Adelaida, marchesa di Susa

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Adelaida di Susa, Margravine di Susa

Nicknames: "Herzogin von Schwaben", "marchese di Susa", "Adelheid Margravine Of Susa", "Adelheid", "Adelais", "o Adeline"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Susa, Torino, Piemonte, Italy
Death: Died in Canischio, Piémont, Italie
Place of Burial: Cathédrale St-Jean , Turin, Piémont, Italie
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Olderico Manfredi II, marchese di Torino e Susa and Berta degli Obertenghi
Wife of Oddon de Maurienne, comte de Savoie; Hermann IV, duke of Swabia and Enrico, marchese di Monferrato
Mother of Amédée II, count of Savoy; Bertha de Savoy; Pierre I, comte de Savoie; Constance de Maurienne; Adelaide de Maurienne (de Savoie, di Susa) and 6 others
Sister of Berta di Susa; Immilla di Susa and Irmgard di Susa

Occupation: Marquise de Suse et d'Italie, Daughter of Olderico-Manfredo II, Marquis of Turin & Ivrea., Margravine of Turin
Managed by: Pam Wilson
Last Updated:

About Adelaida di Susa, Margravine di Susa

Alternative Birth Dates: 1016 and 1034

http://www.mathematical.com/suzaadelais.html

Adelheid (Adelais) Margravine of Susa

born about 1020 Susa, Torino, Italy

died 19 December 1091

father:

  • Ulric II (Udal rico) Meginfred Marchese De Susa

born about 0978 Torino, Piedmont, Italy

died 23 December 1035

mother:

  • Bertha of Ivrea

born about 0980 Lombardy, Italy

died 29 December 1037

siblings:

  • Berta of Torino born about 1040 died before 1064
  • Ermengarde von Susa born about 1015 Turin?, Italy died 21 January 1078

spouse (1st):

  • Eudes (Otto) de Maurienne de Savoy

born about 1002 Maurienne, Savoie, France

died 19 January 1057/60 or 1 March 1059

children (from 1st marriage):

  • Amadeo II Count of Savoy born about 1032 <Geneva, Switzerland> died 26 January 1080

Pietro I of Savoy born 1035

  • Adelaide de Savoy born about 1040 Savoy
  • Berthe of Maurienne born 21 September 1051 died 27 December 1081

spouse (2nd):

  • Hermann IV Duke Of Swabia

born 1015? Schwaben, Bavaria

died 28 July 1038?

children (from 2nd marriage):

  • Hermann I Count of Kastl born 1040? Kastl, Oberpfalz, Bavaria

died 27 January 1056

  • Richwara Princess of Swabia born 1045? Schwaben, Bavaria died 1070

Gebhard I Count of Sulzbach born 1047? Kastl, Oberpfalz, Bavaria

died 1071 Sulzbach, Oberpfalz, Bavaria

biographical and/or anecdotal:

notes or source:

LDS

These spouses could be inverted.

The death date for Herman could be his marriage date as well.

Adelaide di Susa

Da Wikipedia, l'enciclopedia libera.

http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_di_Susa

Adelaide di Susa, conosciuta anche come Adelaide di Torino (Torino, 1016 – Canischio, 19 dicembre 1091), fu marchesana di Torino. Era figlia dell'arduinico Olderico Manfredi, nipote di Arduino de Candie jar Brionne (detto Arduino il Glabro) e marchese di Torino, e dalla contessa Berta Obertagna, figlia di Oberto d'Este. Il suo matrimonio con un Savoia diede origine all'influenza dei Savoia in Piemonte. Le notizie della prima età (l'anno di nascita esatto non è noto) sono molto scarse. Adelaide ebbe un unico fratello, che nel 1034 premorì al padre, e due sorelle, Immilla (o Irmgard o Immula), accasata con nobili tedeschi in entrambi i matrimoni, e Berta, moglie di Teutone del Monferrato e madre di Bonifacio del Vasto. Il marchese divise tra le tre figlie i suoi possedimenti la maggior parte dei quali andò proprio ad Adelaide. Dopo la sua morte però il Piemonte meridionale (Saluzzo, Boves, Ceva, ecc.) passò al figlio di sua sorella Berta.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_of_Susa

--------------------

Adelaide of Susa (also Adelheid, Adelais, or Adeline; c 1014/20 – 19 December 1091[1]) was the Marchioness of Turin from 1034 to her death. She moved the seat of the march from Turin to Susa and settled the itinerant court there. She was the last of the Arduinici.

Born in Turin to Ulric Manfred II and Bertha, daughter of Oberto II around 1014/20, Adelaide's early life is not well-known. Her only brother predeceased her father in 1034, though she had two younger sisters, Immilla and Bertha. Thus, on Ulric's death, the great margraviate was divided between his three daughters, though the greatest part by far went to Adelaide. She received the counties of Ivrea, Auriate, Aosta, and Turin. The margravial title, however, had primarily a military purpose at the time and, thus, was not suitable for a woman.

Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, therefore arranged a marriage between Adelaide and Herman IV, Duke of Swabia, to serve as margrave of Turin after Ulric's death (1034). The two were married in January 1037, but Herman died of the plague while fighting at Naples in July 1038.[2]

Adelaide remarried in order to secure her vast march to Henry of Montferrat (1041), but he died in 1045 and left her a widow for the second time. Immediately, a third marriage was undertaken, this time to Otto of Savoy (1046). With Otto she had three sons, Peter I, Amadeus II, and Otto. She also had two daughters, Bertha and Adelaide. Bertha, the countess of Maurienne, married the Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, while Adelaide married Rudolf of Rheinfeld, who opposed Henry as King of Germany.

After 1060, Adelaide acted as regent for her sons. In 1068, Henry tried to divorce Bertha and consequently drove Adelaide to an intense hatred of him and his family. However, through the intervention of Bertha, Henry received Adelaide's support when he came to Italy to submit to Pope Gregory VII and Matilda of Tuscany at Canossa. Adelaide and Amadeus accompanied the humiliated emperor to Canossa. In gratitude for her mediation, Henry donated Bugey to Adelaide and her family and took back Bertha as his wife, returning to Germany.

Adelaide later played the mediator between her two royal sons-in-law, Henry and the aforementioned Rudolf during the wars of the 1080s in Germany. She was an opponent of the Gregorian reform, though she honoured the papacy, and defender of the autonomy of abbacies.

In 1091, Adelaide died, to the general mourning of her people, and was buried in the parochial church of Canischio (Canisculum), a small village on the Cuorgnè in the Valle dell'Orco, to which she had retired in her later years.[3] In the Cathedral of San Giusto in Susa, in a niche in the wall, there is a statue of walnut wood, beneath a bronze veneer, representing Adelaide, genuflecting in prayer. Above it can be read the inscription: Questa è Adelaide, cui l'istessa Roma Cole, e primo d'Ausonia onor la noma.

Adelaide had passed her childhood amongst the retainers of her father and had even learned the martial arts when young, bearing her own arms and armour. She was reputed to be beautiful and virtuous. She was pious, putting eternal things ahead of temporal. Strong in temperament, she did not hesitate to punish even the bishops and grandees of her realm. She patronised the minstrels and always received them at her court, urging them to compose songs emphasising religious values. She was a founder of cloisters and monasteries that transmitted the history of the region. The only failure of Adelaide's career was the loss of the County of Albon. Greatly admired in her own time, she was compared to Deborah of Biblical fame and was known affectionately as the "marchioness of the Italians." Peter Damian summed up her life and career in the admiring words:

“ Tu, senza l'aiuto di un re, sostieni il peso del regno, ed a te ricorrono quelli che alle loro decisioni desiderano aggiungere il peso di una sentenza legale. Dio onnipotente benedica te ed i tuoi figlioli d'indole regia.

You, without the help of a king, sustain the weight of a kingdom, and to you return those who wish to add to their decisions the weight of legal pronouncement. Omnipotent God bless you and your regal children. ”

[edit] Children

Adelaide and Herman IV, Duke of Swabia had at least three children:

   * Gebhard I, Count of Sulzbach
   * Adalbert I, Count of Windberg
   * Adelaide, married Hermann von Peugen

Adelaide and Otto of Savoy had five children:

   * Peter I of Savoy
   * Amedeus II of Savoy
   * Otto, Bishop of Asti
   * Bertha of Savoy, married Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor
   * Adelaide (died 1080), married Rudolf von Rheinfeld

[edit] Notes

  1. ^ Also given as 27 December.[1]
  2. ^ Herman is stated to have died after eighteen months of matrimony in July 1038.[2]
  3. ^ Her burial is also placed in San Giusto, Susa, or San Giovanni, Turin[3].

--------------------

The family of Odo de SAVOIE and Adelheid MARKGRAFIN

[133758] SAVOIE (de), Odo (Humbert Ier & Auxilia de LENZBURG [133759]), comte de Chablais

  • married about 1046

MARKGRAFIN, Adelheid (Udalrich Manfred & Berta degli OBERTENGHI [134961])

     1) Amédée II, comte de Savoie, married about 1065 Jeanne de GENÈVE

Bibliographie : Europaische Stammtafeln

http://www.francogene.com/quebec--genealogy/133/133758.php

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_of_Susa

--------------------

Adelaide of Susa (also Adelheid, Adelais, or Adeline; ca. 1014/1020 – 19 December 1091[1]) was the Marchioness of Turin from 1034 to her death. She moved the seat of the march from Turin to Susa and settled the itinerant court there. She was the last of the Arduinici.

Born in Turin to Ulric Manfred II and Bertha, daughter of Oberto II around 1014/1020, Adelaide's early life is not well-known. Her only brother predeceased her father in 1034, though she had two younger sisters, Immilla and Bertha. Thus, on Ulric's death, the great margraviate was divided between his three daughters, though the greatest part by far went to Adelaide. She received the counties of Ivrea, Auriate, Aosta, and Turin. The margravial title, however, had primarily a military purpose at the time and, thus, was not suitable for a woman.

Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, therefore arranged a marriage between Adelaide and Herman IV, Duke of Swabia, to serve as margrave of Turin after Ulric's death (1034). The two were married in January 1037, but Herman died of the plague while fighting at Naples in July 1038.[2]

Adelaide remarried in order to secure her vast march to Henry of Montferrat (1041), but he died in 1045 and left her a widow for the second time. Immediately, a third marriage was undertaken, this time to Otto of Savoy (1046). With Otto she had three sons, Peter I, Amadeus II, and Otto. She also had two daughters, Bertha and Adelaide. Bertha, the countess of Maurienne, married the Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, while Adelaide married Rudolf of Rheinfeld, who opposed Henry as King of Germany.

After 1060, Adelaide acted as regent for her sons. In 1068, Henry tried to divorce Bertha and consequently drove Adelaide to an intense hatred of him and his family. However, through the intervention of Bertha, Henry received Adelaide's support when he came to Italy to submit to Pope Gregory VII and Matilda of Tuscany at Canossa. Adelaide and Amadeus accompanied the humiliated emperor to Canossa. In gratitude for her mediation, Henry donated Bugey to Adelaide and her family and took back Bertha as his wife, returning to Germany.

Adelaide later played the mediator between her two royal sons-in-law, Henry and the aforementioned Rudolf during the wars of the 1080s in Germany. She was an opponent of the Gregorian reform, though she honoured the papacy, and defender of the autonomy of abbacies.

In 1091, Adelaide died, to the general mourning of her people, and was buried in the parochial church of Canischio (Canisculum), a small village on the Cuorgnè in the Valle dell'Orco, to which she had retired in her later years.[3] In the Cathedral of San Giusto in Susa, in a niche in the wall, there is a statue of walnut wood, beneath a bronze veneer, representing Adelaide, genuflecting in prayer. Above it can be read the inscription: Questa è Adelaide, cui l'istessa Roma Cole, e primo d'Ausonia onor la noma.

Adelaide had passed her childhood amongst the retainers of her father and had even learned the martial arts when young, bearing her own arms and armour. She was reputed to be beautiful and virtuous. She was pious, putting eternal things ahead of temporal. Strong in temperament, she did not hesitate to punish even the bishops and grandees of her realm. She patronised the minstrels and always received them at her court, urging them to compose songs emphasising religious values. She was a founder of cloisters and monasteries that transmitted the history of the region. The only failure of Adelaide's career was the loss of the County of Albon. Greatly admired in her own time, she was compared to Deborah of Biblical fame and was known affectionately as the "marchioness of the Italians." Peter Damian summed up her life and career in the admiring words:

“ Tu, senza l'aiuto di un re, sostieni il peso del regno, ed a te ricorrono quelli che alle loro decisioni desiderano aggiungere il peso di una sentenza legale. Dio onnipotente benedica te ed i tuoi figlioli d'indole regia.

You, without the help of a king, sustain the weight of a kingdom, and to you return those who wish to add to their decisions the weight of legal pronouncement. Omnipotent God bless you and your regal children. ”

[edit]Children

Adelaide and Herman IV, Duke of Swabia had at least three children:

Gebhard I, Count of Sulzbach

Adalbert I, Count of Windberg

Adelaide, married Hermann von Peugen

Adelaide and Otto of Savoy had five children:

Peter I of Savoy

Amedeus II of Savoy

Otto, Bishop of Asti

Bertha of Savoy, married Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor

Adelaide (died 1080), married Rudolf von Rheinfeld

--------------------

http://www.mathematical.com/suzaadelais.html

Adelheid (Adelais) Margravine of Susa

born about 1020 Susa, Torino, Italy

died 19 December 1091

father:

  • Ulric II (Udal rico) Meginfred Marchese De Susa

born about 0978 Torino, Piedmont, Italy

died 23 December 1035

mother:

  • Bertha of Ivrea

born about 0980 Lombardy, Italy

died 29 December 1037

siblings:

  • Berta of Torino born about 1040 died before 1064
  • Ermengarde von Susa born about 1015 Turin?, Italy died 21 January 1078

spouse (1st):

  • Eudes (Otto) de Maurienne de Savoy

born about 1002 Maurienne, Savoie, France

died 19 January 1057/60 or 1 March 1059

children (from 1st marriage):

  • Amadeo II Count of Savoy born about 1032 <Geneva, Switzerland> died 26 January 1080

Pietro I of Savoy born 1035

  • Adelaide de Savoy born about 1040 Savoy
  • Berthe of Maurienne born 21 September 1051 died 27 December 1081

spouse (2nd):

  • Hermann IV Duke Of Swabia

born 1015? Schwaben, Bavaria

died 28 July 1038?

children (from 2nd marriage):

  • Hermann I Count of Kastl born 1040? Kastl, Oberpfalz, Bavaria

died 27 January 1056

  • Richwara Princess of Swabia born 1045? Schwaben, Bavaria died 1070

Gebhard I Count of Sulzbach born 1047? Kastl, Oberpfalz, Bavaria

died 1071 Sulzbach, Oberpfalz, Bavaria

biographical and/or anecdotal:

notes or source:

LDS

These spouses could be inverted.

The death date for Herman could be his marriage date as well.

--------------------

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ad%C3%A9la%C3%AFde_de_Suse

Adélaïde de Suse

Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre.

Aller à : Navigation, rechercher

Pierre Mignard 001.jpg Codex Manesse Hartmann von Aue.jpg Savoie Blason.svg

Piemonte.svg Francesco Hayez 041.jpg

Cet article est une ébauche concernant l’histoire, le Moyen Âge, le département français de la Savoie, le Piémont et une personnalité italienne.

Vous pouvez partager vos connaissances en l’améliorant (comment ?) selon les recommandations des projets correspondants.

Page d'aide sur l'homonymie Pour les articles homonymes, voir Adélaïde.

Adélaïde de Suse

Adélaïde de Suse

Adélaïde de Suse

Biographie

Naissance 1015 ou 1020

à Turin

Décès 19 décembre 1091

à Canischio

Enfant de Oldéric-Manfred II d'Oriate

et de

Berthe de Toscane

Conjoint 1 Hermann IV de Souabe

2 Henri de Montferrat

3 Othon Ier de Savoie

Enfants Pierre Ier de Savoie

Amédée II de Savoie

Othon

Berthe de Turin

Adélaïde de Savoie

Adélaïde de Suse ou Adélais/Adaline de Suza ou encore Adélaïde de Turin, née Adélaïde de Candie, (née en 1015 ou 1020 à Turin - morte le 19 décembre 1091 à Canischio) était une princesse italienne du Moyen Âge, fille de Oldéric-Manfred II d'Oriate (après 991-1036), margrave (marquis) de Suze et de Berthe de Toscane (vers 976- après 1029), margrave de Suze et comtesse de Turin.

Biographie [modifier]

Cette section est vide, pas assez détaillée ou incomplète. Votre aide est la bienvenue !

Adélaïde de Suse épousa Hermann IV de Souabe (1014-28 juillet 1038) dont elle eut un fils :

   * Gérard Ier de Souabe

Puis, elle épousa Henri de Montferrat

Puis, vers 1046 elle épousa Othon Ier de Savoie, (1023-1060), 3e comte de Savoie (1051) et de Maurienne, dont elle eut :

   * Pierre Ier de Savoie : 4e comte de Savoie, (1048-1078).
   * Amédée II de Savoie : 5e comte de Savoie, (1050-1094).
   * Othon ou Odon, évêque d’Asti (décédé vers 1088)
   * Berthe de Turin (ou Berthe de Savoie, Bertha de Maurine) (1051-1087) épousa en 1066 Henri IV de Franconie, empereur des Romains, élu en 1084.
   * Adélaïde de Savoie, (1052-1079) première épouse de Guigues III d'Albon.

Par ce mariage, elle apporta à la Maison de Savoie de vastes possessions en Italie du nord, avec Suze (clef du passage du Mont-Cenis), Ivrée et Pignerol.

Au décès d'Othon Ier de Savoie en 1060, elle tint la régence. Maîtresse-femme, elle conserva longtemps la tutelle.

Précédé par Adélaïde de Suse Suivi par

Oldéric-Manfred II d'Oriate

Marquis de Turin

ca1034–ca1091

Othon Ier de Savoie

Dernière modification de cette page le 15 mars 2010 à 00:45

-------------------------------------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_of_Susa

Adelaide of Susa

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Adelaide of Susa

Adelaide of Susa (also Adelheid, Adelais, or Adeline; ca. 1014/1020 – 19 December 1091[1]) was the Marchioness of Turin from 1034 to her death. She moved the seat of the march from Turin to Susa and settled the itinerant court there. She was the last of the Arduinici.

Born in Turin to Ulric Manfred II and Bertha, daughter of Oberto II around 1014/1020, Adelaide's early life is not well-known. Her only brother predeceased her father in 1034, though she had two younger sisters, Immilla and Bertha. Thus, on Ulric's death, the great margraviate was divided between his three daughters, though the greatest part by far went to Adelaide. She received the counties of Ivrea, Auriate, Aosta, and Turin. The margravial title, however, had primarily a military purpose at the time and, thus, was not suitable for a woman.

Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, therefore arranged a marriage between Adelaide and Herman IV, Duke of Swabia, to serve as margrave of Turin after Ulric's death (1034). The two were married in January 1037, but Herman died of the plague while fighting at Naples in July 1038.[2]

Adelaide remarried in order to secure her vast march to Henry of Montferrat (1041), but he died in 1045 and left her a widow for the second time. Immediately, a third marriage was undertaken, this time to Otto of Savoy (1046). With Otto she had three sons, Peter I, Amadeus II, and Otto. She also had two daughters, Bertha and Adelaide. Bertha, the countess of Maurienne, married the Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, while Adelaide married Rudolf of Rheinfeld, who opposed Henry as King of Germany.

After 1060, Adelaide acted as regent for her sons. In 1068, Henry tried to divorce Bertha and consequently drove Adelaide to an intense hatred of him and his family. However, through the intervention of Bertha, Henry received Adelaide's support when he came to Italy to submit to Pope Gregory VII and Matilda of Tuscany at Canossa. Adelaide and Amadeus accompanied the humiliated emperor to Canossa. In gratitude for her mediation, Henry donated Bugey to Adelaide and her family and took back Bertha as his wife, returning to Germany.

Adelaide later played the mediator between her two royal sons-in-law, Henry and the aforementioned Rudolf during the wars of the 1080s in Germany. She was an opponent of the Gregorian reform, though she honoured the papacy, and defender of the autonomy of abbacies.

In 1091, Adelaide died, to the general mourning of her people, and was buried in the parochial church of Canischio (Canisculum), a small village on the Cuorgnè in the Valle dell'Orco, to which she had retired in her later years.[3] In the cathedral of Susa, in a niche in the wall, there is a statue of walnut wood, beneath a bronze veneer, representing Adelaide, genuflecting in prayer. Above it can be read the inscription: Questa è Adelaide, cui l'istessa Roma Cole, e primo d'Ausonia onor la noma.

Adelaide had passed her childhood amongst the retainers of her father and had even learned the martial arts when young, bearing her own arms and armour. She was reputed to be beautiful and virtuous. She was pious, putting eternal things ahead of temporal. Strong in temperament, she did not hesitate to punish even the bishops and grandees of her realm. She patronised the minstrels and always received them at her court, urging them to compose songs emphasising religious values. She was a founder of cloisters and monasteries that transmitted the history of the region. The only failure of Adelaide's career was the loss of the County of Albon. Greatly admired in her own time, she was compared to Deborah of Biblical fame and was known affectionately as the "marchioness of the Italians." Peter Damian summed up her life and career in the admiring words:

“ Tu, senza l'aiuto di un re, sostieni il peso del regno, ed a te ricorrono quelli che alle loro decisioni desiderano aggiungere il peso di una sentenza legale. Dio onnipotente benedica te ed i tuoi figlioli d'indole regia.

You, without the help of a king, sustain the weight of a kingdom, and to you return those who wish to add to their decisions the weight of legal pronouncement. Omnipotent God bless you and your regal children. ”

[edit] Children

Adelaide and Herman IV, Duke of Swabia had at least three children:

   * Gebhard I, Count of Sulzbach
   * Adalbert I, Count of Windberg
   * Adelaide, married Hermann von Peugen

Adelaide and Otto of Savoy had five children:

   * Peter I of Savoy
   * Amedeus II of Savoy
   * Otto, Bishop of Asti
   * Bertha of Savoy, married Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor
   * Adelaide (died 1080), married Rudolf von Rheinfeld

[edit] Notes

  1. ^ Also given as 27 December.[1]
  2. ^ Herman is stated to have died after eighteen months of matrimony in July 1038.[2]
  3. ^ Her burial is also placed in the former abbey church of San Giusto, Susa, now Susa Cathedral, or in Turin Cathedral[3].

This page was last modified on 18 September 2010 at 20:34

--------------------

Adelaide of Susa

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Adelaide of Susa (also Adelheid, Adelais, or Adeline; c 1014/20 – 19 December 1091[1]) was the Marchioness of Turin from 1034 to her death. She moved the seat of the march from Turin to Susa and settled the itinerant court there. She was the last of the Arduinici.

Born in Turin to Ulric Manfred II and Bertha, daughter of Oberto II around 1014/20, Adelaide's early life is not well-known. Her only brother predeceased her father in 1034, though she had two younger sisters, Immilla and Bertha. Thus, on Ulric's death, the great margraviate was divided between his three daughters, though the greatest part by far went to Adelaide. She received the counties of Ivrea, Auriate, Aosta, and Turin. The margravial title, however, had primarily a military purpose at the time and, thus, was not suitable for a woman.

Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, therefore arranged a marriage between Adelaide and Herman IV, Duke of Swabia, to serve as margrave of Turin after Ulric's death (1034). The two were married in January 1037, but Herman died of the plague while fighting at Naples in July 1038.[2]

Adelaide remarried in order to secure her vast march to Henry of Montferrat (1041), but he died in 1045 and left her a widow for the second time. Immediately, a third marriage was undertaken, this time to Otto of Savoy (1046). With Otto she had three sons, Peter I, Amadeus II, and Otto. She also had two daughters, Bertha and Adelaide. Bertha, the countess of Maurienne, married the Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, while Adelaide married Rudolf of Rheinfeld, who opposed Henry as King of Germany.

After 1060, Adelaide acted as regent for her sons. In 1068, Henry tried to divorce Bertha and consequently drove Adelaide to an intense hatred of him and his family. However, through the intervention of Bertha, Henry received Adelaide's support when he came to Italy to submit to Pope Gregory VII and Matilda of Tuscany at Canossa. Adelaide and Amadeus accompanied the humiliated emperor to Canossa. In gratitude for her mediation, Henry donated Bugey to Adelaide and her family and took back Bertha as his wife, returning to Germany.

Adelaide later played the mediator between her two royal sons-in-law, Henry and the aforementioned Rudolf during the wars of the 1080s in Germany. She was an opponent of the Gregorian reform, though she honoured the papacy, and defender of the autonomy of abbacies.

In 1091, Adelaide died, to the general mourning of her people, and was buried in the parochial church of Canischio (Canisculum), a small village on the Cuorgnè in the Valle dell'Orco, to which she had retired in her later years.[3] In the Cathedral of San Giusto in Susa, in a niche in the wall, there is a statue of walnut wood, beneath a bronze veneer, representing Adelaide, genuflecting in prayer. Above it can be read the inscription: Questa è Adelaide, cui l'istessa Roma Cole, e primo d'Ausonia onor la noma.

Adelaide had passed her childhood amongst the retainers of her father and had even learned the martial arts when young, bearing her own arms and armour. She was reputed to be beautiful and virtuous. She was pious, putting eternal things ahead of temporal. Strong in temperament, she did not hesitate to punish even the bishops and grandees of her realm. She patronised the minstrels and always received them at her court, urging them to compose songs emphasising religious values. She was a founder of cloisters and monasteries that transmitted the history of the region. The only failure of Adelaide's career was the loss of the County of Albon. Greatly admired in her own time, she was compared to Deborah of Biblical fame and was known affectionately as the "marchioness of the Italians." Peter Damian summed up her life and career in the admiring words:

“ Tu, senza l'aiuto di un re, sostieni il peso del regno, ed a te ricorrono quelli che alle loro decisioni desiderano aggiungere il peso di una sentenza legale. Dio onnipotente benedica te ed i tuoi figlioli d'indole regia.

You, without the help of a king, sustain the weight of a kingdom, and to you return those who wish to add to their decisions the weight of legal pronouncement. Omnipotent God bless you and your regal children. ”

[edit]Children

Adelaide and Herman IV, Duke of Swabia had at least three children:

Gebhard I, Count of Sulzbach

Adalbert I, Count of Windberg

Adelaide, married Hermann von Peugen

Adelaide and Otto of Savoy had five children:

Peter I of Savoy

Amedeus II of Savoy

Otto, Bishop of Asti

Bertha of Savoy, married Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor

Adelaide (died 1080), married Rudolf von Rheinfeld

[edit]

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Adelaide of Susa (also Adelheid, Adelais, or Adeline; 1016 – 19 December 1091) was the Marchioness of Turin from 1034 to her death. She moved the seat of the march from Turin to Susa and settled the itinerant court there.

Born in Turin to Ulric Manfred II and Bertha, daughter of Oberto II around 1016, Adelaide's early life is not well-known. Her only brother predeceased her father in 1034, though she had two younger sisters, Immilla and Bertha. Thus, on Ulric's death, the great margraviate was divided between his three daughters, though the greatest part by far went to Adelaide. She received the counties of Ivrea, Auriate, Aosta, and Turin. The margravial title, however, had primarily a military purpose at the time and, thus, was not suitable for a woman.

Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, therefore arranged a marriage between Adelaide and Herman IV, Duke of Swabia, to serve as margrave of Turin after Ulric's death (1034). The two were married in January 1037, but Herman died of the plague while combatting Naples in July 1038.

Adelaide remarried in order to secure her vast march to Henry of Montferrat (1041), but he died in 1045 and left her a widow for the second time. Immediately, a third marriage was undertaken, this time to Otto of Savoy (1046). With Otto she had three sons, Peter I, Amadeus II, and Otto. She also had two daughters, Bertha and Adelaide. Bertha, the countess of Maurienne, married the Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, while Adelaide married Rudolf of Rheinfeld, who opposed Henry as King of Germany.

After 1060, Adelaide acted as regent for her sons. In 1068, Henry tried to divorce Bertha and consequently drove Adelaide to an intense hatred of him and his family. However, through the intervention of Bertha, Henry received Adelaide's support when he came to Italy to submit to Pope Gregory VII and Matilda of Tuscany at Canossa. Adelaide and Amadeus accompanied the humiliated emperor to Canossa. In gratitude for her mediation, Henry donated Bugey to Adelaide and her family and took back Bertha as his wife, returning to Germany.

Adelaide later played the mediator between her two royal sons-in-law, Henry and the aforementioned Rudolf during the wars of the 1080s in Germany. She was an opponent of the Gregorian reform, though she honoured the papacy, and defender of the autonomy of abbacies.

In 1091, Adelaide died, to the general mourning of her people, and was buried in the parochial church of Canischio (Canisculum), a small village on the Cuorgnè in the Valle dell'Orco, to which she had retired in her later years.[3] In the Cathedral of San Giusto in Susa, in a niche in the wall, there is a statue of walnut wood, beneath a bronze veneer, representing Adelaide, genuflecting in prayer. Above it can be read the inscription: Questa è Adelaide, cui l'istessa Roma Cole, e primo d'Ausonia onor la noma.

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Adelaide of Susa (also Adelheid, Adelais, or Adeline; 1016 – 19 December 1091) was the Marchioness of Turin from 1034 to her death. She moved the seat of the march from Turin to Susa and settled the itinerant court there.

Born in Turin to Ulric Manfred II and Bertha, daughter of Oberto II around 1016, Adelaide's early life is not well-known. Her only brother predeceased her father in 1034, though she had two younger sisters, Immilla and Bertha. Thus, on Ulric's death, the great margraviate was divided between his three daughters, though the greatest part by far went to Adelaide. She received the counties of Ivrea, Auriate, Aosta, and Turin. The margravial title, however, had primarily a military purpose at the time and, thus, was not suitable for a woman.

Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, therefore arranged a marriage between Adelaide and Herman IV, Duke of Swabia, to serve as margrave of Turin after Ulric's death (1034). The two were married in January 1037, but Herman died of the plague while combatting Naples in July 1038.

Adelaide remarried in order to secure her vast march to Henry of Montferrat (1041), but he died in 1045 and left her a widow for the second time. Immediately, a third marriage was undertaken, this time to Otto of Savoy (1046). With Otto she had three sons, Peter I, Amadeus II, and Otto. She also had two daughters, Bertha and Adelaide. Bertha, the countess of Maurienne, married the Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, while Adelaide married Rudolf of Rheinfeld, who opposed Henry as King of Germany.

After 1060, Adelaide acted as regent for her sons. In 1068, Henry tried to divorce Bertha and consequently drove Adelaide to an intense hatred of him and his family. However, through the intervention of Bertha, Henry received Adelaide's support when he came to Italy to submit to Pope Gregory VII and Matilda of Tuscany at Canossa. Adelaide and Amadeus accompanied the humiliated emperor to Canossa. In gratitude for her mediation, Henry donated Bugey to Adelaide and her family and took back Bertha as his wife, returning to Germany.

Adelaide later played the mediator between her two royal sons-in-law, Henry and the aforementioned Rudolf during the wars of the 1080s in Germany. She was an opponent of the Gregorian reform, though she honoured the papacy, and defender of the autonomy of abbacies.

In 1091, Adelaide died, to the general mourning of her people, and was buried in the parochial church of Canischio (Canisculum), a small village on the Cuorgnè in the Valle dell'Orco, to which she had retired in her later years.[3] In the Cathedral of San Giusto in Susa, in a niche in the wall, there is a statue of walnut wood, beneath a bronze veneer, representing Adelaide, genuflecting in prayer. Above it can be read the inscription: Questa è Adelaide, cui l'istessa Roma Cole, e primo d'Ausonia onor la noma. -------------------- Adelaide of Susa (also Adelheid, Adelais, or Adeline; c 1014/20 – 19 December 1091 was the Marchioness of Turin from 1034 to her death. She moved the seat of the march from Turin to Susa and settled the itinerant court there. She was the last of the Arduinici.

Born in Turin to Ulric Manfred II and Bertha, daughter of Oberto II around 1014/20, Adelaide's early life is not well-known. Her only brother predeceased her father in 1034, though she had two younger sisters, Immilla and Bertha. Thus, on Ulric's death, the great margraviate was divided between his three daughters, though the greatest part by far went to Adelaide. She received the counties of Ivrea, Auriate, Aosta, and Turin. The margravial title, however, had primarily a military purpose at the time and, thus, was not suitable for a woman.

Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, therefore arranged a marriage between Adelaide and Herman IV, Duke of Swabia, to serve as margrave of Turin after Ulric's death (1034). The two were married in January 1037, but Herman died of the plague while fighting at Naples in July 1038.

Adelaide remarried in order to secure her vast march to Henry of Montferrat (1041), but he died in 1045 and left her a widow for the second time. Immediately, a third marriage was undertaken, this time to Otto of Savoy (1046). With Otto she had three sons, Peter I, Amadeus II, and Otto. She also had two daughters, Bertha and Adelaide. Bertha, the countess of Maurienne, married the Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, while Adelaide married Rudolf of Rheinfeld, who opposed Henry as King of Germany.

After 1060, Adelaide acted as regent for her sons. In 1068, Henry tried to divorce Bertha and consequently drove Adelaide to an intense hatred of him and his family. However, through the intervention of Bertha, Henry received Adelaide's support when he came to Italy to submit to Pope Gregory VII and Matilda of Tuscany at Canossa. Adelaide and Amadeus accompanied the humiliated emperor to Canossa. In gratitude for her mediation, Henry donated Bugey to Adelaide and her family and took back Bertha as his wife, returning to Germany.

Adelaide later played the mediator between her two royal sons-in-law, Henry and the aforementioned Rudolf during the wars of the 1080s in Germany. She was an opponent of the Gregorian reform, though she honoured the papacy, and defender of the autonomy of abbacies.

In 1091, Adelaide died, to the general mourning of her people, and was buried in the parochial church of Canischio (Canisculum), a small village on the Cuorgnè in the Valle dell'Orco, to which she had retired in her later years.[3] In the Cathedral of San Giusto in Susa, in a niche in the wall, there is a statue of walnut wood, beneath a bronze veneer, representing Adelaide, genuflecting in prayer. Above it can be read the inscription: Questa è Adelaide, cui l'istessa Roma Cole, e primo d'Ausonia onor la noma.

Adelaide had passed her childhood amongst the retainers of her father and had even learned the martial arts when young, bearing her own arms and armour. She was reputed to be beautiful and virtuous. She was pious, putting eternal things ahead of temporal. Strong in temperament, she did not hesitate to punish even the bishops and grandees of her realm. She patronised the minstrels and always received them at her court, urging them to compose songs emphasising religious values. She was a founder of cloisters and monasteries that transmitted the history of the region. The only failure of Adelaide's career was the loss of the County of Albon. Greatly admired in her own time, she was compared to Deborah of Biblical fame and was known affectionately as the "marchioness of the Italians." Peter Damian summed up her life and career in the admiring words:

“ Tu, senza l'aiuto di un re, sostieni il peso del regno, ed a te ricorrono quelli che alle loro decisioni desiderano aggiungere il peso di una sentenza legale. Dio onnipotente benedica te ed i tuoi figlioli d'indole regia.

You, without the help of a king, sustain the weight of a kingdom, and to you return those who wish to add to their decisions the weight of legal pronouncement. Omnipotent God bless you and your regal children. ”

Children

Adelaide and Herman IV, Duke of Swabia had at least three children:

   * Gebhard I, Count of Sulzbach
   * Adalbert I, Count of Windberg
   * Adelaide, married Hermann von Peugen

Adelaide and Otto of Savoy had five children:

   * Peter I of Savoy
   * Amedeus II of Savoy
   * Otto, Bishop of Asti
   * Bertha of Savoy, married Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor
   * Adelaide (died 1080), married Rudolf von Rheinfeld
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Adelaida, marchesa di Susa's Timeline

1020
1020
Susa, Torino, Piemonte, Italy
1030
1030
Age 10
Kastl, Oberpfalz, Bavaria
1030
Age 10
Savoy, France
1032
1032
Age 12
Maurienne, Savoie, Rhone-Alpes, France
1038
1038
Age 18
Schwaben,Bavaria
1040
1040
Age 20
Kastl, Oberpfalz, Bavaria
1040
Age 20
Torino, Torino, Italy
1042
1042
Age 22
1046
1046
Age 26
Geneva,Geneva,,Switzerland
1048
1048
Age 28
Savoy, France