Adeliza van Leuven, Princess of Brabant (c.1105 - c.1151) MP

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Nicknames: "Adelicia of Louvain (Leuven", "Löwen)", "Adela", "Aleidis", "Adèle", "Aelis", "Aleliza", "Adelheid van Leuven", "Adelheid of Brabant", "'Fair Maid of Brabant' Adeliza 'Adela' of Louvain", "Adel; Adelicia de Louven; Adelisa; Adelis; Lucy; Adela of Brabant;"
Birthplace: Leuven, Flemish Region, Belgium
Death: Died in Flanders, Brabant, Belgium
Occupation: Queen of England - See http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Adeliza_of_Louvain, queen consort of the Kingdom of England from 1121 to 1135, the second wife of Henry I, Queen of England, Princess of Brabant, FAIR MAID OF BRABARD, 2nd wife of Henry I
Managed by: Terry Jackson (Switzer)
Last Updated:

About Adeliza van Leuven, Princess of Brabant

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adeliza_of_Louvain and in Dutch: http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelheid_van_Leuven and in French: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ad%C3%A9la%C3%AFde_de_Louvain Adeliza of Louvain,[2] sometimes known in England as Adelicia of Louvain,[3] also called Adela and Aleidis; (1103 – 23 April 1151) was queen consort of the Kingdom of England from 1121 to 1135, the second wife of Henry I.[4] She was the daughter of Godfrey I, Count of Louvain, Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Landgrave of Brabant and Count of Louvain and Brussels. Marriages

Adeliza married Henry I of England on 2 February 1121, when she is thought to have been in her late teens and Henry was fifty-three. It is believed that Henry only married again because he wanted a male heir. Despite holding the record for the most illegitimate children of a British monarch, Henry had only one legitimate son, William Adelin, who predeceased his father on 25 November 1120 in the White Ship disaster.

Adeliza was reputedly quite pretty and her father was Duke of Lower Lotharingia. These were the likely reasons she was chosen. However, no children were born during the marriage. [edit] Queen

Adeliza, unlike the other Anglo-Norman queens, played little part in the public life of the realm during her tenure as queen consort. Whether this was personal inclination or because Henry preferred to keep her nearby in the hope she'd conceive, is unknown. She did, however, leave a mark as a patron of literature and several works, including a bestiary by Philip de Thaon, were dedicated to her. She is said to have commissioned a verse biography of King Henry; if she did, it is no longer extant.

When Henry died on 1 December 1135, Adeliza retired temporarily to the Benedictine convent of Wilton Abbey, near Salisbury. She was present at the dedication of Henry's tomb at Reading Abbey on the first anniversary of his death. At about that time, she founded a leper hospital dedicated to Saint Giles at Fugglestone St Peter, Wiltshire.[5] [edit] Second marriage

As she was still young, she came out of mourning before 1139 and married William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel, who had been one of Henry's chief advisors. She brought with her a Queen's dowry, including the castle of Arundel. King Stephen of England created d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel and Earl of Lincoln.

Although her husband was a staunch supporter of Stephen during the Anglo-Norman civil war, her own personal inclination may have been toward her stepdaughter's cause, the Empress Matilda. When Matilda sailed to England in 1139, she appealed to her stepmother for shelter, landing near Arundel and was received as a guest of the former Queen. [edit] Later life

Adeliza spent her final years in the abbey of Affligem (landgraviat of Brabant), which she richly rewarded with landed estates (three English villages called Ideswordam, Westmerendonam and Aldeswurda, probably near to Arundel).

She died in the abbey and was buried in the abbey church next to her father, Godfrey I, Count of Louvain, (d.1139). The abbey necrology situates her tombstone next to the clockwork. An 18th century floor plan of the church shows her tombstone located halfway up the left nave. Her grave was demolished however during the French Revolution (abt. 1798). Her bones had been found and she was reburied in the cloister of the re-erected Affligem abbey. [edit] Family

One of Adeliza's brothers, Joscelin of Louvain, came to England and married Agnes de Percy, heiress of the Percy family.

Although it is clear that the former queen and Joscelin were very close, he may actually have been an illegitimate son of Adeliza's father and thus her half-brother. His children took their name from their mother's lineage, and their descendants include the medieval Earls of Northumberland.

Adeliza also gave a dowry to one of her cousins when she married in England. [edit] Descendants

Seven of Adeliza and William's children were to survive to adulthood. Among them William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel, father to William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel who was one of the twenty-five guarantors of the Magna Carta.

Adeliza also became an active patron of the church during her second marriage, giving property to Reading Abbey in honour of her late husband and to several other smaller foundations. Adeliza of Louvain Queen consort of the English Tenure 2 February 1121 – 1 December 1135 Spouse Henry I of England William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel Issue Reynor d'Aubigny Henry d'Aubigny Alice, Countess of Eu Olivia d'Aubigny Agatha d'Aubigny William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel Geoffrey d'Aubigny House Norman dynasty House of Louvain Father Godfrey I, Count of Louvain Mother Ida of Namur[1] Born c. 1103 Died 23 April 1151 (aged 48) Affligem Abbey, Brabant Burial Affligem Abbey, Brabant

Adeliza of Louvain (also called Adela and Aleidis; 1103 – 23 April 1151) was queen consort of the Kingdom of England from 1121 to 1135, the second wife of Henry I[2]. She was the daughter of Godfrey I of Leuven, Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Landgrave of Brabant and Count of Leuven and Brussels and his first wife Ida de Namur (not his second wife Constance/Constantia)

First marriage Adeliza married Henry I of England on 2 February 1121, when she is thought to have been somewhere between fifteen and eighteen years of age, whilst Henry was fifty-three.

It is believed that Henry's only reason for marrying again was his desire for a male heir. Despite holding the record for the largest number of illegitimate children of any British monarch, Henry had only one legitimate male heir, William Adelin, who had predeceased his father on 25 November 1120 in the White Ship disaster.

Adeliza was reputedly quite pretty and her father was Duke of Lower Lotharingia. These were the likely reasons she was chosen. However, no children were born during the almost fifteen years of the marriage.

Queen Adeliza, unlike the other Anglo-Norman queens, played little part in the public life of the realm during her tenure as queen consort. Whether this is because of personal inclination, or because Henry preferred to keep her nearby in hopes of her conceiving, is unknown and probably unknowable. She did, however, leave a mark as a patron of literature and several works, including a bestiary by Philip de Thaon, were dedicated to her. She is said to have commissioned a verse biography of King Henry; if she did it is no longer extant.

When her husband died on 1 December 1135, Adeliza retired for a while to the monastery of Wilton, near Salisbury. She was present at the dedication of Henry's tomb at Reading Abbey on the first anniversary of his death.

Second marriage As she was still young she came out of mourning some time before 1139 and married William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel, who had been one of Henry's chief advisors. She brought with her a Queen's dowry, including the great castle of Arundel, and Stephen of England created d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel and Earl of Lincoln.

Although her husband was a staunch supporter of Stephen during the Anglo-Norman civil war, her own personal inclination may have been toward the cause of her stepdaughter Empress Matilda. When the Empress sailed for England in 1139, it was to her stepmother that she appealed for shelter, and she landed near Arundel and was received as a guest of the former Queen.

Later life Adeliza spent her final years in the abbey of Affligem (landgraviat of Brabant), which she richly rewarded with landed estates (three English villages called Ideswordam, Westmerendonam and Aldeswurda, probably near to Arundel).

She died in the abbey and was buried in the abbey church next to her father, duke Godfrey I of Leuven (d.1139). The abbey necrology situates her tombstone next to the clockwork. An 18th century floor plan of the church shows her tombstone located halfway up the left nave. Her grave was demolished however during the French Revolution (abt. 1798). Her bones had been found and she was reburied in the cloister of the re-erected Affligem abbey.

Family One of Adeliza's brothers, Joscelyn de Louvain (Jocelin, Gosuinus), came to England and married Agnes de Percy, heiress of the Percy family.

Although it is clear that the former queen and Josecelin were very close, he may actually have been an illegitimate son of Adeliza's father and thus her half-brother. His children took their name from their mother's lineage, and their descendants include the medieval Earls of Northumberland.

Adeliza also gave a dowry to one of her cousins when she married in England.

Descendants Seven of Adeliza and William's children were to survive to adulthood. Among them William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel, father to William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel who was one of the twenty-five guarantors of the Magna Carta.

Adeliza also became an active patron of the church during her second marriage, giving property to Reading Abbey in honour of her former husband and to several other, smaller foundations.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adeliza_of_Leuven

-------------------- from thePeerage.com:

   Adeliza of Louvain d. 1151, second queen of Henry I, was daughter of Godfrey (Barbatus) of Louvain, duke of Brabant or Lower Lotharingia, descended in the male line from Charles the Great. The date of her birth is not known, but she is described as puella in 1120. It was partly the report of her singular beauty (on which all the chroniclers are agreed), and partly ob spem prolis adipiscendæ (Gervase, i. 92, Rolls Ser.), that Henry, then in his fiftieth year (and a widower since May 1118), sought her hand in the above year. The contract of marriage was signed 16 April 1120; but, owing to the delay in the bride's arrival, the marriage itself did not take place till 24 Jan. 1120-1, the royal pair being crowned by the Archbishop of Canterbury six days later. It was on this occasion that Henry of Huntingdon (p. 243, Rolls Ser.) composed, in praise of her beauty, the elegiacs beginning:Anglorum regina, tuos, Adeliza, decoresIpsa referre parans musa stupore riget.
    Of a gentle and retiring disposition she took no part in politics, but devoted herself to soothing and pacifying the disappointed and sullen king. She also interested herself greatly in the literary movement of the day, taking under her special patronage Geoffroi Gaimar, Philip du Than, the author of the Voyage de St. Brandan, and David the Trouveur. On the death of Henry (1 Dec. 1135) she disappears from view; but it is probable that she retired to the castle of Arundel which, with its honour, had been left to her in dower for life. We find her residing there in 1139, when the empress landed in the neighbourhood, and was received into the castle ab Adeliza quondam regis Henrici regina tunc autem amica (sic) vel uxore W. Comitis de Arundell (Gervase, ed. Stubbs, i. 110). 
     The date of her marriage to William de Albini [see Albini, William de, d. 1176] is unknown; but as she left by him seven children, it cannot have been long after Henry's death. Her only recorded acts after 1139 are her foundation of the small priories of Pyneham and of the Causeway (De Calceto), and her benefactions to that of Boxgrove, all in Sussex, with her gifts to Henry's abbey of Reading and to the cathedral church of Chichester. To the latter she presented the prebend of West Dean in the year 1150, after which date there are no further traces of her. 
      It is stated by Sandford that she was certainly buried at Reading; but she has since been proved to have left her husband and retired to the abbey of Affligam near Alost, in Flanders, which had been founded by her father and uncle, and to which her brother Henry had withdrawn in 1149. Here she died on 24 March 1151 (Annals of Margam), and was buried: Affligenam delata vivendi finem facit ix. kal. Aprilis et sepulta est e regione horologii nostri (Sanderus, Chorographia Sacra Brabantiæ). While lady of Arundel she had sub-enfeoffed her brother Joceline (the Castellan) in the lordship of Petworth on the occasion of his marriage with the heiress of the Percies, by whom he was ancestor of the earls of Northumberland.

Sources:

    Strickland's Lives of the Queens of England (1840), vol. i.
    Lawrence's Memoirs of the Queens of England (1838), vol. i.
    Henry Howard's Howard Memorials (1834), x.
    Butkens' Trophées du Brabant, vol. i.
    Sanderus' Chorographia Sacra Brabantiæ.

Contributor: J. H. R. [John Horace Round]

Published: 1885 _____________________________________________

Adeliza de Louvain1 F, #102038, b. circa 1103, d. circa 23 April 1151

Last Edited=17 Jul 2004

    Adeliza de Louvain was born circa 1103 at Louvain, Belgium.2,3 She was the daughter of Godefroi I de Louvain, Duc de Basse-Lorraine and Ida de Namur, Comtesse de Namur.1 

She married, firstly, Henry I 'Beauclerc', King of England, son of William I 'the Conqueror', King of England and Matilda de Flandre, on 29 January 1121 at Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England.4

She married, secondly, William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel, son of William d'Aubigny and Maud le Bigod, in 1138.2,3

She was also reported to have been married on 2 February 1121 at Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England.

She died circa 23 April 1151 at Affligem Abbey, Afflingham, Flanders, Belgium.2 She was buried at Afflingham, Flanders, Belgium.2

    From 30 January 1121, her married name became Queen Consort Adeliza of England.2 As a result of her marriage, Adeliza de Louvain was styled as Queen Dowager of England on 1 December 1135.3 

She was a nun in 1150 at Affligem Abbey, Afflingham, Flanders, Belgium.2,3 She has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.5

    

Children of Adeliza de Louvain and William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel

   * Reynor d'Aubigny 1
   * Henry d'Aubigny 1
   * Geoffrey d'Aubigny 1
   * Alice d'Aubigny+ d. 11881
   * Olivia d'Aubigny 1
   * Agatha d'Aubigny 1
   * William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel+ b. b 1150, d. 24 Dec 11933

Citations

  1. [S106] Royal Genealogies Website (ROYAL92.GED), online <ftp://ftp.cac.psu.edu/genealogy/public_html/royal/index.html>. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogies Website.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 48. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.
  3. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 233. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  4. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 47.
  5. [S18] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995), reference "Adeliza of Louvain, -1151". Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography.

-------------------- From http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#_Toc159664189

Married (as second wife) Henry I King of England, (Royal Chapel, Windsor Castle 29 Jan or 2 Feb 1121) ADELISA de Louvain, daughter of GODEFROI V "le Barbu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Comte de Louvain & his first wife Ida de Chiny Ctss de Namur ([1103/06]-Afflighem Abbey 23/24 Mar or 23 Apr 1151, bur Afflighem Abbey). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "IV Kal Feb" [1121] of King Henry and "Atheleidem filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingæ puellam virginem" and her coronation as queen "III Kal Feb"[116]. Orderic Vitalis names her and her father[117]. William of Newburgh records the second marriage of King Henry I and "filiam ducis Lotharingie", noting that the marriage was childless[118]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names (in order) "Alaida…Anglorum regina…comitissa de Cleves Ida…[et] Clarissia virgo" as the three daughters of "Godefridus Cum-barba"[119]. The Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon records the marriage of "Henricus rex Anglorum" and "Athelam filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingie" in 1121[120]. She was crowned Queen Consort at Westminster Abbey 30 Jan or 3 Feb 1121. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” married “Regi Angliæ” in 1121[121]. The castle and honour of Arundel was settled on Queen Adelisa after her first husband died. She married secondly ([1136/Sep 1139]) William d’Aubigny [de Albini], who was created Earl of Arundel soon after his marriage. Robert of Torigny records that "Willermi de Albinaio quem vocant comitem de Arundel" married "Aelizam reginam relictam Henrici senioris regis Anglorum"[122]. Adelisa became a nun at Affleghem Abbey, near Aalst in Brabant in 1149/50. The Annals of Margan record the death in 1151 of “Adelidis, regina secunda Henrici regis”[123]. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” died “IX Kal Mai” and was buried at Afflighem after the death of her second husband[124]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "25 Mar" of "Adelicia regina"[125]. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ -------------------- From a Post-em on Web: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igmpostem.cgi?op=show&app=jweber&notify=GNxuisph2uKJGUfPOuo53bzgUVmFTmHm&key=I01917&return=%3Ca+href%3D%22%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Figm%2Ecgi%3Fop%3DGET%26amp%3Bdb%3Djweber%26amp%3Bid%3DI01917%22%3EReturn+to+WorldConnect%3C%2Fa%3E

ID: I01917 Adeliza (Adela) of Louvain

ADELIZA of LOUVAIN (d. 1151), second queen of Henry I, was daughter of Godfrey ('Barbatus') of Louvain, duke of Brabant or Lower Lotharingia, descended in the male line from Charles the Great. The date of her birth is not known, but she is described as 'puella' in 1120. It was partly the report of her singular beauty (on which all the chroniclers agreed), and partly 'ob spem prolis adipiscendæ' (Gervase, i. 92, Rolls Ser.), that Henry, then in his fiftieth year (and a widower since May 1118), sought her hand in the above year. The contract of marriage was signed 16 April 1120; but, owing to the delay in the bride's arrival, the marriage itself did not take place till 24 Jan. 1120-1, the royal pair being crowned by the Archbishop of Canterbury six days later. It was on the occasion that Henry of Huntingdon (p. 243, Rolls Ser.) composed, in praise of her beauty, the elgiacs beginning: Anglorum regina, tuos, Adeliza, decores Ipsa referre parans musa stupore riget. Of a gentle and retiring disposition she took no part in politics, but devoted herself to soothing and pacifying the disappointed and sullen king. She also interested herself greatly in the literary movement of the day, taking under her special patronage Geoffroi Gaimar, Philip du Than, the author of the 'Voyage de St. Brandan,' and David the Trouveur. On the death of Henry (1 Dec. 1135) she disappears from view; but it is probable that she retired to the castle of Arundel which, with its honour, had been left to her in dower for life. We find her residing there in 1139, when the empress landed in the neighbourhood, and was received into the castle 'ab Adeliza quondam regis Henrici regina tunc autem amica (_sic_) vel uxor W. Comitis de Arendell' (Gervase, ed. Stubbs, i. 110). The date of her marriage to William de Albini [see Albini, William de, d. 1176] is unknown; but as she left by him seven children, it cannot have been long after Henry's death. Her only recorded acts after 1139 are her foundation of the small priories of Pyneham and of the Causeway (De Calceto), and her benefactions to that of Boxgrove, all in Sussex, with her gifts to Henry's abbey of Reading and to the cathedral church of Chichester. To the latter she presented the prebend of West Dean in the year 1150, after which date there are no further traces of her. It is stated by Sandford that 'she was certainly buried at Reading;' but she has since been proved to have left her husband and retired to the abbey of Affigam near Alost, in Flanders, which had been founded by her father and uncle, and to which her brother Henry had withdrawn in 1149. Here she died in 24 March 1151 (_Annals of Margam_), and was buried: 'Affligenam delat vivendi finem facit ix. kal. Aprilis et sepulta est e grgione horologii nostri' (Sanderus, _Chorograhia Sacra Brabantiæ_). While lady of Arundel she had subenfeoffed her brother Joceline ('the Castellan') in the lordship of Petworth on the occasion of his marriage with the heiress of the Percies, by whom he was ancestor of the earls of Northumberland. [Stickland's Lives of the Queens of England (1840), vol. i.; Lawrence's Memoirs of the Queens of England (1838), vol. i.; Henry Howard's Howard Memorials (1834), X.; Butkens' Trophéesdu Brabant, vol. i.; Sanderus' Chorographia Sacra Brabantiæ.] J. H. R.* [Ref: DNB, Editors, Leslie Stephen & Sidney Lee, MacMillan Co, London & Smith, Elder & Co., NY, 1908, vol. i, pp. 137-8]

  • John Horace Round, M.A., LL.D., author of this article.

For precise source refs, p. 138 begins "prolis adipiscendæ"

  • ****

Adeliza's failure to bear Henry I a child during the 14 years of their marriage (1121-35) is indeed puzzling, given the number of children both legitimate and illegitimate he had previously sired, and given the fact that after her second marriage, at the age of about 35, she went on to produce 7 children. First and foremost we should remember that Henry and Adeliza married in 1121, when he was in his mid-fifties, a goodly age in that time. It appears from what little we can surmise about the birth dates of his illegitimate and legitimate children that the birth rate among them had already tapered off quite strikingly by 1120, and it's quite possible Henry was no longer quite as successful in reproductive mode as he had once been. Furthermore, I know of no historian who has stated that Henry and Adeliza ever became particularly close or devoted to each other, certainly no more so than Henry had been with his first wife the good Queen Edith-Matilda. If his marriage to Adeliza failed on that very basic level, her childlessness by him would not be quite so surpsising. A dear friend of mind who is presently preparing the first scholarly biography of Adeliza's predecessor Edith-Matilda has opined, though not in print so far, that Henry perhaps was not terribly serious about fathering another child, but always expected, or at least hoped, that his legitimate daughter Matilda (the Empress) would succeed him. This was because he truly wanted the old Anglo-Saxon royal blood, which Matilda had through her mother, to return to the English throne. Certainly there is plenty of evidence that one of the reasons Henry usually cited to justify her succession to the throne when, in the last years of his life, he repeatedly got his barons to swear allegiance to Matilda as his heir, was that she carried the blood of the Old English kings as well as that of the Norman conquerors. Incidentally, as one example of the points of interest we can gather from carefully studying the lives of royal women in the medieval period: if Adeliza married William d'Aubigny at 35 and had 7 children, she was very obviously bearing them well after the age of 40. [Ref: [Ref: Utz 10 Jan 1999 msg to SGM quoting John Carmi Parsons]

One might argue it is possible that the second Earl was not her son, but William and the Queen dowager definitely had a child. CP 5:157, shows that their daughter Alice/Adelise married John, Count of Eu, Lord of Hastings, and cites the following charter from the Cartulary of Robertsbridge: Ego Aliz Comitissa Augi concessi ... pro anima Willelmi Comitis Arundell' patris mei et Aliz Regine matris mee et pro anima domini mei J. Comitis Augi et Godefridi fratris mei ... et pro salute anime mee et omnium antecessorum et successorum .... She calls Aliz the Queen her mother (interesting wording concerning how she addressed her husband). So, unless this is a case of immaculate deception, there were children, actually quite a few, depending on the account you believe (perhaps you meant she had no chidren by Henry I, which is true, but that would be the aged king's fault, not the fault of his young bride, who was younger than the King's daughter, the Empress Matilda). Adeliza was the daughter of Godfrey of Louvain, duke of Lower Lotharingia and became, in her mid-to late teens, the second wife of Henry I in January of 1121, about three years after the death of Henry's first vafe Matilda. Adeliza had no children by Henry during the 15 years as his wife but had seven by her second husband, William dalbini. Henry's need for a wife in 1120 was made urgent by the death of his son and heir William in the White Ship disaster. Most likely in 1138, three years after the death of Henry I, Adeliza married William d'Albini pincerna, son of the butler of first Henry and then Stephen. William d'Albini pincerna senior had solidly supported Stephen, as did William d'Albini pincerna, the younger until 1139. 'Their court was at Arundel (also refered to as the rape of Arundel). By November 1139 the elder Wiliam was deceased and the younger William was earl of Lincoln, created by Stephen. (the editors of Regesta, Vol. III suggest the elder was dead by June 1139). Regesta, Vol. III show William as a frequent attestor for Stephen between 1135 and November, 1139. Adeliza was an active monastic patron following Henry I's death. Her gifts were to Waltham Abbey (early Charters of Waltham Abbey), Reading Abbey (Reading Abbey Cartularies), the monks of St-Vincents, Knights Templars, Waverly Abbey and others. The only surviving Pipe Roll from Henry's reign indicates that in 1130 Adeliza held land in Oxfordshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, Lincolnshire, Berkshire, Gloucestershire (Berkeley), London, Middlesex and Devon. …Adeliza retired to the monastery of Affligem (favored by her father and brothers) shortly before her death in 1151. Another article has suggested that Adeliza, as a child, was educated at Affligem. [Ref: Utz 10 Jan 1999 msg to SGM]

Regards, Curt

http://familytrees.genopro.com/ralphballard/default.htm?page=QueenAdela-ind00067.htm Adeliza, of Louvain (b. 1103-23 Apr. 1151), who married firstly, Henry I, King of England and secondly William D'Aubigny (1109-12 Oct. 1176);

On January 29, 1121, King Henry I married Adeliza, daughter of Godfrey, Count of Louvain, but there were no children from this marriage. Left without male heirs, Henry took the unprecedented step of making his barons swear to accept his daughter Empress Maud, widow of Henry V, the Holy Roman Emperor, as his heir.

Adeliza of Louvain (1103-1151) was queen consort of England from 1121 to 1135, the second wife of King Henry I of England. She was the daughter of a French Count, Godfrey of Louvain.

She married King Henry I in 1121 when she is thought to have been aged somewhere between fifteen and eighteen; he was fifty three. It is believed that Henry's only reason for marrying again was his desire for a male heir. (Despite holding the record for the largest number of illegitimate children of any British monarch, Henry's only legitimate male heir had died in 1120.) Adeliza was reputably quite pretty, and Louvain and England had a mutual enemy in Flanders; these were the likely reasons she was chosen. However, no children were born during the almost 15 years of the marriage.

When her husband died in 1135, Adeliza lived as a nun at Wilton, near Salisbury. As she was still young she came out of mourning some time before 1139 and married William d'Albini, who had been one of Henry's chief advisors. She brought with her a queen's dowry, including the great castle of Arundel, and King Stephen created d'Albini Earl of Arundel. Seven of their children were to survive. Among the descendants of this marriage came two girls destined to become tragic queens; Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard. Adeliza spent her final years in Flanders in a convent.

One of Adeliza's brothers, Jocelin, came to England and married Agnes de Percy, heiress of the Percy family. Their children took their mother's name, and their descendants include the medieval Earls of Northumberland.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adeliza_of_Louvain"

ARUNDEL CASTLE There is nearly 1,000 years of history at this great castle, situated in magnificent grounds overlooking the River Arun in West Sussex and built at the end of the 11th century by Roger de Montgomery, Earl of Arundel. The oldest feature is the motte, an artificial mound, over 100 feet high from the dry moat, and constructed in 1068: followed by the gatehouse in 1070. Under his will, King Henry I (1068-1135) settled the Castle and lands in dower on his second wife, Adeliza of Louvain. Three years after his death she married William d'Albini II, who built the stone shell keep on the motte. King Henry II (1133-89), who built much of the oldest part of the stone Castle, in 1155 confirmed William d'Albini II as Earl of Arundel, with the Honour and Castle of Arundel. Apart from the occasional reversion to the Crown, Arundel Castle has descended directly from 1138 to the present day, carried by female heiresses from the d'Albinis to the Fitzalans in the 13th century and then from the Fitzalans to the Howards in the 16th century and it has been the seat of the Dukes of Norfolk and their ancestors for over 850 years. From the 15th to the 17th centuries the Howards were at the forefront of English history, from the Wars of the Roses, through the Tudor period to the Civil War. Among the famous members of the Howard family are the 2nd Duke of Norfolk (1443-1524), the victor of Flodden, Lord Howard of Effingham, who with Sir Francis Drake repelled the Armada in 1588, the Earl of Surrey, the Tudor poet and courtier, and the 3rd Duke of Norfolk (1473-1554), uncle of Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard, both of whom became wives of King Henry VIII (1491-1547).

These were politically dangerous times: the 'Poet' Earl was executed in 1547; his father, the 3rd Duke of Norfolk only escaped the death penalty because King Henry VIII died the night before the execution was due and the 4th Duke (1536-72) was beheaded for plotting to marry Mary Queen of Scots. There have been two cardinals and a saint in the Howard family; St Philip Howard, 13th Earl of Arundel (1557-95) died in the Tower of London for his faith. By contrast, his son, the 'Collector' 14th Earl (1585-1646), as his nickname suggests, was responsible for many of the treasures which can be seen today. The results of all this history are concentrated at the Castle, which houses a fascinating collection of fine furniture dating from the 16th century, tapestries, clocks, and portraits by Van Dyck, Gainsborough, Mytens, Lawrence, Reynolds, Canaletto and others. Personal possessions of Mary, Queen of Scots and a selection of historical, religious and heraldic items from the Duke of Norfolk's collection are also on display.

During the Civil War (1642-45), the Castle was badly damaged when it was twice besieged, first by Royalists who took control, then by Cromwell's Parliamentarian force led by William Waller. Nothing was done to rectify the damage until about 1718 when Thomas, the 8th Duke of Norfolk (1683-1732) carried out some repairs. Charles Howard, the 11th Duke (1746-1815), known to posterity as the 'Drunken Duke' and friend of the Prince Regent subsequently carried out further restoration. -------------------- Adeliza of Louvain,[2] sometimes known in England as Adelicia of Louvain,[3] also called Adela and Aleidis; (1103 – 23 April 1151) was queen consort of the Kingdom of England from 1121 to 1135, the second wife of Henry I.[4] She was the daughter of Godfrey I, Count of Louvain, Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Landgrave of Brabant and Count of Louvain and Brussels.

Contents [hide] 1 Marriages 1.1 Queen 1.2 Second marriage 2 Later life 3 Family 3.1 Descendants 4 Notes and sources


[edit] Marriages Adeliza married Henry I of England on 2 February 1121, when she is thought to have been in her late teens and Henry was fifty-three. It is believed that Henry only married again because he wanted a male heir. Despite holding the record for the most illegitimate children of a British monarch, Henry had only one legitimate son, William Adelin, who predeceased his father on 25 November 1120 in the White Ship disaster.

Adeliza was reputedly quite pretty and her father was Duke of Lower Lotharingia. These were the likely reasons she was chosen. However, no children were born during the marriage.

[edit] Queen Adeliza, unlike the other Anglo-Norman queens, played little part in the public life of the realm during her tenure as queen consort. Whether this was personal inclination or because Henry preferred to keep her nearby in the hope she'd conceive, is unknown. She did, however, leave a mark as a patron of literature and several works, including a bestiary by Philip de Thaon, were dedicated to her. She is said to have commissioned a verse biography of King Henry; if she did, it is no longer extant.

When Henry died on 1 December 1135, Adeliza retired temporarily to the Benedictine convent of Wilton Abbey, near Salisbury. She was present at the dedication of Henry's tomb at Reading Abbey on the first anniversary of his death. At about that time, she founded a leper hospital dedicated to Saint Giles at Fugglestone St Peter, Wiltshire.[5]

[edit] Second marriage As she was still young, she came out of mourning before 1139 and married William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel, who had been one of Henry's chief advisors. She brought with her a Queen's dowry, including the castle of Arundel. King Stephen of England created d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel and Earl of Lincoln.

Although her husband was a staunch supporter of Stephen during the Anglo-Norman civil war, her own personal inclination may have been toward her stepdaughter's cause, the Empress Matilda. When Matilda sailed to England in 1139, she appealed to her stepmother for shelter, landing near Arundel and was received as a guest of the former Queen.

[edit] Later life Adeliza spent her final years in the abbey of Affligem (landgraviat of Brabant), which she richly rewarded with landed estates (three English villages called Ideswordam, Westmerendonam and Aldeswurda, probably near to Arundel).

She died in the abbey and was buried in the abbey church next to her father, Godfrey I, Count of Louvain, (d.1139). The abbey necrology situates her tombstone next to the clockwork. An 18th century floor plan of the church shows her tombstone located halfway up the left nave. Her grave was demolished however during the French Revolution (abt. 1798). Her bones had been found and she was reburied in the cloister of the re-erected Affligem abbey.

[edit] Family One of Adeliza's brothers, Joscelin of Louvain, came to England and married Agnes de Percy, heiress of the Percy family.

Although it is clear that the former queen and Joscelin were very close, he may actually have been an illegitimate son of Adeliza's father and thus her half-brother. His children took their name from their mother's lineage, and their descendants include the medieval Earls of Northumberland.

Adeliza also gave a dowry to one of her cousins when she married in England.

[edit] Descendants Seven of Adeliza and William's children were to survive to adulthood. Among them William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel, father to William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel who was one of the twenty-five guarantors of the Magna Carta.

Adeliza also became an active patron of the church during her second marriage, giving property to Reading Abbey in honour of her late husband and to several other smaller foundations.

Wikisource has the text of the 1885–1900 Dictionary of National Biography's article about Adeliza of Louvain. 

[edit] Notes and sources 1.^ The Peerage — Adeliza de Louvain 2.^ 'Adeliza of Louvain (c.1103–1151), queen of England, second consort of Henry I' in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (OUP, 2004) 3.^ Agnes Strickland, 'Adelicia of Louvaine' in The Lives of the Queens of England online at 1066.co.nz: "Mr Howard of Corby castle... calls her Adelicia, for the best of reasons - her name is so written in an original charter of the 31st of Henry I..." 4.^ History Timelines 5.^ Strickland, op. cit Adeliza of Louvain House of Leuven Born: 1103 Died: 23 April 1151 English royalty Vacant Title last held by Matilda of Scotland Queen consort of England 2 February 1121–1 December 1135 Vacant Title next held by Matilda of Boulogne [hide]v • d • eEnglish Royal Consorts


George of Denmark (1702–1707) · Mary of Modena (1685–1688) · Catherine of Braganza (1662–1685) · Henrietta Maria of France (1625–1649) · Anne of Denmark (1603–1619) · (Lord Guilford Dudley?) (1553) · Catherine Parr (1543–1547) · Catherine Howard (1540–1542) · Anne of Cleves (1540) · Jane Seymour (1536–1537) · Anne Boleyn (1533–1536) · Catherine of Aragon (1509–1533) · Elizabeth of York (1486–1503) · Anne Neville (1483–1485) · Elizabeth Woodville (1464–1483) · Margaret of Anjou (1445–1471) · Catherine of Valois (1420–1422) · Joanna of Navarre (1403–1413) · Isabella of Valois (1396–1399) · Anne of Bohemia (1383–1394) · Philippa of Hainault (1328–1369) · Isabella of France (1308–1327) · Margaret of France (1299–1307) · Eleanor of Castile (1272–1290) · Eleanor of Provence (1236–1272) · Isabella of Angoulême (1200–1216) · Berengaria of Navarre (1191–1199) · Eleanor of Aquitaine (1154–1189) · Matilda I of Boulogne (1135–1152) · (Geoffrey V of Anjou?) (1141) · Adeliza of Louvain (1121–1135) · Matilda of Scotland (1100–1118) · Matilda of Flanders (1066–1083)


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adeliza_of_Louvain" Categories: English royal consorts | 1103 births | 1151 deaths | Duchesses of Normandy | Women of medieval England | House of Reginar | 12th-century Belgian people | 12th-century English people -------------------- 2 seperate histories on her are below, as well as a link to a book chapter about her. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ See her book chapter at http://www.archive.org/stream/cu31924087994095#page/n227/mode/2up/search/louvain which was taken from "Lives of the queens of England, from the Norman conquest" Volume I - published 1902, by Agnes Strickland. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ From http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Adeliza_of_Louvain ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Adeliza of Louvain (also called Adela and Aleidis; 1103/1105 to April 23, 1151) was queen consort of the Kingdom of England from 1121 to 1135. She was the second wife of Henry I. After her husband's death, Adeliza gave shelter to her step-daughter, Empress Matilda, during the civil war between Matilda and Stephen of Blois for the throne of England.

The daughter of Count Godfrey I of Leuven, she married the much older Henry I shortly after the death of his only legitimate heir. After Henry's death, she married William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel, who had been a chief adviser to the king. Seven of their children survived to adulthood. Although she had remained married to Henry for nearly 15 years, they were unable to produce an heir.

Her grandson, William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel was one of the 25 guarantors of the Magna Carta. She was a patron of the church and spent her final years at Affligem Abbey in Flanders, where she died at the approximate age of 46 or 48 years old.

Contents [hide] 1 Early life and first marriage 2 Second marriage 3 Later life and legacy 4 Notes 5 References 6 Credits


Early life and first marriage

Adeliza was the queen consort to King Henry I of England.Adeliza was born around 1103 at Louvain, or Leuven, Belgium. Other than her being the daughter of Godfrey I of Leuven little is known of her life either before or after she married Henry I of England.

She married Henry, who was the son of William the Conqueror, on February 2, 1121. Her age at the time is uncertain, although she is thought to have been somewhere between 15 and 18 years old, while Henry was 53. Henry's main reason for marrying again was his desire for a male heir. However, despite his reputation for siring the largest number of illegitimate children of any British monarch, Henry had only one legitimate male heir, William Adelin, who had died before his father on November 25, 1120 in the White Ship disaster, the year before Henry married Adeliza.

Adeliza was reputedly an attractive and healthy young woman. This, together with her father's pedigree as duke of Lower Lotharingia made her a good candidate to serve as the prospective mother of a new heir to the British throne. However, no children were born during the almost 15 years of her marriage to Henry.

Adeliza donated lands to Reading Abbey, where Henry I was entombed in 1136Unlike some other Anglo-Norman queens, Adeliza played little part in the public life of the realm during her tenure as queen consort. Whether this is because of personal inclination or because Henry preferred to keep her nearby in hopes of her conceiving a male heir, is unknown. She did, however, leave a mark as a patron of literature. Several works, including a bestiary by Philip de Thaon, were dedicated to her. She is also said to have commissioned a verse biography of King Henry, but if she did, it is no longer extant.

When her husband died on December 1, 1135, Adeliza retired for a time to the monastery of Wilton, near Salisbury. She was present at the dedication of Henry's tomb at Reading Abbey on the first anniversary of his death, and endowed the abbey with lands in his honor.

Second marriage

Arundel Castle was part of Adeliza's dowry when she married William d'Aubigny. She later added apartments to the castle to accommodate the entourage of Empress Matilda, who stayed there for a time during the civil war with Stephen of England.As she was still young, Adeliza came out of mourning some time before 1139 and married William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel, who had been one of Henry's chief advisers. She brought with her a queen's dowry, including the great castle of Arundel. The new king, Stephen of England, created d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel and Earl of Lincoln.

Although her husband was a staunch supporter of Stephen during the Anglo-Norman civil war, her personal inclination may have been toward the cause of Empress Matilda, who was her stepdaughter. When the empress sailed for England in 1139, it was to Adeliza that she appealed for shelter. She therefore landed near Arundel and was received as a guest of the former queen. The stone apartments constructed to accommodate the empress and her entourage survive to this day.

Adeliza and William had seven children surviving to adulthood. All were born at Castle Arundel in Sussex, but their dates are uncertain: William d'Aubigny, (1140) 2nd Earl of Arundel; Olivia (1141); Godfrey (1143); Alice (1145); Agatha (1147); Rayner (1149); and Henry (1151).

One of Adeliza's brothers, Joscelyn de Louvain (Jocelin, Gosuinus), came to England and married Agnes de Percy, heiress of the Percy family. Joscelyn may actually have been an illegitimate son of Adeliza's father and thus her half-brother. His children took their name from their mother's lineage, and their descendants include the medieval Earls of Northumberland.

Later life and legacy Adeliza spent her final years in the abbey of Affligem in Flanders, which she richly rewarded with landed estates. She died in the abbey and was buried in its church next to her father. An eighteenth century floor plan of the church shows her tombstone located halfway up the left nave. However, her grave was demolished during the French Revolution about 1798. Her remains were later reburied in the cloister of the re-erected abbey.

Adeliza was a patron of literature during her marriage to Henry I and of the church during her second marriage, giving property to Reading Abbey in honor of her former husband and to several other, smaller foundations. Her son William was father to William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel who was one of the 25 guarantors of the Magna Carta.

House of Leuven Born: 1103; Died: April 23, 1151 English royalty Preceded by: Matilda of Scotland Queen consort of England February 2, 1121 – December 1, 1135 Succeeded by: Matilda of Boulogne

Notes ↑ The Peerage—Adeliza de Louvain Retrieved December 17, 2008.

References Cokayne, George E., and Peter W Hammond. The complete peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, extant, extinct, or dormant. Gloucester: A. Sutton, 1982-1998. ISBN 9780750901543 Hammond, Peter W., editor. The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda. Stroud, Gloucestershire, UK: Sutton Publishing, 1998. ISBN 9780750901543 McNaughton, C. Arnold. The Book of Kings: A Royal Genealogy. 3 volumes. London, UK: Garnstone Press, 1973. OCLC 59978599 Weir, Alison. Britain's Royal Family: The Complete Genealogy. London, UK: The Bodley Head, 1989. ISBN 9780370313108 Credits New World Encyclopedia writers and editors rewrote and completed the Wikipedia article in accordance with New World Encyclopedia standards. This article abides by terms of the Creative Commons CC-by-sa 3.0 License (CC-by-sa), which may be used and disseminated with proper attribution. Credit is due under the terms of this license that can reference both the New World Encyclopedia contributors and the selfless volunteer contributors of the Wikimedia Foundation. To cite this article click here for a list of acceptable citing formats.The history of earlier contributions by wikipedians is accessible to researchers here:

Adeliza_of_Louvain (Jan 1, 1970) history Note: Some restrictions may apply to use of individual images which are separately licensed.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ From http://livingthehistoryelizabethchadwick.blogspot.com/2010/01/adeliza-of-louvain-lady-of-english.html

I won't be writing a Medieval Monday this week as I've written this main blogpost about one of my female leads from the work in progress. The Empress Matilda shares the credits with her stepmother, Adeliza of Louvain in the new novel. While many readers probably know at least something about the Empress, Adeliza has been less in the public eye and is not well documented by history.

So what was she like, this second queen to Henry I? What's her story?

Adeliza was the daughter of Godrey of Louvain, duke of Lower Lotharingia - an area that is part of Belgium today - see the yellow area on the left of this map. http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/maps/962germa.jpg She was born around 1103, and married Henry I in January 1121 when she was about 18 years old. Henry I's first wife, Matilda of Scotland, had died in 1118. Henry's reputation for begetting children was fearsome and he had more than a score of bastards to his name, but only two legitimate children of his first queen. William Adelin, his son, was heir to the throne, and there was Matilda, his firstborn, who had gone in marriage to Germany as an eight year old child. William Adelin drowned in November 1120 when the White ship sank while leaving Barfleur harbour on a return journey from Normandy to England and Henry found himself without an heir other than Matilda, far away in Germany and now an Empress. Past historians have believed that Henry immediately set about finding a new queen on which to beget more heirs, but it has been proven that even before his son's death, he was in negotiations with Godfrey of Louvain for his daughter's hand. The chroniclers say that Adeliza was beautiful. She was known as 'The Fair Maid of Brabant' She was descended from Charlemagne, and an alliance with her father's house also helped to strengthen Henry I's ties and policies with Germany. By early January 1121, Adeliza was on her way to England and a new life as its queen. As Adeliza settled into life with Henry, he took her everywhere with him, probably in the hope that she would become pregnant. Henry had used his first queen to act as regent when he was absent from England, but Adeliza never took up any kind of political role. This is logical and understandable since by the time Henry married her, he had a very effective administrative system in operation and a strong justiciar in the form of Roger, Bishop of Salisbury. Also, since Adeliza was only 18, unaccustomed to England and Normandy, and inexperienced, there was no point in putting her to rule. Her duty was to Henry and to future heirs. In the event, Adeliza did not become pregnant during the almost 15 years of their marriage. It appears to have been a source of great distress to her. She wrote to Hildebert of Lavardin, Archbishop of Tours for advice on this. We do not know what she said to him, but we do have his reply to her, where he says: 'If it has not been granted to you from Heaven that you should bear a child to the King of the English, in these (the poor) you will bring forth for the King of the Angels, with no damage to your modesty. Perhaps the lord has closed up your womb, so that you might adopt immortal offspring...it is more blessed to be fertile in the spirit than the flesh.' Although Adeliza took no major part in governing the country, she was, nevertheless present at several councils and played a symbolic role in the royal administration. Shortly before her marriage to King Henry, she was elected 'Lady of the English'. She also appeared with Henry at crown wearing ceremonies, including one on the day after her wedding and another the following Pentecost. She was perhaps the first queen entitled to a payment of 'Queen's Gold.' This was later to be an important part of the income of queens. It was a tax of an extra ten per cent on any fine to the crown over the value of ten marks. It was also owed on tax paid by the Jews. The fine was standardised when Eleanor of Aquitaine became queen, but Adeliza is 'the first example of a queen receiving a proportion of a licence fine.' Adeliza also had lands and revenues of her dowry and position as queen of England. She had revenues from Waltham and Queenhithe. (from which she donated 100 shillings to be given each year to Reading Abbey on the anniversary of Henry's death). She had estates in Essex, Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire, Middlesex, Gloucestershire and Devon. She had part of the royal estate at Berkeley and Henry gave her the entire county of Shropshire. She also held the rape of Arundel, including the castle. This and various other lands had not been held as dower by other queens, nor did they revert to the crown on her death, but were hereditary. She appears to have taken an active interest in the management of her lands, issuing orders for example, to the monks of Reading not to alienate any of her gifts to them. 'Aelidis dei gratia regina Edwardo abbati et toto conventui de Radingia, salutem. Audivi a quibusdam quod vultis ecclesiam de Stantona extra dominium vestrum et manum ponere. Quare mando vobis quod nolo ut illam vel aliquod de elemosina mea extra manum vestram ponatis. Teste Reinaldo de Windresores Apud Arondell.' Adeliza was also a concerned sponsor and benefactor of friends and relations. Her brother Joscelin was her constable at Arundel and she gave him the barony of Petworth which was within the honour of Arundel and helped arange him a lucrative marriage. She also helped out her cousin Melisende with a marriage portion of land in Stanton Harcourt. We know that her domestic household seems to have been stable and long serving. Her chaplain was called Herman, her clerk Serlo, and her constable Godeschal. Adeliza was concerned with religeous foundations and seems to have been devout. She founded a leper hospital at Wilton, and in her second marriage, there were also leper houses established at Arundel and Castle Rising. As well as corresponding with Hildebert of Lavardin, she was a close friend of Alexander, bishop of Lincoln, addressing him as 'amico Karissimo' in a charter. She gave donations to Waverley Abbey, Tintern, St. Mary's of Oseney, St. Mary of Eynsham, Waltham Abbey, the Templars, and Affligem Abbey in Brabant, where she was eventually to retire. Adeliza appears to have been well educated and to have enjoyed literature and patronage of the written word. She comissioned an account of Henry's reign from a Scottish poet called David, to be set to music. Sadly this work no longer exists, which is a pity. If it was anything like William Marshal's Histoire, it would ahve been a fantastic insight into the period. Philippe de Thaon's Bestiary is dedicated to Adeliza http://bestiary.ca/etexts/wright1841/bestiary%20of%20philippe%20de%20thaon%20-%20wright%20-%20parallel%20text.pdf In her widowhood, she patronised the poet Serlo of Wilton. When Henry died in 1135, Adeliza entered the nunnery at Wilton and dwelt there for a couple of years, more or less retiring from the world. She was still a young woman though, and when William D'Albini, lord of Buckenham in Norfolk came courting, she agreed to marry him. The D'Albini's were royal stewards and held a solid, important place at court, although they were not of the top rank. William D'Albini had supported Stephen for the throne when Henry died, rather than Henry's daughter Matilda. All the barons had sworn for Matilda during Henry's lifetime, but most were not disposed to welcome her as queen when it came to crunch time. Where Adeliza's sympathies lay is difficult to say, but she had spent a lot of time in Empress Matilda's company between 1125 and 1135, and had known her before that while Matilda was Empress of Germany. However, Adeliza's new husband was staunchly for Stephen. In September 1139, about a year after Adeliza had married William D'Albini, the Empress prepared to come to England to further her claim to the throne. Stephen ordered a watch put on all the ports, but Matilda made instead for Arundel. Although not a port, it had a river connection with the sea and was close to the coast. Several chroniclers seem to think that Adeliza actually invited Matilda to come there. I think she probably did and used the tradition and sacred bond of kinship tie both as a pretext and a genuine reason. Adeliza was of a similar age to Matilda, but she was also her stepmother, and that gave her certain duties and obligations. One of the roles of a queen was that of peace-maker, so perhaps Adeliza thought she could lay the ground for some kind of peace deal between Stephen and Matilda. What her husband thought of all this is not reported, but he certainly went along with it, which suggests, given his otherwise loyalty to Stephen, that he was prepared to indulge his wife. Stephen came to Arundel and the Empress was escorted from the castle to Bristol, and from there the war began in earnest, so as a cordial visit from kin and as a diplomatic exercise, Adeliza's ploy was something of a disaster. Adeliza had been barren in her 15 year marriage to Henry I, but her union with William D'Albini proved the opposite and Adeliza suddenly discovered that she was very fecund indeed. Between 1139 and 1148, she bore seven children. Why she was so fertile with her second husband and not her first is a mystery and open to conjecture. Henry I was certainly not incapable even in his later years, and would have been keen to beget an heir if possible. It's one of history's and biology's puzzles. Adeliza and William's descendants include Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard. The line still exists, although through various side-moves on the family tree. The descendants of Adeliza of Louvain and William D'Albini still own Castle Rising and Arundel Castle today. William D'Albini was a great builder and once his funds and standing increased following his marriage to Adeliza, he embarked on a programme of construction and improvement. His most famous monument is that of Castle Rising in Norfolk where he built an entire castle and graced it with a magnificent entrance hall, rich external decoration based on Norwich Castle, and mod cons in the private chamber. Castle Rising is thought to be the first in the country with separate Ladies and Gents toilets! Having met Adeliza via my alternative research, I must say that when I read this in the conventional record, I burst out laughing because such a refinement was so typical of the Adeliza I am coming to know elsewhere! Adeliza had always been devout, and when her child-bearing years were over, she retired, with her husband's consent, to the Benedictine convent at Afflighem and died there in 1151. Her body was borne to Reading Abbey, where she was buried as a queen beside Henry I. Her husband survived her by another twenty five years and did not remarry. It has been fascinating piecing together the few known details about Adeliza and extrapolating awarenesses of her character from the information available. Although I have based this blog post on the known detail, the Akashic Research has been invaluable too, and has absolutely borne out everything that I've found out from conventional research. Incidentally, I've posted an Akashic description of Adeliza at the top right hand sidebar of the blog. Adeliza of Louvain: An overlooked Queen and 'Lady of the English.'

'O queen of the English, Adela, the very muse who prepares to call to mind your graces is frozen in wonder.' Henry of Huntingdon: The History of the English People

Url to Wikipedia overview article on Arundel Castle http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arundel_Castle

  • Queens Consort by Lisa Hilton published by Weidenfelf & Nicolson

Other works consulted:

Adeliza of Louvain and Anglo Norman Queenship by Laura Wertheimer - Haskins Society Journal 7

The History of the English People 1000-1154 by Henry of Huntingdon - Oxford World Classics.

Picture at the top of the blog is an image from a 12thC bestiary. -------------------- Adeliza of Leuven From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Adeliza of Leuven (also called Adela and Aleidis; 1103 – 23 April 1151) was queen consort of the Kingdom of England from 1121 to 1135, the second wife of Henry I[2]. She was the daughter of Godfrey I of Leuven, Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Landgrave of Brabant and Count of Leuven and Brussels.

First marriage

Adelize married Henry I on 2 February 1121, when she is thought to have been somewhere between fifteen and eighteen years of age, whilst Henry was fifty-three. It is believed that Henry's only reason for marrying again was his desire for a male heir. Despite holding the record for the largest number of illegitimate children of any British monarch, Henry had only one legitimate male heir, William Adelin, who had predeceased his father on 25 November 1120 in the White Ship disaster. Adeliza was reputedly quite pretty and her father was Duke of Lower Lotharingia. These were the likely reasons she was chosen. However, no children were born during the almost fifteen years of the marriage. [edit]Queen

Adeliza, unlike the other Anglo-Norman queens, played little part in the public life of the realm during her tenure as queen consort. Whether this is because of personal inclination, or because Henry preferred to keep her nearby in hopes of her conceiving, is unknown and probably unknowable. She did, however, leave a mark as a patron of literature and several works, including a bestiary by Philip de Thaon, were dedicated to her. She is said to have commissioned a verse biography of King Henry; if she did it is no longer extant. When her husband died on 1 December 1135, Adeliza retired for a while to the monastery of Wilton, near Salisbury. She was present at the dedication of Henry's tomb at Reading Abbey on the first anniversary of his death. [edit]Second marriage

As she was still young she came out of mourning some time before 1139 and married William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel, who had been one of Henry's chief advisors. She brought with her a Queen's dowry, including the great castle of Arundel, and Stephen of England created d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel and Earl of Lincoln. Although her husband was a staunch supporter of Stephen during the Anglo-Norman civil war, her own personal inclination may have been toward the cause of her stepdaughter Empress Matilda. When the Empress sailed for England in 1139, it was to her stepmother that she appealed for shelter, and she landed near Arundel and was received as a guest of the former Queen. [edit]Later life

Adeliza spent her final years in the abbey of Affligem (landgraviat of Brabant), which she richly rewarded with landed estates (three English villages called Ideswordam, Westmerendonam and Aldeswurda, probably near to Arundel). She died in the abbey and was buried in the abbey church next to her father, duke Godfrey I of Leuven (d.1139). The abbey necrology situates her tombstone next to the clockwork. An 18th century floor plan of the church shows her tombstone located halfway up the left nave. Her grave was demolished however during the French Revolution (abt. 1798). Her bones had been found and she was reburied in the cloister of the re-erected Affligem abbey. [edit]Family

One of Adeliza's brothers, Joscelyn de Louvain (Jocelin, Gosuinus), came to England and married Agnes de Percy, heiress of the Percy family. Although it is clear that the former queen and Josecelin were very close, he may actually have been an illegitimate son of Adeliza's father and thus her half-brother. His children took their name from their mother's lineage, and their descendants include the medieval Earls of Northumberland. Adeliza also gave a dowry to one of her cousins when she married in England. [edit]Descendants

Seven of Adeliza and William's children were to survive to adulthood. Among them William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel, father to William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel who was one of the twenty-five guarantors of the Magna Carta. Adeliza also became an active patron of the church during her second marriage, giving property to Reading Abbey in honour of her former husband and to several other, smaller foundations. [edit]Notes and sources

^ The Peerage — Adeliza de Louvain ^ History Timelines

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adeliza_of_Louvain -------------------- Pictured - Petsworth House, Sussex England

Adeliza de Louvain was born circa 1103 Louvain, Belgium.2,3 She was the daughter of Godefroi I de Louvain, Duc de Basse-Lorraine and Ida de Namur, Comtesse de Namur.1 She married, firstly, Henry I 'Beauclerc', King of England, son of William I 'the Conqueror', King of England and Matilda de Flandre, on 29 January 1121 Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England.4 She married, secondly, William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel, son of William d'Aubigny and Maud le Bigod, in 1138.2,3 She was also reported to have been married on 2 February 1121 Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire. She died circa 23 April 1151 Affligem Abbey, Afflingham, Flandre, Belgium.2 She was buried Afflingham, Flandre, Belgium.2

    From 30 January 1121, her married name became Queen Consort Adeliza of England.2 As a result of her marriage, Adeliza de Louvain was styled as Queen Dowager of England on 1 December 1135.3 She was a nun in 1150 Affligem Abbey, Afflingham, Flandre.2,3 She has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.5
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Adelicia van Leuven's Timeline

1105
1105
Leuven, Flemish Region, Belgium
1122
January 29, 1122
Age 17
Windsor, Berkshire, England
1135
1135
Age 30
Arundel Castle, near the Sussex coast
1136
1136
Age 31
England, West Sussex, Arundel (Arundel Castle)
1138
1138
Age 33
Arundel,,Sussex,England
1139
1139
Age 34
1139
Age 34
Buckenham, Norfolk, England
1141
1141
Age 36
Of Castle Arundel, Sussex, England
1147
1147
Age 42
Castle Arundel, Sussex, England
1149
1149
Age 44
Castle Arundel, Sussex, England