Alpín mac Echdach, Rí na Dál Riata

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Alpín mac Echdach, Rí na Dál Riata

Nicknames: "10972"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Dunolly Castle, Argyllshire, Dalriada/Scotland
Death: Died in Galloway, Scotland, Killed during a battle with the Picts
Place of Burial: Dalriada, Scotland
Immediate Family:

Son of Eochaid mac Áeda Find, Rí na Dál Riata and N.N. N.N.
Husband of Unknown Wife
Father of Kenneth I mac Alpine, King of the Picts; Domnall mac Ailpín, Rí na Dál Riata; Miss ARGYLL; Griogair mac Ailpín; NN Ingen Ailpín and 2 others

Occupation: King of Dalriada, Rei de Dalriada (Dál Riata)
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Alpín mac Echdach, Rí na Dál Riata

Alpín, mac Eochaid, King of Dal Riada, Argyll, Kintyre

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpin_II_of_Dalriada

http://www.burkes-peerage.net/articles/scotland/page31d.aspx

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#_Toc209085736

from Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, fmg.ac:

1. EOCHAID . m ---. The primary source which names the wife of Eochaid has not yet been identified. Eochaid & his wife had one child:

a) ALPIN (-killed in battle against the Picts in Galloway [20 Jul/Aug] 834).

The Chronicle of John of Fordun records the accession of "Alpin the son of Achay" in 831, that he ruled for three years, was defeated by the Picts "20 July" and beheaded[12].

The 12th century Cronica Regum Scottorum lists "Alpin filius Eochal venenosi iii, Kynedus filius Alpini primus rex Scottorum xvi…" as kings, dated to the 9th century[13].

m ---. The name of Alpin's wife is not known. Alpin & his wife had two children:

i) KENNETH [Cinaed] MacAlpin (-Forteviot, Perthshire 13 Feb [858], bur [Isle of Iona]). His parentage is confirmed by the Annals of Ulster which record the death in 858 of "Cinaed son of Ailpín king of the Picts"[14]. He succeeded as KENNETH I King of Scotland.

ii) DONALD [Domnall] (-Kinn Belachoir palace or killed in battle Scone 13 Apr [863], bur [Isle of Iona]).

The 10th century Pictish Chronicle Cronica de Origine Antiquorum Pictorum records that "Kinadius…filius Alpini, primus Scottorum…Dunevaldus frater eius" ruled for four years[15]. The 12th century Cronica Regum Scottorum lists "Alpin filius Eochal venenosi iii, Kynedus filius Alpini primus rex Scottorum xvi, Dolfnal filius Alpini iiii…" as kings, dated to the 9th century[16].

The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that "Donald also a son of Alpin" succeeded his brother in 854, reigned for four years, died "at Scone" and was buried "in Iona beside his brother"[17]. He succeeded his brother as DONALD I King of Scotland.

The 11th century Synchronisms of Flann Mainistreach name (in order) "Cinaet mac Ailpin…Domnall mac Ailpin, Custantin mac Cinaeta, (Aedh mac Cinaedha), Girg mac Dungaile, Domnall Dasachtach (mac Custantin)" as Scottish kings, dated to the 9th and 10th centuries[18]. The Annals of Ulster record the death in 862 of "Domnall son of Ailpín king of the Picts"[19].

The Chronicle of the Scots and Picts dated 1177 records that "Douenald mac Alpin" reigned for 4 years, died "in Rathinueramon" and was buried "in Iona insula"[20].

--------------------------

Alpín father of King Kenneth

Irish annals such as the Annals of Ulster and the Annals of Innisfallen name Kenneth's father as one Alpín. This much is reasonably certain.

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba usually begins with Kenneth, but some variants include a reference to Kenneth's father: "[Alpín] was killed in Galloway, after he had entirely destroyed and devastated it. And then the kingdom of the Scots was transferred to the kingdom [variant: land] of the Picts."

John of Fordun (IV, ii) calls Kenneth's father "Alpin son of Achay" (Alpín son of Eochu) and has him killed in war with the Picts in 836; Andrew of Wyntoun's version mixes Fordun's war with the Picts with the Chronicle version which has him killed in Galloway.

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839--Kings Aed mac Boanta of Dal Riada and Eoganan mac Oengus of Pictavia are killed in battle with the Vikings. Pictavia fragments into several competing kingdoms. In Dal Riada, Alpin mac Echdach (son of Eochaid mac Aed Find) assumes the throne. Death of King Aethelstan of East Anglia. He is succeeded by Aethelweard. A large Viking fleet under the command of Thorgest arrives in Ireland, sails up the Shannon and Bann rivers to Armagh, which he captures. Thorgest settles down and forms the first Viking kingdom in Ireland, spanning Ulster, Connacht and Meath.

839--Kings Aed mac Boanta of Dal Riada and Eoganan mac Oengus of Pictavia are killed in battle with the Vikings. Pictavia fragments into several competing kingdoms. In Dal Riada, Alpin mac Echdach (son of Eochaid mac Aed Find) assumes the throne. Death of King Aethelstan of East Anglia. He is succeeded by Aethelweard. A large Viking fleet under the command of Thorgest arrives in Ireland, sails up the Shannon and Bann rivers to Armagh, which he captures. Thorgest settles down and forms the first Viking kingdom in Ireland, spanning Ulster, Connacht and Meath.

http://www.geocities.com/robertp6165/arthuriantimeline5.html

--------------------

Alpín mac Echdach

Alpín mac Echdach may refer to two persons. The first person is a presumed king of Dál Riata in the late 730s. The second is the father of Kenneth MacAlpin (Cináed mac Ailpín). The name Alpín is taken to be a Pictish one, derived from the Anglo-Saxon name Ælfwine; Alpín's patronymic means son of Eochaid or son of Eochu.

[edit]Alpín father of King Kenneth

Irish annals such as the Annals of Ulster and the Annals of Innisfallen name Kenneth's father as one Alpín. This much is reasonably certain.

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba usually begins with Kenneth, but some variants include a reference to Kenneth's father: "[Alpín] was killed in Galloway, after he had entirely destroyed and devastated it. And then the kingdom of the Scots was transferred to the kingdom [variant: land] of the Picts."

John of Fordun (IV, ii) calls Kenneth's father "Alpin son of Achay" (Alpín son of Eochu) and has him killed in war with the Picts in 836; Andrew of Wyntoun's version mixes Fordun's war with the Picts with the Chronicle version which has him killed in Galloway.

[edit]Alpín of Dál Riata

The genealogies produced for Kings of Scots in the High Middle Ages traced their ancestry through Kenneth MacAlpin, through the Cenél nGabráin of Dál Riata to Fergus Mór, and then to legendary Irish kings such as Conaire Mór.

These genealogies, perhaps oral in origin, were subjected to some regularisation by the scribes who copied them into sources such as the Chronicle of Melrose, the Poppleton Manuscript and the like. Either by accident, or by design, a number of kings were misplaced, being moved from the early 8th century to the late 8th and early 9th century.

The original list is presumed to have resembled the following:

1. Eochaid mac Domangairt

2. Ainbcellach mac Ferchair

3. Eógan mac Ferchair

4. Selbach mac Ferchair

5. Eochaid mac Echdach

6. Dúngal mac Selbaig

7. Alpín

8. Muiredach mac Ainbcellaig

9. Eógan mac Muiredaig

10. Áed Find

11. Fergus mac Echdach

After modification to link this list of kings of Dál Riata to the family of Kenneth MacAlpin, the list is presumed to have been in this form:

1. Eochaid mac Domangairt

2. Ainbcellach mac Ferchair

3. Eógan mac Ferchair

8. Muiredach mac Ainbcellaig

9. Eogan mac Muiredaig

10. Áed Find

11. Fergus mac Echdach

4. Selbach mac Ferchair (called Selbach mac Eógain)

5. Eochaid mac Echdach (called Eochaid mac Áeda Find)

6. Dúngal mac Selbaig (name unchanged)

7. Alpín (called Alpín mac Echdach)

However, the existence of the original Alpín is less than certain. No king in Dál Riata of that name is recorded in the Irish annals in the early 730s. A Pictish king named Alpín, whose father's name is not given in any Irish sources, or even from the Pictish Chronicle king-lists, is known from the late 720s, when he was defeated by Óengus mac Fergusa and Nechtan mac Der-Ilei. For the year 742, the Annals of Ulster are read was referring to the capture of "Elffin son of Crop" (the former reading had besieged rather than captured). Whether Álpin son of Crup is related to the Álpin of the 720s is unknown.

--------------------

Alpín mac Echdach may refer to two persons. The first person is a presumed king of Dál Riata in the late 730s.

The second is the father of Kenneth MacAlpin (Cináed mac Ailpín). The name Alpín is taken to be a Pictish one, derived from the Anglo-Saxon name Ælfwine; Alpín's patronymic means son of Eochaid or son of Eochu.

Alpín father of King Kenneth

Irish annals such as the Annals of Ulster and the Annals of Innisfallen name Kenneth's father as one Alpín. This much is reasonably certain.

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba usually begins with Kenneth, but some variants include a reference to Kenneth's father: "[Alpín] was killed in Galloway, after he had entirely destroyed and devastated it. And then the kingdom of the Scots was transferred to the kingdom [variant: land] of the Picts."

John of Fordun (IV, ii) calls Kenneth's father "Alpin son of Achay" (Alpín son of Eochu) and has him killed in war with the Picts in 836; Andrew of Wyntoun's version mixes Fordun's war with the Picts with the Chronicle version which has him killed in Galloway.

Alpín of Dál Riata

The genealogies produced for Kings of Scots in the High Middle Ages traced their ancestry through Kenneth MacAlpin, through the Cenél nGabráin of Dál Riata to Fergus Mór, and then to legendary Irish kings such as Conaire Mór.

These genealogies, perhaps oral in origin, were subjected to some regularisation by the scribes who copied them into sources such as the Chronicle of Melrose, the Poppleton Manuscript and the like. Either by accident, or by design, a number of kings were misplaced, being moved from the early 8th century to the late 8th and early 9th century.

The original list is presumed to have resembled the following:

   1. Eochaid mac Domangairt
   2. Ainbcellach mac Ferchair
   3. Eógan mac Ferchair
   4. Selbach mac Ferchair
   5. Eochaid mac Echdach
   6. Dúngal mac Selbaig
   7. Alpín
   8. Muiredach mac Ainbcellaig
   9. Eógan mac Muiredaig
   10. Áed Find
   11. Fergus mac Echdach

After modification to link this list of kings of Dál Riata to the family of Kenneth MacAlpin, the list is presumed to have been in this form:

   1. Eochaid mac Domangairt
   2. Ainbcellach mac Ferchair
   3. Eógan mac Ferchair
   8. Muiredach mac Ainbcellaig
   9. Eogan mac Muiredaig
   10. Áed Find
   11. Fergus mac Echdach
   4. Selbach mac Ferchair (called Selbach mac Eógain)
   5. Eochaid mac Echdach (called Eochaid mac Áeda Find)
   6. Dúngal mac Selbaig (name unchanged)
   7. Alpín (called Alpín mac Echdach)

However, the existence of the original Alpín is less than certain. No king in Dál Riata of that name is recorded in the Irish annals in the early 730s. A Pictish king named Alpín, whose father's name is not given in any Irish sources, or even from the Pictish Chronicle king-lists, is known from the late 720s, when he was defeated by Óengus mac Fergusa and Nechtan mac Der-Ilei. For the year 742, the Annals of Ulster are read was referring to the capture of "Elffin son of Crop" (the former reading had besieged rather than captured). Whether Álpin son of Crup is related to the Álpin of the 720s is unknown.

[edit] References

   * Anderson, Alan Orr, Early Sources of Scottish History A.D 500–1286, volume 1. Reprinted with corrections. Paul Watkins, Stamford, 1990. ISBN 1-871615-03-8
   * Broun, Dauvit, The Irish Identity of the Kingdom of the Scots in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries. Boydell, Woodbridge, 1999. ISBN 0-85115-375-5
   * Broun, Dauvit, "Pictish Kings 761–839: Integration with Dál Riata or Separate Development" in Sally M. Foster (ed.), The St Andrews Sarcophagus: A Pictish masterpiece and its international connections. Four Courts, Dublin, 1998. ISBN 1-85182-414-6

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpin_II_of_Dalriada

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Summary of Alpin Mac Eochaid

Name:

Alpin Mac Eochaid

Gender:

Male

Father:

Eochaid IV "The Poisonous/Venomous" Rinnamail

Mother:

Fergusa (Urgusia) 

Facts and Events

Birth

7-20-778, Scotland.

Death

7-20-834.

Marriages/Children

Queen of Scotland


Marriage

Scotland.

Children

Kenneth I Mac Alpin

--------------------

Alpin of Kintyre, King of Scotland

M, #102905, d. 20 July 834

Alpin of Kintyre, King of Scotland|d. 20 Jul 834|p10291.htm#i102905|Eochaid IV 'the Poisonous', King of Dalraida||p10209.htm#i102086|Fergusa of Dalraida (||p880.htm#i8793|||||||Fergus (?), King of Dalraida||p880.htm#i8794||||

Last Edited=17 Apr 2004

    Alpin of Kintyre, King of Scotland was the son of Eochaid IV 'the Poisonous', King of Dalraida and Fergusa or Urguisa of Dalraida.1 He died on 20 July 834 at Galloway, Scotland, killed fighting the Picts.1
    Alpin of Kintyre, King of Scotland gained the title of King Alpin of Scotland in 843. He gained the title of King Alpin of Kintyre.

Children of Alpin of Kintyre, King of Scotland

1.Kenneth I MacAlpin, King of Scotland+ b. 810, d. 859

2.Donald I MacAlpin, King of Scotland+ b. 812, d. 13 Apr 863

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Alpin MAC EOCHAID / Daughter of Achalas King Argyllshire

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Husband: Alpin MAC EOCHAID

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Born: ABT 0778 at: ,,Scotland,Great Britain

Married: ABT 0809 at: ,,,Scotland

Died: 20 Jul 0834 at: Galloway,,Scotland

Father: Rinnamail EOCHAIDH

Mother: Fergusa URGUSIA

Notes: [116]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Wife: Daughter of Achalas King Argyllshire

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Born: ABT 0782 at: ,,Scotland,Great Britain

Died: at:

Father: ACHALAS

Mother:

Notes: [117]

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alp%C3%ADn_mac_Echdach

--------------------

Alpin II av Dalriada

Alpin mac Eochaid (død ca. 841) var konge av Dalriada i dagens Skottland fra ca. 839 til sin død.

Hans far skal ha vært Eochaid IV, som i noen kilder ble kalt konge av Skottland. Dette var antagelig en seremoniell tittel, dersom den i det hele tatt var i bruk.

Alpins eldste sønn Kenneth ble den første kongen av det forente Skottland, og han ble i sin tur etterfulgt av Alpins yngre sønn Donald. Hans kone skal ha vært en skotsk prinsesse; hennes navn er ikke kjent.

Hans navn ble gitt til dynastiet som startet med Kenneth I, huset Alpin.

Forgjenger:

Eogán  Konge av Dalriada

(ca. 839–ca. 841) Etterfølger:

Kenneth I av Skottland  

Hentet fra «http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpin_II_av_Dalriada»

Kategori: Dalriadas konger

--------------------

King of Scotland

--------------------

Alpin mac Eochaid (død ca. 841) var konge av Dalriada i dagens Skottland fra ca. 839 til sin død.

Hans far skal ha vært Eochaid IV, som i noen kilder ble kalt konge av Skottland. Dette var antagelig en seremoniell tittel, dersom den i det hele tatt var i bruk.

Alpins eldste sønn Kenneth ble den første kongen av det forente Skottland, og han ble i sin tur etterfulgt av Alpins yngre sønn Donald. Hans kone skal ha vært en skotsk prinsesse; hennes navn er ikke kjent.

Hans navn ble gitt til dynastiet som startet med Kenneth I, huset Alpin.

--------------------

Alpin of Kintyre, King of Scotland

M, #102905, d. 20 July 834

Alpin of Kintyre, King of Scotland|d. 20 Jul 834|p10291.htm#i102905|Eochaid IV 'the Poisonous', King of Dalraida||p10209.htm#i102086|Fergusa (?)||p880.htm#i8793|||||||Fergus (?), King of Dalraida||p880.htm#i8794||||

Last Edited=17 Apr 2004

    Alpin of Kintyre, King of Scotland was the son of Eochaid IV 'the Poisonous', King of Dalraida and Fergusa (?).1 He died on 20 July 834 at Galloway, Scotland, killed fighting the Picts.1
    Alpin of Kintyre, King of Scotland gained the title of King Alpin of Scotland in 843. He gained the title of King Alpin of Kintyre.

Children of Alpin of Kintyre, King of Scotland

1.Kenneth I MacAlpin, King of Scotland+ b. 810, d. 859

2.Donald I MacAlpin, King of Scotland+ b. 812, d. 13 Apr 863

Citations

1.[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 165. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10291.htm#i102905

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Död : Cir 834, Galloway , Kirkcudbright , Skottland

Orsaken till hans död dödades .

Allmänna hänvisningar: 

Dödade samtidigt bekämpa pikterna .

Noterade händelser i hans liv var:

• Han var anställd . King of Kintyre , kung av Skottland

Alpin gift.

-------------------- Alpin of Kintyre, King of Scotland was the son of Eochaid IV 'the Poisonous', King of Dalraida and Fergusa (?). He died on 20 July 834 at Galloway, Scotland, killed fighting the Picts.

Alpin of Kintyre, King of Scotland gained the title of King Alpin of Scotland in 843. He gained the title of King Alpin of Kintyre.

Children of Alpin of Kintyre, King of Scotland:

   * Kenneth I MacAlpin, King of Scotland b. 810, d. 859
   * Donald I MacAlpin, King of Scotland b. 812, d. 13 Apr 863

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10291.htm#i102905 -------------------- Alpin . Died 837, Galloway. !GENEALOGY: Royal Ancestors of

        Magna Charta Barons; Page; 226; G929.72; C6943ra; Denver Public
        Library; Genealogy

             Children of Alpin  and _____:

           13       i   Kenneth MACALPIN

 

        Ms. Charlotte Maness, 757 Oak St, Apartment B, Lakewood, CO 80215

-------------------- KING KENNETH 1 (843-858) "Kenneth the Hardy"

Kenneth Mac Alpin is generally considered the first king the united Scots of Dalriada and the Picts, and so of Scotland, north of a line between the Forth and Clyde rivers.

Ancient Gaelic-speaking people of northern Ireland settled in western Scotland sometime in the 5th century AD. Originally (until 10th century) "Scotia" often denoted Ireland, and the inhabitants Scotia were Scotti. [This is of course based upon the area of Northern Ireland where the Scotti dwelt]. This ancient Dalriadic land, later the area of Argyll and Bute, where these Scots settled, became known as the kingdom of Dal Riada the counterpart to Dal Riata in Ireland. St. Columba introduced them to Christianity and helped raise one person, Aidan, to the kingship Scottish Dalriada in 574.

Footprint in Stone, Dunadd

The original seat of the Scottish Dalriada is thought to be Dunadd, in north Lochgilphead, Argyll. The dark age fortifications on top of the isolated crag of Dunadd, on the edge of the Crinan Moss, were probably the capital of the ancient kingdom of Dalriada. Dalriada was established by Irish immigrants, or raiders, from county Antrim, Ireland around 500 AD., although Scottish raiders had been coming to these shores since circa 330 AD. The site now consists of a series of eroded terraces which, from three separate excavations, have shown evidence of metal-working, including many beautiful brooches, making it consistent with its interpretation of a royal residence of the first Kings of Dalriada. Interestingly, below the summit, on one of the lower terraces are a rock carving of a boar, (an ancient Celtic spiritual symbol, also found in Gaul) an enigmatic description in ogam, and the outline of a footprint! All this seems to indicate that not only was this spot a place of ancient Dalriada, but possibly the place of original inauguration of ancient kings. 

This is echoed by the later inauguration of the Lords of the Isles, whose own inauguration ceremonies at Finlaggan on Islay purposely recalled the kings of Dalriada. Other centres of this ancient seat, (seemingly to be connected with the tribute of grains), are at locations of other ancient royal forts, notably: Dunollie (Oban), Tarbert and Dunaverty (Kintyre).

Map of Scottish Dalriada

They then expanded eastward into what came to be known as the Forest of Atholl and Strathearn (from the river Earn) and northward into the area of Elgin. The union of the lands of modern Scotland began in 843, when Kenneth MacAlpin, then King of the Dalriada, became also king of the Picts and Scots (within a few years, joined "Pict-land" to "Scot-land" to form the kingdom of Alba). By 1034, by inheritance and warfare the Scots had secured hegemony over not only Alba but also Lothian, Cumbria, and later Strathclyde--roughly the territory of modern mainland Scotland, except for the far north and the western Isles. In the 12th century the kingdom was divided into Scotland, Lothian, and Galloway; later Scotland came to be the name for the whole land, and all its inhabitants came to be known as Scots, whatever their origin. The 11th century Duan Albanach, Scotland's earliest Gaelic poem, still gives the country this name, and it remains the Gaelic term for Scotland to this day. But 'Scotland' superceded it in the new language of the Lowland administration, whilst Alba (Albany) was relegated to the title of a royal dukedom in 1398. 

Ciniodh (Kenneth) MacAlpin, known aslo as "Kenneth the Hardy", was believed born around the year 810 AD, but later took the Christian name of Kenneth. His father, Alpin MacEochaid, was king of Scots in name only, as at that time some of the area around Dalriada was actually ruled by the Picts of Caledonia.

His mother is said to have been either a daughter of Achalas, King of Argyllshire or a princess of the royal lines of the Picts. In either case, he was born into a strong royal bloodline. On his father's side he could lay claim as righful heir to the throne of Dalriada and his mother's bloodline gave him the right to petition for the throne of South Pictland, or Caledonia, to use the Roman term.

Mac Alpin

Little is known about his father Alpin although, according to tradition, he took advantage of the Viking raids of early 830's to lead a revolt against the Caledonians. (More on this in Scottish Origins). In 836, after some early success during which he possibly destroyed Galloway, Alpin son of Eochaid the Venomous , virtually the last of the Dalriadic Scottish kings, fell near Laicht Castle, on the ridge which separated Kyle from Galloway, supposedly killed by a single man who lay in wait in a thick wood overhanging the entrance of the ford of a river. He was succeeded by his son Kenneth. 

The Picts victory over Alpin MacEochaid only earned them the right to face the Vikings in battle. A battle they had to be somewhat concerned about, for the Vikings had suffered very few defeats in this century to anyone. They were defeated by the Norsemen in a fierce battle but had not been destroyed.

After Kenneth had ruled his father's land for only a few years, the Vikings struck at the Picts and Scots in 839. It was an odd battle. The Scots were engaged in a losing battle against a branch of the southern Picts still resisting the Scoto-Pictish union; the Vikings watching to see the outcome. When the Scots withdrew the Vikings promptly attacked the Picts delivering a serious defeat to the Southern Picts. The Scots managed to escape to fight another day. The outcome was a disaster for the Picts. This was described by the Irish annalists as a battle between the Gentiles and the men of Fortren. According to tradition, Fortren was the new name given to the combined kingdoms of the Scots and Picts. In the great slaughter that ensued, Eoganan son of Oengus, his brother and successor, and many others were killed. After this battle, the warrior and royal class of the Picts was so severely depleted that they never again offered any serious threat to Vikings or Scots for control of their country. In an unintentional way, the Vikings had helped the Scots rule the Picts y so weaking them.

By Pictish marriage custom, inheritance passed through female (matriarchal descent) and Kenneth's maternal ancestry probably provided some claim to the Caledonian throne, to which now he applied himself.

Though a marriage to the daughter of Constantine (his second cousin) increased his standing, his petition was not accepted during the next four ascensions of the Caledonian Crown. Now Kenneth's sovereignty of Dalriada was regarded as an obstacle to his becoming Ard-righ (High King) of Alban just as there is was sometimes a tendency to prevent the merging of two ancient noble families or houses. The Pictish nobles seem to have resisted his claim and it appears to have taken several years for Kenneth to gain rule over all of the Picts. In the reign of Drust, the last Pictish King of Caledonia, it is said that Kenneth planned and executed an episode that is now known as 'MacAlpins treason'.

Less than eight years had passed since the disastrous defeat by the Vikings in c. 839 and Caledonian rule was still greatly weakened. The country was largely occupied by Viking forces, and he could not mount any serious challenge to their forced authority. It was in those conditions, c. 847 AD, that Kenneth invited the seven remaining Mormaers (Earls) of Caledonia to court to discuss his claim to the throne. According to legend, a great banquet was held at Scone which had become the sacred centre of Pictavia, and the guests were plied with food and wine. Late in the evening, after the guests - including Drust the King - were sufficiently inebriated, they were attacked and slaughtered by Kenneth's men in a scene right from a Shakespearean tragedy and treachery. This is but one version of "MacAlpin's Treason", of which, as with many oral traditions, there are many. One version of the story tells of the benches, on which the mormears were seated, being pulled out from under them, dropping them into a killing pit. Such was the way of Kings of Scotland in this era.

Kenneth cleared the way for his claim to the throne of Caledonia and was crowned not long after in the Pictish monastery of Scone on the ancient Stone of Destiny. This traditions exists, to the present day, the Coronation Stone for all the British monarchs, becoming King of the Picts as well as the Scots (although officially there is only a king/queen of all Britian). The Stone of Destiny (or Scone) has a sacred, religious and ceremonial heritage to the Scots dating back to the 6th - 7th century when the stone, then called the Li Fail and once used to crown the Irish kings at Tara. Allegedly, the stone was brought by Fergus (MacErc) to Dalriada. There are a great many legends about the origins of the stone, but despite the legendary claims it seems to have been quite an indigenous rock. Over time it became known as the Stone of Scone, in reference to its new location in Scone. (The seat of Alba). Kenneth MacAlpin, now king of the Scots and the Picts, and the whole of Scotland north of the Forth and Clyde established Alba, the first united kingdom in Scotland. Its territory ranged from modern Argyll and Bute to the north, across much of southern and central Scotland. Alba was one of the few areas in the British Isles to withstand the invasions of the Vikings, although they did suffer terrible defeats. The ancient link with Ireland (from which the Celtic Scots had emerged) was eventually broken as a cordon of Scandinavian settlements was established in the Western Isles, the far north of Scotland, and Ireland. With southern England also conquered by the Norsemen, (the Saxons called them all generically Danes), Alba was left isolated.

Moot Hill

Kenneth and his successors waged many wars against the English and the Norsemen who continually raided the coasts and threatened the independence of Scotland. The early capital of King Kenneth was at Dunkeld, which was later enlarged to hold the remnants of Saint Columba. It was not long after his accession to the kingship of the unitied Picts and Scots that the capital of the kingdom was moved to Scone, where the historic "Moot Hill" became from then forward the legal center of all Scotland, as it had previously been of Pictland. 

Kenneth has a skillful reputation in politics as well as warfare, at a time when being a successful warrior was the only way to hold on to power. It is said that he was proclaimed king at Scone, a masterstroke as this was in the centre of Pictish territory, and brought with him the Stone of Destiny.

Map of Ancient Alba

He ruled until his death as Kenneth I, King of Alba, the New Kingdom created by the combination of the two previous nations. During this time he seems to have made some further conquests against factions of the resisting Picts and possibly invaded Lothian, Dunbar and Melrose. After attacks on Iona by Vikings he removed relics of St. Columba, probably in 849 or 850, to Dunkeld, which became the headquarters of the Scottish Columban church. 

Kenneth I died in 858, near Scone in Pictish territory, and was buried on the island of Iona. Upon his death in c. 858, his brother Donald became King and ruled as a member of the House of Alpin. Kenneth MacAlpin was the founder of the dynasty that ruled Scotland for centuries.

It is considered unlikely that Kenneth was ever "crowned" king in the modern understanding of the sense of a coronation. He certainly did not get the Papal blessing, as this did not happen to a Scottish king until 1329. But certainly he was the King of Picts and Scots even if these ceremonies were altogether different than we know today. Kenneth's importance in Scottish history lies in the fact that he is traditionally seen as the monarch who became the first to unite the Picts and Scots.

Due to an absence of written records, it remains unclear what happened to the Picts after this time. Apart from their ornately carved stones, jewellery, and a few (possible) graves and settlement sites, the Pictish culture vanishes from history. The future of the land was now Scottish. However it is important not to underplay the importance of the Picts and their effects and contributions to Scottish history and culture. They didn't simply disappear, but were assimilated into a culture known henceforth as Scots, not Picts. The Picts, genetically speaking, are still very present in the blood of most all Scots.

As usual with early history there is more than a touch of myth and legend surrounding him. It isn't wholly accurate to say that he united the Picts and Scots for the first time, as several kings had already done so. The significance of Kenneth's reign is that after him the Picts and Scots stayed united. Nevertheless, he remains one of the most important of early Scottish rulers and the most important leader of a young and struggling nation.

Alpin rebelled against Oengus II, King of the Picts and Dalriada

Alpin of Kintyre, King of Scotland was the son of Eochaid IV 'the Poisonous', King of Dalraida and Fergusa.1 He died on 20 July 834 in Galloway, Scotland, killed fighting the Picts.1

    Alpin of Kintyre, King of Scotland gained the title of King Alpin of Scotland in 843. He gained the title of King Alpin of Kintyre. 

Family

Children Kenneth I MacAlpin, King of Scotland+ b. 810, d. 859

Donald I MacAlpin, King of Scotland+ b. 812, d. 13 Apr 863


Citations [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 165. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.


Alpin, King of Dalriada, d. 841 in Galloway, Scotland

Father: Eochaidh "the Poisonous", King of Dalriada, d. 819

Mother: Urgusia

Alpin rebelled against Oengus II, King of the Picts and Dalriada.

Children:

daughter Mac Alpin

Donald I, King of Scotland, d. 862, Became king 858 in Scotland

Kenneth I, King of Scotland, d. 13 February 858 in Forteviot, Perthshire, Scotland, He became King of Dalriada, 834 in Dungad, Scotland, United Pictish and Dalriada kingdoms 843 in Scotland, cause of death was a tumor.

lineage:

Alpin, King of Dalriada, d. 841 in Galloway, Scotland

Father: Eochaidh "the Poisonous", King of Dalriada, d. 819

Mother: Urgusia

Alpin rebelled against Oengus II, King of the Picts and Dalriada.

Children:

daughter Mac Alpin

Donald I, King of Scotland, d. 862, Became king 858 in Scotland

Kenneth I, King of Scotland, d. 13 February 858 in Forteviot, Perthshire, Scotland, He became King of Dalriada, 834 in Dungad, Scotland, United Pictish and Dalriada kingdoms 843 in Scotland, cause of death was a tumor.

Eochaidh "the Poisonous", King of Dalriada, d. 819

Father: Aed Find "the White", King of Dalriada, d. 771

Mother: Fergina

Spouse: Urgusia

Father: Urguis (Ungast)

Married.

Children:

Alpin, King of Dalriada, d. 841 in Galloway, Scotland

Aed Find "the White", King of Dalriada, d. 771

Father: Eugene VII, King of Dalriada, d. 727, He became King of Dalriada, ca. 726 in Dungad, Scotland

Mother: Spondan

His Gaelic name was Aodh Airgneach.

Spouse: Fergina

Married.

Children:

Eochaidh "the Poisonous", King of Dalriada, m. Urgusia, d. 819

Eugene VII, King of Dalriada, d. 727, He became King of Dalriada, ca. 726 in Dungad, Scotland

Father: Eugene V, King of Dalriada, d. ca. 697, He became King of Dalraida, ca. 696 in Dungad, Scotland

His Gaelic name was Eochaidh or Eocha Angbhadh.

Spouse: Spondan

Married.

Children:

Aed Find "the White", King of Dalriada, m. Fergina, d. 771

Eugene V, King of Dalriada, d. ca. 697, He became King of Dalraida, ca. 696 in Dungad, Scotland

Father: Dongard, d. 673

His Gaelic name was Eochaidh "Crook Nose".

Children:

Eugene VII, King of Dalriada, m. Spondan, d. 727, He became King of Dalriada, ca. 726 in Dungad, Scotland

Dongard, d. 673

Father: Donald IV, King of Dalriada, d. 642 in Strathcarron, Scotland, He became King of Dalriada, ca. 629 in Dungad, Scotland, lost Irish Dalriada 637

His Gaelic name was Domongart.

Children:

Eugene V, King of Dalriada, d. ca. 697, He became King of Dalraida, ca. 696 in Dungad, Scotland

Donald IV, King of Dalriada, d. 642 in Strathcarron, Scotland, He became King of Dalriada, ca. 629 in Dungad, Scotland, lost Irish Dalriada 637

Father: Eugene IV, King of Dalriada, d. 630, He became King of Dalriada, ca. 608 in Dungad, Scotland

His Gaelic name was Domnall Brece (the Frekled) or Donal Breacc (the Speckled).

Children:

Dongard, d. 673

Eugene IV, King of Dalriada, d. 630, He became King of Dalriada, ca. 608 in Dungad, Scotland

Father: Aedon, King of Dalriada, d. 608

His Gaelic name was Eochu Buide (the Fair).

Children:

Donald IV, King of Dalriada, d. 642 in Strathcarron, Scotland, He became King of Dalriada, ca. 629 in Dungad, Scotland, lost Irish Dalriada 637

Conal Cean Gamha, d. 659

Connad Cear, b. ca. 600

Aedon, King of Dalriada, d. 608

Father: Gabran "the Treacherous", King of Dalriada, d. 559, He became King of Dalriada, ca. 538 in Dungad, Scotland

Mother: Ingenach

King Aidan secured the independence of Dalriada in about 575. He was ordained King of Dalriada by Saint Columba.

Children:

Artur

Conaing

Gafron

Eugene IV, King of Dalriada, d. 630, He became King of Dalriada, ca. 608 in Dungad, Scotland

Maithgemma of Monad, m. Cairell of the Dal Fiach

Gabran "the Treacherous", King of Dalriada, d. 559, He became King of Dalriada, ca. 538 in Dungad, Scotland

Father: Dongard, King of Dalriada, d. 506

Mother: Fedelm Foltchain

Spouse: Ingenach

Father: Brychan, King of Brecheiniog

Married.

Children:

Eogann

Aedon, King of Dalriada, d. 608

Dongard, King of Dalriada, d. 506

Father: Fergus Mor, King of Dalriada, b. ca. 434, d. 501

His Gaelic name was Domangart.

Spouse: Fedelm Foltchain

Father: Brion

Married.

Children:

Comghall, d. 537

Gabran "the Treacherous", King of Dalriada, m. Ingenach, d. 559, He became King of Dalriada, ca. 538 in Dungad, Scotland

Fergus Mor, King of Dalriada, b. ca. 434, d. 501

Father: Erc, King of Dalriada, d. 474

After his father died, Fergus Mor became king of Dalriada. The previous colony of Dalriada and Argyle was driven out by the Picts. In 503 (or 498) Fergus Mor returned with an army to establish the kingdom of Scotia Minor. It is believed he brought with him the Stone of Destiny, or Lia Fail. This stone was placed under the throne of Scotland and all kings of Scotland took their oath over it until it was taken by King Edward I of England. It is because of this stone that all Scottish kings are crowned at Scone.

He was the one hundred thirty first monarch of Ireland and the first king of Dalriada.

Children:

Dongard, King of Dalriada, m. Fedelm Foltchain, d. 506

Erc, King of Dalriada, d. 474

Father: Eochaidh Muinreamhar, King of Dalriada

It is during his reign that Scottish Dalriada began to split from the Irish side. Up until that time Dalriada consisted of two halves: the area that is now County Antrim in Ireland, and what was called Scotia Minor, now Argyll, in Scotland. The name "Argyll" means "coastline of the Gaels".

Children:

Angus

Muircheartach

Lorn (Loarn)

Fergus Mor, King of Dalriada, b. ca. 434, d. 501

Eochaidh Muinreamhar, King of Dalriada

Father: Angus Fir, King of Dalriada

Eochaidh was called "the Horseman of the Heavens."

Children:

Erc, King of Dalriada, d. 474

Angus Fir, King of Dalriada

Father: Fedelmid Aislingech, King of Dalriada

Children:

Eochaidh Muinreamhar, King of Dalriada

Fedelmid Aislingech, King of Dalriada

Father: Angus Buidnech

Children:

Angus Fir, King of Dalriada

Angus Buidnech

Father: Fedelmid Romaich

Children:

Fedelmid Aislingech, King of Dalriada

Fedelmid Romaich

Father: Senchormaich

Children:

Angus Buidnech

Senchormaich

Father: Cruitlinde

Children:

Fedelmid Romaich

Cruitlinde

Father: Findfece

Children:

Senchormaich

Findfece

Father: Achircir

Children:

Cruitlinde

Achircir

Father: Eochaidh Antoit

Children:

Findfece

Eochaidh Antoit

Father: Fiascha Cathmail

Children:

Achircir

Fiascha Cathmail

Father: Eochaid Cairbre Riata, King of Dalriada

Children:

Eochaidh Antoit

Eochaid Cairbre Riata, King of Dalriada

Father: Conaire Caem, King of Ireland, d. 165 in Ireland, He became king of Ireland, 158 in Ireland, cause of death was murder by Neimhidh.

Mother: Saraid

It is from Eochaid that the kingdom of Dalriada got its name. He is listed in the Annals of the Four Masters as Cairbre Riada.

Children:

Fiascha Cathmail

Conaire Caem, King of Ireland, d. 165 in Ireland, He became king of Ireland, 158 in Ireland, cause of death was murder by Neimhidh.

Father: Modh Lamha

Mother: Eithne

Conaire's sons are often referred to as "the three Cairbres". They fought alongside the sons of Oilioll Olum at the battle of Caennfeabhrat in 186.

Spouse: Saraid

Father: Conn Ceadchatbach (of the Hundred Battles), King of Ireland, d. 157 in Ireland, He became king of Ireland, 123 in Tara, Ireland, cause of death was slaying by Tibraite Tireach, son of Mal.

Married.

Children:

Cairbre Baschaein

Eochaid Cairbre Riata, King of Dalriada

Cairbre Musc

Modh Lamha

Father: Lugaid Allathach

Spouse: Eithne

Married.

Children:

Conaire Caem, King of Ireland, m. Saraid, d. 165 in Ireland, He became king of Ireland, 158 in Ireland, cause of death was murder by Neimhidh.

Lugaid Allathach

Father: Coirpre Crou-chend

Children:

Modh Lamha, m. Eithne

Coirpre Crou-chend

Father: Daire Dorn Mor

Children:

Lugaid Allathach

Daire Dorn Mor

Father: Coipre Firmaora

Children:

Coirpre Crou-chend

Coipre Firmaora

Father: Admor

Children:

Daire Dorn Mor

Admor

Father: Conaire Mor, d. ca. 040 BC in Bruighean Da Dhearg, Ireland, cause of death was murder by insurgents., He became king of Ireland, ca. 110 BC in Tara, Ireland

Some genealogies do not list Admor.

Children:

Coipre Firmaora

Conaire Mor, d. ca. 040 BC in Bruighean Da Dhearg, Ireland, cause of death was murder by insurgents., He became king of Ireland, ca. 110 BC in Tara, Ireland

Father: Eterscel, d. ca. 111 BC in Aillinn, Ireland, cause of death was slaying by Nuadha Neacht.

Mother: Mes Buachalla

Conaire slew Nuadha Neacht to become the ninety-seventh monarch of Ireland and was known as the "Peace King".

Tha Annals of the Four Masters says: "It was in the reign of Conaire that the sea annually cast its produce ashore, at Inbhear Colptha. Great abundance of nuts were annually found upon the Boinn Boyne and the Buais during his time. The cattle were without keepers in Ireland in his reign, on account of the greatness of the peace and concord. His reign was not thunder producing or stormy, for the wind did not take a hair off the cattle from the middle of Autumn to the middle of Spring. Little but the trees bent from the greatness of their fruit during his time."

Children:

Admor

Eterscel, d. ca. 111 BC in Aillinn, Ireland, cause of death was slaying by Nuadha Neacht.

Father: Eogan

Etersel became the ninety-fifth monarch of Ireland ca. 115 BC.

Spouse: Mes Buachalla

Married.

Children:

Conaire Mor, d. ca. 040 BC in Bruighean Da Dhearg, Ireland, cause of death was murder by insurgents., He became king of Ireland, ca. 110 BC in Tara, Ireland

Eogan

Father: Ailill Lactighe

Mother: Medb (Maeve)

Children:

Eterscel, m. Mes Buachalla, d. ca. 111 BC in Aillinn, Ireland, cause of death was slaying by Nuadha Neacht.

Ailill Lactighe

Father: Iar

It is possible that Ailill and his father, Iar, have been reversed in the listing; making Ailill the father and Iar his son.

Spouse: Medb (Maeve)

Father: Eochaidh Feidhleach, King of Ireland, d. ca. 131 BC in Tara, Ireland

Maeve is responsible for the Cattle Raid of Cooley.

Married.

Children:

Eogan

Iar

Father: Dedad (Deagadh)

Children:

Ailill Lactighe, m. Medb (Maeve)

Dedad (Deagadh)

Father: Sin

Children:

Iar

Sin

Father: Roshin

Children:

Eachadach

Dedad (Deagadh)

Roshin

Father: Trir (Thrir)

Children:

Sin

Trir (Thrir)

Father: Ro-thrir

Children:

Roshin

Ro-thrir

Father: Earmail (Arnail)

Children:

Trir (Thrir)

Earmail (Arnail)

Father: Main Mor

Children:

Ro-thrir

Main Mor

Father: Fergusa

Children:

Earmail (Arnail)

Fergusa

Father: Feradaigh

Children:

Main Mor

Feradaigh

Father: Ailill Erand

Children:

Fergusa

Ailill Erand

Father: Fiachu Fer-mara

Children:

Feradaigh

Fiachu Fer-mara

Father: Aenghus Tuirmheach Teamhrach, King of Ireland, d. ca. 325 BC in Tara, Ireland

Children:

Ailill Erand

Brychan, King of Brecheiniog

Children:

Ingenach, m. Gabran "the Treacherous", King of Dalriada

Urguis (Ungast)

Urguis may have been king of the Picts.

Children:

Urgusia, m. Eochaidh "the Poisonous", King of Dalriada

Unuist, High King of Picts

 

-------------------- 839--Kings Aed mac Boanta of Dal Riada and Eoganan mac Oengus of Pictavia are killed in battle with the Vikings. Pictavia fragments into several competing kingdoms. In Dal Riada, Alpin mac Echdach (son of Eochaid mac Aed Find) assumes the throne. Death of King Aethelstan of East Anglia. He is succeeded by Aethelweard. A large Viking fleet under the command of Thorgest arrives in Ireland, sails up the Shannon and Bann rivers to Armagh, which he captures. Thorgest settles down and forms the first Viking kingdom in Ireland, spanning Ulster, Connacht and Meath.

http://www.geocities.com/robertp6165/arthuriantimeline5.html

-------------------- Alpín mac Echdach may refer to two persons. The first person is a presumed king of Dál Riata in the late 730s. The second is the father of Kenneth MacAlpin (Cináed mac Ailpín). The name Alpín is taken to be a Pictish one, derived from the Anglo-Saxon name Ælfwine; Alpín's patronymic means son of Eochaid or son of Eochu.

[edit] Alpín father of King Kenneth

Irish annals such as the Annals of Ulster and the Annals of Innisfallen name Kenneth's father as one Alpín. This much is reasonably certain.

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba usually begins with Kenneth, but some variants include a reference to Kenneth's father: "[Alpín] was killed in Galloway, after he had entirely destroyed and devastated it. And then the kingdom of the Scots was transferred to the kingdom [variant: land] of the Picts."

John of Fordun (IV, ii) calls Kenneth's father "Alpin son of Achay" (Alpín son of Eochu) and has him killed in war with the Picts in 836; Andrew of Wyntoun's version mixes Fordun's war with the Picts with the Chronicle version which has him killed in Galloway.

[edit] Alpín of Dál Riata

The genealogies produced for Kings of Scots in the High Middle Ages traced their ancestry through Kenneth MacAlpin, through the Cenél nGabráin of Dál Riata to Fergus Mór, and then to legendary Irish kings such as Conaire Mór.

These genealogies, perhaps oral in origin, were subjected to some regularisation by the scribes who copied them into sources such as the Chronicle of Melrose, the Poppleton Manuscript and the like. Either by accident, or by design, a number of kings were misplaced, being moved from the early 8th century to the late 8th and early 9th century.

The original list is presumed to have resembled the following:

   1. Eochaid mac Domangairt
   2. Ainbcellach mac Ferchair
   3. Eógan mac Ferchair
   4. Selbach mac Ferchair
   5. Eochaid mac Echdach
   6. Dúngal mac Selbaig
   7. Alpín
   8. Muiredach mac Ainbcellaig
   9. Eógan mac Muiredaig
   10. Áed Find
   11. Fergus mac Echdach

After modification to link this list of kings of Dál Riata to the family of Kenneth MacAlpin, the list is presumed to have been in this form:

   1. Eochaid mac Domangairt
   2. Ainbcellach mac Ferchair
   3. Eógan mac Ferchair
   8. Muiredach mac Ainbcellaig
   9. Eogan mac Muiredaig
   10. Áed Find
   11. Fergus mac Echdach
   4. Selbach mac Ferchair (called Selbach mac Eógain)
   5. Eochaid mac Echdach (called Eochaid mac Áeda Find)
   6. Dúngal mac Selbaig (name unchanged)
   7. Alpín (called Alpín mac Echdach)

However, the existence of the original Alpín is less than certain. No king in Dál Riata of that name is recorded in the Irish annals in the early 730s. A Pictish king named Alpín, whose father's name is not given in any Irish sources, or even from the Pictish Chronicle king-lists, is known from the late 720s, when he was defeated by Óengus mac Fergusa and Nechtan mac Der-Ilei. For the year 742, the Annals of Ulster are read was referring to the capture of "Elffin son of Crop" (the former reading had besieged rather than captured). Whether Álpin son of Crup is related to the Álpin of the 720s is unknown.

[edit] References

   * Anderson, Alan Orr, Early Sources of Scottish History A.D 500–1286, volume 1. Reprinted with corrections. Paul Watkins, Stamford, 1990. ISBN 1-871615-03-8
   * Broun, Dauvit, The Irish Identity of the Kingdom of the Scots in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries. Boydell, Woodbridge, 1999. ISBN 0-85115-375-5
   * Broun, Dauvit, "Pictish Kings 761–839: Integration with Dál Riata or Separate Development" in Sally M. Foster (ed.), The St Andrews Sarcophagus: A Pictish masterpiece and its international connections. Four Courts, Dublin, 1998. ISBN 1-85182-414-6

--------------------

Alpín father of King Kenneth

Irish annals such as the Annals of Ulster and the Annals of Innisfallen name Kenneth's father as one Alpín. This much is reasonably certain.

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba usually begins with Kenneth, but some variants include a reference to Kenneth's father: "[Alpín] was killed in Galloway, after he had entirely destroyed and devastated it. And then the kingdom of the Scots was transferred to the kingdom [variant: land] of the Picts."

John of Fordun (IV, ii) calls Kenneth's father "Alpin son of Achay" (Alpín son of Eochu) and has him killed in war with the Picts in 836; Andrew of Wyntoun's version mixes Fordun's war with the Picts with the Chronicle version which has him killed in Galloway.

-------------------- Killed fighting the Picts. -------------------- Alpin acceded in 834. He was killed fighting the Picts about 837. -------------------- Alpin mac Eochaid (død ca. 841) var konge av Dalriada i dagens Skottland fra ca. 839 til sin død.

Hans far skal ha vært Eochaid IV, som i noen kilder ble kalt konge av Skottland. Dette var antagelig en seremoniell tittel, dersom den i det hele tatt var i bruk.

Alpins eldste sønn Kenneth ble den første kongen av det forente Skottland, og han ble i sin tur etterfulgt av Alpins yngre sønn Donald. Hans kone skal ha vært en skotsk prinsesse; hennes navn er ikke kjent.

Hans navn ble gitt til dynastiet som startet med Kenneth I, huset Alpin.

-------------------- SOURCES:

1) GENEALOGY: Royal Ancestors of Magna Charta Barons; Page 226, 228; G929.72;

C6943ra; Denver Public Library; Genealogy

Alpin, King of Scots 834-37, was slain in Galloway in 837 -------------------- King of the Picts [Ref: Moriarty Plantagenet p29]

probably expelled from the kingship of Dal Riata by Oengus, King of the Picts, in 736 [Ref: Michael Davidson SGM 10/23/1995-115700]

-------------------- Notes for Alpin of Kintyre King of Scotland: Nothing is known of this first in the line of Scottish Monarchs.

Children of Alpin of Kintyre King of Scotland are: +Kenneth Macalpin (Kenneth I), b. date unknown, d. Abt. 859, Forteviot, Perthshire. +Donald I King of Scotland, d. 863.

--------------------

Alpin MacEachaid, King of Argyll, Kintyre, & Dalriada was born circa 778 at Scotland. He died on 20 July 841 at Galloway, Scotland.

-------------------- For more information:

http://fabpedigree.com/s060/f160889.htm -------------------- Alpín mac Echdach may refer to two persons. The first person is a presumed king of Dál Riata in the late 730s. The second is the father of Kenneth MacAlpin (Cináed mac Ailpín). The name Alpín is taken to be a Pictish one, derived from the Anglo-Saxon name Ælfwine; Alpín's patronymic means son of Eochaid or son of Eochu.

[edit] Alpín father of King Kenneth

Irish annals such as the Annals of Ulster and the Annals of Innisfallen name Kenneth's father as one Alpín. This much is reasonably certain.

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba usually begins with Kenneth, but some variants include a reference to Kenneth's father: "[Alpín] was killed in Galloway, after he had entirely destroyed and devastated it. And then the kingdom of the Scots was transferred to the kingdom [variant: land] of the Picts."

John of Fordun (IV, ii) calls Kenneth's father "Alpin son of Achay" (Alpín son of Eochu) and has him killed in war with the Picts in 836; Andrew of Wyntoun's version mixes Fordun's war with the Picts with the Chronicle version which has him killed in Galloway.

[edit] Alpín of Dál Riata

The genealogies produced for Kings of Scots in the High Middle Ages traced their ancestry through Kenneth MacAlpin, through the Cenél nGabráin of Dál Riata to Fergus Mór, and then to legendary Irish kings such as Conaire Mór and the shadowy Deda mac Sin.

These genealogies, perhaps oral in origin, were subjected to some regularisation by the scribes who copied them into sources such as the Chronicle of Melrose, the Poppleton Manuscript and the like. Either by accident, or by design, a number of kings were misplaced, being moved from the early 8th century to the late 8th and early 9th century.

The original list is presumed to have resembled the following:

1. Eochaid mac Domangairt

2. Ainbcellach mac Ferchair

3. Eógan mac Ferchair

4. Selbach mac Ferchair

5. Eochaid mac Echdach

6. Dúngal mac Selbaig

7. Alpín

8. Muiredach mac Ainbcellaig

9. Eógan mac Muiredaig

10. Áed Find

11. Fergus mac Echdach

After modification to link this list of kings of Dál Riata to the family of Kenneth MacAlpin, the list is presumed to have been in this form:

1. Eochaid mac Domangairt

2. Ainbcellach mac Ferchair

3. Eógan mac Ferchair

8. Muiredach mac Ainbcellaig

9. Eogan mac Muiredaig

10. Áed Find

11. Fergus mac Echdach

4. Selbach mac Ferchair (called Selbach mac Eógain)

5. Eochaid mac Echdach (called Eochaid mac Áeda Find)

6. Dúngal mac Selbaig (name unchanged)

7. Alpín (called Alpín mac Echdach)

However, the existence of the original Alpín is less than certain. No king in Dál Riata of that name is recorded in the Irish annals in the early 730s. A Pictish king named Alpín, whose father's name is not given in any Irish sources, or even from the Pictish Chronicle king-lists, is known from the late 720s, when he was defeated by Óengus mac Fergusa and Nechtan mac Der-Ilei. For the year 742, the Annals of Ulster are read was referring to the capture of "Elffin son of Crop" (the former reading had besieged rather than captured). Whether Álpin son of Crup is related to the Álpin of the 720s is unknown.

[edit] References

Anderson, Alan Orr, Early Sources of Scottish History A.D 500–1286, volume 1. Reprinted with corrections. Paul Watkins, Stamford, 1990. ISBN 1-871615-03-8

Broun, Dauvit, The Irish Identity of the Kingdom of the Scots in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries. Boydell, Woodbridge, 1999. ISBN 0-85115-375-5

Broun, Dauvit, "Pictish Kings 761–839: Integration with Dál Riata or Separate Development" in Sally M. Foster (ed.), The St Andrews Sarcophagus: A Pictish masterpiece and its international connections. Four Courts, Dublin, 1998. ISBN 1-85182-414-6

[hide]v • d • eKings of Dál Riata


Fergus Mór · Domangart Réti · Comgall · Gabrán · Conall · Áedán · Eochaid Buide · Connad Cerr · Domnall Brecc · Ferchar · Conall Crandomna · Dúnchad · Domangart · Máel Dúin · Domnall Donn · Ferchar Fota · Eochaid mac Domangairt · Ainbcellach · Fiannamail · Selbach · Dúnchad Bec · Dúngal · Eochaid mac Echdach · Muiredach · Eógan · Interregnum · Áed Find · Fergus · Donncoirce · Interregnum? · Conall mac Taidg · Conall mac Áedáin · Domnall · Áed mac Boanta


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alp%C3%ADn_mac_Echdach"

Categories: Kings of Dál Riata | Medieval Gaels -------------------- Ailpín mac Eochaid

    Ailpín mac Eochaid was born in 778. He was the son of Eochaid IV 'the Poisonous', King of Dalraida and Fergusa (?).2 He died on 20 July 834 at Galloway, Scotland, killed fighting the Picts.2

Children of Ailpín mac Eochaid 1.Kenneth I 'the Hardy', King of Alba+ b. 810, d. 859 2.Donald I, King of Alba+ b. 812, d. 13 Apr 863 3.Grigair mac Ailpín1 b. c 820, d. 868

Citations 1.[S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia. 2.[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 165. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.

http://thepeerage.com/p10291.htm#i102905

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Alpín mac Echdach, Rí na Dál Riata's Timeline

778
778
Dunolly Castle, Argyllshire, Dalriada/Scotland
809
809
Age 31
810
810
Age 32
Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland
812
812
Age 34
812
Age 34
Scotland
820
820
Age 42
Argyll, Dál Riata, Scotland
820
Age 42
Scotland
830
830
Age 52
Scotland
831
831
Age 53
King of Scotland, Picts
831
Age 53
King of Scotland, Picts