Alpaïde / Alpais / Chalpaida (c.654 - 714) MP

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Nicknames: "Chalpaida/", "Elphide//", "Aupa─Ås", "Aupais", "von Sachsen", "Elfide", "Alpaïs von Sachsen", "de Bruyères", "Alpaide", "Alphaida//", "(Chalpais)", "Aupais /Alpaide/", "Friedelfrau", "Alpaïde / Alpais / Chalpaida de Bruyeres", "a noblewoman and Charles' mistress"
Birthplace: Liège, Walloon Region, Belgium
Death: Died in Probably Austrasia (within present Belgium), Frankish Kingdom
Occupation: Second wife of Peppin II, Concubine, concubine, MAYOR of the PALACE of AUSTRIA, Kallades "den sköna Calpaida", Den sköna Chalpaida, (Alpais .)(Alpaïde .), (Concubine to Pepin II), Prince, Concubin, mother of Charles the Hammer, consort of Pepin of Hers
Managed by: Margaret, (C)
Last Updated:

About Alpaïde / Alpais / Chalpaida

Summary:

Relationships:

Parents: Unknown. English Wikipedia asserts that "Domesticus" Dodo is her father, but according to the Chronicle of Bèze (apparently written by Johannes de Beze in the 12th century), he is her brother.

Siblings:

  • 1. Dodo or Dodon, Domesticus who killed St. Lambert

Spouse:

  • Pepin "le Gros" or "d'Heristal" (b. c645), dux Austrasia (675-714), maior domus Neustria (688-714) - full title at death: "Senior Princeps Francorum et Dux, Præfectus Palatii et Major-domus" (d. Jupille, near Liege, bur. Basilique de Saint-Arnoul, Metz). No other known spouses.

Children:

  • 1. Charles "Martel" (b. c690), Maior domus Austrasia (717-741, d. 16/22 October 741 at Quierzy-sur-Oise in present Department d Aisne, bur. église de l'abbaye royale de Saint Denis in present Paris)

Basic information:

Birth: Unknown. There have been one or two assertions of 654 as a birth year, but uncertain as to where this comes from (Charles Martel is estimated as having been born near 690, which would indicate, if this date is accepted, that she was 36 when he was born - without there being any source justifying this, establishing such an age for her motherhood seems rather random). Location is unspecified - there is apparently nothing to support a birth in Aquitaine, as at least one user has asserted.

Marriage: Unknown. (Definitely before 690, date of birth for her son Charles "Martel".) Pepin "le Gros" was based in Neustria at the time, so Neustria (present northern France) is a reasonable assertion.

Death: Unknown. (Definitely after the death of St. Lambert, who was murdered at her behest by her brother Dodo, a Domesticus, between 698 and 701, when he vocally objected to Pepin's bigamy - he was perhaps one of the last Frankish leaders to have had two legitimate wives at the same time, as following Lambert's martyrdom over the "sanctity of marriage," the church became more aggressive in its opposition. Russian Wikipedia suggests before 714, apparently predeceasing Pepin.)

Burial: Unknown. A user had suggested that she had died and was buried at the Abbaye de Saint-Martin et Sainte-Adèle d’Orp-le-Grand, founded sometime in the late 600s (its founder, Sainte Adele d'Orp-le-Grand, died in 700, and the present church is built on her monastery's ruins), but there is no record of Alpais taking the habit, residing, or being buried there. It is possible that Adele and Alpais were confused by someone at one point, and thus the mistake. But given her being demonized by the Church under Lambert, and having remained an influential figure in Pepin's court for the remainder of her life, it seems unlikely she would be buried at such a monastery.

Occupation: Second wife of Pepin "le Gros" (served in this role simultaneously alongside Plectrudis, though apparently the two women had more a confrontational rather than cooperative relationship, based on the story of how Charles "Martel" got his name).

Alternate names: Alpais, Chalpais, Alpaida, Elfide, Chalpaida, Chalpaidis, Alpaïde, Альпаи́да

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From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Franks Maior Domi (covering her birth family):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKSMaiordomi.htm#ChalpaisMPepin

Brother and sister, parents not known:

1. DODO .

  • Domesticus. The Chronicle of St Bèze records that "Dodone comite" killed "sanctus Lambertus Tungrorum Episcopus"[495].

2. CHALPAIS [Alpais] .

  • Sigeberto's Vita Landiberto episcopi Traiectensis names "puellam nobilem…Alpaidem" as second wife of Pépin, specifying that she was "soror…Dodonis qui domesticus Pippini principis erat"[496]. The mid-12th century Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Alpade, sorore Dodonis, qui sanctum Lambertum episcopum Leodinensem martyrisavit" as second wife of Pépin[497].
  • Settipani[498] does not support the theory that Alpais was the sister of Bertrada, mother of Charibert, whose daughter married Pépin King of the Franks, the hypothesis being based on King Pépin and his wife inheriting property from their respective fathers.
  • m (bigamously) as his second wife, PEPIN [II] "le Gros" or "d'Herstal", son of ANSEGISEL & his wife Begga ([645]-Jupille, near Liège 16 Dec 714, bur Metz, basilique de Saint-Arnoul).

References:

  • [495] Chronicle of Bèze, p. 246, footnote 2 commenting that the murder took place in 696 and that Dodon was the brother of Alpais.
  • [496] Vita Landberti episcopi Traiectensis Auctore Sigeberto xvi, MGH SS rer. Merov. VI, p. 397.
  • [497] Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi descendentium Mettensis 1, MGH SS XXV, p. 382.
  • [498] Settipani, C. and Kerrebrouck, P. van (1993) La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987, 1ère partie, Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq), p. 156.

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From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Franks Maior Domi (covering her married life):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKSMaiordomi.htm#PippinLeGrosAustrasiedied714B

PEPIN [II] "le Gros" or "d'Herstal", son of ANSEGISEL & his wife Begga ([645]-Jupille, near Liège 16 Dec 714, bur Metz, basilique de Saint-Arnoul).

  • The Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis names "Anschisus" as father of "Pippinum"[87]. "Pippinus" declares himself "filius Ansegisili" in his charter dated 20 Feb 691, which also names "matrona mea Plectrudis"[88]. The Annales Xantenses name "Pippinus" as son of "Anchisus dux" when recording that he succeeded on the death of his father in 685[89], although this is misdated. "Pipinum secundum" is named as son of Ansegisel and Begga in the Chronicon Sancti Huberti[90].
  • Duke of Austrasia [675].
  • He fled from the palace in 679 after opposing maior domus Ebroin. Civil war with Neustria broke out, and Pépin defeated the Neustrians at Tertry, Somme in Jun 687 before becoming maior domus of Austrasia in [688/90].
  • He became maior domus of Neustria in 688 after the murder of maior domus Berchar[91]. "Pippinus filius Ansegisili quondam necnon…matrone mea Plectrudis" donated property to the church of St Arnulf at Metz by charter dated 20 Feb 691[92]. "Childebertus rex Francorum" names "Pippino maiorem domus nostro" in his charter dated 14 Mar 697[93].
  • Fredegar (Continuator) records that he defeated Radbod Duke of the Frisians at Duurstede in [692/97][94].
  • The Liber Historiæ Francorum records the death of "Pippinus" after ruling for 27 years[95]. The Chronicon Sancti Medardi Suessionensis records the death in 714 of “Pippinus senior Princeps Francorum et Dux, Præfectus Palatii et Major-domus” and the accession of “Carolus dictus Martellus in loco patris”[96]. The Annales Metenses record the death "XVII Kal Ian 714" of "Pippinus princeps"[97].

m firstly ([670/75]) PLECTRUDIS, daughter of HUGOBERT & his wife [Irmina Abbess of Oeren] (-after 717, bur Köln, St Maria im Kapitol).

  • "Pippinus" names "matrona mea Plectrudis, filia Huogoberti quondam" in his two charters dated 13 May 706[98]. The Liber Historiæ Francorum names "Pippino…uxor nobilissima…Plectrudis" but does not give her origin[99]. After the death of her husband, she "took everything under her control" according to Fredegar (Continuator)[100]. The Monumenta Epternacensia records that "Raginfredum maiorem domus" married "Plectrudem"[101], but this is not corroborated by other sources.
  • She was regent for her grandson Theodebald, but opposed by her stepson Charles "Martel" whom she imprisoned. Charles escaped, and defeated the forces of Plectrudis at Vinchy, near Cambrai, 28 May 717.
  • She founded St Maria im Kapitol at Köln.

[m] secondly (bigamously) CHALPAIS [Alpais], sister of DODO, daughter of ---.

  • Sigeberto's Vita Landiberto episcopi Traiectensis names "puellam nobilem…Alpaidem" as second wife of Pépin, specifying that she was "soror…Dodonis qui domesticus Pippini principis erat"[102]. The mid-12th century Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Alpade, sorore Dodonis, qui sanctum Lambertum episcopum Leodinensem martyrisavit" as second wife of Pépin[103].
  • Settipani does not support the theory that Alpais was the sister of Bertrada, mother of Charibert, whose daughter married Pépin King of the Franks, the hypothesis being based on King Pépin and his wife inheriting property from their respective fathers[104].
  • The Chronicle of St Bèze records that "Dodone comite" killed "sanctus Lambertus Tungrorum Episcopus"[105].

Mistress (1): ---. The name of Pépin's mistress is not known.

Pépin & his first wife had two children:

1. DROGO (-24 Mar 708, bur Metz, Abbaye de Saint-Arnoul[106]).

  • The Liber Historiæ Francorum names "maioris Drocus…minoris Grimoaldus" as the two sons of "Pippino [et]…uxor nobilissima…Plectrudis", specifying that Drogo accepted "ducatum Campaniæ"[107]. "Drogo et Grimoldus" are named as sons of Pépin and his wife Plectrudis in the Gesta Fontanellensium[108]. Sigeberto's Vita Landiberto episcopi Traiectensis names "Drogo…et Grimoaldus" as sons of Pépin and "legitima sua coniunx Plictrudis", specifying that Drogo was "dux…Campanensium"[109].
  • Fredegar (Continuator) records that his father invested Drogo as dux in Champagne in [688/90][110], and dux of the Burgunds after 697. This is the only example so far identified of a late 7th century creation of a dux apparently assigned to govern a particular territory.
  • The Annales Metenses record the death of Drogo in 708 and his burial "iuxta Mettensem urbem in basilica beati Arnulfi confessoris"[111]. The Obituaire of Saint-Arnoul de Metz includes "IX Kal Apr Drogo dux"[112].
  • m (after 688) ADALTRUDIS, daughter of BERCHAR maior domus in Neustria & his wife Anstrudis. Her origin is determined from the charter of "Childebertus rex Francorum" dated 14 Mar 697 which names "Drogus…socer suos…Bercharius…coniuge sui Adaltrute"[113]. On the other hand, the Annales Metenses name "Austrudem filia Warattonis quondam…maioris domus derelictam Bertarii" as wife of "Drogonem primogenitum suum [Pippini]"[114]. The Gesta Fontanellensium also names Adaltrudis, wife of Drogo, as "filia Warattonis [et] Ansfledis coniugis eius"[115], but the 697 charter is probably a more reliable source as, if it is correctly dated, it was written only a few years after the death of Berchar. Drogo & his wife had [five] children.

2. GRIMOALD (-murdered Liège Apr 714).

  • The Liber Historiæ Francorum names "maioris Drocus…minoris Grimoaldus" as the two sons of "Pippino [et]…uxor nobilissima…Plectrudis"[129]. "Drogo et Grimoldus" are named as sons of Pépin and his wife Plectrudis in the Gesta Fontanellensium[130]. Sigeberto's Vita Landiberto episcopi Traiectensis names "Drogo…et Grimoaldus" as sons of Pépin and "legitima sua coniunx Plictrudis"[131].
  • His father named him maior domus in Neustria[132] in [695], and in Burgundy in [700]. "Childeberthus rex Francorum" names "Grimoaldo maiorum domus nostri" in his charter dated 25 Feb 702[133]. His father created him dux in Champagne and dux of the Burgunds in 708. The Annales Metenses record that, after the death of Drogo, "Pippino genitore suo" appointed "germanus eius Grimoaldus" to succeed "in principatum"[134]. "Childebercthus rex Francorum" names "Grimoaldo maiorem domus nostri…Gairinus quondam loce ipsius Parisiace comis…Sigofredus comis palatie nostre" in his donation to the abbey of St Denis by charter dated 13 Dec 710[135].
  • Fredegar (Continuator) records that Grimoald was murdered by Rantgar, a pagan Frisian, at the tomb of St Lambert at Liège[136]. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that Grimoald was murdered by "Rantgario gentile, filio Belial" at "basilica sancti Landeberti martyris Leudico"[137].
  • m (711) THEODESINDIS, daughter of RATBOD Duke of the Frisians & his wife ---. The Liber Historiæ Francorum names "Theudesindam filiam Radbodi ducis" as wife of "Grimoaldus"[138]. Her marriage is referred to by the Continuator of Fredegar, which does not give her name[139]. Sigeberto's Vita Landiberto episcopi Traiectensis refers to the betrothal of "Grimoaldus" and "Rabbodonis ducis Fresionum…filiæ"[140]. The Chronicon Moissiacense names "Thudsindam filiam Radbodi ducis" as wife of "Grimaldus"[141]. The date of the marriage is provided by the Annales Metenses which record the marriage in 711 of "Grimoaldus" and "filiam Radboldi ducis Frisionum"[142].
  • Mistress (1): ---. The name of Grimoald's mistress is not known. Grimoald had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1).

Pépin & his second [wife] had one child:

3. CHARLES “Martel” ([690]-Quierzy-sur-Oise, Aisne 16 or 22 Oct 741, bur église de l'abbaye royale de Saint Denis).

  • The Chronicon Moissiacense names "Karolum" as son of "Pippinus præfatus princeps…ex alia uxore nomine Alpaigde"[149].
  • He succeeded his father in 717 as maior domus in Austrasia.

Pépin had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):

4. CHILDEBRAND (-after 751, maybe after 762).

  • Childebrand was either the illegitimate son of Pépin "le Gros" by an unknown mistress or his second son by his second [wife] Chalpais. He is described as "germanus" of Charles "Martel" by the Continuator of Fredegar, in the part which Childebrand himself sponsored[150].
  • Count in Burgundy,
  • Duke in Provence 737/39.
  • Historian, he was the author of part of the continuations of the chronicle of Fredegar written during the reign of King Pépin (751-768).
  • m ---. The name of Childebrand´s wife is not known. Childebrand & his wife had one child.

References:

  • [87] Pauli Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis , MGH SS 2, p. 265.
  • [88] MGH Diplomatum Imperii I, Diplomata Maiorum Domum, no. 2, pp. 91-2.
  • [89] Annales Xantenses 685, MGH SS II, p. 220.
  • [90] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andaginensis 3 (7), MHG SS VIII, p. 570.
  • [91] Fredegar (Continuator), 5, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 171.
  • [92] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Maiorum Domus ex stirpe Arnulforum, no. 2, p. 92.
  • [93] MGH Diplomatum Imperii I, Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 70, p. 62.
  • [94] Fredegar (Continuator), 6, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 172.
  • [95] Liber Historiæ Francorum 51, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 325.
  • [96] Chronica Sancti Medardi Suessionensis, Spicilegium II, p. 487.
  • [97] Annales Mettenses 714, MGH SS I, p. 322.
  • [98] MGH Diplomatum Imperii I, Diplomata Maiorum Domum, no. 4 and 5, pp. 93-4.
  • [99] Liber Historiæ Francorum 48, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 323.
  • [100] Fredegar (Continuator), 8, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 173.
  • [101] Monumenta Epternacensia, MGH SS XXIII, p. 59.
  • [102] Vita Landberti episcopi Traiectensis Auctore Sigeberto xvi, MGH SS rer. Merov. VI, p. 397.
  • [103] Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi descendentium Mettensis 1, MGH SS XXV, p. 382.
  • [104] Settipani, C. and Kerrebrouck, P. van (1993) La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987, 1ère partie, Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq), p. 156.
  • [105] Abbé E. Bougaud (ed.) (1875) Besuensis Abbatiæ Chronicon, authore Joanne Monacho (Dijon) [same volume as Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne de Dijon], p. 246, footnote 2 commenting that the murder took place in 696 and that Dodon was the brother of Alpais.
  • [106] Fredegar (Continuator), 6, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 172.
  • [107] Liber Historiæ Francorum 48, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 323.
  • [108] Gesta Abbatum Fontanellensium, 2.2, MGH SS II, p. 276.
  • [109] Vita Landberti episcopi Traiectensis Auctore Sigeberto xvi, MGH SS rer. Merov. VI, p. 397.
  • [110] Fredegar (Continuator), 6, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 172.
  • [111] Annales Metenses 708, MGH SS I, p. 321.
  • [112] 'Obits mémorables tirés de nécrologes luxembourgeois, rémois et messins', Revue Mabillon VI (1910-1911), p. 264.
  • [113] MGH Diplomatum Imperii I, Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 70, p. 62.
  • [114] Annales Mettenses 693, MGH SS I, p. 321.
  • [115] Gesta Abbatum Fontanellensium, 8.1, MGH SS II, p. 280.
  • [129] Liber Historiæ Francorum 48, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 323.
  • [130] Gesta Abbatum Fontanellensium, 2.2, MGH SS II, p. 276.
  • [131] Vita Landberti episcopi Traiectensis Auctore Sigeberto xvi, MGH SS rer. Merov. VI, p. 397.
  • [132] Fredegar (Continuator), 6, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 172.
  • [133] MGH Diplomatum Imperii I, Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 73, p. 64.
  • [134] Annales Mettenses 708, MGH SS I, p. 321.
  • [135] MGH Diplomatum Imperii I, Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 77, p. 68.
  • [136] Fredegar (Continuator), 7, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 172.
  • [137] Liber Historiæ Francorum 50, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 324.
  • [138] Liber Historiæ Francorum 50, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 324.
  • [139] Fredegar (Continuator), 7, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 172.
  • [140] Vita Landberti episcopi Traiectensis Auctore Sigeberto xxvii, MGH SS rer. Merov. VI, p. 405.
  • [141] Chronicon Moissiacense 713, MGH SS I, p. 290.
  • [142] Annales Mettenses 711, MGH SS I, p. 322.
  • [149] Chronicon Moissiacense 713, MGH SS I, p. 289.
  • [150] Fredegar (Continuator), 21, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 177.

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She was probably a mistress or secondary wife of Pépin. Traditionally, she has been identified as a daughter of Childébrand, a Frankish noble. However, a controversial reconstruction makes her a daughter of Ervigio, King of the Visigoths, and thereby (very arguably) a descendant of the late Roman emperors (David Hughes).

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Ben M. Angel notes: A lot of postings here assert that Alpaida was a concubine of Pepin II, and not a wife. However, both French Wikipedia and the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy have her as a second (bigamous) wife, and appear to have the sources to back their assertions (Sigeberto's Vita Landiberto episcopi Traiectensis, the mid-12th century Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi, Liber Historiae Francorum, and the Chronicle of Fredegaire). Would welcome seeing the (credible) source that says she was "merely a concubine". (The English Wikipedia page on Pippin asserts that she is a concubine, but doesn't specify as a footnote what source was used to say that she was merely a mistress.)

Also, with respect to her birth and death years, 635/640 to 714 refers to the years that Pepin II was alive, not the years that Alpaida was alive.

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Alternative years: 654-705

several merged profiles had birth/dead date as 654-705 need to check - i sthere actually one or 2 persons

Parents are different too.

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Prenom also listed as "Alpais."

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From the Nationmaster profile of Alpaida: http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Alpaida

Alpaida was also known as Chalpaida. She was Pepin II's (635 or 640 - December 16, 714) concubine and mother to Pepin II's illegitimate son, Charles Martel (Charles the Hammer) (August 23, 686_ October 22, 741).

http://www.genealogy.theroyfamily.com/p30520.htm

Aupais Female, (about 654 - )

Aupais was born about 654.1

She was also known as Elphide (Chalpaida). Aupais was a concubine.1

Aupais married Pépin II of Heristal Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia, son of Duke Ansgise Mayor of the Palace and Saint Begga of Landen.1,2,3

Charts

  • Ancestry of Edward III
  • Children of Aupais and Pépin II of Heristal Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia
  • Childebrand I Lord of Perracy and of Bougy, Count of Autun+ ( - 751)1,3
  • Charles Martel Mayor of the Palace+ (688 - 22 Oct 741)4,1,2,5,3

Citations

  • Stuart, Roderick W. Royalty for Commoners, The Complete Known Lineage of John of Gaunt, Son of Edward III, King of England, and Queen Philippa. Fourth Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2002.
  • Moriarty, G. Andrews. "The Origin of the Carolingians", The New England Historical and Genealogical Register volume XCVIII (October 1944).
  • Sewell Genealogy Site. Online http://www3.sympatico.ca/robert.sewell/sitemapweb.html
  • Weis, Frederick Lewis. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650. Fifth Edition. Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1982.
  • Kelley, David H.. "Genealogical Research in England: A New Consideration of the Carolingians", The New England Historical and Genealogical Register volume CI (April 1947).

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English Wikipedia Entry on Alpaida (Retrieved 1-22-2009)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpaida

Alpaida (Elfide, Chalpaida) was Pepin II's (635 or 640 - December 16, 714) concubine and mother to Pepin II's illegitimate son, Charles Martel (Charles the Hammer) (August 23, 686 - October 22, 741). She was daughter of Dodo.

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Alpaida was Pepin de Herstal's second wife. Normally, this would mean that she was the Duke of the Franks' wife following the death or divorce of the first wife, but in this case it means simultaneously with the first-married wife.

---

From the French Wikipedia page on Alpaide:

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpa%C3%AFde

Alpaïde, Alpais ou Chalpais, est la seconde épouse de Pépin de Herstal, maire du palais d'Austrasie. Pépin l'a épousé du vivant de sa première épouse Plectrude en cette époque où la polygamie était encore possible. Alpaïde est la mère de Charles Martel, maire du palais et ancêtre de la dynastie des Carolingiens, et probablement de Childebrand, ancêtre de la famille des Nibelungides.

C'est le Liber Historiæ Francorum qui est le premier à mentionner, en 725 mais sans nommer la mère, la naissance de Charles Martel : (« Pépin ... avait eu d'une autre épouse un fils nommé Karl ». Puis le comte Childebrand, frère de Charles Martel, reprend la continuation de la chronique de Frédégaire et note que « Pépin prit une autre femme, noble et belle, nommée Alpaïde, dont il eut un fils qu’il nomma dans sa propre langue Karl ; cet enfant grandit fort et bien fait, et devint illustre ». Ces deux textes, contemporains des évènements, établissent clairement qu'Alpaïde est une épouse de Pépin de Herstal, et non une concubine comme l'affirmeront des textes du IXe siècle défavorables aux Carolingiens et à une époque où la monogamie devient la règle. D'ailleurs, Alpaïde a une importance politique non négligeable et autour d'elle se regroupent des partisans opposés à Plectrude. Après la mort de Pépin le Jeune, ces partisans seront les soutiens de Charles Martel contre Plectrude et son petit-fils Théodebald[1],[2].

C'est également au cours de ce même siècle qu'Alpaïde apparaît dans un autre texte à propos de la légende de saint Lambert. Ce dernier désapprouvait ouvertement l'union entre Pépin et Alpaïde, qu'il qualifiait de concubinage. En représailles, Dodon, frère d'Alpaïde envoie des parents pour ravager les terres de l'évêque, mais sont surpris et tués par deux neveux de ce dernier. Dodon se venge en attaquant la demeure de saint Lambert et en le tuant[1]. Mais la critique récente rejette une partie de ce récit : si la première Vita de saint Lambert nomme bien Dodon comme le meurtrier de l'évêque, il agit pour venger ses parents et Alpaïde n'est pas mentionnée par cette histoire[3].

Les historiens sont partagés sur la question de savoir si Alpaïde est également la mère du comte Childebrand. Le terme utilisé pour qualifier la parenté entre Charles Martel et Childebrand est germanus, qui signifiait frère de même père, et éventuellement de même mère. Le portrait élogieux d'Alpaïde que Childebrand brosse dans la continuation de la chronique milite en faveur de la maternité d'Alpaïde envers Childebrand. C'est en tout cas le point de vue d'Eduard Hlawitschka. Mais Léon Levillain estime que si Childebrand était fils d'Alpaïde, il se serait lui-même nommé quand il parle de la postérité de Pépin et d'Alpaïde. Childebrand est qualifié d'avunculus de Pépin le Bref, alors que s'il était frère de père et de mère de Charles, le terme correct aurait été patruus. Enfin l'onomastique ne montre pas de lien entre la descendance des deux frères. Mais en fait, avunculus avait déjà à cette époque le sens large d'oncle, sans plus de précision, le peu que Childebrand ne se cite pas peut passer pour de la modestie, et la fraternité est assurée par des textes, même si on ne retrouve pas les mêmes prénoms dans les deux branches[4].

En 673, la charte de fondation d'un monastère à Bruyères-le-Châtel mentionne parmi les témoins un dignitaire du nom de Childebrand. Ce prénom, assez rare, montre une parenté avec le comte homonyme, qui pourrait être son petit-fils. Dans la mesure où Alpaïde est mère du comte Childebrand, ce dignitaire pourrait être le père d'Alpaïde[5].

À la fin de sa vie, Alpaïde se retire à l'abbaye d'Orp-le-Grand (province du Brabant wallon) où elle décéde vers 705[réf. nécessaire].

Notes et références

  • 1.↑ a et b Settipani 1993, p. 155.
  • 2.↑ Riché 1983, p. 38.
  • 3.↑ Settipani 1993, p. 155-6.
  • 4.↑ Settipani 1993, p. 159-161.
  • 5.↑ Settipani 1989, p. 33-4.

Bibliographie

Pierre Riché, Les Carolingiens, une famille qui fit l'Europe, Hachette, coll. « Pluriel », Paris, 1983 (réimpr. 1997), 490 p. (ISBN 2-01-278851-3)

Christian Settipani, Les Ancêtres de Charlemagne, Paris, 1989, 170 p. (ISBN 2-906483-28-1)

Christian Settipani, La Préhistoire des Capétiens (Nouvelle histoire généalogique de l'auguste maison de France, vol. 1), éd. Patrick van Kerrebrouck, 1993 (ISBN 2-9501509-3-4)

Jean-Charles Volkmann, Bien connaître les généalogies des rois de France, Éditions Gisserot, 1999 (ISBN 2-877472086)

Michel Mourre, Le Petit Mourre. Dictionnaire d'Histoire universelle, Éditions Bordas, avril 2007 (ISBN 978-2-04-732194-2)

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In English:

Alpaide, Alpais, or Chalp, is the second wife of Pepin de Herstal, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia.

Pepin married his first wife Plectrude at a time when polygamy was still possible. Alpaide is the mother of Charles Martel, Mayor of the Palace and ancestor of the Carolingian dynasty. She may also be the mother of Childebrand, ancestor of the Nibelungid family.

The Liber Historiae Francorum is the first to mention her in 725 as the mother of Charles Martel, but without actually naming her: "Pippin... had another wife, a son named Karl." Then Count Childebrand, brother of Charles Martel, continued the Chronicle of Fredegaire: "Pippin took another wife, noble and beautiful, named Alpaide, with whom he had a son named Karl in his own language, and this child grew up safe and well, and became illustrious."

These two texts clearly establish Alpaide as a wife of Pepin de Herstal, and not as a concubine - as presented by texts of the ninth century Carolingian age, a time when monogamy had become the rule.

Moreover, Alpaide was a considerable political figure, around whom those opposed to Plectrude gathered. After the death of Pepin The Middle, this opposition rallied around Charles Martel in his fight against Plectrude and her son Theodebald.

It was also during this (eighth) century that Alpaide appeared in another text about the legend of St. Lambert. The latter openly disapproved of the union between Pepin and Alpaide, calling her a concubine. In retaliation, Dodon, brother of Alpaide, incites his father to ravage the lands of the bishop, but he is surprised and killed by the future saint's two nephews. Dodon takes revenge by attacking and killing St. Lambert.

But a recent review dismisses part of the story: if St. Lambert appoints Dodon as well as the murderer of the bishop, he acted to avenge his father, and Alpaide is not mentioned in the story.

Historians are divided on the question of whether Alpaide is also the mother of Count Childebrand. The term used to describe the relationship between Charles Martel and Childebrand is "germanus," which means brother of the same father, and possibly the same mother. The Chronicle seems to advocate that Alpaide is mother to Childebrand, or at least such is the view of Eduard Hlawitschka (historian).

But Leon Levillain believes that if Childebrand was the son of Alpaide, he himself would be appointed when he speaks of the descendants of Pepin and Alpaide. Childebrand is described as "avunculus" of Pepin, whereas if he was the brother of the father and mother of Charles, the correct term would have been "patruus".

Finally, onomastics shows no link between the offspring of the two brothers. But in fact, avunculus had at the time the broad sense of an uncle, and that Childebrand's words and lack of onomastic connection can be passed for modesty.

In 673, the charter for the foundation of a monastery called Bruyeres-le-Chatel mentions among the witnesses a dignatary named Childebrand. This surname is fairly rare, and shows up in a kinship of the Comte's namesake, from whom could be a grandson. With respect to Alpaide as the mother of Count Childebrand, this official may be the father of Alpaide.

At the end of her life, Alpaide retired to the abbey of Orp-le-Grand (in Brabant Wallon), where she died around 705.

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And from the English Wikipedia page on Lambert of Maastricht (d. 700):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Lambert

Saint Lambert or Landebertus (c. 636 – c. 700) was the bishop of Maastricht (Tongeren) from about 670 until his death.

Lambert was from a noble family of Maastricht, a protegé of his uncle, Bishop Theodard of Maastricht. When Theodard was murdered soon after 669, the councillors of Childeric II made Lambert bishop of Maastricht.

Lambert was related to Hugobert and Plectrude, Pepin of Heristal's lawful wife and thus an in-law of hereditary mayors of the palace who controlled the Merovingian kings of Austrasia.

After Childeric was murdered in 673, the faction of Ebroin, majordomo of Neustria and the power behind that throne, expelled him from his see, in favor of their candidate, Faramundus. Lambert spent seven years in exile at the recently-founded Abbey of Stavelot (674–681). With a change in the turbulent political fortunes of the time, Lambert was returned to his see.

In company with Willibrord, who had come from England in 691, Lambert preached the gospel to the pagans in the lower stretches of the Meuse, in the area that came to be called the Landgraviate of Brabant.

Shortly after Lambert's (and Plectrude's) family had murdered Dodo, a domesticus of Pepin of Heristal and father of Pepin's mistress Alpaida, Dodo's relatives murdered Lambert out of revenge, on his estate, the Gallo-Roman villa that has become Liège. The official Roman Catholic version is that Lambert became a martyr for his defence of marital fidelity, denouncing Pepin's liaison with Alpaida, daughter of Dodo, who was to become the mother of Charles Martel (CE "Saint Lambert").

Although Lambert was buried at Maastricht, his successor as bishop, Hubertus, translated his relics to Liège, to which the see of Maastricht was eventually moved. The shrine became St. Lambert's Cathedral, destroyed in 1794. Its site is the modern Place Saint-Lambert. Lambert's tomb is now located in the present Liège Cathedral.

His feast day in the Roman Catholic Church calendar is September 17.

The Lambertusfest in Münster has long been a folk holiday, celebrated for two weeks culminating on the eve of the 17th of September. Children build "Lambertus pyramids" of branches, decorated with lanterns and lamps around which they dance and sing traditional songs (known as Lambertussingen or Käskenspiel).

External links

  • Biografisch-Bibliografisches Heiligenlexikon: Heilige Lambert (in German)
  • Ökumenisches Heiligenlexikon: Lambert (in German)
  • Catholic Encyclopedia: "Saint Lambert"
  • Ökumenisches Heiligenlexikon: Lambert in the reign of Dagobert II (in German)

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http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chalpaida

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Alpaida (also known as Elfide, Chalpaida, Alpais, Chalpaïde. Alberda) was Pepin II's concubine and mother to two of Pepin II's illegitimate sons, Charles Martel and Childebrand des Francs, both of whom were independently our ancestors.

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Concubine of Peppin II

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She was a concubine

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Alpaida (Elfide, Chalpaida) was Pepin II's (635 or 640 - December 16, 714) concubine and mother to Pepin II's illegitimate son, Charles Martel (Charles the Hammer) (August 23, 686 - October 22, 741). She was daughter of Dodo.

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Alpaida (Elfide, Chalpaida) was Pepin II's (635 or 640 - December 16, 714) concubine and mother to Pepin II's illegitimate son, Charles Martel (Charles the Hammer) (d. October 22, 741).

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CHARLEMAGNE THE PIOUS AND PROLIFIC PROGENITOR By: Xenia Stanford Biography & Archived Articles Article Published December 23, 1999

Although a Christian should take only one wife even then, Charlemagne had four. He may have been married to only one at a time. However, he also kept five known mistresses throughout his marriages. Charles the Great sired at least eighteen children, only eight of whom were legitimate. He refused to let his daughters marry so he would not lose them but he allowed them numerous affairs out of which came several illegitimate children. In spite of this, he was a deeply devout man.

He was well versed in the scriptures and quoted chapter and verse to those who erred in their ways. He supported the Church through organization and funding but he was also very demanding of its behaviour. Many of his capitularies deal with how the clergy should act and how they should improve their morals. He expected much more of them than of himself. He expected celibacy at a time when even Popes were known for their debauchery. Nuns particularly were victims of his scathing attacks on their whoring.

He also demanded that the Church not tolerate image worship and superstition even though most of the religious hierarchy disagreed with him. He also blasted the clergy in one of his capitularies in 811 for the earthly possessiveness and cheating of their parishioners. He introduced tithing (one tenth of income) to counteract the Church's need against the Church's greed. Charlemagne himself left one-third of his estates to the Church.

Known to be ruthless in his evangelical efforts to bring Christianity to all (even to the beheading of those who refused to be baptized), he was honest and caring in his dealings with his earthly empire and strove to improve the preparation of himself and his subjects for the world beyond life. Years after his death, the Church ignored his worldly indiscretions and beatified him for his contributions.

CHARLEMAGNE - GREAT BOON TO GENEALOGISTS To this great man we also owe much in terms of genealogical records for he required the church to document baptisms, marriages and wills. Always one for standardization, he insisted the priests record these events diligently and consistently. This was at least the beginning of parish records. Though none have been found dating from this period, Charlemagne reinforced the importance of maintaining documentary evidence, which no doubt contributed to the earliest registers to be uncovered.

The oldest register found so far, which covers the cities of Givry in Saône and Loire (Saône-et-Loire) for the years1334 to 1357, was after the influence of the next great reformer King Louis IX, canonized as Saint Louis. However, Saint Louis definitely drew upon the practices established by his predecessor.

Charlemagne's own secretary Einhard kept a diary or record of the great man's life. Though often it seems exaggerated, it remains a way to understand history as it unfolded. Charlemagne was also the subject of much literature during his time and later, such as the poems of Theobold. In 814 he died at Aachen from pleurisy in the forty-seventh year of his reign with his son Louis already crowned as his successor. He was seventy-two years old but his legacy to history still lives on.

CHARLEMAGNE - ANCESTRY According to some the greatest of all rulers of Francia may not have been French at all. Charlemagne was believed to be mainly German as he was reputed to be blond and spoke German as his primary tongue. The difficulty is, even knowing as much as we know about Charlemagne, we know little about his ancestry and truly what mix of blood ran through his ancestors' veins.

Were the Merovingians French just because they arose from the Frankish people and the Carolingian rulers German? The Franks themselves were Germanic in origin and replaced the Celts who were the first known inhabitants of what is now France. Although the nations of France and Germany became dreaded enemies, I don't think we can separate them so categorically during or before the time of Charlemagne.

As explained in the past issues, Charlemagne arose from the line of chief administrators known as Mayors of the Palace who served under and later over the Merovingian kings. However, despite the hard efforts of genealogists the Carolingian lineage named for Charlemagne can only be truly documented as far back as his 3rd great grandfather. We know his grandfather Pepin d'Herstal or Pepin I (Pippin I to some historians) was the grandson of Pepin the Elder but the generation before and the generation between are unnamed in the histories found to date.

As we can see people, such as the rulers above, were distinguished by "nicknames". No one had surnames at the time and later historians named the dynastic lines after a significant ruler but naming people after some physical attribute, profession or characteristic was certainly prominent then. What is also significant is that many women's names were recorded as well. Thus we know that Pepin d'Herstal was married to a woman named Itta.

Pepin and Itta had three known children. One, a girl named Gertrude, became an abbess and was not known to have any offspring but the other two had descendants. Although the other daughter, Begga, was to produce the most significant heirs, initially the couple's only known son, Grimoald, gained his father's position and title of Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia after Pepin I's death about 639 or 640 AD.

Thus so far we have the following lineage: (See website for diagram)

Grimoald had a daughter Wulfetrude who became a well-known abbess. Although the actual paternity of another child called Childebert has been questioned, Grimoald claimed him as son and named him in 656 AD as the successor to King Sigebert of Neustria over Sigebert's son and heir Dagobert. Dagobert was exiled to Ireland but his supporters were so angered by the coup they captured and killed Grimoald soon after.

Childebert died in 662 but already the kingdom had been thrown into turmoil with the wars between Neustria and Austrasia and between the Merovingian heirs and the descendants of the powerful mayors. Although Grimoald had a grandson Childebrand whose parents' names are unknown, it was his nephew, son of sister Begga who regained the mayoral supremacy and the rule.

Begga married Ansegisel and produced a son, Pepin or Pippin named for her father. This Pepin (now called Pepin II) had children by at least two women. One of these women was his wife Plectrude and the other his mistress Alpaida.

He married Plectrude around 670 for her inheritance of substantial estates in the Moselle region. They produced at least two children and through them at least two significant grandchildren. These legitimate children and grandchildren claimed themselves to be Pepin's true successors and with the help of his widow Plectrude tried to maintain the position of Mayor of the Palace after their progenitor's death on December 16, 714.

The position of Mayor of the Palace had over the years become one of great significance and with the work of Pepin the Elder and his grandson Pepin d'Herstal it had become as important if not greater than the role of the king. Under Grimoald the land holdings and influence of the Mayor had increased. Pepin II was not satisfied with ruling only Austrasia, thus in 690 he also took over as Mayor of the Palace for Neustrian King Theuderic. Although the king still sat on the throne, the role and title of Mayor as well as Pepin's fortunes in land were inheritances to be coveted.

However, the son of Pepin II and his mistress Alpaida gained favour among the Austrasians and despite the efforts of Plectrude to silence her rival's child by imprisoning him, he became the one Mayor of the Palace and true ruler of Francia. This illegitimate son of Pepin II was Charles Martellus (the Hammer) or Charles Martel whose deeds have been explained in previous issues.

His descent from Begga is as follows: (see website for diagram)

Like his father, Charles had rival children from two unions, that of his wives: Rotrude and Swanachild. Charles had deposed both kings by 739 and began rule under the title of Princeps or Prince. In 740 he placed his two sons from his first marriage, Pepin III (aka Pepin Le Bref or the Short) and Carloman as the Mayors of the Palaces of Neustria and Austrasia respectively.

Grifo, the son of Charles and second wife Swanachild, was appointed ruler of Thuringia about the same time. However, after Charles death in 741, Grifo's half-brothers banished Swanachild to a convent and imprisoned Grifo.

In 746 Carloman, apparently the more militarily successful of the brothers, resigned as Mayor of Austrasia and went to Rome for monastic training. He placed the Mayoralty into the hands of his young son, Drogo, and asked the boy's uncle Pepin Le Bref to watch over him and the administration of Austrasia. Instead Pepin took over complete control about a year later and in 751 convinced the Pope to make him King of all Franks and his wife Bertrada the Queen. Drogo who continued to protest was thrown into prison by his uncle in 753.

Pepin Le Bref or Pepin the Short had two sons by Bertrada. Charles, the eldest, was born in 748 prior to his parent's marriage. In order to legitimize his son and ensure his succession rather than Drogo's, Pepin married Bertrada in 749. In 751 their second son Carloman (II to distinguish him from his uncle) was born.

After Pepin's death in 768 AD, his two sons split the kingdom once again. The older son Charles was given Austrasia and other lands. Carloman was given various regions but Neustria was not listed by name since it appears to have been divided between the two rather than given in totality to Carloman. This division did not last long as Carloman died on December 4, 771.

Thus the descent from Charles Martel is as follows: (see website for diagram)

It may be amazing to learn the deaths of these rulers were recorded accurately giving date and place of death and age at death. Fredegar, the historian, used church records from Saint-Denis to find the exact death dates of Pepin II and III as well as Carloman II.

No longer did historians have to live during the time for accurate information nor did they need to rely solely on word of mouth, legends or the writings of others. However, as stated under Charlemagne - Great Boon to Genealogists, we have seen that the records of the Church and of administration were soon to increase even more in frequency and accuracy due to the work of Carloman II's brother Charles, whom we know better as Charlemagne.

CHARLEMAGNE - DESCENDANCY Although Charlemagne's son and successor Louis I succeeded in keeping the kingdom together during his lifetime, after he died the empire was divided into three among his sons. The youngest, Charles "the Bald" became Emperor of France, another son, Louis "the German", was crowned King of Germany and Austria and the third, Lothaire, ruled Belgium. From these three Kings came the nations above that continue to exist today though the borders changed over the years.

From their descendants and those of the other many children of Charlemagne come countless numbers who are the progeny of this great man. These may be patriots of any of those three original nations but many can be found elsewhere in the world.

One of the lines for many North Americans descends through Catherine Baillon, a "fille de roi" who came to New France and married Pierre Miville. Baillon's descent from King Philippe II Auguste of France (a descendant of Charlemagne and wife Hildegard) has been carefully researched. The work has primarily been conducted by four genealogists who are all well-known for their past accurate and well-documented works. They are René Jetté, John P. DuLong, Roland-Yves Gagné, and Gail F. Moreau who have a website dedicated to the Baillon genealogy at http://www.habitant.org/baillon.

This foursome has obtained extensive and expensive documentation from original sources. So far they have written two articles, one in French and one in English, and are currently working on a book to share their findings with us. Although I have not read either article, I know all four through their prior works, contributions to lists and email correspondence. Therefore, I have no hesitation in recommending you read either of the two articles cited below:

René Jetté, John P. DuLong, Roland-Yves Gagné, and Gail F. Moreau. "De Catherine Baillon à Charlemagne." Mémoires de la Société généalogique canadienne-française 48 (Autumn), 1997: 190-216 (in French).

René Jetté, John P. DuLong, Roland-Yves Gagné, and Gail F. Moreau. "From Catherine Baillon to Charlemagne." _American-Canadian Genealogist_ 25:4 (Fall 1999): 170-200 (in English).

http://globalgenealogy.com/globalgazette/gazxs/gazxs46.htm

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-------------------- Alpaida (Elfide, Chalpaida) was Pepin II's (635 or 640 - December 16, 714) concubine and mother to Pepin II's illegitimate son, Charles Martel (Charles the Hammer) (August 23, 686 - October 22, 741). She was daughter of Dodo. -------------------- Concubine

Source:

-------------------- Leo: Caroli Magni Progenies, Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977 , Rösch, Siegfried, Reference: 52.

see conection http://gw.geneanet.org/hpichot?p=childebrand;n=de+bruyeres

view all 20

Alpais's Timeline

654
654
Liège, Walloon Region, Belgium
680
680
Age 26
Heristal, Liege, Belgium
684
684
Age 30
Herstal, Région Wallonne, Belgique
686
August 23, 686
Age 32
Herstal, Liège, Walloon Region, Belgium

This place is now Belgium. The book, 'The Dark Ages', states that Charles was 26 yrs. old at the time of his father's death.

689
689
Age 35
Probably Heristal, Austrasia (within present Belgium), Frankish Kingdom
714
December 16, 714
Age 60
Probably Austrasia (within present Belgium), Frankish Kingdom
1923
September 17, 1923
Age 60
September 17, 1923
Age 60
October 24, 1923
Age 60
October 24, 1923
Age 60