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Agnes Browne (Bedingfield)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: of, Oxburgh, Norfolk, England
Death: Died in Suffolk, England
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Sir Edmond Bedingfield, Kt. and Margaret Bedingfield
Wife of Christopher Browne, Esq., of Stamford & Tolethorpe
Mother of Edmund Browne; Anne Gomley; George Browne; Agnes Browne; Katherine Griggs and 3 others
Sister of Thomas de Bedingfield; Robert de Bedingfield; Sir Edmund Bedingfield, KB; Alice Booth; Peter de Bedingfield and 1 other
Half sister of Margaret Jernegan

Managed by: John Ryan Horan
Last Updated:

About Agnes Browne

Bond's "Genealogies...":

        'Christopher Browne, of Stamford, and of Tolethorpe, County Rutland, married (first) Grace, [from this marriage=Francis], daughter and heir of John Pinchbeck, County Lincoln, Esquire, endowed 20th Edward IV; married (second) Agnes, daughter of ***Bedingfield, County Norfolk. This third wife was Elizabeth."

Children of Agnes Bedingfield and Christopher Browne:

  • + 12 i. Christopher6 Browne, born in England; died 1538.
  • 13 ii. Edmond Browne. He married Joan Cecil. Notes for Edmond Browne: from Burke's "American Families with British Ancestry," 1983, General Publishing Co. Inc., Baltimore, p. 2586: 'Edmond, m. Joan, dau. by his 2nd wife, of David Cecil, of Stamford, the grandfather of Sir William Cecil (Lord Burleigh), the famous minister of Queen Elizabeth.'
  • 14 iii. Robert Browne.
  • 15 iv. Anne Browne. She married Mr. Gomley.
  • 16 v. George Browne.
  • 17 vi. Katherine Browne.
  • 18 vii. Agnes Browne.

notes

Notes for Agnes Bedingfield:

"While there is much speculation among genealogists as to Agnes Bedingfield's dates (born anywhere between 1450 and 1500), there does not seem to be any controversy about her marriage to Christopher Browne--according to Savage's "Genealogical Dictionary..." and others--and their children. Some genealogists have her father as Edmond Bedingfield, born about 1450, in Norfolk, England, and died October 15, 1496, Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk, England. Edmond married Margaret Scott about 1478. She was born about 1453, in Kent, England, and died January 29, 1514, Oxborough/Oxburgh, Norfolk, England.  Whatever Agnes's exact parentage was, at least she was a Bedingfield."

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source: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~dantrogers/pafg567.htm#13497

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Taken from http://www.hullhome.com/Brown.gen.htm

While there is much speculation among genealogists as to Agnes Bedingfield's dates (born anywhere between 1450 and 1500), there does not seem to be any controversy about her marriage to Christopher Browne--according to Savage's "Genealogical Dictionary..." and others--and their children. Some genealogists have her father as Edmond Bedingfield, born about 1450, in Norfolk, England, and died October 15, 1496, Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk, England. Edmond married Margaret Scott about 1478. She was born about 1453, in Kent, England, and died January 29, 1514, Oxborough/Oxburgh, Norfolk, England. Whatever Agnes's exact parentage was, at least she was a Bedingfield.

from booklet published by Henry Bedenfield (Bedingfield/Beddingfield/Bennefield, etc.) resident of family seat Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk County, England:

      "The Bedingfield family originated in Norman times and it is said that the earliest known ancestor, Ogerus de Pugeys, came over from Normandy at the time of the conquest as one of the four knights of the Lord Malet. This may not be quite true, and in any case no serious claim has ever been made that Ogerus fought at the Battle of Hastings. However, it is certainly known that Ogerus, a latinize form of the Viking name Ogier, did hold land at Bedingfield (near Eye, Suffolk) of Robert Malet, Lord of Eye, who built the castle there and founded Eye Priory. Also there is a village in Normandy called Paugeais, near Thury Harcourt, which could be the same as Pugeys. The earliest known record of the family, a charter made during King William Rufus' [son of William the Conqueror] reign (1087-1100) tell us of Ogerus paying tithe to Robert Malet and as it is a confirmatory charter there must have been an earlier charter giving the same information though since lost. The charter was re-confirmed by King Henry I (1100-1135) to Ogerus' successor Peter de Bedingfield when the manor became part of the Honour of Eye...
      "The manor of Bedingfield continued to be the chief seat of the family until the inheritance of Tuddenham lands by Sir Edmund in 1476 and when Oxburgh Hall was built. It then became the chief seat, though Bedingfield continued to be owned until relatively modern times by a junior branch of the family." (The Oxburgh/Bedingfield family seat moved only once in their 900 year history and then only 50 miles.)

[Today Oxburgh--pronounced Oxboro-- is a part of the National Trust in England. Dowager Lady Agnes Bedingfield gave Oxburgh Hall to Trust in the 1950s to ensure its future preservation. Author and present resident Henry Bedingfield and his family live in selected quarters.]

from http://www.users.bigpond.net:

      "The Bedingfield surname is locality in origin, and can be traced to a single founder of the line. There are a number of derivatives including Bedenfields, Bedingfields, Bennafields, Benefields, or Beddingfields.
      "The Bedingfields are a very old Catholic family. They are first found in England after 1066 with Ogerus de Pugeys de Bedingfield. Ogerus de Pugeys was a Knight of Lord Malet, Companion to William, the Conqueror...
      "The Bedingfield/Pugeys are of Norman descent with their forebears settling in Normandy, France along with King Rolo of Norway. Rolo was a Viking leader of the principality of Normandy. The King of France gave Rolo the land of Normandy in an agreement to end the [Vikings'] looting of France and to help the King of France from other Vikings attacking France. One of the Lords of Normandy was William, Lord Malet de Freville. Ogerus de Pugeys was a knight in Lord Malet's court. William the Conqueror was the king [Duke] of Normandy at this time.
      "In 1066 when William the Conqueror came over to England, Lord Malet and his knights came with him to fight the Anglo-Saxon King [Harold]. Lord Malet was first cousin to the King of England's wife and was apparently entrusted with the guard of Harold's body after he had been slain on the battlefield [!]. After the conquest, William [Malet] was made governor of York Castle and was slain in it defense about 1071. Lord Malet's son Robert possessed at the general survey thirty-two lordships in Yorkshire, three in Essex, one in Hampshire, two in Nofts, eight in Lincolnshire, and 221 in Suffolk. The near kinsman William Malet [2] became Lord of the Honor of Eye in Suffolk.
      "Because Ogerus de Pugeys fought bravely alongside Lord Malet, he was given land in Suffolk, England, in an area known as 'Badyngafelda' [Old English/Anglo-Saxon]. Badyngafelda was a pasture or meadow that was primarily used for the grazing of sheep. The son of Ogerus was given the duty of caretaker for the second William Malet of Honor of Eye in Suffolk. Ogerus de Pugeys was given the title of Sir Knight Ogerus de Pugeys of Badyngafelda. The name was later changed to de Badyngafelda in recognition of the estate and manor and the de Pugeys was dropped. The family's first seat was Flemming Hall (it is now a farmhouse surrounded by a moat). Around the 1300s the de was dropped and the family became known simply as Bedingfield.
       "In the fourteenth century the family divided into two branches, one of which established itself at Ditchingham, the other at Oxburgh in the Norfolk, which continues to be the ancestral home.

At right is Oxburgh Hall, the family seat of the Bedingfields, as it appears today (from picturesofengland.com).

      "The family was staunchly Catholic and was well respected during Tudor Times, with Sir Henry Bedingield being made governor of the Tower of London during the reign of the Catholic Queen Mary. He guarded Elizabeth with over 100 men. He was perhaps overly strict with his young charge, but his vigilance was as much for Elizabeth's benefit as for the Queen's. Elizabeth's life was sought by ardent supporters of the Queen, and [she was] hidden away in obscurity. Elizabeth may well have been the successful victim of an assassin. Although Bedingfield's constraints irritated her, Elizabeth certainly appears to have appreciated his efforts, affectionately calling him her 'gaoler' and when she became queen, although she dismissed him from court, she bore him no ill will, and teased him that if she should need to keep someone closely confined, she would summon him. She later visited him at Oxburgh Hall in 1578." [This Henry would have been our Agnes's first or second cousin.]
view all 11

Agnes Browne's Timeline

1460
1460
Oxburgh, Norfolk, England
1480
1480
Age 20
Stamford, Lincolnshire, England
1486
1486
Age 26
Stamford Lincolnshire, England
1488
1488
Age 28
Stamford Lincolnshire, England
1492
1492
Age 32
Stamford Lincolnshire, England
1495
1495
Age 35
Stamford Lincolnshire, England
1497
1497
Age 37
Stanford, Lincolnshire, England
1498
1498
Age 38
Stamford, Lincolnshire, England
1516
1516
Age 56
Suffolk, England
1533
1533
Age 56