Amédée III, comte de Savoie

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Amedeo III di Savoia, conte di Savoia

Also Known As: "Amadeus", "Amédée", "Amadeo III Count of Savoy", "Count of Maurienne", "Count of Geneva", "7th Count of Savoy"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Carignano, Turin, Piedmont, Italy
Death: Died in Nikosia, Nicosia District, Cyprus
Place of Burial: Church of St. Croix, Nikosia, Nicosia District, Cyprus
Immediate Family:

Son of Humbert II le Renforcé, comte de Savoie and Gisèle (Gille) de Bourgogne
Husband of Mathilde d' Albon; Poncia Adélaïde dame de Treves; Mahaut (Mathilde) d'Albon, Comtesse d'Albon & Vienne and Béatrix Aynard, dame de Domène
Ex-husband of Adelaide
Father of Mafalda de Saboia, rainha consorte de Portugal; Alix de Savoie Maurienne; Isabella Comtessa av Savoyen; Umberto III 'il Beato' di Savoia, conte di Savoia; Johann (John) av Savoyen and 5 others
Brother of Alice de Savoie; Adélaïde de Maurienne, reine de France; Agnès de Maurienne; Rinaldo (Renaud) de Savoie and Guy de Savoie
Half brother of Giovanna de Montferrato; Maud de Montferrat; Guglielmo V, marchese di Monferrato and Isabella di Montferrato

Occupation: Amedeo III, conte di Savoia e Moriana, Greve av Savoy, Aosta och Moriana, Greve av Savoyen, Comte, de Genève, Count of Savoy, Conde de Saboya y de Maurienne, Conte di Savoia
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Amédée III, comte de Savoie

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amadeus_III,_Count_of_Savoy

Amadeus III, Count of Savoy, Count of Geneva

And in French: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Am%C3%A9d%C3%A9e_III_de_Savoie

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Coats of Arms of early Counts of Savoy

Amadeus III of Savoy (1095, Carignano, Piedmont - 1148) was Count of Savoy and Maurienne from 1103 until his death. He was also known as the Crusader. [1]

He was the son of Humbert II of Savoy and Gisela of Burgundy, the daughter of William I of Burgundy. He succeeded as count of Savoy upon the death of his father. Amadeus had a tendency to exaggerate his titles, and also claimed to be Duke of Lombardy, Duke of Burgundy, Duke of Chablais, and vicar of the Holy Roman Empire, the latter of which had been given to his father by Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor.

He helped restore the Abbey of St. Maurice of Agaune, in which the former kings of Burgundy had been crowned, and of which he himself was abbot until 1147. He also founded the Abbey of St. Sulpicius in Bugey, Tamié Abbey in the Bauges, and Hautecombe Abbey on the Lac du Bourget.

In 1128, Amadeus extended his realm, known as the "Old Chablais", by adding to it the region extending from the Arve to the Dranse d'Abondance, which came to be called the "New Chablais" with its capital at St. Moritz. Despite his marriage to Mahaut, he still fought against his brother-in-law Guy, who was killed at the Battle of Montmeillan. Following this, King Louis VI of France, married to Amadeus' sister Adélaide de Maurienne, attempted to confiscate Savoy. Amadeus was saved by the intercession of Peter the Hermit, and by his promise to participate in Louis' planned crusade.

In 1147, he accompanied his nephew Louis VII of France and his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine on the Second Crusade. He financed his expedition with help from a loan from the Abbey of St. Maurice. In his retinue were many barons from Savoy, including the lords of Faucigny, Seyssel, La Chambre, Miolans, Montbel, Thoire, Montmayeur, Vienne, Viry, La Palude, Blonay, Chevron-Villette, Chignin, and Châtillon. Amadeus travelled south through Italy to Brindisi, where he crossed over to Durazzo, and marched east along the Via Egnatia to meet Louis at Constantinople in late 1147. After crossing into Anatolia, Amadeus, who was leading the vanguard, became separated from Louis near Laodicea, and Louis' forces were almost entirely destroyed.

Marching on to Adalia, Louis, Amadeus, and other barons decided to continue to Antioch by ship. On the journey, Amadeus fell ill on Cyprus, and died at Nicosia in April of 1148. He was buried in the Church of St. Croix in Nicosia. In Savoy, his son Humbert III succeeded him, under the regency of bishop Amadeus of Lausanne.

[edit] Family and children

He had no children with his first wife Adelaide. In 1123 he married Mahaut (or Mafalda, or Matilda) of Albon, the sister of Guy IV of Dauphinois, with whom he had ten children:

      1. Elisa of Savoy (1120-?) married Humberto of Beaujeu
      2. Mafalda (Mahaut), (1125-1158), married Alfonso I of Portugal
      3. Agnes of Savoy (1125-1172), married William I, Count of Geneva
      4. Humbert III (1136-1188)
      5. John of Savoy
      6. Peter of Savoy
      7. William of Savoy
      8. Margaret of Savoy (died 1157)
      9. Isabella of Savoy
     10. Juliana of Savoy (died 1194), abbess of St. André-le-Haut

This page was last modified on 11 October 2010 at 02:55.

http://www.servinghistory.com/topics/Amadeus_III,_Count_of_Geneva::sub::President_Of_The_Council_Of_Savoy

In 1347–48 Amadeus spent a long stay at the Avignonese curia of Clement VI, who was then concerned with settling disputes in the Piedmont and Lombardy. On 4 January 1348 the count of Savoy came of age and the regency ended, although it continued in practice, as Amadeus VI was only fourteen years old. Later that year the lord of Vaud died and Amadeus III was left as sole regent, overseeing the "council of Savoy" or "count's council", as the former regency council was then known. The Savoyard historians Jehan Servion and Jean Cabaret d'Oronville record that the council elected one of its members, Guillaume de la Baume, to co-rule with the count of Geneva, who was still not trusted by the Savoyards. Guillaume's election may have been due to French influence.

By 9 July 1351, Amadeus had fallen out with the rest of the council of Savoy and its anti-French policy. On that day, presiding over a meeting of the council at Saint-Genix, he ordered that his opposition to hearing some ambassadors from Edward III of England be recorded. Amadeus and the Savoyard chancellor, Georges de Solerio, were largely responsible for the subsequent treaty signed with France on 27 October at Avignon.

In 1351 the peasantry of the Valais rebelled against the lordship of the Bishop of Sion, then Guichard Tavel, of Genevan family and Savoyard allegiance. On 7 January 1352 the rebels were excommunicated by Clement VI. In March an army, led by Amadeus of Savoy, Amadeus of Geneva, John II of Montferrat, and Peter IV of Gruyère was gathering at Saint-Maurice to crush the rebels. The inhabitants of the Valais were so intimidated, however, that they surrendered without a fight.

Related Resources :: Amadeus III, Count Of Geneva ...

  1. CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA Felix V - Regnal name of Amadeus of Savoy, Antipope 1440-1449 of a duchy, and in 1422 conferred on Amadeus the county of Geneva. with a deputation from the council, Amadeus acquiesced
  2. House Of Savoy - LoveToKnow 1911 - count, and subsequently the latter's brother, Amadeus II. Amadeus VIII. 1391-1440 , Savoy prospered in every way. The count council of Basel by a strange decision elected Amadeus
  3. THE SUPREME ORDER OF THE MOST HOLY ANNUNCIATION - date was 1350 when Amadeus VI of Savoy, known as the Green Count conferred upon the President of the Council of Charles II, John Amadeus , Duke of Savoy 1490-1496

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Am%C3%A9d%C3%A9e_III_de_Savoie

Amédée III de Savoie

Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre.

Aller à : Navigation, rechercher

Amédée III de Savoie

Dynastie Maison de Savoie

Titre Comte de Savoie

(1103 - 1148)

Prédécesseur Humbert II de Savoie

Successeur Humbert III de Savoie

Biographie

Naissance 1095

Décès 30 août 1148

Nicosie

Enfant de Humbert II de Savoie]

et de

Gisèle de Bourgogne

Conjoint 1 Adélaïde

2 Mahault d'Albon

Enfants Alix de Savoie

Mathilde de Savoie

Agnès de Savoie

Humbert III de Savoie

Jean de Savoie

Pierre de Savoie

Guillaume de Savoie

Marguerite de Savoie

Isabelle de Savoie

Julienne de Savoie

Amédée III de Savoie[1] ou de Savoie-Maurienne, est né vers 1095 et mort le 30 août 1148 à Chypre lors de la deuxième croisade. Fils d'Humbert II de Savoie dit « le Renforcé » et de Gisèle de Bourgogne (1075 - m. ap. 1133), fille de Guillaume Ier le Grand, comte de Bourgogne et de Mâcon, il est le 7e comte de Savoie et de Maurienne (1103-1148) et marquis de Suze.

Sommaire

[afficher]

   * 1 Biographie
         o 1.1 Titulature
   * 2 Participation à la deuxième croisade
         o 2.1 Unions et descendance
   * 3 Voir aussi
         o 3.1 Articles connexes
   * 4 Notes et références

Biographie [modifier]

Titulature [modifier]

Ce comte portait un certain nombre de titres, avec cependant une tendance à l'exagération et à l'usurpation :

   * du fait des possessions de la Maison de Savoie en Piémont, il s'octroya le titre de « duc en Lombardie » ;
   * du fait de la filiation de sa mère, fille du comte de Bourgogne Guillaume le Grand, il s'octroya le titre de « duc en Bourgogne » ;
   * du fait que la Maison de Savoie avait, depuis l'empereur Conrad le Salique, un droit de gouvernement sur le Chablais, il prit prétexte d'une mauvaise administration du lieutenant impérial pour s'emparer des provinces du Chablais, puis de la vallée d'Aoste, et s'octroyer le titre de « duc de Chablais » ;
   * il semblerait aussi, qu'il continuait à porter indûment le titre de vicaire de l'empire, titre non héréditaire qui avait été décerné à son père par l'empereur Henri IV.

Habile, il aida à la renaissance de l'abbaye de Saint-Maurice d'Agaune, dans laquelle les rois des deux Bourgognes se faisaient couronner, il en était l'abbé laïc (1103 - 1147). Il fonda aussi l'abbaye de Saint-Sulpice en Bugey, l'abbaye de Tamié dans le massif des Bauges et l'abbaye d'Hautecombe, sur la rive escarpée du Lac du Bourget. C'est aussi lui qui remplace l'aigle par la croix blanche dans les armoiries de Savoie.

Article détaillé : Armorial et nobiliaire de Savoie.

En 1128, Amédée III agrandit son domaine en ajoutant à son gouvernement – ce qu'on appelait le « Vieux Chablais » – la région s'étendant de l'Arve jusqu'à la Dranse d'Abondance, formant ainsi le « Nouveau Chablais », dont Saint-Maurice était la capitale.

Son mariage avec la sœur de Guigues IV d'Albon, surnommé Dauphin, ne l'empêcha pas d'aller guerroyer contre ce dernier pour des histoires de délimitations de frontière. C'est lors d'une bataille près de Montmélian que Guigues IV fut mortellement blessé. Suite à cet épisode, le roi Louis VI le Gros voulu lui confisquer ses États. Sa sœur, Adèle de Savoie (née vers 1092, morte en 1154), épouse de Louis VI, approuvait aussi cette mesure. Finalement il ne dut son salut, qu'à l'intercession de Pierre l'Ermite, après avoir fait la promesse de participer à la croisade en préparation.

Participation à la deuxième croisade [modifier]

En 1147, il partit donc aux côtés de son neveu, le roi Louis VII de France et d'Aliénor d'Aquitaine à la deuxième croisade, il finança son expédition, grâce à un prêt de l'Abbaye de Saint-Maurice d'Agaune. Dans cette aventure, il est accompagné par de nombreux chevaliers et nobles savoyards, dont le baron du Faucigny et son fils, les barons de Pierre de Seyssel, de La Chambre, de Miolans, de Montbel, les seigneurs de Thoire-Villars, de Montmayeur, de Vienne, de Viry, de La Palude, de Blonay, de Chevron Villette, de Chignin et de Châtillon[2]. Le 30 août 1148, il mourut à Nicosie dans l'île de Chypre et fut inhumé dans l'église Sainte-Croix.

L'évêque Amédée de Lausanne (Saint Amédée de Clermont, dit de Lausanne) (n. v. 1110 - 1159) devint le tuteur de son fils Humbert III de Savoie.

Unions et descendance [modifier]

Sa première femme Adélaïde, ne lui donna pas d'enfants. En 1123, il épousa Mahaut d'Albon ou Mathilde, (n. v. 1110 - m. ap. 1145), sœur de Guigues IV d'Albon, laquelle lui donna quatre garçons et six filles, dont :

  1. Alix de Savoie ou Élise (n. v. 1123 - ?), épouse Humbert III de Beaujeu (n. ap. 1107 - 1174).
  2. Mathilde de Savoie ou Mahaut (1125 - 1158), épouse Alphone Ier de Portugal
  3. Agnès de Savoie (1125 - 1172), épouse du comte Guillaume Ier de Genève
  4. Humbert III de Savoie (1136 - 1188) dit « le Bienheureux »
  5. Jean de Savoie
  6. Pierre de Savoie
  7. Guillaume de Savoie
  8. Marguerite de Savoie (? - 1157)
  9. Isabelle de Savoie
 10. Julienne de Savoie (? - 1194), abbesse de Saint-André-le-Haut de Vienne.

Voir aussi [modifier]

Articles connexes [modifier]

   * Histoire de la Savoie
   * Maison de Savoie
   * Liste des comtes et ducs de Savoie

Notes et références [modifier]

  1. ↑ Généalogie d'Amédée III sur le site Medieval Lands [archive]
  2. ↑ Claude Genoux, Histoire de Savoie, depuis la domination romaine jusqu'à nos jours, Fontaine de Siloé, 1997

Précédé par Amédée III de Savoie Suivi par

Humbert II

comte de Savoie

Humbert III

Dernière modification de cette page le 9 janvier 2010 à 23:18.

--------------------

Amadeus III of Savoy (1095–1148) was Count of Savoy and Maurienne from 1103 until his death. He was also known as the Crusader.

He was the son of Humbert II of Savoy and Gisela of Burgundy, the daughter of William I of Burgundy. He succeeded as count of Savoy upon the death of his father. Amadeus had a tendency to exaggerate his titles, and also claimed to be Duke of Lombardy, Duke of Burgundy, Duke of Chablais, and vicar of the Holy Roman Empire, the latter of which had been given to his father by Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor.

He helped restore the Abbey of St. Maurice of Agaune, in which the former kings of Burgundy had been crowned, and of which he himself was abbot until 1147. He also founded the Abbey of St. Sulpicius in Bugey, Tamié Abbey in the Bauges, and Hautecombe Abbey on the Lac du Bourget.

In 1128, Amadeus extended his realm, known as the "Old Chablais", by adding to it the region extending from the Arve to the Dranse d'Abondance, which came to be called the "New Chablais" with its capital at St. Moritz. Despite his marriage to Mahaut, he still fought against his brother-in-law Guy, who was killed at the Battle of Montmeillan. Following this, King Louis VI of France, married to Amadeus' sister Adélaide de Maurienne, attempted to confiscate Savoy. Amadeus was saved by the intercession of Peter the Hermit, and by his promise to participate in Louis' planned crusade.

In 1147, he accompanied his nephew Louis VII of France and his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine on the Second Crusade. He financed his expedition with help from a loan from the Abbey of St. Maurice. In his retinue were many barons from Savoy, including the lords of Faucigny, Seyssel, La Chambre, Miolans, Montbel, Thoire, Montmayeur, Vienne, Viry, La Palude, Blonay, Chevron-Villette, Chignin, and Châtillon. Amadeus travelled south through Italy to Brindisi, where he crossed over to Durazzo, and marched east along the Via Egnatia to meet Louis at Constantinople in late 1147. After crossing into Anatolia, Amadeus, who was leading the vanguard, became separated from Louis near Laodicea, and Louis' forces were almost entirely destroyed.

Marching on to Adalia, Louis, Amadeus, and other barons decided to continue to Antioch by ship. On the journey, Amadeus fell ill on Cyprus, and died at Nicosia in April of 1148. He was buried in the Church of St. Croix in Nicosia. In Savoy, his son Humbert III succeeded him, under the regency of bishop Amadeus of Lausanne.

He had no children with his first wife Adelaide. In 1123 he married Mahaut (or Mafalda, or Matilda) of Albon, the sister of Guy IV of Dauphinois, with whom he had ten children:

Elisa of Savoy (1120-?) married Humberto of Beaujeu

Mafalda (Mahaut), (1125-1158), married Alfonso I of Portugal

Agnes of Savoy (1125-1172), married William I, Count of Geneva

Humbert III (1136-1188)

John of Savoy

Peter of Savoy

William of Savoy

Margaret of Savoy (died 1157)

Isabella of Savoy

Juliana of Savoy (died 1194), abbess of St. André-le-Haut

--------------------

Amadeus III of Savoy (1095, Carignano - 1148) was Count of Savoy and Maurienne from 1103 until his death. He was also known as the Crusader. [1]

He was the son of Humbert II of Savoy and Gisela of Burgundy, the daughter of William I of Burgundy. He succeeded as count of Savoy upon the death of his father. Amadeus had a tendency to exaggerate his titles, and also claimed to be Duke of Lombardy, Duke of Burgundy, Duke of Chablais, and vicar of the Holy Roman Empire, the latter of which had been given to his father by Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor.

He helped restore the Abbey of St. Maurice of Agaune, in which the former kings of Burgundy had been crowned, and of which he himself was abbot until 1147. He also founded the Abbey of St. Sulpicius in Bugey, Tamié Abbey in the Bauges, and Hautecombe Abbey on the Lac du Bourget.

In 1128, Amadeus extended his realm, known as the "Old Chablais", by adding to it the region extending from the Arve to the Dranse d'Abondance, which came to be called the "New Chablais" with its capital at St. Moritz. Despite his marriage to Mahaut, he still fought against his brother-in-law Guy, who was killed at the Battle of Montmeillan. Following this, King Louis VI of France, married to Amadeus' sister Adélaide de Maurienne, attempted to confiscate Savoy. Amadeus was saved by the intercession of Peter the Hermit, and by his promise to participate in Louis' planned crusade.

In 1147, he accompanied his nephew Louis VII of France and his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine on the Second Crusade. He financed his expedition with help from a loan from the Abbey of St. Maurice. In his retinue were many barons from Savoy, including the lords of Faucigny, Seyssel, La Chambre, Miolans, Montbel, Thoire, Montmayeur, Vienne, Viry, La Palude, Blonay, Chevron-Villette, Chignin, and Châtillon. Amadeus travelled south through Italy to Brindisi, where he crossed over to Durazzo, and marched east along the Via Egnatia to meet Louis at Constantinople in late 1147. After crossing into Anatolia, Amadeus, who was leading the vanguard, became separated from Louis near Laodicea, and Louis' forces were almost entirely destroyed.

Marching on to Adalia, Louis, Amadeus, and other barons decided to continue to Antioch by ship. On the journey, Amadeus fell ill on Cyprus, and died at Nicosia in April of 1148. He was buried in the Church of St. Croix in Nicosia. In Savoy, his son Humbert III succeeded him, under the regency of bishop Amadeus of Lausanne.

[edit] Family and children

He had no children with his first wife Adelaide. In 1123 he married Mahaut (or Mafalda, or Matilda) of Albon, the sister of Guy IV of Dauphinois, with whom he had ten children:

1.Elisa of Savoy (1120-?) married Humberto of Beaujeu

2.Mafalda (Mahaut), (1125-1158), married Alfonso I of Portugal

3.Agnes of Savoy (1125-1172), married William I, Count of Geneva

4.Humbert III (1136-1188)

5.John of Savoy

6.Peter of Savoy

7.William of Savoy

8.Margaret of Savoy (died 1157)

9.Isabella of Savoy

10.Juliana of Savoy (died 1194), abbess of St. André-le-Haut

[edit] Ancestry

[show]v • d • eAncestors of Amadeus III, Count of Savoy

                                 

 16. Humbert I of Savoy 
 
         

 8. Otto of Savoy   
 
               

 17. Auxilia of Lenzburg 
 
         

 4. Amadeus II of Savoy   
 
                     

 18. Ulric Manfred II of Turin 
 
         

 9. Adelaide of Susa   
 
               

 19. Bertha of Luni 
 
         

 2. Humbert II of Savoy   
 
                           

 20. Gérold I, Count of Geneva 
 
         

 10. Gérold II, Count of Geneva   
 
               

 21. Berthe 
 
         

 5. Jeanne of Geneva   
 
                     





 11. Gisèle   
 
               





 1. Amadeus III of Savoy   
 
                                 

 24. Otto-William, Count of Burgundy 
 
         

 12. Reginald I, Count of Burgundy   
 
               

 25. Adelaide Ermentrude of Reims and Roucy 
 
         

 6. William I, Count of Burgundy   
 
                     

 26. Richard II, Duke of Normandy 
 
         

 13. Adelaide of Normandy   
 
               

 27. Judith of Brittany 
 
         

 3. Gisela of Burgundy   
 
                           













 7. Étiennette   
 
                     














[edit] External links

FMG on Amadeus III of Savoy

Amadeus III, Count of Savoy

House of Savoy

Born: 1095 Died: 1148

Regnal titles

Preceded by

Humbert II Count of Savoy

1103–1148 Succeeded by

Humbert III

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amadeus_III,_Count_of_Savoy"

Categories: 1095 births | 1148 deaths | People from the Province of Turin | House of Savoy

--------------------

Amadeus III of Savoy (1095–1148) was Count of Savoy and Maurienne from 1103 until his death. He was also known as the Crusader.

He was the son of Humbert II of Savoy and Gisela of Burgundy, the daughter of William I of Burgundy. He succeeded as count of Savoy upon the death of his father. Amadeus had a tendency to exaggerate his titles, and also claimed to be Duke of Lombardy, Duke of Burgundy, Duke of Chablais, and vicar of the Holy Roman Empire, the latter of which had been given to his father by Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor.

He helped restore the Abbey of St. Maurice of Agaune, in which the former kings of Burgundy had been crowned, and of which he himself was abbot until 1147. He also founded the Abbey of St. Sulpicius in Bugey, Tamié Abbey in the Bauges, and Hautecombe Abbey on the Lac du Bourget.

In 1128, Amadeus extended his realm, known as the "Old Chablais", by adding to it the region extending from the Arve to the Dranse d'Abondance, which came to be called the "New Chablais" with its capital at St. Moritz. Despite his marriage to Mahaut, he still fought against his brother-in-law Guy, who was killed at the Battle of Montmeillan. Following this, King Louis VI of France, married to Amadeus' sister Adélaide de Maurienne, attempted to confiscate Savoy. Amadeus was saved by the intercession of Peter the Hermit, and by his promise to participate in Louis' planned crusade.

In 1147, he accompanied his nephew Louis VII of France and his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine on the Second Crusade. He financed his expedition with help from a loan from the Abbey of St. Maurice. In his retinue were many barons from Savoy, including the lords of Faucigny, Seyssel, La Chambre, Miolans, Montbel, Thoire, Montmayeur, Vienne, Viry, La Palude, Blonay, Chevron-Villette, Chignin, and Châtillon. Amadeus travelled south through Italy to Brindisi, where he crossed over to Durazzo, and marched east along the Via Egnatia to meet Louis at Constantinople in late 1147. After crossing into Anatolia, Amadeus, who was leading the vanguard, became separated from Louis near Laodicea, and Louis' forces were almost entirely destroyed.

Marching on to Adalia, Louis, Amadeus, and other barons decided to continue to Antioch by ship. On the journey, Amadeus fell ill on Cyprus, and died at Nicosia in April of 1148. He was buried in the Church of St. Croix in Nicosia. In Savoy, his son Humbert III succeeded him, under the regency of bishop Amadeus of Lausanne.

He had no children with his first wife Adelaide. In 1123 he married Mahaut (or Mafalda, or Matilda) of Albon, the sister of Guy IV of Dauphinois, with whom he had ten children:

Elisa of Savoy (1120-?) married Humberto of Beaujeu

Mafalda (Mahaut), (1125-1158), married Alfonso I of Portugal

Agnes of Savoy (1125-1172), married William I, Count of Geneva

Humbert III (1136-1188)

John of Savoy

Peter of Savoy

William of Savoy

Margaret of Savoy (died 1157)

Isabella of Savoy

Juliana of Savoy (died 1194), abbess of St. André-le-Haut

--------------------

Amadeus III of Savoy was Count of Savoy and Maurienne from 1103 until his death. He was also known as "the Crusader."

He succeeded as Count of Savoy upon the death of his father. Amadeus had a tendency to exaggerate his titles, and also claimed to be Duke of Lombardy, Duke of Burgundy, Duke of Chablais, and vicar of the Holy Roman Empire, the latter of which had been given to his father by Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor.

He helped restore the Abbey of St. Maurice of Agaune, in which the former kings of Burgundy had been crowned, and of which he himself was abbot until 1147. He also founded the Abbey of St. Sulpicius in Bugey, Tamié Abbey in the Bauges, and Hautecombe Abbey on the Lac du Bourget.

He had no children with his first wife Adelaide. In 1123 he married Mahaut (or Mafalda, or Matilda) of Albon, the sister of Guy IV of Dauphinois, with whom he had ten children, including our ancestor Humbert.

In 1128, Amadeus extended his realm, known as the "Old Chablais", by adding to it the region extending from the Arve to the Dranse d'Abondance, which came to be called the "New Chablais" with its capital at St. Moritz. Despite his marriage to Mahaut, he still fought against his brother-in-law Guy, who was killed at the Battle of Montmeillan. Following this, King Louis VI of France, married to Amadeus's sister Adélaide de Maurienne, attempted to confiscate Savoy. Amadeus was saved by the intercession of Peter the Hermit, and by his promise to participate in Louis's planned crusade.

In 1147, he accompanied his nephew Louis VII of France and his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine on the Second Crusade. He financed his expedition with help from a loan from the Abbey of St. Maurice. In his retinue were many barons from Savoy, including the lords of Faucigny, Seyssel, La Chambre, Miolans, Montbel, Thoire, Montmayeur, Vienne, Viry, La Palude, Blonay, Chevron-Villette, Chignin, and Châtillon. Amadeus travelled south through Italy to Brindisi, where he crossed over to Durazzo, and marched east along the Via Egnatia to meet Louis at Constantinople in late 1147. After crossing into Anatolia, Amadeus, who was leading the vanguard, became separated from Louis near Laodicea, and Louis' forces were almost entirely destroyed.

Marching on to Adalia, Louis, Amadeus, and other barons decided to continue to Antioch by ship. On the journey, Amadeus fell ill on Cyprus, and died at Nicosia in April of 1148. He was buried in the Church of St. Croix in Nicosia. In Savoy, his son Humbert III succeeded him, under the regency of bishop Amadeus of Lausanne.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amadeus_III for more information.

--------------------

CASA DE SABOYA

1) Significado: Nombre de una región situada al sureste de Francia y noroeste de Italia.

2) Casa solar: Saboya, Francia. Esta Casa tiene su origen en la de Borgoña-Ivrea. Padres de Humberto "de las Blacas Manos" fueron Adalberto II, marqués de Ivrea y Gerberga de Maçon Borgoña.

3) Armas: Las antiguas armas de la Casa de Saboya (hasta Humberto III) (peut être mytiques mais probablement portées parce que les Comtes de Savoie étaient Vicaires Impériaux). D'or, à l'aigle de sable. A partir de Tomás I (desde el siglo XII): En campo de Gules, una cruz de plata (De gueules, à la croix d'argent).

4) Antepasados:

I. Humberto "de las manos blancas", conde de Saboya nació entre el 972 y el 975. Murió el 11-X-1048. Casó con Ancillie de Lenzbourgh (ver nota 1). Tuvieron por hijo a

II. Odón, conde de Saboya nació hacia el año de 1020. Murió en diciembre de 1060. Casó con Adelaida, marquesa de Turín y Susa (ver nota 2). Tuvieron por hijos a Amadeo II de Saboya (1047, que sigue) y Bertha de Saboya (1-I-1051/52 a 7-IV-1088, que casó el 13-VII-1066 con Enrique IV, emperador de Alemania: ver Casa de Franconia).

III. Amadeo II, conde de Saboya nació en el año de 1047. Murióel 7-V-1080. Casó con Juana de Génova (+ c.1095, hija de Geroldo I de Génova y de Gisela). Tuvieron por hijo a

IV. Humberto II, conde de Saboya nació hacia el año de 1072. Murió el 14-X-1103. Casó hacia 1090 con Gisela de Borgoña (c.1074, ver Casa de Borgoña Ivrea). Tuvieron por hijos a Amadeo III de Saboya (c.1092, que sigue) y Adelaida de Saboya (c.1092, casada con Luis VI "el Gordo" de Francia: ver Reyes Capetos).

V. Amadeo III, conde de Saboya nació hacia el año de 1092 en Saboya. Murió el 1-IV-1148 en Nicosia. Casó con Matilde, condesa de Albon, en 1123 (ver nota 3). Tuvieron por hijos a Matilde, condesa de Saboya (1125, que casó con Alfonso I de Portugal) y Humberto III (4-VIII-1136, que sigue).

VI. Humberto III "el Santo", conde de Saboya nació el 4-VIII-1136 en Saboya. Murió el 4-III-1188/89. Casó con Beatriz de Mâcon en 1177 (ver nota 4). Tuvieron por hijo a

VII. Tomás I, conde de Saboya nació el 10-VI-1168 en Charbonnieres, Savoy, France. Murió el 22-III-1232/33 en Mocalieri, Italia. Casó con Beatriz (Margarita) de Ginebra y Faucigny en mayo de 1196 (ver nota 5). Tuvieron por hijo a

VIII. Amadeo IV, conde de Saboya-Chablais-Aosta nació el año de 1197 en Saboya. Murió el 2-VIII-1253 en Montmélian, Francia. Caso con Cecilia des Baux Orange hacia 1244 (ver Casa des Baux-Orange). Tuvieron por hija a

IX. Beatriz de Saboya y des Baux-Orange nació hacia el año 1245. Murió el 23-II-1291/92. Casó hacia 1274 con don Manuel, infante de Castilla (ver Reyes de Castilla) y tuvieron por hijo a don Juan Manuel, infante de Castilla (Escalona, Toledo, 5-V-1282). Una hija de don Juan Manuel, doña Juana Ibáñez de Manuel, casó con Juan Galíndez de Múgica. Esta pareja son bisabuelos de doña Juana de Butrón y Múgica, que en 1425 casó con Lope García de Salazar, el autor de las "Bienandanzas e Fortunas".

NOTAS:

[1] Ancillie de Lenzbourgh nació el año 1005. Casó antes de 1020 con Humberto de Saboya. Sus padres fueron Arnoldo II de Lenzbourgh (c.980; hijo de Ulrich de Lenzbourgh) y una hija de Bero de Argovie.

[2] Adelaida, marquesa de Turín y Susa nació hacia el año 1015. Murió el 19-I-1091/92. Sus padres fueron: Olderico Manfredi II, marqués de Turín y Susa (992 a 8-II-1034/35), y Berta de Liguria (hija de Obert "el Joven" de Liguria).

[3] Matilde, condesa de Albón nació el año 1100. Murió después de enero de 1144/45. Sus padres fueron Guigues III de Albon, conde de Grenoble y Matilde de Inglaterra (1070, hija de Edgardo II de Inglaterra y Margarita de Escocia: ver Reyes de Inglaterra y Reyes de Escocia).

[4] Beatriz de Mâçon nació el 8-IV-1136 en Vienne, Isere, Francia. Sus padres fueron Geraud I de Borgoña, conde de Mâcon y de Viennne, y Guyonne de Salins. Guyonne era hija de Gaucher III de Salins, nieta de Gaucher II, biznieta de Humberto II, tataranieta de Gaucher I, cuarta nieta de Humberto I de Salins y quinta nieta de Alberico de Narbona (hijo de Maieul I de Narbona: ver Señores de Narbona) y Atalana de Maçon.

[5] Beatriz de Ginebra y Faucigny nació el año 1180 en Ginebra, Suiza. Murió en 1236 en St. Pierre de Curtille, Rhône-Alpes, Savoie, France. Está sepultada en la Abadía de Hautecombe, Ontex, Rhône-Alpes, Savoie, France. Sus padres fueron Guillermo I, conde de Ginebra (c.1132 a 15-VIII-1195) y Margarita de Faucigny. Guillermo I de Ginebra era hijo de Amadeo I, nieto de Aymon I, biznieto de Geroldo II y Tetberga de Rheinfelden (ver datos de su hermana: Adelaida de Rheinfelden), tataranieto de Geroldo I, 4° nieto de Alberto de Ginebra, 5° nieto de Conrado I de Ginebra, 6° nieto de Albitus de Ginebra y 7° nieto de Radberto de Ginebra (c.870). -------------------- Amadeus III of Savoy (1095, Carignano, Piedmont – April 1148, Nicosia) was Count of Savoy and Maurienne from 1103 until his death. He was also known as the Crusader. [1]

He was the son of Humbert II of Savoy and Gisela of Burgundy, the daughter of William I of Burgundy. He succeeded as count of Savoy upon the death of his father. Amadeus had a tendency to exaggerate his titles, and also claimed to be Duke of Lombardy, Duke of Burgundy, Duke of Chablais, and vicar of the Holy Roman Empire, the latter of which had been given to his father by Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor.

He helped restore the Abbey of St. Maurice of Agaune, in which the former kings of Burgundy had been crowned, and of which he himself was abbot until 1147. He also founded the Abbey of St. Sulpicius in Bugey, Tamié Abbey in the Bauges, and Hautecombe Abbey on the Lac du Bourget.

In 1128, Amadeus extended his realm, known as the "Old Chablais", by adding to it the region extending from the Arve to the Dranse d'Abondance, which came to be called the "New Chablais" with its capital at St. Moritz. Despite his marriage to Mahaut, he still fought against his brother-in-law Guy, who was killed at the Battle of Montmeillan. Following this, King Louis VI of France, married to Amadeus' sister Adélaide de Maurienne, attempted to confiscate Savoy. Amadeus was saved by the intercession of Peter the Hermit, and by his promise to participate in Louis' planned crusade.

In 1147, he accompanied his nephew Louis VII of France and his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine on the Second Crusade. He financed his expedition with help from a loan from the Abbey of St. Maurice. In his retinue were many barons from Savoy, including the lords of Faucigny, Seyssel, La Chambre, Miolans, Montbel[disambiguation needed], Thoire, Montmayeur, Vienne, Viry, La Palude, Blonay, Chevron-Villette, Chignin, and Châtillon. Amadeus travelled south through Italy to Brindisi, where he crossed over to Durazzo, and marched east along the Via Egnatia to meet Louis at Constantinople in late 1147. After crossing into Anatolia, Amadeus, who was leading the vanguard, became separated from Louis near Laodicea, and Louis' forces were almost entirely destroyed.

Marching on to Adalia, Louis, Amadeus, and other barons decided to continue to Antioch by ship. On the journey, Amadeus fell ill on Cyprus, and died at Nicosia in April 1148. He was buried in the Church of St. Croix in Nicosia. In Savoy, his son Humbert III succeeded him, under the regency of bishop Amadeus of Lausanne.

[edit] Family and childrenHe had no children with his first wife Adelaide. In 1123 he married Mahaut (or Mafalda, or Matilda) of Albon, the sister of Guy IV of Dauphinois, with whom he had ten children:

1.Elisa of Savoy (1120-?) married Humberto of Beaujeu 2.Mafalda (Mahaut), (1125-1158), married Afonso I of Portugal 3.Agnes of Savoy (1125-1172), married William I, Count of Geneva 4.Humbert III (1136-1188) 5.John of Savoy 6.Peter of Savoy 7.William of Savoy 8.Margaret of Savoy (died 1157) 9.Isabella of Savoy 10.Juliana of Savoy (died 1194), abbess of St. André-le-Haut

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Amédée III, comte de Savoie's Timeline

1092
1092
Carignano, Turin, Piedmont, Italy
1120
1120
Age 28
1125
1125
Age 33
1125
Age 33
Savoie, France
1128
1128
- 1178
Age 36
Count of Geneva
1134
1134
Age 42
Chambery, Savoie, France
1135
1135
Age 43
Avigliana, Province of Turin, Piedmont, Italy
1137
1137
Age 45
Savoie, France
1138
1138
Age 46
Savoie, France
1139
1139
Age 47
Chambery, Savoie, France