Alexander Beckstead (1802 - 1870)

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Birthplace: Schoharie, New York, USA
Death: Died in West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Managed by: Thomas Craig Frost
Last Updated:

About Alexander Beckstead

Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868 Allen Taylor Company (1849) Age 47


Departure: 5-6 July 1849 Arrival: 10-20 October 1849

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Birth: Mar. 16, 1802 Schoharie County New York, USA

Death: Feb. 20, 1870 West Jordan Salt Lake County Utah, USA

Son of Francis Beckstead, Sr. and Margaret Barkley Alexander

Married Catherine Lince, 25 Jan 1823, Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario, Canada - 15 children

Married Keziah Albine Petty, 18 Nov 1854, West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah - 10 children

Married Clarissa Ann Gilson, 3 Feb 1856, Salt Lake City, Salt, Utah - 8 children

History - When Alexander was about five years old his father and family moved to Williamsburg, Canada, where his father secured 200 acres of land, under a land grant. It is assumed, therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm until he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince/Lenss, at which time he farmed for himself.

During the period 1837-38 three Mormon missionaries visited the homes of Alexander, his father Francis, Sr., and others of the family. Most of them accepted the Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join the Saints then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and wagons enduring many personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt, Caldwell County, Missouri, in the last week in September 1838. At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs, and after a short time our families escaped to Far West, Missouri, where they spent the winter. The next spring, 1839, they moved with the Saints to the area near Nauvoo, Illinois.

The families located wherever they could find suitable places to make a home - some were at Lima, some at Carthage, and some at Warsaw, Illinois, all near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander's family consisted of 9 children.

After the death of Francis, Sr., in 1841, the great responsibility of looking after his family, and the others of his father's family, rested upon the shoulders of Alexander.

When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846, Alexander and the other families moved to the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Almost immediately upon their arrival the United States Government requested President Brigham Young to furnish 500 volunteers for the Mormon Battalion to fight in the War against Mexico. Three of the Beckstead boys joined this group, thus reducing the help that was so much needed to look after the families.

Alexander was not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they were moving, and had gone only a short distance, tragedy struck again; this time in the death of Francis Beckstead, Jr., a young brother of Alexander, which was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the families. However, Alexander continued on, and most of them reached the Utah Valley in September 1849. For more detailed information of the history of our ancestors read the Introduction history section.

Alexander Beckstead settled in West Jordan, Utah, where there was practically nothing but sagebrush. They all located on what was known as the River bottoms, of the Jordan River, which was their only source of water.

Alexander and his family were reported to be the first to get water on the land from the river. They worked with pick and shovel, and mostly by hand, built the Beckstead Ditch, which permitted them to take the water from the Jordan River for us as they needed it. They had to dig wells for drinking water, and at first most of their homes were adobe huts, and some were merely holes dug into the bank along the river bottoms. Then as rapidly as possible better homes were built, a Church meeting place was provided, and they had a place for school children, very meager of course.

Later Alexander erected the first Blacksmith shop in that area. This shop, built before 1853, was west and south of the Old Rock Meeting house, in West Jordan. The building was made of slabs and rough lumber with a roof of slabs. It did not contain a bench to sit on. The men who came to visit or were waiting for their work to be finished, just stood around.

In 1861 to 1863 Alexander Beckstead assisted materially in sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement West. During the hard times when flour cost $25 a sack, Alexander, instead of selling his flour, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one occasion he sent his son, John Alma Beckstead, with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people in St. George, Utah, area - without cost to them.

Alexander was a veteran Elder in the LDS Church, during his entire life, and a friend to everyone in need. He passed away at his home in West Jordan and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery.


Family links:

Spouses:
  • Keziah Albine Petty Beckstead (1835 - 1907)
  • Clarrisa Ann Gilson Washburn (1837 - 1911)
  • Catherine Elinore Lince Beckstead (1807 - 1889)*
Children:
  • Margaret Mariah Beckstead Egbert (1823 - 1901)*
  • Gordon Silas Beckstead (1825 - 1891)*
  • Henry Beckstead (1827 - 1888)*
  • Harriet Vernitia Beckstead Hunsaker (1831 - 1905)*
  • Thomas Wesley Beckstead (1833 - 1893)*
  • Lucy Ann Beckstead (1835 - 1848)*
  • Emeline Beckstead Bills (1837 - 1917)*
  • Sarah Elizabeth Beckstead Winward (1838 - 1890)*
  • Samuel Alexander Beckstead (1840 - 1861)*
  • Amanda Jane Beckstead (1843 - 1844)*
  • George Washington Beckstead (1845 - 1912)*
  • John Alma Beckstead (1848 - 1927)*
  • Joseph Alonzo Beckstead (1850 - 1923)*
  • Hyrum Beckstead (1855 - 1937)*
  • Eliza Ariminta Beckstead Lee (1857 - 1923)*
  • Aaron Beckstead (1858 - 1924)*
  • Catherine Lince Beckstead Foisy (1859 - 1926)*
  • Fanny Kesiah Beckstead Williams (1859 - 1936)*
  • Robert Beckstead (1861 - 1921)*
  • Viola Janette Beckstead (1862 - 1863)*
  • Heber Alexander Beckstead (1865 - 1925)*
  • Francis Albert Beckstead (1866 - 1952)*
  • Ira Beckstead (1867 - 1938)*
  • Evelyn Abigail Beckstead (1867 - 1867)*
  • Susan Vilinda Beckstead (1868 - 1869)*
  • Alexander Beckstead (1870 - 1942)*

Burial: South Jordan Cemetery South Jordan Salt Lake County Utah, USA Plot: 7-57-3 -------------------- Alexander Beckstead

[Suggest a correction]

Birth: Mar. 16, 1802

Schoharie County

New York, USA

Death: Feb. 20, 1870

West Jordan

Salt Lake County

Utah, USA


Son of Francis Beckstead, Sr., and Margaret Barkley Alexander

Married Catherine Lince, 25 Jan 1823, Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario, Canada - 15 children

Married Keziah Albine Petty, 18 Nov 1854, West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah - 10 children

Married Clarissa Ann Gilson, 3 Feb 1856, Salt Lake City, Salt, Utah - 8 children

When Alexander was about five years old his father and family moved to Williamsburg, Canada, where his father secured 200 acres of land, under a land grant. It is assumed, therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm until he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince/Lenss, at which time he farmed for himself.

During the period 1837-38 three Mormon missionaries visited the homes of Alexander, his father Francis, Sr., and others of the family. Most of them accepted the Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join the Saints then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and wagons enduring many personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt, Caldwell County, Missouri, in the last week in September 1838. At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs, and after a short time our families escaped to Far West, Missouri, where they spent the winter. The next spring, 1839, they moved with the Saints to the area near Nauvoo, Illinois.

The families located wherever they could find suitable places to make a home - some were at Lima, some at Carthage, and some at Warsaw, Illinois, all near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander's family consisted of 9 children.

After the death of Francis, Sr., in 1841, the great responsibility of looking after his family, and the others of his father's family, rested upon the shoulders of Alexander.

When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846, Alexander and the other families moved to the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Almost immediately upon their arrival the United States Government requested President Brigham Young to furnish 500 volunteers for the Mormon Battalion to fight in the War against Mexico. Three of the Beckstead boys joined this group, thus reducing the help that was so much needed to look after the families.

Alexander was not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they were moving, and had gone only a short distance, tragedy struck again; this time in the death of Francis Beckstead, Jr., a young brother of Alexander, which was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the families. However, Alexander continued on, and most of them reached the Utah Valley in September 1849. For more detailed information of the history of our ancestors read the Introduction history section.

Alexander Beckstead settled in West Jordan, Utah, where there was practically nothing but sagebrush. They all located on what was known as the River bottoms, of the Jordan River, which was their only source of water.

Alexander and his family were reported to be the first to get water on the land from the river. They worked with pick and shovel, and mostly by hand, built the Beckstead Ditch, which permitted them to take the water from the Jordan River for us as they needed it. They had to dig wells for drinking water, and at first most of their homes were adobe huts, and some were merely holes dug into the bank along the river bottoms. Then as rapidly as possible better homes were built, a Church meeting place was provided, and they had a place for school children, very meager of course.

Later Alexander erected the first Blacksmith shop in that area. This shop, built before 1853, was west and south of the Old Rock Meeting house, in West Jordan. The building was made of slabs and rough lumber with a roof of slabs. It did not contain a bench to sit on. The men who came to visit or were waiting for their work to be finished, just stood around.

In 1861 to 1863 Alexander Beckstead assisted materially in sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement West. During the hard times when flour cost $25 a sack, Alexander, instead of selling his flour, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one occasion he sent his son, John Alma Beckstead, with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people in St. George, Utah, area - without cost to them.

Alexander was a veteran Elder in the LDS Church, during his entire life, and a friend to everyone in need. He passed away at his home in West Jordan and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery.


Family links:

Children:
 Margaret Mariah Beckstead Egbert (1823 - 1901)*
 Gordon Silas Beckstead (1825 - 1891)*
 Henry Byram Beckstead (1827 - 1888)*
 Harriet Vernitia Beckstead Hunsaker (1831 - 1905)*
 Thomas Wesley Beckstead (1833 - 1893)*
 Emeline Beckstead Bills (1837 - 1917)*
 Sarah Elizabeth Beckstead Winward (1838 - 1890)*
 Samuel Alexander Beckstead (1840 - 1861)*
 Amanda Jane Beckstead (1843 - 1844)*
 George Washington Beckstead (1845 - 1912)*
 John Alma Beckstead (1848 - 1927)*
 Joseph Alonzo Beckstead (1850 - 1923)*
 Aaron Beckstead (1858 - 1924)*
 Robert Beckstead (1861 - 1921)*

Spouses:
 Catherine Elinore Lince Beckstead (1807 - 1889)
 Keziah Albine Petty Beckstead (1835 - 1907)
 Clarissa Ann Gilson Washburn (1837 - 1911)

  • Point here for explanation

 

Burial::

South Jordan Cemetery

South Jordan

Salt Lake County

Utah, USA

Plot: 7-57-3




-------------------- Son of Francis Beckstead, Sr. and Margaret Barkley Alexander. Married Catherine Lince, 25 Jan 1823, Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario, Canada - 15 children. Married Keziah Albine Petty, 18 Nov 1854, West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah - 10 children. Married Clarissa Ann Gilson, 3 Feb 1856, Salt Lake City, Salt, Utah - 8 children History - When Alexander was about five years old his father and family moved to Williamsburg, Canada, where his father secured 200 acres of land, under a land grant. It is assumed, therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm until he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince/Lenss, at which time he farmed for himself.

During the period 1837-38 three Mormon missionaries visited the homes of Alexander, his father Francis, Sr., and others of the family. Most of them accepted the Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join the Saints then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and wagons enduring many personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt, Caldwell County, Missouri, in the last week in September 1838. At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs, and after a short time our families escaped to Far West, Missouri, where they spent the winter. The next spring, 1839, they moved with the Saints to the area near Nauvoo, Illinois.

The families located wherever they could find suitable places to make a home - some were at Lima, some at Carthage, and some at Warsaw, Illinois, all near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander's family consisted of 9 children.

After the death of Francis, Sr., in 1841, the great responsibility of looking after his family, and the others of his father's family, rested upon the shoulders of Alexander.

When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846, Alexander and the other families moved to the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Almost immediately upon their arrival the United States Government requested President Brigham Young to furnish 500 volunteers for the Mormon Battalion to fight in the War against Mexico. Three of the Beckstead boys joined this group, thus reducing the help that was so much needed to look after the families.

Alexander was not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they were moving, and had gone only a short distance, tragedy struck again; this time in the death of Francis Beckstead, Jr., a young brother of Alexander, which was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the families. However, Alexander continued on, and most of them reached the Utah Valley in September 1849. For more detailed information of the history of our ancestors read the Introduction history section.

Alexander Beckstead settled in West Jordan, Utah, where there was practically nothing but sagebrush. They all located on what was known as the River bottoms, of the Jordan River, which was their only source of water.

Alexander and his family were reported to be the first to get water on the land from the river. They worked with pick and shovel, and mostly by hand, built the Beckstead Ditch, which permitted them to take the water from the Jordan River for us as they needed it. They had to dig wells for drinking water, and at first most of their homes were adobe huts, and some were merely holes dug into the bank along the river bottoms. Then as rapidly as possible better homes were built, a Church meeting place was provided, and they had a place for school children, very meager of course.

Later Alexander erected the first Blacksmith shop in that area. This shop, built before 1853, was west and south of the Old Rock Meeting house, in West Jordan. The building was made of slabs and rough lumber with a roof of slabs. It did not contain a bench to sit on. The men who came to visit or were waiting for their work to be finished, just stood around.

In 1861 to 1863 Alexander Beckstead assisted materially in sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement West. During the hard times when flour cost $25 a sack, Alexander, instead of selling his flour, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one occasion he sent his son, John Alma Beckstead, with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people in St. George, Utah, area - without cost to them.

Alexander was a veteran Elder in the LDS Church, during his entire life, and a friend to everyone in need. He passed away at his home in West Jordan and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery.


Spouses:

 

Keziah Albine Petty Beckstead (1835 - 1907)

 

Clarrisa Ann Gilson Washburn (1837 - 1911)

 

Catherine Elinore Lince Beckstead (1807 - 1889)


Children:

 

Margaret Mariah Beckstead Egbert (1823 - 1901)

 

Gordon Silas Beckstead (1825 - 1891)

 

Henry Beckstead (1827 - 1888)

 

Harriet Vernitia Beckstead Hunsaker (1831 - 1905)

 

Thomas Wesley Beckstead (1833 - 1893)

 

Lucy Ann Beckstead (1835 - 1848)

 

Emeline Beckstead Bills (1837 - 1917)

 

Sarah Elizabeth Beckstead Winward (1838 - 1890)

 

Samuel Alexander Beckstead (1840 - 1861)

 

Amanda Jane Beckstead (1843 - 1844)

 

George Washington Beckstead (1845 - 1912)

 

John Alma Beckstead (1848 - 1927)

 

Joseph Alonzo Beckstead (1850 - 1923)

 

Hyrum Beckstead (1855 - 1937)

 

Eliza Ariminta Beckstead Lee (1857 - 1923)

 

Moses William Beckstead (1857 - 1916)

 

Aaron Beckstead (1858 - 1924)

 

Fanny Kesiah Beckstead Williams (1859 - 1936)

 

Catherine Lince Beckstead Foisy (1859 - 1926)

 

Robert Beckstead (1861 - 1921)

 

Margaret Beckstead Hibbard (1862 - 1944)

 

Viola Janette Beckstead (1862 - 1863)

 

Martha Ann Beckstead Aylett (1864 - 1930)

 

Heber Alexander Beckstead (1865 - 1925)

 

Francis Albert Beckstead (1866 - 1952)

 

Evelyn Abigail Beckstead (1867 - 1867)

 

Ira Beckstead (1867 - 1938)

 

Susan Vilinda Beckstead (1868 - 1869)

 

Alexander Beckstead (1870 - 1942)


Created by: SMS

Record added: Feb 16, 2007

Find A Grave Memorial# 17955065

Obituary from Deseret News, March 2, 1870: In West Jordan Ward, February 23rd, 1870, of a disease of the lungs, Alexander Beckstead. He was born March 16, 1802, in the township of Williamsburg, County of Dundas, Upper Canada. He was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 10th, 1837, and in the spring following, he with his family, went to Missouri, and with the Saints he was driven from Missouri to Illinois and from thence moved to Council Bluffs, where he stayed three years. In 1849 he emigrated to this valley and built the third house in what was now called West Jordan Ward. He is the father of thirty-two children, had eighty-six grandchildren ad thirteen great grandchildren, all in the church. He was a faithful Saint and was honored and respected by all who knew him. He was in his 68th year, and died in full faith of the Gospel.

view all 39

Alexander Beckstead's Timeline

1802
March 16, 1802
Schoharie, New York, USA
1823
January 25, 1823
Age 20
Williamsburg,,,Canada
December 9, 1823
Age 21
Williamburg,Dundas,Canada
1825
November 25, 1825
Age 23
1827
December 4, 1827
Age 25
Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario, Canada
1829
September 24, 1829
Age 27
1831
January 17, 1831
Age 28
Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario, Canada
1831
Age 28
1833
April 27, 1833
Age 31
Ontario, Canada
1835
March 16, 1835
Age 33