anjou:

Parents: Foulques II d'Anjou and Gerberge

Spouses:

1. Etienne de Brioude

2. Raymond IV, Comte de Toulouse

3. Louis, Roi d'Aquitaine

4. Guillaume 'le Libérateur', Comte d'Arles

5. Othon Guillaume, Comte de Macon (also known as Gugliemo di Ivrea)

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From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Anjou and Maine:

ADELAIS [Blanche] d'Anjou ([940/50]-[29 May 1026, bur Montmajour, near Arles]).

  • Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by the Chronicle of Saint-Pierre du Puy which names "comes Gaufridus cognomento Grisogonella…Pontius et Bertrandus eius nepotes…matre eorum Adalaide sorore ipsius"[69], the brothers Pons and Bertrand being confirmed in other sources as the sons of Etienne de Brioude, for example, the charter dated 1000 under which "duo germani fratres…Pontius, alter Bertrandus" donated property to Saint-Chaffre for the souls of "patris sui Stephani matrisque nomine Alaicis"[70].
  • Adelais's second and third marriages are confirmed by Richer who records the marriage of Louis and "Adelaidem, Ragemundi nuper defuncti ducis Gothorum uxorem" and their coronation as king and queen of Aquitaine[71].
  • The Chronicon Andegavensi names "Blanchiam filiam Fulconis Boni comitis Andegavensis" as wife of the successor of "Lotharius rex Francorum", but confuses matters by stating that the couple were parents of "filiam Constantiam" wife of Robert II King of France[72]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Blanchiam" as the wife of "Lotharius rex…Ludovicum filium" but does not give her origin[73].
  • She was crowned Queen of Aquitaine with her third husband on the day of their marriage.
  • The Libro de Otiis Imperialibus names "Blanchiam" as wife of "Ludovicus puer [filius Lotharii]"[74]. Rodulfus Glaber refers to the unnamed wife of "Ludowicum" as "ab Aquitanis partibus uxorem", recounting that she tricked him into travelling to Aquitaine where "she left him and attached herself to her own family"[75]. Richer records her marriage with "Wilelmum Arelatensem" after her divorce from Louis[76].
  • Her fourth marriage is confirmed by the Historia Francorum which names "Blanca sorore Gaufridi comitis Andegavensis" as wife of "Guillelmi comitis Arelatensis"[77]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Blanche comitisse Arelatensis" as mother of "Constantia [uxor Robertus rex]", specifying that she was "soror Gaufridi Grisagonelli"[78].
  • The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Blanca sorore eius" ( "eius" referring incorrectly to Foulques "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou) as wife of "Guillelmi Arelatensis comitis" and as mother of Constance, wife of Robert II King of France[79].
  • "Adalaiz comitissa" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille by charter dated 1003[80]. This charter is subscribed by "Emma comitissa…Wilelmus comes", the second of whom was presumably the son of Adelais but the first of whom has not been identified. "Pontius…Massiliensis ecclesie pontifex" issued a charter dated 1005 with the consent of "domni Rodhbaldi comitis et domne Adalaizis comitisse, domnique Guillelmi comitis filii eius"[81]. "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018 (this document making no mention of her supposed fifth husband)[82].
  • No explanation has been found for her having been named Adelais in some sources and Blanche in others, as it is difficult to interpret these documents to mean that they referred to two separate individuals.
  • Adelais's supposed fifth marriage is deduced from the following: Count Othon-Guillaume's wife is named Adelais in several charters[83], and Pope Benedict VIII refers to "domnæ Adeleidi comitissæ cognomento Blanchæ" with "nuruique eius domnæ Gerbergæ comitissæ" when addressing her supposed husband in a document dated Sep 1016[84], Gerberga presumably being Count Othon-Guillaume's daughter by his first wife who was the widow of Adelaide-Blanche d´Anjou's son by her fourth husband. However, the document in question appears not to specify that "domnæ Adeleidi…" was the wife of Othon Guillaume and the extracts seen (the full text has not yet been consulted) do not permit this conclusion to be drawn. It is perfectly possible that the Pope named Adelais-Blanche in the letter only in reference to her relationship to Othon Guillaume´s daughter.
  • If her fifth marriage is correct, Adelais would have been considerably older than her new husband, and probably nearly 60 years old when she married (Othon-Guillaume's first wife died in [1002/04]), which seems unlikely.
  • Another difficulty is presented by three entries dated 1018, 1024 and 1026 which appear to link Adelais to Provence while, if the fifth marriage was correct, she would have been with her husband (whose death is recorded in Sep 1026) in Mâcon.
  • These entries are: firstly, "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018[85]; secondly, "Vuilelmus filius Rodbaldi" donated property "in comitatu Aquense in valle…Cagnanam" to Marseille Saint-Victor by charter dated 1024, signed by "Adalaiz comitissa, Vuilelmus comes filius Rodbaldi"[86]; and thirdly, a manuscript written by Arnoux, monk at Saint-André-lès-Avignon, records the death in 1026 of "Adalax comitissa"[87].
  • The necrology of Saint-Pierre de Mâcon records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "Adalasia comitissa vocata regali progenie orta"[88]. An enquiry dated 2 Jan 1215 records that "comitissa Blanca" was buried "apud Montem Majorem"[89].

m firstly ([950/60]) as his second wife, ETIENNE de Brioude, son of BERTRAND --- & his wife Emilgarde [Emilde] --- (-before [970/75]).

m secondly ([970/75]) RAYMOND IV Comte de Toulouse, son of RAYMOND III Comte de Toulouse & his wife Gundinildis --- ([945/55]-killed "Carazo" [972/79]).

m thirdly (Vieux-Brioude, Haute-Loire 982, divorced 984) LOUIS associate King of the Franks, son of LOTHAIRE King of the Franks & Emma d'Arles [Italy] ([966/67]-Compiègne 21 May 987, bur Compiègne, église collégiale de Saint-Corneille). Crowned King of Aquitaine the day of his marriage in 982. He succeeded his father in 986 as LOUIS V King of the Franks.

m fourthly ([984/86]) as his second wife, GUILLAUME [II] "le Libérateur" Comte d'Arles Marquis de Provence, son of BOSON [II] Comte d'Arles & his wife Constantia [de Vienne] ([955]-Avignon 993 after 29 Aug, bur Sarrians, église de Sainte-Croix).

[m fifthly (before 1016) as his second wife, OTHON GUILLAUME Comte de Mâcon et de Nevers [Bourgogne-Comté], son of ADALBERTO associate-King of Italy & his wife Gerberge de Chalon ([960/62]-Dijon 21 Sep 1026).]

References

[69] Saint-Chaffre, Chronicon Monasterii Sancti Petri Aniciensis, CCCCXII, p. 152. [70] Saint-Chaffre CXLIV, p. 70. [71] Guadet, J. (ed.) (1845) Richeri Historiarum (Paris) (“Richer”) III.XCII and XCIV, pp. 112 and 114. [72] Chronico Andegavensi 987, RHGF X, p. 271. [73] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d´Anjou, p. 382. [74] Libro Otiis Imperialibus, RHGF IX, p. 45. [75] France, J., Bulst, N. and Reynolds, P. (eds. and trans.) (1989) Rodulfi Glabri Historiarum Libri Quinque, Rodulfus Glaber Opera (Oxford) Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum I.7, p. 17. [76] Richer III.XCV, p. 116. [77] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***. [78] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1013, MGH SS XXIII, p. 780. [79] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 110. [80] Guérard, M. (1857) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Victor de Marseille (Paris) Tome I, 653, p. 645. [81] Guérard, M. (1857) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Victor de Marseille (Paris) Tome I, 15, p. 18. [82] Guérard, M. (1857) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Victor de Marseille (Paris) Tome I, 630, p. 626. [83] Ragut, M. C. (ed.) (1864) Cartulaire de Saint-Vincent de Mâcon (Mâcon) (“Mâcon”) 471, 490, pp. 271, 284-5, and Bernard, A. and Bruel, A. (eds.) (1876-1903) Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Cluny (Paris) (“Cluny”) Tome IV, 2694, p. 721. [84] Benedict VIII, Letter 16, Patrologia Latina CXXXIX1603, cited in Bouchard, C. B. (1987) Sword, Miter, and Cloister: Nobility and the Church in Burgundy 980-1198 (Cornell University Press), p. 270, and quoted in Manteyer, G. de (1908) La Provence du 1ère au 12ème siècles (Paris), p. 274. [85] Guérard, M. (1857) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Victor de Marseille (Paris) Tome I, 630, p. 626. [86] Guérard, M. (1857) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Victor de Marseille (Paris) Tome I, 225, p. 252. [87] Manteyer (1908), p. 273, quoting Bibl. nat. de Madrid, ms. Ee 40, fo 118 vo. [88] Obituaires de Lyon II, Prieuré Saint-Pierre de Mâcon, p. 482. [89] Manteyer (1908), p. 274, quoting Biblioth. Méjanes ms. 812, recueil Bouquier, t. 1, pp. 145-6, Catal. des mss. Départements, t. XVI, Aix, 1894 ms. 915.

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First Husband, from the FMG page on Toulouse Nobility: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TOULOUSE%20NOBILITY.htm#Etiennedied975

ETIENNE de Brioude, son of BERTRAND & his wife Emilde --- (-before [970/75]).

"Bertrandus et uxor mea Emildis et Stephanus filius noster" donated property "in villa…Antonio" to Saint-Julien de Brioude for the souls of "genitoris mei et genetricis meæ Godanæ" by charter dated 937[1171]. "Stephanus filius quondam Bertrandi et Emildis" restored property "manso…Lacus" to Saint-Julien de Brioude which he had usurped after his father died by undated charter, signed by "domina Adalaiz…mariti sui Stephani atque filiorum suorum Poncii et Bertranni"[1172]. According to Settipani, Etienne was not "Comte de Gévaudan", although his descendants by his second wife later possessed the counties of Gévaudan, Brioude and Forez[1173].

m firstly ANNE, daughter of ---.

m secondly ([950/60]) as her first husband, ADELAIS d'Anjou

Etienne & his first wife had [one possible child]:

1. [EMILDE (-after [993/1002]) m ROTBALD [II] Comte de Provence, son of BOSON [II] Comte d'Arles & his wife Constantia --- (-[1008]).]

Etienne & his second wife had [four] children:

2. PONS (-murdered [26 Feb 1011/1016]). "Stephanus filius quondam Bertrandi et Emildis" restored property "manso…Lacus" to Saint-Julien de Brioude which he had usurped after his father died by undated charter, signed by "domina Adalaiz…mariti sui Stephani atque filiorum suorum Poncii et Bertranni"[1199]. "Episcopus sedis Aniciensis Vuido" names "Pontii comitis nepotis sui fratrisque eius Bertrandi" in a charter dated 13 Apr 997[1200]. Comte de Gévaudan. "Poncius…comes…Gabalitanensis telluris necnon et Forensis patriæ" donated "ecclesiam Langat…in comitatu Gabalitensi, aliam ecclesiam…Favairolas…" to Saint-Julien de Brioude, for the souls of "genitorum suorum Stephani et Alais et uxoris eius Theotbergæ et filiorum eius Stephani et Poncii vel fratrum eius Bertrandi et Willelmus et nepotum eius Stephani, Rotberti et Willelmi", by charter dated Feb [1010], signed by "Roberti vicecomitis, Willelmi fratris eius…"[1201]. "Stephanus vicecomes Gabalitanensium cum coniuge mea Aiamolde" founded the monastery of Langogne "in comitatu Gabalitano in vicaria Miliacense in villa…Lingonia secus ripam fluvii Elerii", with the consent of "…Rigaldi fratris mei et Urbani, filiique eius Simonis, Pontii quoque comitis ac Bertrandi fratrum", and donated property including "in comitatu Vivariensi" by charter dated 998[1202]. "Duo germani fratres…Pontius, alter Bertrandus" donated property to Saint-Chaffre for the souls of "patris sui Stephani matrisque nomine Alaicis" by charter dated 1000[1203]. The Chronicle of Saint-Pierre du Puy names "comes Gaufridus cognomento Grisogonella…Pontius et Bertrandus eius nepotes…matre eorum Adalaide sorore ipsius"[1204]. "Poncius…comes…Gabalitanensis" donated property to Saint-Julien de Brioude for the souls of "genitorum meorum Stephani et Alaiz et uxoris meæ Theotberganæ et filiis meis Stephani et Poncii, vel fratribus meis Bertrando et Villelmo et nepotibus meis [Stephanum], Robertum atque Villelmum" by charter dated Feb 1011, subscribed by "Stephanus vicecomes…Rotberti vicecomitis, W. fratris sui…"[1205]. The Liber miraculorum Sanctæ Fidæ name "Arsendis, uxor Vuillelmi Tholosani comitis, fratris…Pontii" and specify that the latter was murdered by "Artaldo…privigno suo", in revenge for the repudiation of his mother, Pons's second wife[1206]. m firstly ---. This first marriage is demonstrated by the chronology of Pons´s children which shows that they could not have been born from his marriage to Theutberga. m secondly ([1001/08], repudiated) as her second husband, THEUTBERGA, widow of ARTAUD Comte [de Lyon et de Forez], daughter of ---]. "Poncius…comes…Gabalitanensis telluris necnon et Forensis patriæ" donated "ecclesiam Langat…in comitatu Gabalitensi, aliam ecclesiam…Favairolas…" to Saint-Julien de Brioude, for the souls of "genitorum suorum Stephani et Alais et uxoris eius Theotbergæ et filiorum eius Stephani et Poncii vel fratrum eius Bertrandi et Willelmus et nepotum eius Stephani, Rotberti et Willelmi", by charter dated Feb [1010], signed by "Roberti vicecomitis, Willelmi fratris eius…"[1207]. Her first marriage is confirmed by the Liber miraculorum Sanctæ Fidæ which specifies that "Pontii" was murdered by "Artaldo…privigno suo"[1208]. m thirdly ---. According to Settipani, Pons repudiated his second wife in order to marry a third wife but he cites no source which confirms this third marriage[1209]. Pons & his first wife had [three] children.

3. BERTRAND . "Stephanus filius quondam Bertrandi et Emildis" restored property "manso…Lacus" to Saint-Julien de Brioude which he had usurped after his father died by undated charter, signed by "domina Adalaiz…mariti sui Stephani atque filiorum suorum Poncii et Bertranni"[1214]. "Episcopus sedis Aniciensis Vuido" names "Pontii comitis nepotis sui fratrisque eius Bertrandi" in a charter dated 13 Apr 997[1215]. "Stephanus vicecomes Gabalitanensium cum coniuge mea Aiamolde" founded the monastery of Langogne "in comitatu Gabalitano in vicaria Miliacense in villa…Lingonia secus ripam fluvii Elerii", with the consent of "…Rigaldi fratris mei et Urbani, filiique eius Simonis, Pontii quoque comitis ac Bertrandi fratrum", and donated property including "in comitatu Vivariensi" by charter dated 998[1216]. "Duo germani fratres…Pontius, alter Bertrandus" donated property to Saint-Chaffre for the souls of "patris sui Stephani matrisque nomine Alaicis" by charter dated 1000[1217]. "Poncius…comes…Gabalitanensis" donated property to Saint-Julien de Brioude for the souls of "genitorum meorum Stephani et Alaiz et uxoris meæ Theotberganæ et filiis meis Stephani et Poncii, vel fratribus meis Bertrando et Villelmo et nepotibus meis [Stephanum], Robertum atque Villelmum" by charter dated Feb 1011, subscribed by "Stephanus vicecomes…Rotberti vicecomitis, W. fratris sui…"[1218]. The Chronicle of Saint-Pierre du Puy names "comes Gaufridus cognomento Grisogonella…Pontius et Bertrandus eius nepotes…matre eorum Adalaide sorore ipsius"[1219].

4. [HUMBERGE [Ermengarde] ([970/75]-). "Umberga" donated property to Sauxillanges for the souls of "senioris mei Vuillelmi et…filiorum meorum tam vivis quam etiam defunctis" by charter dated to [1000/10][1220]. "Domni Stephani episcopi, domni Rotberti, domni Vuillelmi, Umbergane comitisse matris eorum" signed a charter dated to [1013/21] under which property was donated to Sauxillanges[1221]. There is doubt about Humberge's parentage but the hypothesis shown here appears to provide the best solution to various chronological difficulties. The Flandria Generosa names "Ermengardis comitissa Arvenensis" as sister of "Constantia regina Francorum", when outlining the basis for the consanguinity between their great-great-grandchildren, Baudouin VII Count of Flanders and [Hawise] de Bretagne, which provided the grounds for the couple's separation[1222]. It has been assumed in many secondary sources[1223] that this passage means that "Ermengarde" was the full sister of Queen Constance (who was the third wife of Robert II King of France) and therefore that she was the daughter of Guillaume [II] Comte de Provence by his second marriage to Adelais d'Anjou. However, this is chronologically impossible. The marriage of "Ermengarde's" daughter, also named Ermengarde, to Eudes II Comte de Blois, is dated to 1005 according to the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois Fontaines[1224]. Even if this date is inaccurate, the estimated birth date of Ermengarde junior's eldest son is [1010], and the marriage of her daughter is dated to 1018 (although the chronology suggests that this may have been an infant betrothal or marriage). Assuming that there is a degree of accuracy in these three dates, the daughter of "Ermengarde" Ctss d'Auvergne could not have been born later than [995] at the latest. This places the birth of "Ermengarde" senior to [980] at the very latest, about five years before Adelais's marriage to Guillaume Comte de Provence. Given that Adelais's third marriage to Louis V King of the West Franks was childless, and her second marriage to Raymond IV Comte de Toulouse was brief, it is therefore most likely that "Ermengarde" was Adelais's daughter by her first marriage to Etienne de Brioude. Some corroboration for this hypothesis is found in the charter dated 1011 under which "Poncius comes Gabalitanensis" (who was the son of Adelais d'Anjou by her marriage to Etienne de Brioude) donated property to Saint-Julien de Brioude, for the souls of "genitorum suorum Stephani et Alais et uxoris eius Theotbergæ et filiorum eius Stephani et Poncii vel fratrum eius Bertrandi et Willelmus et nepotum eius Stephani, Rotberti et Willelmi", by charter dated Feb [1010], signed by "Roberti vicecomitis, Willelmi fratris eius…"[1225]. In this scenario, Etienne, Robert and Guillaume would be the sons of Pons's full sister "Ermengarde" Ctss d'Auvergne. However, this raises yet more difficulties. The secondary sources also assume that "Ermengarde's" husband was Robert [I] Comte d'Auvergne. However, the only known son of Comte Robert [I] was Guillaume [V] Comte d'Auvergne. Assuming that the "nepotes" of Comte Pons are named in order of seniority in the 1011 charter, "Vuillelmi" would have been the youngest brother. No other reference has been to found to his assumed older brothers Etienne and Robert. In any case, it is unlikely that Guillaume [V] Comte d'Auvergne would have been born much before [995/1000] for consistency with the dates of his marriage and his death. If this is correct, it would raise doubts about the use of the title "vicecomes" in the 1011 charter, as their father would still have been at the height of his power. All these difficulties would be solved if the "nepotes" of Comte Pons were in fact the three known sons of Guillaume [IV] Comte d'Auvergne, not of Robert [I] Comte d'Auvergne. If this is correct, "Ermengarde" would in fact have been "Humberge", who, as shown above, is named in other primary sources as the wife of Comte Guillaume. m GUILLAUME [IV] Comte d'Auvergne, son of [GUY Comte d'Auvergne & his wife Ausenda ---.]

References:

[1171]Doniol, H. (ed.) (1863) Cartulaire de Saint-Julien de Brioude (Clermont Ferrand/Paris), 74, p. 94. [1172] Brioude 105, p. 122. [1173] Settipani, C. and Kerrebrouck, P. van (1993) La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987, 1ère partie, Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq), p. 336 footnote 996. [1174] Brioude 293, p. 300. [1199] Brioude 105, p. 122. [1200] Saint-Chaffre CXL, p. 69. [1201] Brioude 331, p. 335. [1202] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 156, col. 331. [1203] Saint-Chaffre CXLIV, p. 70. [1204] Saint-Chaffre, Chronicon Monasterii Sancti Petri Aniciensis, CCCCXII, p. 152. [1205] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 169, col. 357. [1206] Robertini, L. (ed.) (1994) Liber miraculorum sanctæ Fidæ (Spoleto), p. 56, quoted in Settipani (2004), p. 313. [1207] Brioude 331, p. 335. [1208] Robertini, L. (ed.) (1994) Liber miraculorum sanctæ Fidæ (Spoleto), p. 56, quoted in Settipani (2004), p. 313. [1209] Settipani (2004), p. 313. [1210] Brioude 331, p. 335. [1211] Brioude 331, p. 335. [1212] Bernard, A. ´Histoire territoriale du Lyonnais´, Recueil de mémoires et documents sur le Forez, Tome II (Saint-Etienne, 1875), p. 288, which does not provide the source reference for the original. [1213] Bernard (1875), p. 288. [1214] Brioude 105, p. 122. [1215] Saint-Chaffre CXL, p. 69. [1216] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 156, col. 331. [1217] Saint-Chaffre CXLIV, p. 70. [1218] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 169, col. 357. [1219] Saint-Chaffre, Chronicon Monasterii Sancti Petri Aniciensis, CCCCXII, p. 152. [1220] Doniol, H. (ed.) (1864) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Sauxillanges (Clermont), 267, quoted in Settipani (2004), p. 317. [1221] Doniol, H. (ed.) (1864) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Sauxillanges (Clermont), 402, quoted in Settipani (2004), p. 317. [1222] Flandria Generosa 25, MGH SS IX, p. 323. [1223] See for example ES III 732. [1224] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1005, MGH SS XXIII, p. 778. [1225] Brioude 331, p. 335. --- Second Husband, from the FMG page on Toulouse: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TOULOUSE.htm#Raymonddied978


RAYMOND de Toulouse, son of RAYMOND III Comte de Toulouse & his wife Gundinildis --- ([945/55]-killed "in Garazo" [972/79]).

The Codex de Roda names "Regemundo…et domnus Ucus episcopus" as the children of "Regemundus" (son of "Pontio" and his wife "filia Garsie Sanzionis") and his unnamed wife, specifying that the younger Raymond was killed "in Garazo"[308].

As pointed out by Settipani[309], it is reasonable to suppose that Raymond was the same person as "…Raymundo filio Gundinildis nepoti meo" who is named in the codicil testament of "Gersindæ comitissæ", widow of Comte Raymond Pons, dated to [972][310].

Apart from these references, there appears to be no documentary record relating to this Comte Raymond. He succeeded his father [before 972] as RAYMOND IV Comte de Toulouse.

[m firstly (repudiated) ---. The Vita Fulcranni records that "comitem Tholosanum" (unnamed) repudiated his wife to marry another who had been repudiated by her first husband[311]. The Histoire Générale de Languedoc dates this passage to [975], although, because of the reconstruction of the family of the comtes de Toulouse which it has adopted, it assumes that the count in question was Comte Guillaume III "Taillefer"[312]. Even if the chronology had been favourable to this identification, it is unclear how the passage could refer to Comte Guillaume´s two marriages as there is no record of his second wife, Emma de Provence, having been married before. On the other hand, it is not impossible that the passage could refer to the comte de Toulouse who was the husband of Adelais d´Anjou. No record has been found which dates the death of Adelais´s first husband, and it is not impossible that their marriage was terminated by repudiation rather than his death. If this is correct, the passage could refer to an otherwise unrecorded first marriage of Comte Raymond IV.]

m [secondly] ([970/75]) as her second husband, ADELAIS d'Anjou, widow of ETIENNE de Brioude.

Comte Raymond & his wife (unspecified as to which one) had [two] children:

1. GUILLAUME ([970/75]-Sep 1037, bur Toulouse, Saint-Sernin). His mother names her son Guillaume de Toulouse and his wife Emma in an act dated 1021[334]. He succeeded his father in [979] as GUILLAUME III “Taillefer” Comte de Toulouse.

2. [LIEDGARDE . Recorded as "matertera" of Etienne Bishop of Clermont[335], who was the son of her uterine half-brother Pons Comte de Gévaudan. It is assumed that she was the daughter of Adelais by her second marriage, but this is not beyond all doubt.]

References:

[308] Lacarra, J. M. 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', Estudios de Edad Media de la Corona de Aragón Vol. I (Zaragoza, 1945) 33, p. 251. [309] Settipani, C. (2004) La Noblesse du Midi Carolingien. Etudes sur quelques grandes familles d'Aquitaine et du Languedoc du IXe au XIe siècles (Prosopographica et Genealogica, Oxford), p. 43. [310] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 126, col. 274. [311] Vita S. Fulcranni Episc. Lodevensis, II, 8, Acta Sanctorum, Ioannes Bollandus, Februarius, Tomus II, p. 712. [312] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome III, p. 174. [334] Settipani (2004), p. 30, which does not cite the primary source. [335] Settipani (2004), pp. 52-3 footnote 6. --- Third Husband, from the FMG Page on Carolingians: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#LouisVFrance

LOUIS ([966/67]-Compiègne 22 May 987, bur Compiègne, église collégiale de Saint-Corneille).

Rodulfus Glaber names Louis as son of King Lothaire, commenting that he "had not inherited the energy of his father"[394].

His father declared him associate king in 978, crowned 8 Jun 979. He was crowned king of Aquitaine the day of his marriage in 982.

Rodulfus Glaber records that his father "escorted his son home" after he was left by his wife and that "they lived together for some years"[395]. The impression left by these texts is that Louis was in some way subnormal.

He succeeded his father 2 Mar 986 as LOUIS V King of the Franks. He quarrelled with his mother, banished Adalbero Bishop of Laon, and besieged Reims[396].

Richer records that he died 22 May from injuries received when falling from his horse while hunting[397]. The Historia Francorum Senonensis records the death in 987 of "Hludovicus, filius eius [=Hlotharius rex] iuvenis" and his burial "in basilica beati Cornelii martiris Compendio"[398]. The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 22 May of "Hludovicus iuvenis Rex"[399].

m (Vieux-Brioude, Haute-Loire 982, divorced 984) as her third husband, ADELAIS [Blanche] d'Anjou, widow firstly of ETIENNE de Brioude and secondly of RAYMOND Comte de Toulouse.

References:

[394] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum I.7, p. 17 "…iuvenem patre minus fore industrium". [395] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum I.7, p. 17 "…iuvenem patre minus fore industrium". [396] McKitterick, R. (1983) Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians 751-987 (Longman, London and New York), p. 327. [397] Guadet, J. (ed.) (1845) Richeri Historiarum (Paris), IV.V, p. 147. [398] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 367. [399] L'abbé Lebeuf (1855) Mémoires concernant l'histoire civile et ecclésiastique d'Auxerre et de son ancient diocese (Auxerre), Tome IV, p. 14. --- Fourth Husband, from the FMG Page on Provence: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#GuillaumeIIArlesProvencedied993

GUILLAUME [II] “le Libérateur”, son of ([955]-Avignon 993 after 29 Aug, bur Sarrians, église de Sainte-Croix).

"Boso comes et uxor sua Constantia…illorum filii…Willelmus comes, Rotbaldus comes, Pontius juvenis" signed the charter dated May [963] under which "Gencius et uxor mea Aiburga" donated property "in pago Aquense superiore ad castrum…Ansoyse" to Monmajour[250].

The order of birth of the two sons of Boson is unclear. The May [963] charter suggests that Guillaume was his older son. However, Guillaume is omitted from the charter dated Mar 965 under which "eius filio Rothboldo et fratre eius Wilelmo comite" consented to the charter of "Bosoni comitis, filii Rothboldi quondam"[251], which suggests that Rotbald was older.

Comte de Provence, charters showing that both he and his older brother Rotbald were recorded as counts during the same period, although it is not known whether this was a joint countship or whether there was a geographical split between their jurisdictions.

Marquis de Provence. "Vuilelmus marchius Arelatense Provintie" donated property "in comitatu Avinionense, in agro Rupiano, in loco…la Lona" to Saint-Victor, Marseille by charter dated 17 Apr 979, signed by "Arsinda comitissa"[252]. "Willelmus comes" donated property to Cluny by charter dated 28 Aug [990] signed by "Rodbaldus comes, Adalaix comitissa, Wilelmus comes et filius eius Wilelmus"[253]. "Dominus princeps et marchio istius provinciæ…Willelmus cum coniuge sua…Adelaix et filio suo…Willelmo" restored property to the abbey of Saint-Césaire d´Arles by charter dated 992, subscribed by "Domnus Rotbaldus comes…Willelmus comes filius Rotbaldi et uxor sua Lucia, Wilelmus comes Tolosanus et uxor sua Ema…"[254].

He became a monk.

m firstly (before Apr 970) ARSINDE, daughter of --- (-after 17 Apr 979). "Wilelmus comes Provincie et coniunx mea Arsinna" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille by charter dated Apr 970[255]. "Vuilelmus marchius Arelatense Provintie" donated property "in comitatu Avinionense, in agro Rupiano, in loco…la Lona" to Saint-Victor, Marseille by charter dated 17 Apr 979, signed by "Arsinda comitissa"[256]. Szabolcs de Vajay suggests that the first wife of Marquis Guillaume was the sister of Adelais, whose first testament dated 4 Oct 978 names her, basing the hypothesis on onomastics and favorable chronology[257]. Under this testament of "Adelais", she donated her foundation "Narbonam…sanctique Salvatoris" to "sororibus meis et domnæ Arsindæ comitissæ", bequeathed "mea hereditas de Vidiliano" to "Arsindi sorori meæ", "alodes de Tolomiano" to "Ermesindi", and "mea hereditas de Artimiciano" to "Garsindi"[258]. The wording suggests that "Arsindi…Ermesindi…Garsindi" were all sisters of the testator, although the relationship is not specified in the case of Arsinde. It is probable that "domnæ Arsindæ comitissæ" in this document was the wife of Guillaume II Comte de Provence as no other Ctss Arsende has been identified at the time. However, the wording of the passage in which she is named suggests that she was a different person from "Arsindi sorori meæ". Szabolcs de Vajay suggests (as reported by Settipani: the Szabolcs article has not yet been consulted) that the testator was the possible daughter of Arnaud [I] Comte de Comminges. She can be identified as Adelais, widow of Matfried Vicomte de Narbonne, as the document names the couple´s two sons whose affiliation is confirmed by other primary sources. As explained more fully in the document TOULOUSE, KINGS, DUKES & COUNTS, other primary source documentation suggests that the wife of Vicomte Matfried may have been the daughter of Raymond Pons Comte de Toulouse. If this is correct, the chronology suggests that her sister would have been too old to have married Guillaume II Comte de Provence.

m secondly ([984/86]) as her fourth husband, ADELAIS [Blanche] d'Anjou, widow firstly of ETIENNE de Brioude, secondly of RAYMOND IV Comte de Toulouse, divorced wife (thirdly) of LOUIS V King of the West Franks.

Comte Guillaume [II] & his second wife had two children:


1. GUILLAUME [III] ([986/87]-1018 before 30 May). "Willelmus comes" donated property to Cluny by charter dated 28 Aug [990] signed by "Rodbaldus comes, Adalaix comitissa, Wilelmus comes et filius eius Wilelmus"[280]. "Pontius…Massiliensis ecclesie pontifex" issued a charter dated 1005 with the consent of "domni Rodhbaldi comitis et domne Adalaizis comitisse, domnique Guillelmi comitis filii eius"[281]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[282], he was the son of Comte Guillaume by his first wife but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified. It is probably speculative, based on his marriage date, which suggests that he was born earlier than the date of his father's second marriage. In any case, Guillaume's parentage appears to be proved by the charter dated 1005. Comte de Provence 992, minor until 994.

2. CONSTANCE ([987/89]-Château de Melun 22 or 25 Jul 1032, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). The Historia Francorum names "Constantiam, filiam Guillelmi comitis Arelatensis, natam de Blanca sorore Gaufridi comitis Andegavensis" as wife of King Robert[283]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines also names "Constantia filia fuit Blanche comitisse Arelatensis" as wife of "Robertus rex"[284]. The Chronicon Hugonis names "Constantiam" as wife of "Robertus", specifying that she was "cognatam Hugonis Autisiodorensis episcopi comitis Cabilonensis"[285]. This is presumably based on Rodulfus Glaber who states incorrectly that "Constantiam…filiam…prioris Willemi Aquitanie ducis" was wife of King Robert II, specifying that she was "cognatam" of Hugues Comte de Chalon Bishop of Auxerre[286]. The only relationship so far identified between the two is that Constance's maternal uncle, Geoffroy I Comte d'Anjou, was the second husband of the mother of Comte Hugues. Rodulfus Glauber dates her marriage to "about the year 1000"[287]. The king attempted to separate from Constance in 1008 in order to take back his second wife, according to Rodulfus Glaber through the influence of "Hugo dictus Beluacensis"[288], but he restored Constance's royal prerogatives end 1009[289]. She opposed her husband's proposal to crown their second son Henri as associate king in 1026, supporting the candidature of her third son Robert[290]. She organised two revolts against King Robert and another against her son King Henri I after his accession[291]. Rodolfus Glaber records the death of Queen Constance in the same city as her husband [Melun] and in the same month [Jul] in the following year, and her place of burial[292]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "XI Kal Aug" of "regina Constancia"[293]. The necrology of Argenteuil Priory records the death "VIII Kal Aug" of "Constancia regina"[294]. m ([Sep 1001/25 Aug 1003]) as his third wife, ROBERT II King of France, son of HUGUES Capet King of France & his wife Adelais d’Aquitaine (Orléans ([27 Mar] 972-Château de Melun 20 Jul 1031, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

References:

[250] Manteyer (1908), p. 225, quoting Chantelou Histoire de Monmajour, Revue Historique de Provence, 1ère année, p. 37. [251] Gallia Christiana Novissima, Marseille, Col. 47-48, no. 66, and Marseille Saint-Victor Tome I, 29, p. 40. [252] Marseille Saint-Victor Tome II, Appendix, 1042, p. 509. [253] Cluny Tome III, 1837, p. 80. [254] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 153, col. 325. [255] Marseille Saint-Victor Tome I, 598, p. 590. [256] Marseille Saint-Victor Tome II, Appendix, 1042, p. 509. [257] Vajay, S. de 'Comtesses d'origine occitane dans la Marche d'Espagne aux 10e et 11e siècles', Hidalguia 28 (1980), p. 756, cited in Settipani (2004), p. 63 footnote 1. [258] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 130, col. 284. [280] Cluny Tome III, 1837, p. 80. [281] Marseille Saint-Victor Tome I, 15, p. 18. [282] ES II 187. [283] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***. [284] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1013, MGH SS XXIII, p. 780. [285] Chronicon Hugonis, monachi Virdunensis et divionensis abbatis Flaviniacensis I 996, MGH SS VIII, p. 368. [286] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.7, p. 107. [287] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.40, p. 165. [288] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.7, p. 107. [289] Kerrebrouck, P. Van (2000) Les Capétiens 987-1328 (Villeneuve d'Asq), p. 57. [290] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.34, p. 157. [291] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 56 and 57. [292] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.36, p. 159. [293] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 267. [294] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Prieuré d'Argenteuil, p. 348. --- Fifth Husband, from the FMG page on Burgundy Duchy Nobility: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#OthonIMacondied1026

(Birth name:) GUGLIELMO di Ivrea, son of ADALBERTO II associate-King of Italy & his wife Gerberge [de Chalon] ([960/62]-Dijon 21 Sep 1026, bur Dijon, Abbaye de Saint-Bénigne).

Rodulfus Glaber names "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" and records that, as a boy, he was secretly stolen from the land of the Lombards and restored to his mother "with no small cunning by a certain monk"[1218]. "Einricus…imperator" confirmed the property of the abbey of Fruttuaria, referring to property donated by "Otto qui et Vuillielmus comes filius Adalberti nepos Berengarii regis", by charter dated 1014[1219]. It is assumed therefore that Guillaume was imprisoned as a child by Emperor Otto I in Italy after his father and paternal grandfather were deposed as kings of Italy.

The Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne, interpolated into the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, names "Guilelmum Ottonem et eius matrem Gerbergam" when recording that he was adopted by his mother's second husband "dux Burgundie Henricus"[1220].

He adopted the name OTHON-GUILLAUME. He succeeded in [981] as Comte de Mâcon, by right of his first wife.

He was declared heir to the duchy of Burgundy and installed as Comte de Nevers by his stepfather in 986. He was recognised as duke of Burgundy on the death of his stepfather in 1002, but deprived of his inheritance by Robert II King of France in Spring 1003 when the latter invaded Burgundy with troops lent by Richard II Duke of Normandy.

Rodulfus Glaber records that "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" rebelled against the king [Robert II] on one occasion, supported by his son-in-law Landry Comte de Nevers[1221].

"Comes Otto" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon for the souls of "Heinrici ducis qui eum loco filii adoptavit et genetricis sue Gerberge uxoris predicti ducis ac filii sui Widonis et Hermintrudis coniugis" by charter dated 1004[1222].

Comte Othon continued to claim the duchy of Burgundy, but reconciled himself with the king of France in 1005, finally renouncing his claims in 1015. He was designated comes Burgundiæ[1223], presumably a descriptive title with no precise territorial significance at that time although Othon did own extensive territories in Burgundy.

The Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon records the death in 1027 of "Otto qui et Willelmus dictus est comes" and his burial at St Bénigne[1224]. The memorial on the tomb of "Nobiliter natus Guillelmus et Otho vocatus" records his death "1027 XI Kal Oct"[1225]. The necrology of Autun Saint-Martin records the death “XVI Id Dec” of “Guillelmus dux Burgundie, anno 1025”[1226].

m firstly (before [981/82]) as her second husband, ERMENTRUDE, widow of AUBRY [II] Comte de Mâcon, daughter of RAGENOLD Comte de Roucy & his wife Alberade of Lotharingia ([950/55][1227]-[5 Oct 1002/1004]). "Ermentrudis" is named as daughter of "Alberada filia …Gerbergæ" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which does not name either her father or her husband but specifies that Ermentrudis was the mother of Agnes[1228], the latter naming both her parents in charters (see below). "Ermentrudis" is named as daughter of "Alberada filia …Gerbergæ" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which does not name either her father or her husband but specifies that Ermentrudis was the mother of Agnes (Ctss de Poitou)[1229]. Bouchard highlights the absence of proof that the husband of Alberade of Lotharingia was Ragenold Comte de Roucy[1230]. "Ermentrudis conjuge sua" consented to the donation of land "in Aponiaco villa" by "Albericus comes Matisconensis" to Cluny by charter dated 14 Jan 971[1231]. The genealogy of the Comtes de Mâcon, included in the cartulary of Saint-Vincent de Mâcon, records the marriage of "dominus Guillelmus comes" with the wife of "Albericus filius Letaudi comitis"[1232]. Rodulfus Glaber states that "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" married the sister of "Brunone Lingonensi episcopo" who supported him in his rebellion against the king [Robert II][1233]. "Otto comes, Irvis comitissa" subscribed a charter dated to [994] under which "Milo…uxoris mee Ermengarde" donated property to Cluny[1234]. It is assumed that "Irvis" is a copyist error for "Ermentrudis" as no other reference to a countess of this name has been found. Her date of death is indicated by the Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon which records a donation by "Otto comes cognomento Willelmus" with "filii eius Rainaldi" dated 1004 "pro anima Hinrici Ducis, qui eum loco filii adoptavit et genitricis sue Gerberge uxoris predicti Ducis, ac filii sui Widonis et Hermintrudis coniugis"[1235]. This is presumably the donation recorded in the charter dated 1004 under which "Comes Otto" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon for the souls of "Heinrici ducis qui eum loco filii adoptavit et genetricis sue Gerberge uxoris predicti ducis ac filii sui Widonis et Hermintrudis coniugis"[1236].

m secondly (before 1016) ADELAIS [Blanche], daughter of --- (-29 May 1026, bur Montmajour, near Arles).

"Otto comes et uxor mea Adila" donated property to Saint-Vincent de Mâcon by two charters dated to 1015 or before (during the reign of Robert I King of France) both subscribed by "Rainaldi filii sui"[1237]. "Otto comes et uxor mea Adeleidis et filius meus Rainaldus atque Otto nepos meus" donated property to Cluny by charter dated to [1015][1238]. "Otto comes qui nominatur Willelmus" issued a charter dated 2 Nov 1023 subscribed by "Raynardi comitis, Adheleydis uxoris eius"[1239].

The origin of Otto-Guillaume's second wife is not known with certainty. Most secondary source genealogies assume that she was Adelais [Blanche] d'Anjou, widow firstly of Etienne de Brioude, widow secondly of Raymond Comte de Toulouse, divorced wife thirdly of Louis V King of the Franks, widow fourthly of Guillaume [II] Comte de Provence, daughter of Foulques II "le Bon" Comte d’Anjou & his first wife Gerberge ---.

Adelais's supposed fifth marriage is deduced from the following: Count Othon-Guillaume's wife is named Adelais in several charters[1240], and Pope Benedict VIII refers to "domnæ Adeleidi comitissæ cognomento Blanchæ" with "nuruique eius domnæ Gerbergæ comitissæ" when addressing her supposed husband[1241], Gerberga presumably being Count Othon-Guillaume's daughter by his first wife who was the widow of Adelaide-Blanche d'Anjou's son by her fourth husband. However, the document in question appears not to specify that "domnæ Adeleidi…" was the wife of Othon Guillaume and the extracts seen (the full text has not yet been consulted) do not permit this conclusion to be drawn.

It is perfectly possible that Adelais-Blanche was named in the letter only in reference to her relationship to Othon Guillaume´s daughter.

If her fifth marriage is correct, Adelais would have been considerably older than her new husband, and probably nearly 60 years old when she married (Othon-Guillaume's first wife died in [1002/04]), which seems unlikely.

Another difficulty is presented by three entries dated 1018, 1024 and 1026 which appear to link Adelais to Provence while, if the fifth marriage was correct, she would have been with her husband (whose death is recorded in Sep 1026) in Mâcon. These entries are: firstly, "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018[1242]; secondly, "Vuilelmus filius Rodbaldi" donated property "in comitatu Aquense in valle…Cagnanam" to Marseille Saint-Victor by charter dated 1024, signed by "Adalaiz comitissa, Vuilelmus comes filius Rodbaldi"[1243]; and thirdly, a manuscript written by Arnoux, monk at Saint-André-lès-Avignon, records the death in 1026 of "Adalax comitissa"[1244].

The necrology of Saint-Pierre de Mâcon records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "Adalasia comitissa vocata regali progenie orta"[1245].

Comte Othon [I] & his first wife (not Adelaide) had five children (kept for reference):

1. GUY de Mâcon ([982]-1004 or before, bur Dijon Saint-Bénigne) m (before 999) --- . The origin of the wife of Comte Guy is not known with certainty. One possibility is that she was --- de Chalon, daughter of Lambert Comte de Chalon & his second wife Adelais ---.

2. MATHILDE de Mâcon (-13 Nov or 13 Dec 1005, bur Auxerre Saint-Etienne) m ([989][1257]) LANDRY [IV] de Monceau, son of BODO Seigneur de Monceaux-le-Comte & his wife --- (-11 May 1028). He was invested in 990 as Comte de Nevers by his father-in-law as a reward for services. Seneschal of France. Comte d'Auxerre 1015.

3. GERBERGE de Mâcon ([985]-[1020/23]) m ([1002]) GUILLAUME III Comte de Provence, son of GUILLAUME II Comte de Provence et d'Arles & his wife Adélaïde [Blanche] d'Anjou (-1018 before 30 May).

4. RENAUD de Mâcon ([990]-3/4 Sep 1057, bur Besançon). He succeeded his father in 1026 as Comte Palatin de Bourgogne.

5. AGNES de Mâcon ([990/95]-Saintes 10 Nov 1068, bur Poitiers, Priory of Saint-Nicolas) m firstly (1019) as his third wife, GUILLAUME III "le Grand" Comte de Poitou, GUILLAUME V Duke of Aquitaine, son of GUILLAUME IV "Fier-à-Bras" Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME II Comte de Poitou] & his wife Emma de Blois ([969]-Abbaye de Maillezais 31 Jan 1030). m secondly (1 Jan 1032, divorced [1049/52]) as his first wife, GEOFFROY d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES III "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou & his second wife Hildegarde [de Metz] (14 Oct 1006-14 Nov 1060). He succeeded his father in 1040 as GEOFFROY II "Martel" Comte d'Anjou. The Chronico Sancti Michaelis records that "Gaufredus Martellus Andegavensis comes" married "Agnetem comitissam Pictavensem" incestuously in 1032[1267]. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the marriage "1032 Kal Jan" of "Gaufridus comes, Agnetem comitissam incesto", indirectly indicating her origin in a later passage which records the marriage "1043 XII Nov" of "Hainricus imperator [et] filiam Agnetis comitissæ"[1268]. Regent of Aquitaine for her son 1039-1044. She arranged her daughter's marriage with Emperor Heinrich III in 1043 and lived at the imperial court after this time. After her separation from her second husband, in 1047 she founded the abbey of Notre-Dame de Saintes, where she became a nun in 1068[1274]. "Agnes" founded the abbey of Saint-Nicolas at Poitou with the consent of "ambobus filiis Guillelmi et Gauffrido" by charter dated [1050][1275].

References:

[1218] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, pp. 105-7. [1219] D H II 305, p. 379. [1220] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1002, MGH SS XXIII, p. 778. [1221] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 105. [1222] Chevrier, G. and Chaume, M. (eds.) (1986) Chartes et documents de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon des origines à 1300 (Dijon) II, 228, p. 24. [1223] Bouchard (1987), p. 265, although the author does not cite her primary source for this statement. [1224] Chronicle St-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 181. [1225] Chronicle St-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 181 footnote 2 which quotes the memorial but comments that it has since disappeared from the church. [1226] Autun Saint-Martin, Extrait du nécrologe de Saint-Martin d´Autun, p. 383. [1227] Her son by her first marriage is named in 971. [1228] Flodoard Addit codex 1 (inserted after 966), MGH SS III, p. 407. [1229] Flodoard Addit codex 1 (inserted after 966), MGH SS III, p. 407. [1230] Bouchard, C. B. (1987) Sword, Miter, and Cloister: Nobility and the Church in Burgundy 980-1198 (Cornell University Press), p. 169. [1231] Cluny, Tome II, 1291, p. 368. [1232] Mâcon Saint-Vincent 7, p. 6. [1233] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 105. [1234] Cluny, Tome III, 2267, p. 398. [1235] Chronicle St-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 163. [1236] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 228, p. 24. [1237] Mâcon Saint-Vincent 471 and 490, pp. 271 and 284. [1238] Cluny, Tome III, 2694, p. 721. [1239] Cluny, Tome III, 2782, p. 807. [1240] Mâcon 471, 490, pp. 271, and 284-5, and Cluny Tome IV, 2694, p. 721-22. [1241] Benedict VIII, Letter 16, Patrologia Latina CXXXIX1603, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 270, and quoted in Manteyer, G. de (1908) La Provence du 1ère au 12ème siècles (Paris), p. 274. [1242] Guérard, M. (1857) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Victor de Marseille (Paris) Tome I, 630, p. 626. [1243] Marseille Saint-Victor I, 225, p. 252. [1244] Manteyer, G. de (1908) La Provence du 1ère au 12ème siècles (Paris), p. 273, quoting Bibl. nat. de Madrid, ms. Ee 40, fo 118 vo. [1245] Obituaires de Lyon II, Prieuré Saint-Pierre de Mâcon, p. 482. [1267] Chronico Sancti Michaelis in periculo maris, RHGF X, p. 176. [1268] Marchegay, P. and Mabille, E. (eds.) (1869) Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou (Paris) Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, pp. 23 and 24. [1274] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Contribution à l'histoire de l'attitude des royaumes pirénéens dans la querelle des investitures: de l'origine de Berthe, reine d'Aragon et de Navarre', Estudios Genealógicos, Heráldicos y Nobiliarios, en honor de Vicente de Cadenas y Vicent (Hidalguía, Madrid, 1978), Vol. 2, pp. 375-402, 398. [1275] Poitiers Saint-Nicolas 1, p. 5. -------------------------- From the English Wikipedia page on Adelais of Anjou: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelais_of_Anjou

Adelaide[1] (c. 947–1026),[2] called the White,[3] was the daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga of Maine. She was therefore the sister of Geoffrey Greymantle. She was married five times to some of France's most important noblemen.

1. Her first marriage, probably before 960, was to Stephen, Viscount of Gévaudan.

2. Her second marriage was to Raymond III, Count of Toulouse and Prince of Gothia, in 975. He died in 978.

3. In 982, she married Louis, the young son of Lothair of France, and the two were jointly crowned Monarchs of Aquitaine on the same day at Brioude. The large difference in age between the spouses was cause for a quick divorce in 984.

4. She fled then to Arles, where she contracted, against papal advice, a marriage with William I of Provence in 984. She gave him a daughter, Constance of Arles, who later married Robert II of France.

5. Her final marriage was to Otto-William, Duke of Burgundy.

Raymond III and Adelaide had the following children:

1. Raymond (IV or V) 2. Hugues (Hugh) 3. Letgarda, who married Borrel II of Barcelona.

Notes

1. ^ Variously given as Alice, Adelais, Adalais, or Azalais. 2. ^ Adélaïde Blanche d'Anjou 3. ^ "la Blanche."

(The couple may have had a second daughter, Ermengarde d'Arles, who later married Robert I d'Auvergne.) --- Adelaide of Anjou House of Anjou Born: circa 947 Died: 29 May 1026

Viscountess consort of Gévaudan, bef. 960–975 Preceded by Anne Succeeded by Theutberg

Countess consort of Toulouse, 975–978 Preceded by Gundinildis Succeeded by Arsende

Queen consort of Aquitaine, junior Queen of the West Franks 982–984 Served alongside: Emma of Italy Preceded by Emma of Italy Succeeded by Emma of Italy

Countess and Margravine consort of Provence 984–993 Served alongside: Emilde of Gévaudan Preceded by Arsenda Succeeded by Gerberga of Mâcon

Countess consort of Burgundy 1016–1026 Preceded by Ermentrude de Roucy Succeeded by Adelaide of Normandy --------------------------- From the French Wikipedia page on Adelaide d'Anjou: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ad%C3%A9la%C3%AFde_d%27Anjou

Adélaïde d'Anjou appelée aussi Blanche d'Anjou, ou encore Adélaïde du Gévaudan[1], est née vers 947 et est décédée en 1026[2]

Sœur de Geoffroy Grisegonelle, elle est la fille de Foulques II, comte d'Anjou, et de Gerberge.

Biographie

Ses premières unions

Lorsqu'elle épouse en 982 le jeune Louis V (pas encore roi de France) à Brioude, elle est déjà deux fois veuve du comte Étienne de Gévaudan (mort en 970) dont elle a eu des enfants, et du comte Raymond de Toulouse (mort en 978). La trop grande différence d’âge et les débauches du jeune époux vont être la cause de son divorce en 984.

Son mariage avec le comte de Provence

Elle se réfugie à Arles et se remarie contre l'avis du pape avec le comte de Provence, Guillaume en 984. Leur fille, Constance d’Arles (986-1032) sera reine de France par son mariage avec Robert II en 1003. Le couple aurait eu une seconde fille, Ermengarde d'Arles[3] qui épouse par la suite Robert Ier d'Auvergne. À la mort de Guillaume en 993, elle assure une longue régence qui fournit à la nouvelle noblesse l'occasion de se soulever à plusieurs reprises contre la dynastie comtale[4]. Elle doit également intervenir après la mort du nouveau comte Guillaume II tué au siège du château de Fos en 1018[5].

Un cinquième mariage ?

L'hypothèse d'une cinquième union d'Adélaïde d'Anjou, veuve du comte de Provence, avec Othon Guillaume, comte de Bourgogne et de Mâcon, a été proposée en 1907 par René Poupardin[6] et repris par d'autres historiens à sa suite. Cette hypothèse repose uniquement sur trois chartes[7] attestant simplement l'existence d'une seconde épouse d'Othon Guillaume du nom d'Adélaïde et une bulle du pape Benoît VIII adressée, entre autres, aux dirigeants séculiers de Bourgogne et de Provence, parmi lesquels Othon Guillaume et Adélaïde, sans faire mention d'une union entre eux. Cette hypothèse, qui ne repose sur aucune preuve décisive, est donc à considérer avec prudence[8].

Elle meurt en 1026 et est inhumée à Montmajour, une abbaye proche d'Arles considérée à l'époque comme la nécropole de la famille comtale de Provence.

Notes

1. ↑ De par son mariage avec Étienne, comte de Gévaudan, Revue du Gévaudan, des causses et des Cévennes, tome n°9, 1963, pp 105 à 111.

2. ↑ Richer – Historiarum libri quatuor – Académie impériale de Reims – Reims,1855 p.339 (Liv.III) ici [archive] : ... Ils ne connurent presque pas non plus l’amour conjugal ; car, Louis entrant à peine dans la puberté, tandis qu’Adelaïde était déjà vieille, il y avait entre eux incompatibilité d’humeur et désaccord. Point de chambre commune, ils n’en pouvaient souffrir ; s’arrêtaient-ils quelque part, ils prenaient chacun une hôtellerie séparée ; devaient-ils avoir un entretien, c’était en plain air ; pas de longues conversations d’ailleurs, quelques mots suffisaient. Ils vécurent ainsi pendant deux ans, tellement opposés de caractère, qu’il s’ensuivit un divorce. (XCV) Louis, qui n’avait point de gouverneur, se livrait en jeune homme à toutes sortes de frivolités.

3. ↑ Chronique de Raoul Glaber – Collection des mémoires de France par M. Guizot – Paris, 1824 - L.Ier, ch.III, §180,181 ici [archive] Quand ce jeune prince fut parvenu à l'adolescence, Lothaire l'établit roi et le désigna pour son successeur; il lui choisit aussi pour épouse une princesse d'Aquitaine, qui s'aperçut bientôt que le jeune homme n'hériterait pas des talens de son père. Dès lors elle résolut de se séparer de son époux; et comme elle était douée d'une grande finesse, elle lui fit entendre adroitement qu'ils feraient bien de revenir ensemble dans la province qu'elle avait quittée, supposant que ses droits héréditaires lui en assuraient la possession. Louis, sans soupçonner l'artifice, céda aux conseils de sa femme, et partit avec elle. Quand ils furent en Aquitaine, elle laissa son époux pour rejoindre les siens.

4. ↑ Ermengarde est parfois considérée comme la fille d'Adélaïde et d' Étienne de Gévaudan.

5. ↑ Martin Aurell, Jean-Paul Boyer et Noël Coulet - La Provence au Moyen Âge, page 22.

6. ↑ Martin Aurell, Jean-Paul Boyer et Noël Coulet - La Provence au Moyen Âge, page 23.

7. ↑ René Poupardin, Le Royaume de Bourgogne, 888-1038 : étude sur les origines du royaume d'Arles. Paris: Bibliothèque de l'École des hautes études, IVe section, Sciences historiques et philologiques ; fasc. 163, p. 418, note 6

8. ↑ Auguste Bernard et Alexandre Bruel, éditeurs. Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Cluny, Paris : Imprimerie nationale , t. 3, charte no 2694; C. Ragut, éditeur. Cartulaire de Saint-Vincent de Mâcon connu sous le nom de livre enchaîné. Mâcon, 1864, chartes no 471 et 490.

9. ↑ Stasser 1997, p. 25.

10. ↑ a et b Stasser 1997, p. 24 --- English translation of French Wikipedia section of Regent of Provence:

After William's death in 993, she was for a long time the Regent of Province, Several uprisings took place during her rule. The first uprising was in 1008 under the son of Nivelon de Signes, Viscomte de Guillaume, followed in 1009 by Audibert and Rainaud de Chateaurenard. The new generation of nobility violently denied the religious donations made by the Marquis and members of his entourage. After the death of the new Comte Guillaume de Provence at the siege of Castle Fos in 1018, the situation became even more critical when the Fos family rose in rebellion, increasing the death toll and forcing Adelaide to seek outside help, including her son from a previous marriage (with William II d'Arles), William III Taillefer, Comte de Toulouse.

From English Wikipedia: Her final marriage was to Otto-William, Duke of Burgundy.

French Wikipedia expands on this: The hypothesis of a fifth marriage of Adelaide d'Anjou, widow of the Comte de Provence William, with Otto, Comte de Bourgogne et Macon, was proposed in 1907 by Rene Poupardin, and repeated by other historians after him. The assumption is based only on three charters that simply state the existence of a second wife of Otto-William called Adelaide and a Papal Bull by Benedict VIII addressing, among other things, the secular leaders of Burgundy and Province, including Otto-William and Adelaide, with no mention of a union between them. This assumption therefore is not based on conclusive evidenced and should be viewed with caution.

She died in 1026, perhaps in Avignon since the year of her death is marked by a monk of the Abbey of St-Andre near Avignon. She is buried in Montmajour, an abbey near Arles considered at the time as the necropolis of the family of the Comte de Provence. --- French Wikipedia Sources et bibliographie

Thierry Stasser, « Adélaïde d'Anjou, sa famille, ses unions, sa descendance. État de la question », dans Le Moyen Âge, vol. 103, no 1, 1997, p. 9-52 (ISSN 0027-2841)

Christian Lauranson-Rosaz, L'Auvergne et ses Marges (Velay, Gévaudan) du VIIIe au XIe siècle. La fin du monde antique ?, Les Cahiers de la Haute-Loire, Le Puy-en-Velay, 1987 (réimpr. 2008) (1re éd. 1987), 494 p. [lire en ligne]

Martin Aurell, Jean-Paul Boyer et Noël Coulet - La Provence au Moyen Âge - (ISBN 2-85399-617-4).

Eliana Magnani Soares-Christen, « Les femmes et l’exercice du pouvoir comtal dans le Midi. Autour d’Adélaïde Blanche d’Anjou, comtesse de Provence († 1026) », dans Armel Nayt-Dubois et Emmanuelle Santinelli-Foltz, éd. Femmes de pouvoir, pouvoir des femmes dans l’Occident médiéval et moderne, Presses Universitaires de Valenciennes, Valenciennes, 2009, p. 273-289 (ISBN 978-2-905725-99-8) — Résumé en ligne Richer – Historiarum libri quatuor – Académie impériale de Reims – Reims,1855

Chronique de Raoul Glaber – Collection des mémoires de France par M. Guizot – Paris, 1824 - -------------------- From Darryl Lundy's Peerage page (Forrás / Source): http://www.thepeerage.com/p5.htm#i47

Adelaide d'Anjou F, #47, d. before 990 Last Edited=16 Jun 2008

Adelaide d'Anjou was the daughter of Fulk II d'Anjou, Comte d'Anjou and Gerberge de Tours. She married Guillaume III Taillefer, Comte de Provence, son of Raimond III Pons, Comte de Toulouse and Gersende (?). (Ben M. Angel notes: This is in error. She married instead Guillaume II Le Liberateur, Comte d'Arles, among others.)

She died before 990.

Adelaide d'Anjou was also known as Arsinde d'Anjou .

Child of Adelaide d'Anjou and Guillaume III Taillefer, Comte de Provence (rather: Guillaume II Le Liberateur, Comte d'Arles):

-1. Constance d'Arles+ b. c 973, d. 25 Jul 1032

(No sources given.) -------------------- Marriage(s) and Relationships: Married to: Count d'Arles+Provence Guillaume II BET. 984 - 986

      Child: Constance de Provence 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Notes: Source: Leo van de Pas -------------------- Gift två gånger.

Children 1. Nonia De GRANOL, b. 960

2. Toda De PROVENCE, b. Abt 970

3. Lucie De PROVENCE, b. Abt 983, Arles, Provence, France , d. Yes, date unknown

4. Count Guillaume II De PROVENCE, b. Abt 985

5. Constance De Taillefer of TOULOSE, of France, b. Abt 986, Toulouse, , France , d. 25 Jul 1032, Melun, France

6. Odile De PROVENCE, b. Abt 990, d. Aft 1012 -------------------- Married 5 times. -------------------- From the Genealogy of the French in North America database: http://www.francogene.com/quebec--genealogy/128/128949.php

The family of Guillaume II de PROVENCE and Adèle dite Blanche d'ANJOU

[128949] PROVENCE (de), Guillaume II (Boso & Constance de PROVENCE [128948]), comte de Provence et d'Arles, born about 950

  • married about 980, from France ? (France)

ANJOU (d'), Adèle dite Blanche (Geoffroy Ier & Adélaïs de VERMANDOIS [129058])

1) Constance, born 986, died 1032-07, buried Saint-Denis (Seine-Saint-Denis : 930066), France, married .. (France) 1003 or 1005 Robert II le Pieux de FRANCE

Bibliographie : Essai sur l'histoire des comtes souverains de Provence; Histoire de la maison royale de France (Père Anselme); Mémoires (Société généalogique canadienne-française)

Source(s) or reference(s) : Essai sur l'histoire des comtes souverains de Provence; Histoire de la maison royale de France (Père Anselme); Mémoires (Société généalogique canadienne-française) -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelais_of_Anjou -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelais_of_Anjou Adelaide[1] (c. 947–1026),[2] called the White,[3] was the daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga. She was therefore the sister of Geoffrey Greymantle. She was married five times to some of France's most important noblemen.

Her first marriage, probably before 960, was to Stephen, Viscount of Gévaudan. Her second marriage was to Raymond III, Count of Toulouse and Prince of Gothia, in 975. He died in 978.

In 982, she married Louis, the young son of Lothair of France, and the two were crowned King and Queen of Aquitaine on the same day at Brioude. The large difference in age between the spouses was cause for a quick divorce in 984.

She fled then to Arles, where she contracted, against papal advice, a marriage with William I of Provence in 984. She gave him a daughter, Constance of Arles, who later married Robert II of France.

Her final marriage was to Otto-William, Count of Burgundy.

http://www.thepeerage.com/p5.htm#i47 Adelaide d'Anjou F, #47, d. before 990 Adelaide d'Anjou|d. b 990|p5.htm#i47|Fulk II d'Anjou, Comte d'Anjou|d. 958|p5.htm#i48|Gerberge de Tours||p5.htm#i49|Fulk I. d'Anjou, Comte d'Anjou|d. c 942|p510.htm#i5093|Roselle de Loch||p510.htm#i5094|Theobald de Tours||p819.htm#i8181||||

Last Edited=16 Jun 2008

    Adelaide d'Anjou was the daughter of Fulk II d'Anjou, Comte d'Anjou and Gerberge de Tours. She married Guillaume III Taillefer, Comte de Provence, son of Raimond III Pons, Comte de Toulouse and Gersende (?). She died before 990.
    Adelaide d'Anjou was also known as Arsinde d'Anjou.

Child of Adelaide d'Anjou and Guillaume III Taillefer, Comte de Provence

   * Constance d'Arles+ b. c 973, d. 25 Jul 1032

Fulk II d'Anjou, Comte d'Anjou M, #48, d. 958 Fulk II d'Anjou, Comte d'Anjou|d. 958|p5.htm#i48|Fulk I d'Anjou, Comte d'Anjou|d. c 942|p510.htm#i5093|Roselle de Loch||p510.htm#i5094|Engelger d'Anjou|d. c 888|p510.htm#i5096|Aelinde de Gatinai||p510.htm#i5097|Gardier de Loch, Seigneur de Loch||p510.htm#i5095||||

Last Edited=25 Jan 2010

    Fulk II d'Anjou, Comte d'Anjou was the son of Fulk I d'Anjou, Comte d'Anjou and Roselle de Loch. He married Gerberga de Gatinois.1 He died in 958 at Tours, France.1
    Fulk II d'Anjou, Comte d'Anjou also went by the nick-name of Fulk 'the Good'. He gained the title of Comte d'Anjou.

Children of Fulk II d'Anjou, Comte d'Anjou and Gerberge de Tours

   * Geoffrey I d'Anjou, 4th Comte d'Anjou+ d. 21 Jul 987
   * Bouchard de Vendôme, Comte de Vendôme+ d. 26 Feb 1007
   * Guy d'Anjou d. b 995
   * Drogo d'Anjou d. c 998
   * Blanche d'Anjou d. c 1026
   * Humbert d'Anjou d. a 957
   * Adelaide d'Anjou+ d. b 990
   * Adelheid d'Anjou

Citations

  1. [S1916] Tim Boyle, "re: Boyle Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 16 September 2006. Hereinafter cited as "re: Boyle Family."

-------------------- First name aka: Arsinde & Adelaide Blanche.

Source: The book, 'Kings & Queens of Europe' -------------------- Adelaide (c. 947–1026), called the White, was the daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga of Maine. She was therefore the sister of Geoffrey Greymantle. She was married five times to some of France's most important noblemen.

Her first marriage, probably before 960, was to Stephen, Viscount of Gévaudan. Her second marriage was to Raymond III, Count of Toulouse and Prince of Gothia, in 975. He died in 978.

In 982, she married Louis, the young son of Lothair of France, and the two were jointly crowned Monarchs of Aquitaine on the same day at Brioude. The large difference in age between the spouses was cause for a quick divorce in 984.

She fled then to Arles, where she contracted, against papal advice, a marriage with William I of Provence in 984. She gave him a daughter, Constance of Arles, who later married Robert II of France.

Her final marriage was to Otto-William, Duke of Burgundy. -------------------- Gersende (?)

F, #3977

Last Edited=20 Jan 2003

    She was a niece of Hugh, King of Italy.

Child of Gersende (?) and Raimond III Pons, Comte de Toulouse

-1. Guillaume III Taillefer, Comte de Provence+ b. c 947, d. Sep 1037

Forrás / Source:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p398.htm#i3977

--------------------

http://www.thepeerage.com/p398.htm#i3976

Gersende (?)

F, #3977

Last Edited=20 Jan 2003

    
    She was a niece of Hugh, King of Italy.

Child of Gersende (?) and Raimond III Pons, Comte de Toulouse

Guillaume III Taillefer, Comte de Provence+ b. c 947, d. Sep 1037 -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelais_of_Anjou

Adelaide[1] (c. 947–1026),[2] called the White,[3] was the daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga. She was therefore the sister of Geoffrey Greymantle. She was married five times to some of France's most important noblemen.

Her first marriage, probably before 960, was to Stephen, Viscount of Gévaudan. Her second marriage was to Raymond III, Count of Toulouse and Prince of Gothia, in 975. He died in 978.

In 982, she married Louis V of France, the young son of Lothair of France, and the two were crowned King and Queen of Aquitaine on the same day at Brioude. The large difference in age between the spouses was cause for a quick divorce in 984.

She fled then to Arles, where she contracted, against papal advice, a marriage with William I of Provence in 984. She gave him a daughter, Constance of Arles, who later married Robert II of France.

Her final marriage was to Otto-William, Count of Burgundy. -------------------- Adelaide-Blanche of Anjou (c. 940 –1026) was the countess by marriage of Gévaudan and Forez, of Toulouse, of Provence, and of Burgundy; and queen consort of Aquitaine. She was the regent of Gevaudan during the minority of her sons in the 960s, and the regent of Provence during the minority of her stepson from 994 until 999. She was the daughter of Fulk II, Count of Anjou and Gerberga and sister of Geoffrey Greymantle. She successfully increased Angevin fortunes being married a total of five times. Her family had become upwardly mobile to the point that, as a member of just the third generation from Ingelger, Adelaied-Blanche had married into the highest ranks of the older nobility of western Francia. Her first marriage was to Stephen, the powerful Count of Gévaudan[3] and Forez in eastern Aquitaine. She was no more than fifteen at the time[5] and he was much older. Still, they had three children who survived to adulthood. Stephen died in the early 960s and after his death she ruled the lands as countess-regent for her sons William, Pons and Bertrand. She continued to govern Gevaudan and Forez while her remaining two sons learned to rule their father's counties. Additionally, after her oldest son William's death in 975 she raised his infant son Stephen. Her brother Guy (a.k.a. Guido II) was made Count-Bishop of le Puy in 975 amidst local opposition and at his request Adelaide, acting for her sons Guy and Bertrand, led an army to aid him in establishing the "Peace of God" in le Puy. In 982, as the widow of her second husband, Raymond III, count of Toulouse, she wed Louis V of France, son of Lothair of France. The two were crowned King and Queen of Aquitaine at Brioude by her brother Bishop Guy of le Puy. But the marriage lasted just over a year due to the couple being unable to peacefully live together. There was also a significant age difference—he being just fifteen and Adelaide-Blanche being over forty. Adelaide found herself in a precarious situation with king Lothair but was rescued by Count William I of Provence who she subsequently married in c. 984. Count William of Provence died in 994 shortly after becoming a monk at Avignon. In 1010 king Robert II of France along with Odo II, Count of Blois went to Rome to secure an annulment from Robert's second wife, Constance of Arles, Adelaide-Blanche's daughter by William I. Pope Sergius IV, a friend to the Angevin counts, upheld the marriage and additionally upheld Adelaide's struggle to maintain control of lands at Montmajour Abbey. These lands, at Perth, had been donated by Count William I of Provence with his wife Adelaide-Blanche, as well as by a previous donation by William's father, Boson. A dispute over these lands arose by four brothers, sons of Nevolongus, who pope Sergius threatened with excommunication if they did not withdraw their claim. The claim was withdrawn and the lands remained under the control of Adelaide-Blanche acting as regent for her son William II of Provence. Her fifth marriage was to Otto-William, Count of Burgundy,[c] who subsequently died 21 September 1026. Adelaide-Blanche herself died in 1026, aged approximately eighty-six. The location of her death was probably at Avignon, since the year of her death is recorded by Arnoux, a monk of the abbey of Saint-André, near Avignon. She was buried in Montmajour Abbey, near Arles, considered at the time as the burial place of the family of counts of Provence. Marriages and children

She married first, c. 955, Stephen, Count of Gévaudan.[14] Children of this marriage were: William, (c. 955-975).
Pons, Count of Gévaudan and Forez. He died aft. 26 February 1011.
Bertrand, Count of Gévaudan.
Almodis of Gévaudan, she married Adalbert I de Charroux, Count de la Haute  

Her second marriage was to Raymond III, Count of Toulouse and Prince of Gothia, in 975. He died in 978.

She married as her third husband Louis V of France and the two were crowned King and Queen of Aquitaine but the marriage ended in annulment.
As her fourth husband she married, c. 994—996, William I of Provence

Together they had: Constance of Arles, who later married Robert II of France.

Ermengarde, she married Robert I, Count of Auvergne.
Tota-Adelaide, she married Bernard I, Count of Besalú. 

Her final marriage was to Otto-William, Count of Burgundy. He and Adelaide had no children. [

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Adélaïde la Blanche d'Anjou, Reine consort d'Aquitaine's Timeline

946
946
Anjou, now, Pays de la Loire, France
946
France
966
966
Age 20
Toulouse, France
966
Age 20
968
968
Age 22
Toulouse, France
970
970
Age 24
970
Age 24
Gevaudan, Alpes de Haute Provence, Provence, France
973
973
Age 27
Gévaudan, Toulouse, France
973
Age 27
France
975
975
Age 29
France