Aeldert Heymansz Roosa

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Aeldert Heymansz Roosa

Nicknames: "Aldert Heyamnsen", "Aldert Roosa", "Albert /Roosa/Aldert Hymans Roosa", "Albert Roosa", "Aleardt Roosa", "Albrecht Roosa", "Haymanse Albert"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Herwijnen, Lingewaal, Gelderland, The Netherlands
Death: Died in Esopus, Hurley, Ulster County, New York, United States
Place of Burial: Hurley, Ulster, New York, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Heijmen Gijsbertsz Rosa and Eyken Jans Janse Kuystendr.
Husband of Wijntje Ariens Wynt Je Ariens de Jongh
Father of Heyman Aldertse Roosa; Arien Heymanse Roosa; Jan Alderts Roosa; Eyke Albertse Roosa; Maartje Alderts Roosa and 6 others
Brother of Govert Heijmensz Rosa; Jan Heymensz Rosa; Anneke Heymans Rosa and Gijsbert Heijmans Roosa
Half brother of Olee Rooza and Neeltien Rooza

Occupation: "agriculturist, from Herwynen, Gelderland, Holland; a Sergeant in the Burgher Guard; 1673 officers at Esopus by Governor Anthony COLVE; one of the first Schepens of Esopus., overseer, Farmer/Yeoman, Cheesemaker, Kolonist in Nieuw Nederland
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About Aeldert Heymansz Roosa

Aleardt, Aldert or Albert Heymanse Roose came to this country from Harwyen, also spelled Herwijnen, in Gelderland, Holland, on Waal river, five miles west of Bommel. Or it may be the present Herwijnen, a short distance east of Bommel in Gelderland or the present Herwen in Gelderland twelve miles southeast of Arnhem. With him came his wife, Wyntje (Lavinia) Allard or Ariens, and eight children in the ship Bontekoe (Spotted Cow), Captain Peter Lucas April 15, 1660; and settled in the Wildwyck district of Esopus, now Kingston, Ulster County, New York.

Of these eight children: Heyman, bom in 1643, married Maritje Roosevelt. Arie, bom in 1645, married Maria Pels. Jan, bom in 1651, married Hellegond Williamse Van Buren. lkee or Aaghe married Dr. Roelof Kiersted. Maritje married Laurens Jansen. Neeltje married Hendrick Pawling after Nov. 3, 1676. Jannetje married Mattys TenEyck at Hurley Nov. 16, 1679. Aert. Two other children were bom to him and his wife after coming to New Netherland, viz; Annatje and Geurt.

Albert Hymanse Roosa died at Hurley Feb. 27, 1679 (see Kingston Dutch Church Register, bapt. no. 175, where the minister noted the day of his death).

Notes:

The spelling of Roosa has several variations as, Roos, Rosa, Rose, etc.

Notes:

The Roosa family came from Herwynen, Gelderland, Holland, sailing in De Bonte-Koe (Spotted Cow) on 4/15/1660, and went immediately to Esopus, New Amsterdam (New York). Roosa was a land owner and friend of Gov. Stuyvesant and an elder in the Esophus Dutch Reformed church.

Governor Stuyvesant giving a name to Wiltwick (Esopus), May 16th,

1661, appointed Roosa one of its first schepens. Here he took up land,

for which he got a patent in 1664, and died in 1679, leaving a good es-

tate, and eight surviving children.

Notes:

ALLARD HEYMANSEN ROOSA arrived in the harbor of New York on 15 Apr 1660 aboard DE BONTE COE (The Spotted Cow) with his wife and eight children. He married WYNTJE ARIENS DE JONGH born about 1630; daughter of Adrian Meertensen De Jongh. They settled at Wiltwyck (now Kingston NY) and Allard became a prosperous farmer on the rich land. He was a man of considerable means as evidenced by a Power of Attorney appointing Adrian D'Jong to manage his assets in the Netherlands; this was dated shortly before his departure for North America. This document names him as "yeoman at Herwynen". Allard died 27 Feb 1678/9 Hurley NY.

SECOND GENERATION

Children of ALLARD HEYMANSEN ROOSA and WYNTJE ARIENS DE JONGH:

+1. Arie born 3 June 1643 Holland; died 1699 Rhinebeck NY; married about 1669 at Kingston NY Maria Pels born 1645 Greenbush NY; daughter of Evert Pels and Jannetje Symans.

+2. Heyman born 1644 Holland; married Anna Margaret Roosevelt bp 29 Aug 1654 New Amsterdam RDC; daughter of Claes Martensen Van Rosenvelt and Jannetje Thomas.

+3. Jan born 1646 Holland married Hillegond Willemsen Van Buren.

4. Ykje born 1651 Holland; died 1684 Hurley NY; married 1670 at Kingston NY Roelof Kiersted bp 1 Jan 1647 New Amsterdam; died 1685 Kingston NY; son of Hans Kiersted and Sarah Roelofse.

5. Maritje born 1653; married Laurens Jansen Courtright born 1651 Leerdam Gelderland Netherlands; died 1727; son of Jan Bastiaensen Courtright.

6. Neeltje born 1653; died 27 Oct 1745 Rhinebeck NY; married 3 Nov 1676 Henry Pawling.

7. JANNETJE/JENNEKEN born about 1655 Netherlands; died 23 June 1726; married 16 Nov 1679 Hurley NY MATTYS TEN EYCK born 20 Mar 1657/8 New Amsterdam; died 6 July 1741 Hurley NY; son of Coenradt Ten Eyck and Maria Boele.

8. Aert born about 1658 Holland; married Wyntie Aundruium D'Ong.

9. Annatje born 1662 Kingston NY.

10. Geurt born 15 June 1664 Kingston NY; died 15 June 1664.

THIRD GENERATION

Children of Arie Roosa and Maria Pels:

1. Aldert married 21 June 1696 Petronella Van Etten.

+2. Evert married Tryntje Van Etten; daughter of Jacob Jansen Van Etten and Annetje Ariens.

3. Jannetje born 1670; married Jan Van Etten.

Children of Heyman Roosa and Anna Margaret Roosevelt:

1. Jannetie born 6 Oct 1675 Ulster Co. NY; married 30 Nov 1702 Kingston NY Philip Houghteling.

+2. Aldert bp 2 Mar 1678/9 Kingston NY RDC; married Aage Krom.

3. Wyntie married William Crom/Krom.

4. Claes bp 27 Apr 1684 Kingston NY RDC; married Sarah Rutsen.

5. Gysbert bp 17 Oct 1686 Kingston NY RDC.

6. Neeltje bp 13 Oct 1689 Kingston NY RDC; married (1) Johannes Cool; married (2) William Decker.

7. Rachel bp 19 Apr 1696 Kingston NY RDC; married Johannes Ten Broeck.

8. Lea bp 11 Sep 1698 Kingston NY RDC; married 11 Sep 1719 Kingston NY Anthony Crispel.

Children of Jan Roosa and Hillegond Willemsen Van Buren:

+1. Gysbert Jansen married 13 Oct 1695 Kingston NY Grietje Hendrickse Bond.

FOURTH GENERATION

Children of Evert Roosa and Tryntje Van Etten:

+1. Ary married Geesjen Ostrander.

Children of Aldert Roosa and Aagie Krom:

1. Zara bp 11 Feb 1722; probably married 10 Apr 1746 Jan Louw.

Children of Gysbert Jansen Roosa and Grietje Hendrickse Bond:

1. Hillegond born 9 Aug 1696.

2. Jan bp 28 May 1699 Kingston NY RDC.

3. Hendrick born 29 Aug 1703; died young.

4. Hendrick born 30 Mar 1707.

5. Geertjen bp 5 Oct 1712.

FIFTH GENERATION

Children of Ary Roosa and Geesjen Ostrander:

1. Lea bp 12 Aug 1722 Kingston NY RDC; married Petrus Terwilliger.

ALDERT HEYMANSE ROOSA

born

~1602

Herwijnen, Gelderland, Netherlands

married

~1642 to Wyntje Ariens De Jongh

Herwijnen, Gelderland, Netherlands

died

Feb. 27, 1679

Kingston, Ulster NY

Children 1

Arien/Arie Aldertse Roosa

Heyman Aldertse Roosa

Jan Aldertse Roosa

Eyke Aldertse Roosa

Maritje Aldertse Roosa

Neeltje Aldertse Roosa

Jannetje Aldertse Roosa

Aert Aldertse Roosa

Guert Aldertse Roosa

CHR Jun. 3, 1643; m. 1669 to Maria Everts Pels at Kingston; d. 1699 at Rhinebeck, Ulster NY

b. ~1644/5; m. 1678 to Marritje (Anna Margriet) Claesz Roosevelt at Kingston DRC; wd. Sep. 8, 1708; d. Nov. 15, 1708 at Hurley, Ulster NY

b. Apr. 15, 1646; m. 1675 to Hillegond Willems Van Buren

b. ~1652; m. Nov. 1, 1672 to Laurens Jansen Von Kortryck at Kingston; d. Marbletown, Ulster NY

b. ~1653; m. Nov. 3, 1676 to Henry Pawling at Kingston; d. > Oct. 1745 at Rhinebeck, Ulster NY

b. ~1656; m. Nov. 16, 1679 to Mattys Ten Eyck at Kingston DRC

b. ~1658; died young

b. ~1664 at Hurley; d. Jun. 16, 1664 at Hurley

EYKE ALDERTSE ROOSA

born

Apr. 2, 1651 Herwijnen, Gelderland, Netherlands

married

1670 to Roeloff Kierstede died

~1685

Kingston, Ulster NY

Children

see Roeloff Kierstede

FOOTNOTES

1660 - Albert Heymanse ROOSA, "agriculturist, from Herwynen, Gelderland, Holland, and wife and eight children" arrived in New Netherland in April 1660, in the ship called the "Spotted Cow." The wife of Albert Heymans ROOSA was named Wyntje ALLARD or ARIENS, and soon after their arrival they settled in the Esopus district at Wiltwyck, now Kingston, Ulster County, New York. At this place, with Cornelis Barents SLECHT and wife Tryntje BOS, Mathese BLANCHAN and wife Madeline JORISSE, Roeloff SWARTWOUT and wife Eva Alberts BRADT de NOORMAN, and others, Albert Heymans ROOSA and his wife Wyntje ALLARD participated in the first Administration of the Lord's Supper on 25 December 1660, by the Rev. Harmanus BLOEM.

Kregier, Martin, DOCUMENTARY HISTORY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, Vol.III, p.56;

NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY RECORD, v.31, p.163-166,235-237;

Marinus Schoonmaker, HISTORY OF KINGSTON, NEW YORK (1888), p.485;

James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), p.412n.

1661 - On 4 March 1661, Aleardt Heymensen ROOSE, Cornelis Barentsen SLECHT, Juriaen WESTVAEL, Roeloff SWARTWOUT, Gertruy ANDRIES, and Thomas CHAMBERS joined in a contract guaranteeing a salary to Domine BLOEM who had been called as the regular pastor of the Dutch Church at Wiltwyck.


NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY RECORD (1900), v.31, p.163-166,235-237.

1663 - Aldert Heymansen ROOSA was commissioned, 30 March 1663, to lay out and fortify with palisades for the protection of the settlers of Dew Dorf (Hurley) against the savages. On 7 April 1663, ROOSA reported to Stuyvesant that the savages would not allow the building of the fortifications because they were not included in the treaty of 1660. He wrote: "Praying that the gifts promised the savages be sent at once that your good and humble subjects may remain without fear and molestation from these barbarous people, for if rumors and warnings may be believed it would be too dangerous for your humble petitioners and faithful subjects to continue and advance their work otherwise."

ROOSA's petition was forwarded to STUYVESANT only a few weeks prior to the massacre of 7 June 1663, when New Dorf (Hurley) was completely destroyed and many houses in Wiltwyck (Kingston) were burned.

Bertha Jane Thomas Libby, GENEALOGY OF JANE ELIZABETH WHEELER THOMAS (1974), pp.149-155.

See Regional Information - Dutch Names for an explanation of the conventions of the time.

Alternate spellings of Roosa include Rosa, Roos, Roose, Rose (the latter especially after New Netherland became New York).

Alternate spellings of Aldert include Aeldert, Alaerdt, Albert, Elbert, Alert, Allert, Aelardt, Allard

Alternate spellings of Eyke include Aaghe, Yke, Ytse, Ytie, Ikee, Eycke; in the New Amsterdam DRC records she appears as Yke Jans and Ytie Alberts; in the Kingston DRC records she appears as Eyke Albertse Rosa

1 Children's ages in April 1660 from passenger list of the Bontekoe: Arien 17, Heyman 15, Jan 14, Eyke 9, Maritje 8, Neeltje 7, Jannetje 4, Aert 2

1663 - Hendrick Jochemsz SCHOONMAKER was twice wounded at the Massacre of Wiltwyck on 7 June 1663.

Family tradition says that at the time of the Massacre of Wiltwyck, 7 June 1663, Jochem Hendricksz SCHOONMAKER (1655-1730) was on his way to visit his maternal uncle, Volckert Jansen DOUW, at the New Village (Hurley), when he was captured by a Wappinger Indian named Wamassaun. During his captivity he suffered from the brutality of the Indians who amused themselves by throwing burning coals and ashes from their pipes upon his head, thereby scarring it in many places so it was his practice always thereafter to wear a red stocking cap.

THE SCHOONMAKER FAMILY, Part One, p.7.


1663 During the forenoon of 7 June 1663, while the men were in the field, a number of Indians of the Esopus tribe infiltrated the stockade at Nieuw Dorp (Hurley) and, in a sudden onslaught, began to pillage and burn the village. Lieutenant Hendrick SCHOONMAKER of the Burgher Guard streaked for home from the river gate, where he and Jacob PIETERSEN, the miller, had been standing, and "was severely wounded in his house by two shots," but evidently he saved himself and others there. Captain Thomas CHAMBERS managed to break through, though wounded on the way to his farm, and to issue commands "to secure the gates, to clear the cannon and to drive out the savages." The Christians rallied and "the heathen, through God's mercy," were "chased and put to flight." Twelve men had been killed and eight others had been wounded; four women and three children had been struck down or burned alive; four women and six children were missing, among them Rachel de la MONTAGNE the wife of surgeon Gysbert Van IMBROECK (Van AMBOURGH); two of the children of Albert Heymanse ROOSA; and the wife and child of Dominie Van LAER. Magdelena (DIRCKS) ROSENKRANS, veteran of three Indian wars, had not been caught napping, it seems. The baptism of her fifth child during the next month indicates that she had given birth to a daughter, Rachel ROSENKRANS, near the time of the massacre.

A relief force was dispatched from Fort Amsterdam, and during the last days of July, guided by an escapee, Rachel de la MONTAGNE, wife of Gysbert Van AMBOURGH the surgeon, an expedition of 210 men captured the Indian fort up the Rondout valley (at Wawarsing) where she had been held. In early September 1663, Lieut. van KOUWENHOVEN and Captain KREGIER attacked a new fort that the Esopus Indians were building and killed fifteen Indian warriors, including sachem Papequanaehen, and seven of their women and children. In the two or three months following, there were two or three raids on other Indian sites; and through an exchange of prisoners, most of the missing Christians were accounted for. The Esopus tribes fragments were scattered among their neighbor tribes.

NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY RECORD, v.90, pp.12-14.


1663 Immediately following the massacre at Esopus, forty persons at New Harlem were formed into militia companies. Daniel TORNEUR, Jan La MONTAGNE, Michiel MUYDEN, Jaques CRESSON and Jan P. SLOT, were supplied with firelocks; and Isaac VERMEILLE, Abram VERMEILLE, Pierre CRESSON, Jean Le ROY, Glaude Le MAISTRE and Aert P. BUYS, with musquets. Also listed as privates were Joost Van OBLINUS, Jan SCHOENMAKER, et.al.

James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), p.201-203.

At the destruction of the village of Hurley, on 7 June 1663, by the Indians, two of the children of Albert Heymanse ROOSA, with 43 others, women and children, were taken captive. The story of the rescue of these captives by the colonial forces under command of Captain Martin KREGIER is one of the most interesting episodes in the history of early New York.

See Kregier, Martin, DOCUMENTARY HISTORY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, Vol.4, p.39 et seq.;

O'Callaghan, E. B. DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE COLONIAL HISTORY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK (1858), v.2, p256 et seq., 323 et seq., 407.

In a hearing of a complaint against Frederick PHILLIPSEN, Nicholaes MEYER, Luykas ANDRIESZEN and others to the Council of New Netherland, the following testimony was given: "8th Xober, 1663 - Also send a convey down in the morning with grain to the river side, which on returning brought up the Wappinger Sachem and his wife, Splitnose, the Indian last taken by us. Which Sachem brought with him two captive Christian children, stating to us that he could not, pursuant to his previous promise of the 29th of November, bring along with him the remainder, being still five Christian captives, because three were at their hunting grounds and that he could not find them, but that another Indian was out looking for them; the two others are in his vicinity; the squaw who keeps them prisoner will not let them go, because she is very sick and hath no children, and expects soon to die; and when he can get Albert Heyman's oldest daughter, who is also at the hunting ground, and whom he hath already purchased and paid for, then he shall bring the remainder of the Christian captives along. For the two Christian Children which he hath brought with him; an Indian child is given him, being a little girl, and three pieces of cloth, with which he was content."

Hood, Dellman O. THE TUNIS HOOD FAMILY (Portland, Oregon 1960), p.17.

1665 - In May 1665, when it was rumored that Albert Heymanse ROOSA, a Sergeant in the Burgher Guard, was to be arrested for a second assault on the English when he took away a soldier's gun, the guardsmen armed and assembled. Having learned that their sergeant was merely summoned to court, they dispersed without taking any action; but their Officers' Council felt constrained to investigate the matter. After taking some testimony, the investigation was suspended awaiting the coming of the Governor. Governor NICOLLS arrived in September, and sought to ease tensions by replacing the garrison commandant with a commissioned officer, Captain BRODHEAD, who had brought his family here with him to America with the intention of settling here. The Governor instructed BRODHEAD to "be single and indifferent as to justice between soldiers and burghers" and "not let insinuations beget a prejudice in his mind against the Dutch." But the Captain turned out to be a strong partisan of the English.

Capt. BRODHEAD tended to embroil himself with the Dutch/French settlers, even with his neighbors at the New Dorp (Hurley), where he had rented a farm. One day he arrived at the store of Louys DuBOIS while a fight between the feisty Albert Hymanse ROOSA and five English soldiers was going on. ROOSA had entered the store in search of a man to repair his plough-colter and, being badgered by the soldiers, who were in there drinking brandy, he had thrown the colter at one who was drawing his sword, scoring a near miss. Three of the soldiers had chased him outside. BRODHEAD's presence ended the outside engagement, but BRODHEAD didn't go inside to stop the beating the other two soldiers were giving the storekeeper, DuBOIS, and his wife. It was the English soldiers that preferred charges; and the Wiltwyck magistrates, with BRODHEAD sitting as observer, held ROOSA for further examination.

NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY RECORD, v.90, pp.94-102.

1666 - On 16 February 1666, Aldert Heymans ROOSA and his oldest son, Arie Albertsen ROOSA, were convicted with others in using arms in an illegal manner to awe, terrify, and suppress his Majesty's English Garrison at Esopus.

Bertha Jane Thomas Libby, GENEALOGY OF JANE ELIZABETH WHEELER THOMAS (1974), p.150.

1667 - In September 1665, soon after New Netherland had become a Province of Great Britain, the English Governor, Richard NICHOLLS, had visited Kingston and placed Captain Daniel BRODHEAD in command at that place. Owing to BRODHEAD's tyrannical conduct, and the many acts of oppression and cruelty by the English soldiers under his command, the inhabitants rose in open hostility in 1667, and in a petition to Governor NICHOLLS for redress, they set forth numerous deeds of cruelty by the soldiers; vis:

"Albert Heymans ROOSA, going with his plouw yron towards the SMITS, was assaulted by five souldrs. whoe wounded him very much, whereupon the souldiers said --?-- the sd. Albert Heymans going --?-- without any reason --?-- brought him to --?-- Imprisonment was most grievously --?-- wounded by Richard HAMER"

Governor NICHOLLS on 16 April 1667 appointed a Commission to inquire into their troubles, and in his letter of instructions, he says: "Albert Heymans and Anthony D. ELBA have spoken most malicious words, and I look upon them as great incendiaries and disaffected persons; if their words be proved they shall not be suffered to live in this government; if they have been actors in the late riot, pitch upon them two for ringleaders, and give order to inventory and secure their estates by the Schout and Commissaries." These troubles are called the "Mutiny at Esopus" in the histories of the time. The Commission appointed by Governor NICHOLLS sat at Esopus for three days. Captain BRODHEAD, admitting the truth of the charges against him was suspended from his command and he died three months afterwards, on 14 July 1667 at Esopus. Antony d'ELBA, Cornelis Barentsen SLEGHT, Albert Heymans ROOSA, and Albert ROOSA's son Ariaen, "were found guilty of a rebellious and mutinous riot, and were taken to New York for sentence. Lieutenant Hendrick SCHOONMAKER, who had also been arrested, was found to have acted under duress and was released. NICHOLS, by advice of his council on the 3rd of May, sentenced Albert Heymans ROOSA to be banished for life out of the government." This sentence of the burghers was subsequently modified, and he returned to Esopus.

Schoonmaker, Marius, THE HISTORY OF KINGSTON (1888), pp.52-57;

NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY RECORD, v.31, p.165.

Governor Francis LOVELACE restored Albert Heymensen ROOSA to favor, and on 16 Sept. 1669 appointed him and Louis DuBOIS two of the Overseers for Hurley, called New Dorp or New Village. The records state that in 1669 "Albert Heymensen peticond to sett up a Brewhouse and Tanffatts in Hurley," and an order was made granting permission.

1669 The names of Albert Heymens ROOSA, Arien Albertson ROOSA, Jacob Jansen VanETTEN, Jan Jansen VanETTEN, Tho. QUICK, Roeloff SWARTWOUT, Mattys BLANCHAN, Louys DuBOIS, and others, appear on a petition to Sir Edmund ANDROS, Governor of New York, praying that he would assist them in procuring a minister for Esopus "that can preache bothe English and Dutche, wch. will bee most fitting for this place, it being in its Minority."

Kregier, Martin, DOCUMENTARY HISTORY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, Vol.3, p.965;

NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY RECORD, v.31, p235.

1670 Albert Heymanse ROOSA was a Sergeant in Capt. Henry PAWLINGS's company on 5 April 1670 at the military rendezvous held at Marbletown. His son Arie ROOSA was a private in the same Company. And in 1673 Albert ROOSA was Captain of a company recruited from Hurley and Marbletown.

SECOND ANNUAL REPORT of the STATE HISTORIAN of NEW YORK, pp.185,191, 198-207, 266,276, 285-298, 378-379, 384,427.

1670 Jan Albertse ROOSA served on the muster roll in Hurley, New York 5 April 1670.

1670 Jan Albertse ROOSA, son of Albert Heymanse ROOSA, married, ca.1670, to Helligoud Williams van BUREN.

1670 Dr. Roeloff KIERSTED married, 1670, to Aaghe ROOSA, born 1651, daughter of Albert Heymanse and Wyntje (ARIENS) ROOSA.

Marinus Schoonmaker, HISTORY OF KINGSTON, NEW YORK (1888), p.482.

1670 - Dr. Roeloff KIERSTED married, 1670, to Aaghe ROOSA, born 1651, daughter of Albert Heymanse and Wyntje (ARIENS) ROOSA.

Marinus Schoonmaker, HISTORY OF KINGSTON, NEW YORK (1888), p.482.

1673 - Albert Heymans ROOSA was confirmed in 1673, as one of the officers at Esopus by Governor Anthony COLVE, and described as "Captain Albert Heymans, who had been prominent in the riot of 1667."

Sources:

1. Sylvester's Hist. Ulster County, page 36

2. Col. Hist. N. Y., VoL XIII., page 231.

3. Col. Hist. N. Y., Vol. XIII., pages 227-228

4. Col. Hist. N. Y., VoL SIII., pages 242-3

5. Schoommaker's Hist. of Kingston, page 3 9. OLDE ULSTER, Vol II, pages 1-9

6. Col. His t. N. Y. Vol. XIII., page 475. Vol. II, page 626 Report State Historian New York, Colonial Series (1896) page 384). http://www.hopefarm.com/roosa.htm

7. Bennett, David Veernoy, The First American Mrs. Rosecrans , NYGBR, vol. 90, p. 10 and p. 164; ; also see transcription at Appendix C - Magdalen, Part 3

De Young, Dirk P., Notes on the Roosa-de Jongh Families, NYGBR Jan. 1939, pps. 33-34

CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH NOTES ON SOME OF THE PATERNAL ANCESTORS, DESCENDANTS, AND COLLATERAL LINES, OF FREDERICK PERRY DECOURSEY (1900-1978) at Bill Decoursey's notes on old Dutch families

8. A Genealogy of the Quick Family in America

http://www5.familytreemaker.com/cgi-bin/thredir.cgi?url=http://www.familyt reemaker.com/_glc_/1123/1123_108.html

9. Biography of WESTBROEK, ANTHONY JANSON

http://www.familytreemaker.com/_glc_/2344/2344_5.html

GenealogyLibrary.com

10. Kingston Dutch Church Register, bapt. no. 175

--------------------

ALDERT HEYMANSEN ROOSA was born about 1620 at Herwynen, Gelderland, Netherlands, the son of Heyman Roosa

Aldert married Wyntie De Jonge in 1642 in Gelderland, Netherlands. She was born about 1623 at Herwynen, Gerderland, the daughter of Andrian and Maria De Jongh

Surnames were not utilized by the Dutch at the time and therefore Wyntie was not known as Wyntie Roosa but as Wyntie Alderts, meaning "Wyntie the wife of Aldert".

all but one born in the Netherlands. 
  ALEARDT, Aldert or Albert Heymanse Roose came to this country from Harwyen, also spelled Herweyen, in Gelderland, Holland, on Waal river, five miles west of Bommel. Or it may be the present Heywennen, a short distance east of Bommel in Gelderland or the present Herwen in Gelderland twelve miles sontheast of Arnhem. With him came his wife, Wyntje (Lavinia) Allard or Ariens, and eight children in the ship Bontekoe (Spotted Cow), Captain Peter Lucas April 15, 1660; and settled in the Wildwyck district of Esopus, now Kingston, Ulster County, New York. Aldert was about 40 years old, Wyntie was about 37. and the children ranging in ages from 17 to 2,all but one born in the Netherlands.  they were members of the Dutch Reformed Church. 
Of these eight children: Heyman, born in 1643, married Maritje Roosevelt. Arie, born in 1645, married Maria Pels. Jan, bom in 1651, married Hellegond Williamse Van Buren. lkee or Aaghe married Dr. Roelof Kiersted. Maritje married Laurens Jansen. Neeltje married Hendrick Pawling after Nov. 3, 1676. Jannetje married Mattys TenEyck at Hurley Nov. 16, 1679. Aert. Two other children were born to him and his wife after coming to New Netherland, viz; Annatje and Guert. 

From the fact that in Gelderland at the present time the language of its people is interspersed with Spanish words and idioms it has been supposed that many religious refugees from Spain during the first years of the Inquisition settled in this particular Province of Holland, among whom may have been ancestors of Albert Heymanse; if so, this can account for the spelling of the name, by the Hollanders-Roose -which to them would produce the same sound as Rosa, his name in Spanish.

On December 25, 1660, Aldert Heymanse Roosa and his wife, with Anna Blom, Jacob Joosten, Jacob Burhans, Mathias Blanchan and wife, Anton Crespel and wife, Andries Barentse and wife, Margaret Chambers, Gertruy Andries, Roelof Swartwout and wife, and Cornelise Sleght and wife participated in the first administration of the Lord's Supper at the Esopus or Wildwyck.

   Aldert Heymanse Roosa was a wealthy man for those days, bringing with him considerable property from Holland, and he speedily occupied an influential position in the early making of Kingston, in all of which he appeared as a leader and director of events. On the fourth of March, 1661, he joined with Thomas Chambers, Cornelis Barentse Sleght. Gertruy Andries, Roe of Swartwout and Jurian Westvael in a contract guaranteeing a salary to the Reverend Hermanus Blom, who had been called as pastor of the Dutch church at Wildwyck. Of this church he was for many years an elder; and because of the energy with which Domine Blom and he sought to conserve the surplus of the estates of deceased parents for the benefit of the poor of the village he was sometirnes called " the consistory " of the church. 

On the 5th day of May, 1661, Evert Pels, Cornelis Barentse Sleght and Aldert Heymanse Roosa were appointed commissaries at Wildwyck and took their oath of office, and on the 16th day of the same month Peter Stuyvesant, in behalf of the Mighty Lords, the States General of the United Netherlands, and the Lord Directors of the Privileged West India Company granted its first charter to Wildwyck, in which Evert Pels, Cornelis Barentse Sleght and Aldert Heymanse Roosa were appointed schepens, and therein designated as '- interested, intelligent persons, possessing Real Estate, peaceable men, professors of the Reformed religion as it is now preached in the, United Netherlandish Churches in conformity through the Word of God, and the orders of the Synod of Dordrecht." And new lots were then laid out at Wildwyck, Of which Aldert Hymanse Roosa was allotted No. 24 and his son Jan No. 30.

On April 6th, 1662 permission was given by the Director-General to lay out a new village at the Esopus. It was called Nieuw Dorp, now Hurley, at which place Matthew Blanshan and his sons-in-law, Anthony Crespel and Louis DuBois settled the same year. Directly after this warnings were received and sent to New Amsterdam of pending troubles from the Indians at the Esopus. (Col. Hist. N. Y., Vol. XIII., pages 227-228). On the 11th of October, 1662, Aldert Heymanse Roosa was commissioned to proceed to New Amsterdam to obtain one hundred pounds of powder and two hundred pounds of lead for the protection of the old and new settlements. (Col. Hist. N. Y., Vol. XIII., page 231.)

Aldert Heymanse Roosa must have been among the earliest settlers of the new village because on March 30, 1663, he, Jan Joosten and Jan Garretsen were appointed by Director-General Stuyvesant commissaries to lay out and fortify it with palisades for protection against attacks of savages. (Sylvester's Hist. Ulster county, page 36).

On the 7th of April, 1663, Aldert Heymanse Roosa and his fellow commissaries reported to Governor Stuyvesant that the savages would not allow the building of palisades or fortifications at the new village, because the land was not included in the treaty made with them in the year 1660, and had not been fully paid for; and praying that the gifts promised the savages the previous autumn be sent at once, and that the new place and village be assisted with a few soldiers and ammunitions of war, at least, until the new settlement should be put into a proper state of defense and inhabited by a good number of people; that 'your humble and faithful subjects may remain without fear and molestation from these barbarous people, and with some assurance for the peaceful, undisturbed and unhindered continuation of the work begun, for if rumors and warnings may be believed, it would be too anxious, if not too dangerous an undertaking for your humble petitioners and faithful subjects to continue and advance their work otherwise." (Col. Hist. N. Y., Vol. XIII., pages 242-3).

These warnings were not heeded and these earnest requests were not complied with, and on June 7th, 1663, the Indians attacked the New Village and Wildwyck. At Wildwyck they burned twelve dwelling houses; murdered eighteen persons, men, women and children, and carried away ten persons more as prisoners. The New Village was burned to the ground and its inhabitants mostly taken prisoners or killed. Only a few of them escaped to Wildwyck, among wnom were Roosa, Blanchan, Crespel and DuBois. So there were sixty-five persons missing in general, either killed or captured, besides nine pesons who came to Wildwyck, severely wounded. Among those taken prisoners at the New Village were the wife and two children of Louis DuBois; wife and one child of Anton Crespel; two children of Matthew Blanshan; two children of Aldert Heymanse Roosa and wife and three children of Lambert Huybertse Brink. (Col. Hist. N. Y. Vol. Xlll., pages 245-6, 256- 372).

By September 12, 1660 they had settled at Hurley, Ulster County, New York. There he was a member of the Judges Council in 1661; overseer in 1669; sergeant of the militia company in 1670 and a captain in 1673. When he died his wife received a grant of 320 acres in recognition of his public service.

When the town of Hurley was first built, Aldert was commissioned to go to New Amsterdam to obtain 200 pounds of lead for the protection of the settlements. On March 30, 1663, he was commissioned to layout and fortify with palisades for protection. On April 7, 1663 he reported to the governor that the Indians would not allow the building of the fortifications because the land was not included in the treaty of 1660 and the purchased had not been paid for.

Aldert requested immediate attention to get the Indians taken care of. Evidently it wasn't enough or too late, as the Indians attacked the town June 7, 1663. The indians took 45 women and children prisoner including two of Aldert Roosa's children.

In September 1665, after New Netherlands had become a Province of Great Britain, the English Governor came to the area and placed Captain Daniel Brodhead in command. Brodhead and his soldiers were very tyrannical, creating open hostility with the inhabitants. Even Aldert Roosa was beaten by the soldiers.

They petitioned the Governor to review the problem, giving him examples of their abuse. The commission that was appointed to review the situation blamed the inhabitants. Therefore Aldert Roosa, one of his sons and two others were sentenced to be banished. All their sentences were later modified and they were allowed to return

The Governor of the area was changed and therefore Aldert was pardoned and even named overseer in 1669. He was an Elder of the Dutch Church in Wiltwyck (Kingston) for many years.

Aldert Roosa died February 27, 1679 at Hurley, Ulster County, New York about 59 years old

ALDERT HEYMANSE ROOSA

Feb. 28, 1660 Gave power of attorney to his brother-in-law, Arien Ariense de Jongh, secured by Aldert's interest in the estate of the late Arien Meertensen De Jongh, to assure a buyer that back taxes (dating to 1626) would be paid

Mar. 3, 1660 Conveyed half of a tract of land, as yet undivided between the heirs of Govert Ariensen De Jongh, in Hellouw (near Herwijnen); Aldert again pledged his interest in the estate of the late Arien Meertensen De Jongh as security for the fulfillment of the contract

Apr. 15, 1660 Arrived in New Amsterdam on the Bontekoe (Spotted Cow)

Jul. 15, 1660 Peace Treaty made with the Indians at Esopus

Sep. 12, 1660 Aldert & Wyntje are among the first members of the Dutch Reformed Church at Esopus (later Kingston)


Dec. 25, 1660 Aldert & Wyntje participated in administration of the first Lord's Supper by Domine Harmanus Blom at Esopus

Mar. 4, 1661 With others, guaranteed a salary to the Domine, Harmanus Blom

May 16, 1661 Charter conferred for the formation of Wiltwyck at Esopus; Roeloff Swartout was appointed Schout; Aldert Roosa was one of the first 3 schepens (magistrates) - along with Evert Pels and Cornelis Barentse Slecht. Roosa served as schepen until May 22, 1663

Spring 1662 Appears as an owner of one of the “new lots” at Wiltwyck, lot #24

May 30, 1662 Burgher Guard organized at Esopus with Thomas Chambers, Captain, and Hendrick Jochemse Schoonmaker, Lieutenant

Oct. 11, 1662 Commissioned to purchase two hundred pounds of lead and one hundred pounds of powder at New Amsterdam for the defense of Esopus

Mar. 30, 1663 Commissioned to layout and fortify a palisade at Nieuw Dorp (Hurley) and appointed an Overseer by Peter Stuyvesant

Apr. 7, 1663 Informed Stuyvesant that the Indians at Hurley would not allow the construction of fortifications, on the grounds that they had not been included in the Esopus peace treaty (made 3 years earlier); Aldert requested that the promised gifts be sent for distribution to the Indians

Jun. 7, 1663 Indian massacre (“Second Esopus War”) at Hurley and Wiltwyck; Hurley almost completely destroyed by fire and two of Aldert's daughters captured; they were rescued with the remaining surviving prisoners in early September

Jul. 7, 1663 With Jan Hendricksen, threatened to shoot two Wappinger Indians who were being questioned by Schout Swartout

Feb. 12, 1664 As an elder of the Church Consistory, signed a petition to the court denigrating the “Bacchanalian” excesses of Fastenseen (Shrove Tuesday), recommending that it be proscribed

~1664 At Wiltwyck, threatened 3 English soldiers with an axe in a dispute over the use of his canoe

May 1665 As a Sergeant in the Burgher Guard, “relieved” an English soldier of his gun; threatened with arrest but case was suspended to await arrival of the Governor

Sep. 1665 Governor Richard Nicholls appointed Captain Daniel Brodhead to maintain peace between the English and the Dutch at Esopus

~1666 Altercation with English soldiers in the store of Louis Dubois; held over for examination by Captain Brodhead

Feb. 16, 1666 Aldert and his eldest son Arien were convicted, along with others, of the illegal use of firearms to threaten the English soldiers at Esopus; they were sentenced to be banished and further fined 100 bushels of wheat - but there is no record that the sentence was carried out

Jan. 2, 1667 Filed a complaint against Schout George Hall for personally using firewood that had been provided for the soldiers

Feb. 4,1667 An instigator of the “Esopus Mutiny” - clash between the English and the Dutch precipitated by the arrest of Cornelis Barentse Slecht

Apr. 16, 1667 Aldert and eldest son Arien (along with Cornelis Barentse Slecht and Antony D'Elba) convicted of rebellious and mutinous riot and sent to New York City for sentencing

May 3, 1667 Aldert banished from the Colony by Governor Nicholls

Jul. 31, 1667 Following Treaty of Breda (confirming English possession of New Netherland), Nicholls declared a general amnesty and sentences were not carried out. Aldert remained in New Netherland

1669 Granted permission to establish a brewhouse and tavern at Hurley

Sep. 16, 1669 Appointed an overseer of Hurley by Governor Francis Lovelace

Apr. 1670 Commissioned as a Sergeant in Burgher Guard under Captain Henry Pawling (who would later marry Aldert's daughter Neeltje) by Governor Lovelace

Apr. 12, 1671 Baptism of Sara Kierstede at New Amsterdam Dutch Reformed Church, daughter of Roeloff Kierstede and Yke Jans; witnesses: Mr. Hans Kierstede, Cornelis Van Borsum, Sara Roelofs

Mar. 26, 1673 Baptism of Wyntje Kierstede at New Amsterdam Dutch Reformed Church, daughter of Roeloff Kierstede and Ytie Alberts; witnesses: Johannes Van Brug, Catharina Roelofs

Oct. 6, 1673 Appointed Captain of militia of Hurley and Marbletown

Aug. 4, 1677 Baptism of Hans Kierstede at New Amsterdam Dutch Reformed Church, son of Roeloff Kierstede and Ytie; witnesses: Sara Kierstede

Feb. 27, 1679 Death of Aldert Heymanse Roosa at Kingston

Mar. 2, 1679 Wyntje De Jongh sponsored the baptism of her grandson, Aldert, son of Heiman Aldertse Rosa and Margriet Rosevelt at the Kingston Dutch Reformed Church

1685 Wyntje De Jongh was granted 320 acres at Hurley in recognition of the services provided to the community by her late husband

SOURCES

Bennett, David Veernoy, The First American Mrs. Rosecrans , NYGBR, vol. 90, p. 10 and p. 164; ; also see transcription at Appendix C - Magdalen, Part 3

De Young, Dirk P., Notes on the Roosa-de Jongh Families, NYGBR Jan. 1939, pps. 33-34

CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH NOTES ON SOME OF THE PATERNAL ANCESTORS, DESCENDANTS, AND COLLATERAL LINES, OF FREDERICK PERRY DECOURSEY (1900-1978) at Bill Decoursey's notes on old Dutch families

ALDERT HEYMANSE ROOSA

The ancestor of the Roosa family in America was Albert Heymans Roosa. He landed in New Netherlands in April 1660, coming in the ship called the "Spotted Cow", in company with Roeloff Swartwout and others.

The record of his arrival is found in "Documentary History of New York", Volume 3, page 56, under the chapter entitled "Early Immigrants to New Netherland, 1657-1664". The account is as follows:

"Albert Heymans, agriculturist, from Gelderland, and wife and eight children."

The wife of Albert Heymans Roosa was named Wyntje Allard or Ariens, and soon after their arrival they settled in the Esopus district at Wiltwyck, now Kingston, Ulster County, New York.

At this place, with Cornelis Barents Slecht and wife Tryntje Bos, Mathese Blanchan and wife Madeline Jorisse, Roeloff Swartwout and wife Eva Alberts Bradt de Noorman, and others, Albert Heymans Roosa and his wife Wyntje Allard participated in the first Administration of the Lord's Supper on December 25, 1660, by the Rev. Harmanus Bloem.

Roosa was a wealthy man for those days, bringing with him considerable property from Holland, and he speedily "occupied an influential position in the new settlement". In the Spring of 1661, he joined in a contract guaranteeing a salary to Domine Bloem who had been called as the regular pastor of the Dutch Church at Wiltwyck/

The following is a copy of that agreement:

The undersigned inhabitants of the settlement at the place called Esopus, promise to give our reverend minister Harmanus Bloem as salary for the first year (which salary has commenced with his arrival here, on the 5th of September, 1660) the sum of seven hundred guilders in corn, at beaver valuation, in case his farm should fail and we promise further to put the farm in good order according to contract, as soon as the land has been allotted and to raise that sum at the latest for the coming farming season. This we the undersigned, promise faithfully and truly to do.

This done the 4th of March 1661.

Thomas Chambers

Cornelis Barentsen Slecht

The Mark _____ of Gertry Andries

Roeloff Swartwout

Alaerdt Heymensen Roose

The Mark _____ of Juriaen Westvael

See "Documents relating to the History and Settlements of the Towns along the Hudson and Mohawk Rivers", page 194; being Volume 13, old series, and Volume 2, new series of "Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New York; The History of Kingston, New York", page 22. By Marius Schoonmaker, of Kingston.

"Esopus (Kingston) was then without any local government, and, in fact a dependency of Fort Orange (Albany). The People were dissatisfied with such a dependent position, and wanted a government of their own. About that time Roeloff Swartwout, a son of one of the original settlers, visited Holland, and through his representations, and other influences, the Amsterdam Directors of the West India Company determined to make the Esopus settlement and independent jurisdiction."

In pursuance of such a plan, they passed an order appointing Roeloff Swartwout, Schout of Esopus, his jurisdiction embracing the powers of sheriff and "the duties of presiding officer of the of the Court in civil actions, and the duties of prosecutin attorney in criminal proceedings".

Pursuant to the directions of Their Lords High Mightinesses of Holland, Governor Stuyvesant and his Council, at New Amsterdam on May 16, 1661, granted a charter to organize a civil government at Wiltwyck.

The order was in Dutch and it is recorded in the Wiltwyck records. The following is a translation thereof:

"May 16, 1661. Director General Petrus Stuyvesant, delegated and authorized in all matters of government relating to the public welfare of all the county of New Netherland, by power and commission from the noble Lord Directors of the privileged West India Company, observing the situation and condition of a place called the Esopus, which hath now been inhabited and settled six or seven years; hath, in consideration of the situation and population thereof, erected the locality into a village and given it the name of Wiltwyck, whereby it shall be called now and henceforward".

A copy of the Charter, etc. is to be found in Schoonmaker's "History of Kingston", pages 24-28, and Appendix, pages 503-506, and in "Documents relating to the History and Settlements of the Towns along the Hudson and Mohawk Rivers", above cited, at oages 196-198. See also "History of the State of New York, First Period 1609-1664", page 690. By John Romeyn Brodhead.

By this Charter; Evert Pels, Cornelis Barentsen Slecht and Elbert Heymans Roose were appointed the first three Schepens, or Magistrates, who with the presiding Schout, Roeloff Swartwout completed "the Organization of the first village and first judicial tribunal in this section of the State". A copy of the oath of office of the three Schepens is given on page 196 of Documents, etc., above cited.

In 1661 Roosa was appointed one of the three Commissioners to enclose the New Village at the Esopus, called Hurley. See also "The Register of New Netherland, 1626 to 1674". By E.B. O'Callaghan, L.L.D. pages 71 and 158. This volume is the "Blue Book" of the Dutch and French Huguenot Families of early New Netherland.

In 1662 a schedule of the old and newly surveyed lots in Wiltwyck with the names of their owners, was made out, and in the "List of old lots, before the place was laid out", appear the names of Evert Pels, owner of lot 2, and Jan Broersen Dekker owner of lot 11. In the "List of lots newly laid out", Albert Heymans Roosa appears as the owner of lot 24, and Juriaen Westvael as owning lot 25. Documents, etc., page 230. "History of Kingston", pages 28-29.

At the destruction of the village of Hurley, on June 7, 1663, by the Indians, two of the children of Roosa, with 43 others, women and children, were taken captive. The story of the rescue of these captives by colonial forces under command of Captain Martin Kriegier is one of the most interesting of the episodes in the history of early New York. It may be found in Documents, etc., page 256 et seq. and page 323 et seq.; Doc. Hist., N. Y., Volume 4, page 39 et seq., and in "Bi-Centenary Re-Union of the Descendants of Louis and Jacques Du Bois.

The authorities above cited contain many accounts of the acts of Roosa in the early making of Kingston, in all of which he appears as a leader and director of events.

In September, 1665, soon after New Netherland had become a Province of Great Britain, the English Governor, Richard Nicolls, visited Kingston and placed Captain Daniel Brodhead in command at that place. Owing to that officer's tyrannical conduct, and the many acts of oppression and cruelty by the English soldiers under his command, the inhabitants rose in open hostility in 1667.

In their petition to Governor Nicolls for redress, the inhabitants set forth numerous deed of cruelty by the soldiers; eight of the items are as follows, viz:

"1. Cornelis Barentsen Slecht is beaten in his owne house by his Souldr. George Porter, and after this by the other Souldrs. forced to prison, and was by some souldrs, at his imprisonment used very hard.

3. It is happened that Capt. Brodhead comminge at the house of Lewis Du Bois tooke an anchor of Brandy and throwed it upon the ground because sd. Bois Refused him Brandy without paiment, and did Likewise force this sd. Bois to give him Brandy.

4. And the sd. Bois his wife coming for hur monny at the sd. Brodheads house, he drove the said Bois his wife, with a beare kynff out of his house.

6. Albert Heymans Roos, going with his plouw yron toward the Smits, was assaulted by five souldrs. whoe wounded him very much, whereupon

7. The souldiers said the sd. Albert Heymans going without any Reason brought him to Imprisonment was most griviously wounded by Richard Hamer.

12. John Cornelissen Smith, going alonge the Streete was assalted & persecuted to his verry shop & was Like

13. to have been murthered by George Porter, but he was hindered in his desseyn by Frans Vreeman; and the sd. George Porter hath Likewise upon the sd. day in open streete assaulted Roeloff Swartwout.

14. Cornelia Barentsen Slecht, beinge by Capt. Brodhead very ill treated, in his owne house, was afterwards by the sd. Capt. forced to prison, and his armes by force taken out of his house, wch still doe Remaine by the sd. Capt. Brodhead."

Governor Nicolls on April 16, 1667, appointed a Commission to enquire into their troubles, and in his letter of instructions, he says:

"Albert Heymans and Anthony D. Elba have spoken most malicious words, and I look upon them as great incendiaries and disaffected persons; if their words be proved they shall not be suffered to live in this governmentl; if they have been actors in the late riot, pitch upon them two for ringleaders, and give orders to inventory and secure their estates by the Schout and Commissioners".

Documents, etc., page 407. "History of Kingston", pages 52-57. These troubles are called the "Mutiny at Esopus" in the histories of the time.

The Commission appointed by Governor Nicholls sat at Esopus for three days. Captain Brodhead, admitting the truth of the charges against him was suspended from his command and he died three months afterwards, on July 14, 1667, at Esopus.

Albert Heymans Roosa, Cornelis Barentsen Slecht, and two others "were found guilty of a rebellious and mutinous riot, and were taken to New York for sentence. Nicholls, by advice of his council on the 3rd of May, sentenced Heymans to be banished for life out of the government, and the others for shorter terms out of Esopus, Albany and New York. All these

sentences of the burghers were subsequently modified, and the offenders returned to Esopus.

Governor Francis Lovelace restored Roosa to favor, and in 1669 appointed him and Louis Du Bois two of the Overseers for Hurley, called New Dorp, or New Village. In 1673 he was confirmed as one of the officers at Esopus by Governor Anthony Colve, and described as "Captain Albert Heymans, who had been prominent in the riot of 1667".

The records state that in 1669 "Albert Heymensen peticond to sett up a Brewhouse and tanffatts in Hurley", and an order was made to grant permission".

His name appears with that of his son Arien Albertson Roosa and those of Jacob Jansen Van Etten, Jan Jansen Van Etten, Thomas Quick, Roeloff Swartwout, Mattys Blanchan, Louys 'Du Bois and others, to petition to Sir Edmond Andros, Governor of New York, praying that he would assist them in procuring a minister for Esopus "that can can preache bothe Inglish and Dutche, wch. will bee most fitting for this place, it being in its Minority". Documents, etc.,pages 543-4. Doc. Hist., N.Y., Volume 3, page 965.

Albert Heymans Roosa served in the military forces of the Colony as mustering officer and in other capacities, and on April 5, 1670, at the military rendezvous held at Marbletown, he was present as Sergeant of Captain Henry Pawling's Company at which also appeared his son Arie Roosa as private, and in 1673 Albert was Captain of a company recruited from Hurley and Marbletown. See "Second Annual Report of the State Historian of New York", pages 378-379, 384. See also, same volume, pages 185, 191, 198, 201, 204-7, 266, 276, 285, 287, 290, 294, 298 and 427 for accounts of Albert and his son Captain Arie Roosa.

Albert Heymans Roosa died at Hurley on February 27, 1679. In 1685 his widow, Wyntje Allard secured a grant of 320 acres at Hurley.


 

Added July 3, 2006

-------------------- Arrived in the harbor of N.Y. on April 15, 1660 aboard 'De Bonte Coe' (the 'Spotted Cow') with his wife & 8 children. Allard was a prosperous farmer & settled his family in Wiltwyck (now Kingston, N.Y.). A man of considerable means as evidenced by a Power of Attorney appointing Adrian D'Jong to manage his assets in the Netherlands; this was dated shortly before his departure for N. America. This document names him as 'yeoman at Herwynen'. -------------------- Arrived in the harbor of New York on April 15, 1660 aboard De Bonte Coe ('The Spotted Cow') with his wife & 8 chldren. Allard was a prosperous farmer & settled his family in Wiltwyck (now Kingston, N.Y.). A man of considerable means as evidenced by a Power of Attorney appointing Adrian d'Jong to manage his assets in the Netherlands; this was dated shortly before his departure for North America. This document names him as 'Yeoman at herwynen'. A Yeoman is a landowner. He was also of Kingston, Ulster, New York. -------------------- From ROOTSWEB WORLD CONNECT: "The Roosa Family in Holland" compiled by Lorraine Duke.*

"4. Aeldert (Aldert/Albert) Heijmans Roosa (Rosa). He was born about 1621 in Herwijnen. He married Wyntje (Wilhelmina) Ariens de Jongh of the same village. She was daughter of Arien Meertensen de Jongh and Maijken. They both left their villag e in Holland with their eight children in 1660 and sailed for New Amsterdam."

OVERALL REPORT OF ROOSA, DEJONGH & related familes: "Aldert Heijmanszn Rosa with his wife, Wijntje de Jongh, with eight children immigrated on ship "Bonetekoe" in spring of 1660 to New Amsterdam".

"On Feb 28, 1660, prior to departure, Alert Heymans, yeoman of Herwijnen, gives Adriaen Adriaens de Jonghm (Alert's brother-in-law) power of attorney to handle his affairs. Source: The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, issued Quarterl y, Vol LVIII, 1927, 226 West 58th St, NY."

From: 'Lists of Inhabitants of Colonial New York" by Edmund Bailey O'Callahan Chapter entitled Early Immigrants to New Netherland 1657-1664. On DE BONTE KOE (The Sportted Cow) April 1660 voyage, Captain Pieter Lucasz: "Albert Heymans [Roosa] far mer, from Gelderland, wife and 8 children: 17, 15, 14, 9, 8, 7, 4, 2 yrs old.

From: "Jacobus Jansen Van Etten" by Eva Alice Scott, 1930. Starting page 133 entitled "Miscellanea".

ROOSA: The ROOSA family of Ulster and Dutchers Co. NY.

I. ROOSA, Albert Heymans: (1), Burger, with his wife and children came from Gelderland, in 1660 on the ship called "Spotted Cow" from Holland. He was born Gelderland, died Hurley, NY, 2-27-1679. He was appointed "Schepan" (Alderman) of Wiltwick , (Esopus), now Kingston, NY by Peter Stuyvesant in 1669. He served in the Military forces of the Colony as mustering officer and in other capacities and on April 5, 1670 recruited at Hurley and Marbletown. (see 2nd annual report of State Historia n, NY, pp 378, 379, 384. Also same vol. pp 185, 191, 201, 204, 207, 266, 276, 285, 287, 290, 294, 427. Accounts of Albert and his son Arie. Vol. 31 pp 235-236 NY Historical Magazine.) Wife Wyntje Allard (Wyntie Arrens) Ariens

DIRECT LINE of EVA. A. SCOTT from ALBERT ROOSA: (1) Page 134 EAS "Jacob Jansen Van Etten):

I. Albert Roosa and wife Wyntie Ariens; II. Capt ARIE ROOSA and wife Marie Pels; III. Jennetje Roosa and husband Jan Van Etten; IV. Jacobus Van Etten b 1696 d 1779 and wife Antjen Westbrock; V. Jan Van Etten b 1720 and wife Mary Westfall; VI . Daniel Van Etten b 1742 and wife(2nd) Mary Brink; VII. John Van Etten b 1772 and wife Ann LaBar; VIII. Sally Van Etten and John McKenzie; IX. Harriet McKenziand Alexander Scott; X. Alexander Scott and Rosa Bell Lewis; XI. Eva Alice Scott.

The ROOSA Bible record is published in OLD ULSTER Volume 7, p.28, 239. Jennetje Roosa, her Bible-1744 was in the possion of Mr. John P. Roosa of Hurley, N.Y. in 1911.

Note:

THE ROOSA FAMILY OF ULSTER AND DUTCHESS COUNTIES, NEW YORK. by HOLDRIDGE OZRO COLLINS, of LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA. (Some summarizing of this presentation is made by RAJ).

Governor Francis Lovelace restored Roosa to favor, and in 1669 appointed him and Louis Du Bois two of the Overseers for Hurley, called New Dorp, or New Village. "In 1673 he was confirmed as one of the officers at Esopus by Gov Anthony Colve, an d described as "Captain Albert Heymans, who had been prominent in the riot of 1667."

The records state that in 1669, "Albert Heymansen peticond to sett up a Brewhouse and tanfatts in Hurley," and an order was made granting permission.

His name appears with that of his son Arien Albertson Roosa and those of Jacob Jansen Van Etten, Jan Jansen Van Etten, Tho. Quick, Roeloff Swarthout, Mattys Blanchan, Louys Du Bois and others, to the petition to Sir Edmund Andros, Gov of NY, pray ing that he would assist them in procuring a minister for Esopus "that he can preache bothe Inglish and Dutche, wch. will bee most fitting for this place, it being in its Minority."

Documents, etc pp 543-4. Doc Hist, NY, Vol 3, p 965. Albert Heymans Roosa served in the military forces of the Colony as mustering officer and in other capacities, and on April 5, 1670, at the military rendezvous held at Marbletown, he was pres ent as Sgt of Capt Henry Pawling's Co at which also appeared his son Arie Roosa as private, and in 1673 Albert was Capt of a company recruited from Hurley and Marbletown. See Second Annual Report of State Historian of New York, pp 378-9, 384. Se e also, same vol., pp 185, 191, 198, 201, 204-7, 266, 276, 285, 287, 290, 294, 298 and 497 for accounts of Albert and his son Capt Arie Roosa.

Albert Heymans Roosa died at Hurley on Feb 27, 1679. In 1685 his widow, Wyntie Allard secured a grant of 320 acres at Hurley. He had the following children, viz: i. Arie or Aria, b in Holland; married at Kingston, Maria Pels, dau of the Schepi n Evert Pels. The proofs of this marriage are found in records of old Dutch Ch of Kingston. Translated by Rev Roswell Randall Hoes, etc. P12, of that Vol, #196, Ary Heymansse Rosa and Marya Pels appear at bpt of their child Evert; p16, #264, Ar y Rosa & Maria Pels, bpt of child Weyntie; p 24, #426, Ary Rosa and Maria Pels at bpt child Engeltie: p 30, #544, Arian Rose Albertson & Maria Ever Pels at bpt of Annetje; p 42, #785, Arien Roos and wife Maria Pels at bpt of Arien; p 54, #1056, Ar iaan Roosa & Mary Pels at bpt Mary. In the records Arie Roosa is spelled Aria, Ariaan, Arien, Roosa, Roos, Rose, etc. The mother of Maria Pels was Jannetje Symens, and record of her marr to Evert Pels appears p 2, #10 and p 4 #55 of Hoes' Regist er.

ii. Heyman, marr Margriet Rosevelt. iii. Jan, marr Hellegond Williams. iv. Ikee, marr Roeloff Kierstede. v. Maritje, marr ....Jansen. vi. Neeltien, marr Hendric Paeldin, 1676. Banns, Nov 3. vii. Jannetje, marr Matys Ten Eyck, Nov 16 , 1679.

viii. Aert. ix. Annetje. x. Guert, d Jun 15, 1664. The record reads: "hic filius obiit ante baptismum."

Arie Roosa came from Holland with father Albert Heymans Roosa and motherf Wyntie Allard on the "Spotted Cow".

His name, spelled Arrie Roos, is found on "A Rool of the Names and Surnames of them that haue takin the oath of allegiance in ye County of Vlstr. by ordr. of His Excely; Ye Governor; ye ffirst day of Septembr Anno Qe: Domini 1689" and also upo n "A List of ffreeholders ithin the County of Ulster, 1728. The ffreeholders for the Town of Kiungston, Vizt." In the former list appear also the names of Abraham Du Bois, Thomas Quick, Cornelius Slecht, Jan Elting, Jan Van Vliet, Jacob Van Etten , Jan Van Etten his son, Benjamin Provoost, Louis Du Bois, Johannes Westbroeck, Jan Broersen Dekker and Evert Pels.

The "New York Army List for 1700" embraces the following, viz:

"Province of New York. List of ye present officers of ye Militia in his Matys. Province of New York in America Commissionated by his Excel. Richd. Earle of Bellmont. Capt. Generall & Govr. in Chief in & over his Matys. said Province &c. vizt.."

"Of the Regiment of Militia in ye Counties of Ulster & Dutchess. Jacob Rutsen Lieut. Col.

Of another Foot Compa. in ye said Countys: Aria Rose, Captain; John Rose, Lieut.; Aria Gerrutse, Ensigne; Doc Hist, NY Vol1, pp 357, 363.

Second Annual Report NY Historian, pp 419, 427.

In 1686, Arie Roosa, Jan Eltinge, Gerrit Aartsen, Hendrik Kip and Jacob Kip were granted a large tract of land in Dutchess County. This grant is called the "Arie Roosa Patent," and it embraced about one thousand and five hundred acres, opposit e Roundout Creek, near Kingston and extending along the bank of the Hudson River.

Arie Roosa settled upon this grant and lived there his remaining life, and many of his descendants are now found in Dutchess County, prosperous farmers and merchants.

List of Arie's children essentially same as in above record in Eva Alice Scott. This list is followed by: "An account of the descendants of Jannetje Roosa and her husband Jan Van Etten may be found in paper entitled "The Van Etten Family of Ulst er and Orange Counties, New York," published in The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol xxx, p 52, January,1899; Vol xxx, p 183, July, 1899; Vol xxx, p 229, October, 1899.

Note: History of Herwijnen states: "A great agricultural depression, affecting first the inland areas and North Brabant, in the 1650s and early 1660s, became general in nature in the late 1660s. (One must wonder if this depression influenced AL(D)ER T HEIJMANSZ ROOSA's decision to immigrate to New Amsterdam in the spring of 1660.) After 1662, grain and dairy prices fell dramatically, and rents, because the Republic had been the only west European county regularly exporting and re-exporting gr eat quantities of agricultural produce. This depression, came also to the rest of Europe, but lasted substantially longer in the Republic, not coming out of it until the mid eighteenth century. This was mainly caused because English ships seale d off the harbors preventing the Dutch to trade." 6

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  • 6684. Aldert Hymens Roosa
  • [6684. Aldert Hymens Roosa 1, 2, 3, 4 was born in 1620 in Harwyen, Gelderland, Holland. He died on 27 Feb 1679 in Kingston, Ulster, New York. He married Wyntje Ariens de Jongh in 1642 in New York. [13368. Metjie de Roos was born in 1600. He died in 1625/1694. He married Heyman Gysbert. [Parents]
  • 6685. Wyntje Ariens de Jongh 1 was born in 1623 in Herwynen, Gelderland, Holland. She died on 15 Apr 1660 in Kingston, Ulster, New York. [Parents] ] ;
  • freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.... ;
  • ALEARDT, Aldert or Albert Heymanse Roose came to this country from Harwyen, also spelled Herweyen, in Gelderland, Holland, on Waal river, five miles west of Bommel. Or it may be the present Heywennen, a short distance east of Bommel in Gelderland or the present Herwen in Gelderland twelve miles sontheast of Arnhem. With him came his wife, Wyntje (Lavinia) Allard or Ariens, and eight children in the ship Bontekoe (Spotted Cow), Captain Peter Lucas April 15, 1660; and settled in the Wildwyck district of Esopus, now Kingston, Ulster County, New York. Of these eight children: Heyman, born in 1643, married Maritje Roosevelt. Arie, born in 1645, married Maria Pels. Jan, bom in 1651, married Hellegond Williamse Van Buren. lkee or Aaghe married Dr. Roelof Kiersted. Maritje married Laurens Jansen. Neeltje married Hendrick Pawling after Nov. 3, 1676. Jannetje married Mattys TenEyck at Hurley Nov. 16, 1679. Aert. Two other children were born to him and his wife after coming to New Netherland, viz; Annatje and Guert.
  • Arrival Date: 1652, aboard The Spotted Cow Albert Heymanse Roosa was sometimes listed as Allert Heymanse and Aldert Heymans. Albert Heyman lived in Wildwyck and later in Hurley, Ulster Co NY.
  • From the fact that in Gelderland at the present time the language of its people is interspersed with Spanish words and idioms it has been supposed that many religious refugees from Spain during the first years of the Inquisition settled in this particular Province of Holland, among whom may have been ancestors of Albert Heymanse; if so, this can account for the spelling of the name, by the Hollanders-Roose -which to them would produce the same sound as Rosa, his name in Spanish.
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Aeldert Heymansz Roosa's Timeline

1621
1621
Herwijnen, Lingewaal, Gelderland, The Netherlands
1628
1628
Age 7
Holland (North), Netherlands
1628
Age 7
Holland (North), Netherlands
1628
Age 7
Holland (North), Netherlands
1630
1630
Age 9
Herwijnen, Gelderland, Netherlands
1640
1640
Age 19
Gelderland, The Netherlands
1643
June 3, 1643
Age 22
Herwijnen, Lingewaal, Gelderland, The Netherlands
June 3, 1643
Age 22
Herwynen, Gelderland, Netherlands
1646
April 15, 1646
Age 25
Herwijnen, Gelderland, Netherlands
1651
April 2, 1651
Age 30
Herwynen, Gelderland, Netherlands