Amahetai ll MoyToy of Tellico

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Amodohiyi "Chief Pigeon" Moytoy, Uku of Great Tellico

Nicknames: "The Pidgeon", "Ani'-Ga'tâge'wi", "of Tainesi (Cherokee)", ""Trader Tom" Carpenter", "First Beloved Man", "Emperor of the Cherokee", "Water Conjuror or Rainmaker", "Supreme Chief of the Cherokee", "Amodohiyi", "The Pigeon Moytoy", "Rain Conjuror", "The Pigeon of Tellico", ""Th..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Tellico, AL, USA
Death: Died in Cherokee Nation East,TN,USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Amatoya Moytoy, I, of Tellico; Quatsy "Nancy" of Tellico and Quatsy "Nancy" (of the Ani'-Wa'ya (Wolf Clan))
Husband of Woman of Ani'-ga'tage'wi (Kituah or Wild Potato Clan) and Go-sa-du-isga
Father of A-nu-wa-gi (Peggy) Moytoy; Clogoittah Maiden of Tellico; A-nu-wa-gi (Peggy) Moytoy, Wild Potato Clan; Kallannah of Tellico, Cherokee Emissary to England; Tathtowe (Tittoe II) of Tellico, Cherokee Emissary to England and 6 others
Brother of Oukah-Ulah Moytoy, Cherokee Emissary to England; Sister Old Hop Moytoy; Nancy Nanye-hi Moytoy, Wolf Clan; William Moytoy Brock; Kanagatoga "Old Hop" Moytoy, First Beloved Man of the Cherokee and 13 others
Half brother of Thomas Pasmere Carpenter; "Trader Tom" Carpenter, II; Elizabeth Williams and Quatsy Susan Place

Occupation: The Pigeon of Tellico, Wolfclan "Emporer of the Cherokee", Chief of cherokee nation 1730-1760
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Amodohiyi "Chief Pigeon" Moytoy, Uku of Great Tellico

Moytoy of Tellico (d. 1741 or 1760?) was a Cherokee leader from Great Tellico, recognized by British colonial authorities as the "Emperor of the Cherokee"; the Cherokee themselves used the title "First Beloved Man". His name is derived from Amo-adawehi, "rainmaker," although it is unclear whether this was his personal name or a title he held.

In 1730 Sir Alexander Cuming, a Scottish adventurer with no particular authority, arranged for Moytoy to be crowned emperor over all of the Cherokee towns. He was crowned in Nikwasi with a headdress Cuming called the "Crown of Tannassy."

Cuming arranged to take Moytoy and a group of Cherokee to England to meet King George. Moytoy declined to go, saying that his wife was ill. Attakullakulla (Little Carpenter) volunteered to go in his place. The "Crown" was laid at King George's feet along with four scalps.

Some European sources refer to Moytoy's wife as a woman named Go-sa-du-isga, and title her the "Queen of the Cherokee." On his death the British recognized his 13 year old son Amouskositte as Emperor. He had little real authority among the elder-dominated Cherokee, and by 1753 Kanagatucko (Old Hop) of Chota had emerged as the dominant leader.

-------------------- Moytoy also known as the Pigeon Of Tellico was born ca. 1687 in Tellico, TN.

Parents:

Amatoya Moytoy m. Quatsy of Tellico issue:

1. Nancy Moytoy

2. Moytoy (Pigeon of Tellico)

3. Old Hop

(5 daughters)

Marriage to unknown. Children:

1. Oconostota born ca. 1704 died about 1783.

2. Clogoittah born ca. 1706 was one of the members of the delegation that went to England in 1730 to see King George II

3. Kitegista born ca. 1708 died aft. 1788

4. Tathtowe born ca. 1712 also was one of the delegates to King George II in 1730

5. Killaque born ca. 1714

6. Skalilosken born ca. 1718

7. Ounaconoa born ca. 1722

8. Kollannah born ca. 1724

9. Oukaii-Oukah born ca. 1726

10. Amo-Scossite "Bad Water or Dreadful Water" born ca. 1728

11. Ahna-Wakie born ca. 1730

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~coatsblueprints/96.htm

1. Information from WFT James Lindsey Thompson

Supreme Chief of the Cherokee 1730-1760

The Pigeon of Tellico

2. info from familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/i/cJames-R-Hicks/BOO....

The Eastern Bank of Cherokee, by John R. Finger, Univ of TN Press, Knoxville:

(Early Cherokee society was atomized into clans with individual chiefs)...Sir Alexander Cuming boldly addressed this problem in 1730 by traveling to Cherokee country and proclaiming a single chief, Moytoy, as the first chief and king of his people.

  • **************************************************************************************************************

from Don Chesnut's web page; www.users.mis.net/chestnut/pages/cherokee.htm

Moytoy: a Cherokee chief recognized by the English as "emperor" in 1730. both the correct form and the meaning of the name are uncertain; the name occurs again as Moyatoy in a document of 1793; a boy upon the East Cherokee reservation a few years ago bore the name of Ma'tayi, for which no meaning can be found or given.

  • **************************************************************************************************************

Old Frontiers, by John P. Brown, also details a Moytoy of Settico who was rampaging through VA after the death of "Emperor" Moytoy of Tellico, and in the Colonial Records of South Carolina, 1754-1765, a letter dated 1/31/1757 references a "Moyatoya, son to the Mankiller of Highwassey deceased". (Moytoy's son Raven of Hiwassee had a son called Moytoy who could be this Moytoy of Settico)

  • *************************************************************************************************************

AKA A-ma'-he-ta-i or Rain Conjuror; I'm guessing the name "moytoy" is an abbreviated form of A-ma'-he-ta-i = a-MAA-HE-TA-I = Mahetai = moytoy. (I also think that the "Pigeon" is a different person than Moytoy.)

--------------------

Moytoy Pigeon of Tellico, Principal Chief and Emperor of the Cherokee ("Trader Tom" Carpenter) was the leading Chief of the Cherokee tribe from April 3, 1730 to 1760. He was also created "Emperor of the Cherokees" by the British envoy Sir Alexander Cuming in 1730, and had previously been Chief of Great Tellico. He is known as Moytoy II, or Moytoy the Younger, as he succeeded his father, Moytoy I, or Amatoya Moytoy of Chota.

Moytoy II was originally named Pigeon of Tellico (English translation), and was born around 1687 in that town. His father, Moytoy I, was the town chief of Chota ca. 1700-1730. His mother, Quatsy, was from Tellico, so this was his home (Cherokee society is matrilineal and matrilocal, and inheritance for males is avuncular).

Moytoy was crowned with the "Crown of Tannassy," as described by Cuming (the name probably has origins with the traditional capital of Tanasi, near Chota). It is said to have been a traditional Cherokee hide cap covered in feathers and several hanging animal tails. The crown was later taken to England.

Some sources refer to Moytoy II's wife as a woman named Go-sa-du-isga, and title her the "Queen of the Cherokee" (in fact there are no traditional consort titles, so this was a European distinction). They had many children who went on to become prominent Cherokee leaders, among them Oconostota (Stalking Turkey), who succeeded his cousin Attacullaculla as Principal Chief in 1775 or 1777. Moytoy's daughter, Waw-Li, married the Scottish immigrant John Joseph Vann, making the Cherokee town chief, James Vann, Moytoy's grandson. Another son, Amo-Scossite, took the title "Emperor of the Cherokees" after his uncle Old Hop's death. However, his adoption of the European title alone held no political authority, and Attacullaculla was the de facto ruler. The imperial title fell out of use after 1761.

Since 1968, Donald Joe Robinson, a Cherokee man from Dallas, Texas, has styled himself "Oukah" (Chief or King) and "Emperor of the Tsalagi" (Cherokee). Although he has received some attention, any legitimate link between his assumed title and Moytoy's lineage has yet to be proven. His claims are largely regarded as false.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moytoy_II

In 1730, Trader-Tom (Moytoy II) took over as Chief, receiving what was described as the “Crown of Tannassy”. Tanasi was where the previous Chief resided and the traditional headdress was passed on to him.

http://nativenewsonline.org/history/hist0403.html

April 3, 1730: In the Cherokee village of Nequassee, modern day Franklin, North Carolina, Sir Alexander Cuming oversaw a ceremony making Chief Moytoy the "Emperor of the Cherokees." This was his final step in having the Cherokees acknowledge the sovereignty of King George II of England.


BACKGROUND:

From http://cherokeehistory.com/1700thro.html


As tribes acquired firearms from Europeans and used them against neighboring tribes, a "weaponry race" began. Tribes accelerated trade to acquire firearms for military purposes. Initially the guns were purchased with furs and skins. The South Carolina Colony, established in 1670, was encouraging the tribes to trade their Native American prisoners of war which were then sold into slavery. In 1705, there were complaints from North Carolina that the South Carolina governor's trade in Native American slaves had so angered the tribes that an Indian war was inevitable.

Several tribes, including the Cherokee, assisted colonists in driving out their mutual enemy, the Tuscarora, in a war that lasted from 1711-1713. However, with the Tuscarora out of the way, the tribes begin to address their grievances with the colonists -- primarily the sale of Native Americans into slavery despite agreements to discontinue this practice.

The result was a war, in 1715, in which the combined tribes in the region threatened to wipe-out the South Carolina Colony. Ultimately, the colonists were able to mass their forces and after achieving several victories the tribes began to sue for peace. Peace was made with the Cherokee who were given a large quantity of guns and ammunition in exchange for their alliance with the colony.

In 1721, a treaty was signed with South Carolina to systematize trade but the most significant condition was the establishment of a fixed boundary between the Cherokee and the colony which was the first land cession made by the Cherokee to the Europeans. The population of the Cherokee Nation was probably 16,000-17,000 including 6,000 warriors. Although allied with the English, the Cherokee began to favor the French who had established Fort Toulouse near present Montgomery AL. The French showed greater respect for the Indians than the British who considered them an inferior race. (It should be noted that the English also considered non-English whites as inferior).

To prevent a Cherokee alliance with the French, Sir Alexander Cuming visited the prominent Cherokee towns and convinced the Cherokee to select an "emperor", Chief Moytoy of Tellico, to represent the tribe in all dealings with the British. In addition, he escorted seven Cherokees to England who met with the King and swore allegiance to the crown.

A treaty was signed obligating the Cherokee to trade only with the British, return all runaway slaves, and to expel all non-English whites from their territory. In return, the Cherokee received a substantial amount of guns, ammunition, and red paint.

Although the seven Cherokee who made the trip were presented the to the king as "chiefs", only one could be considered a prominent Cherokee -- the others being young men who went for the adventure. The chiefs of the tribe declined due to their responsibilities for hunting and defense. However, one of the young men was Attacullakulla, known as "Little Carpenter", who later became a powerful and influential chief.


  • ****

From http://www.telliquah.com/Moytoy.htm (written by Lowell Kirk)

In 1730 an unofficial envoy of King George II appointed" Moytoy, the chief of Great Tellico, "emperor" of the Cherokees. Moytoy, in return, recognized the English king's sovereignty over the Cherokees. The Cherokee had developed significant trade arrangements with no other European settlements except South Carolina.

But the British had already fought two colonial wars with the French and were on the verge of another. The French were beginning to open, trade with the Cherokee from their recently constructed Fort Tolouse on the Alabama River. Since the 1689-97 King William's War, the French and English had been involved in warfare and international rivalry. In the War of the Spanish Succession (1702-13)

France had yielded Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Hudson Bay region to Great Britain. The Spanish had been forced to yield their missions to the British in Georgia and North Florida. English forces with Indian allies destroyed the bulk of the Spanish missions there. The French made peace with the Iroquois in the north, and encouraged them to make raids on the Cherokee to the south who were allies with the British. The French hoped to recoup their losses to the British in the north by making alliances with the Cherokee in the south. So the British and the French both began to woo the Cherokee.

Both English and French were edging their colonial claims closer and closer toward each other's claims in America, and the Cherokee were caught up in the middle of the conflict. As the French claimed the land drained by rivers flowing into the Mississippi River, the British wanted to cement as many alliances with the Indians who inhabited the upper Tennessee River as quickly as possible. Economic rivalry for the American Indian fur trade was becoming fierce. Added to that was the fact that the French generally had a much better relationship with Indian tribes than did the British. Control of the Indian trade on the head waters of the Tennessee River was very important to the British economy, especially to its' colony of South Carolina.

William Steele's book, The Cherokee Crown of Tannassy is an excellent description of how Moytoy of Great Tellico was appointed Emperor of the Cherokee in 1730. Sir Alexander Cuming successfully persuaded Moytoy to recognize and give his allegiance to the British king. Steele's work is based on Cuming's own journal. Cuming arrived in Tellico, guided by the Scottish trader, Ludovick Grant, by following the trail over Ooneekawy Mountain. Moytoy, headman of Great Tellico, gave Cuming a tour of the palisaded town. Moytoy pointed out scalps of enemy French Indians which hung on poles in front of the houses of warriors. Cuming was introduced to the powerful Tellico priest, Jacob the Conjurer. While at Great Tellico, Jacob took Cuming to petrifying cave filled with stalactites and stalagmites. In the cave was Jacob's Uktena crystal, which was kept in the cave and fed the blood of small animals twice a week and the blood of a deer twice a year. The Cherokee town of Chatuga was also enclosed in the palisades.

From Great Tellico, Ludovick Grant led Cuming along a 16-mile trail to Tannassy, in order to convince the Warrior of Tannassy to accept Moytoy as Emperor of the Cherokee. At Tannassy, Grant introduced Cuming to Eleazer Wiggan, another Carolina trader who lived in Tannassy. The Warrior of Tannassy submitted his homage to King George 11 and gave Cuming his crown of dyed opossum hair. Cuming returned to Great Tellico and on the last day of March, 1730, departed Great Tellico with Moytoy, Jacob the Conjurer and a great many other attendants back up the Ooneekawy Mountain to the Valley towns. It was in the Cherokee town of Nequassee that the Cherokee national council formally agreed to accept Moytoy as their "emperor" and to give their allegiance to King George II. This was accomplished with a great deal of ceremony and dancing.

Under the agreement made with Moytoy, the Cherokee would trade with no other European nation, the Cherokee would be rewarded for the return of fugitive slaves to English masters, and the Cherokee were promised military assistance if England went to war with any foreign powers. Specifically, this meant the French. Seven Cherokee were taken to London by Cuming and wined and dined. For twenty years after their return these seven Cherokee told stories of British power and majesty which helped to maintain cordial relationships between the Cherokee and the British.

One of the Cherokees taken to England was Attakullakulla, known to the British as "the Little Carpenter", For the next three decades Attakullakulla, who became a "white" or "peace" chief, used his exceptional speaking skill to discourage Cherokee alignment with the French. Attakullakulia's son, Dragging Canoe, would play an important role in the conflicts that occurred in East Tennessee during and after the American Revolution.

When Moytoy of Great Tellico died, his son inherited the title of "Emperor". But Cherokee central authority soon moved toward Old Hop, another "white" or "peace" chief who presided over the Cherokee "empire" from his town of Chota. Chota was located about five miles upriver on the Little Tennessee from the mouth of the Tellico River. By 1750 a "red" or "wae' chief, Oconostota, became influential within the Cherokee "empire". It was during this time that another smallpox epidemic spread devastation in the Cherokee country and Oconostota charged that the disease had been brought by the English with their trade goods, When his own face remained pock-marked by the disease, he became increasingly hostile to the English and sought to align the tribe with the French, who were seriously interested in wooing the Cherokee away from the British.

from James Hicks:

The Eastern Band of Cherokee, by John R Finger, Univ of TN Press, Knoxville:

[Early Cherokee society was atomized into clans with individual chiefs]... Sir Alexander Cuming boldly addressed this problem in 1730 by traveling to Cherokee country and proclaiming a single chief, Moytoy, as the first chief and King of his people.

  • ********************************

from Don Chesnut's web page; www.users.mis.net/~chesnut/pages/cherokee.htm

Moytoy: a Cherokee chief recognized by the English as "emperor" in 1730. Both the correct form and the meaning of the name are uncertain; the name occurs again as Moyatoy in a document of 1793; a boy upon the East Cherokee reservation a few years ago bore the name of Ma’tayi, for which no meaning can be found or given.

  • ********************************

Old Frontiers, by John P Brown, also details a Moytoy of Settico who was rampaiging through VA after the death of "Emperor" Moytoy of Tellico, and in the Colonial Records of South Carolina, 1754-1765, a letter dated 1/31/1757 references a "Moyatoya, son to the Mankiller of Highwassey deceased". [Moytoy's son Raven of Hiwassee had a son called Moytoy who could be this Moytoy of Settico]

  • ********************************

AKA A-ma'-he-ta-i or Rain Conjuror; I'm guessing the name "Moytoy" is an abbreviated form of A-ma'-he-ta-i = a-MA-HE-TA-I = Mahetai = Moytoy. (I also think that the "Pigeon" is a different person than Moytoy.)---James Hicks

__________________________________-

from Wikipedia:

Moytoy of Tellico (d. 1741[1]) was a Cherokee leader from Great Tellico, recognized by British colonial authorities as the "Emperor of the Cherokee"; the Cherokee themselves used the title "First Beloved Man". His name is derived from Amo-adawehi, "rainmaker,"[2] although it is unclear whether this was his personal name or a title he held.

In 1730 Sir Alexander Cuming, a Scottish adventurer with no particular authority, arranged for Moytoy to be crowned emperor over all of the Cherokee towns. He was crowned in Nikwasi with a headdress Cuming called the "Crown of Tannassy."

Cuming arranged to take Moytoy and a group of Cherokee to England to meet King George. Moytoy declined to go, saying that his wife was ill. Attakullakulla (Little Carpenter) volunteered to go in his place. The "Crown" was laid at King George's feet along with four scalps.

Some European sources refer to Moytoy's wife as a woman named Go-sa-du-isga, and title her the "Queen of the Cherokee." On his death the British recognized his 13 year old son Amouskositte as Emperor. He had little real authority among the elder-dominated Cherokee, and by 1753 Kanagatucko (Old Hop) of Chota had emerged as the dominant leader.[3]

Notes

  1. ^ Gearing, Fred (1962). Priests and Warriors: Social Structures for Cherokee Politics in the 18th Century. 
  2. ^ Brown, p. 538
  3. ^ Hoig, Stan (1998). The Cherokees and Their Chiefs: In the Wake of Empire. University of Arkansas Press. 

Sources

   * Brown, John P. Old Frontiers. (Kingsport: Southern Publishers, 1938).
   * Haywood, W.H. The Civil and Political History of the State of Tennessee from its Earliest Settlement up to the Year 1796. (Nashville: Methodist Episcopal Publishing House, 1891).
   * Litton, Gaston L. "The Principal Chiefs of the Cherokee Nation", Chronicles of Oklahoma 15:3 (September 1937) 253-270 (retrieved August 18, 2006).
   * Mooney, James. Myths of the Cherokee and Sacred Formulas of the Cherokee. (Nashville: Charles and Randy Elder-Booksellers, 1982).
   * Ramsey, James Gettys McGregor. The Annals of Tennessee to the End of the Eighteenth Century. (Chattanooga: Judge David Campbell, 1926).

--------------------

Tellico, Moytoy "the Pigeon" of Chief

Birth : ABT 1687 Tellico, Cherokee Nation-East

Death : ABT 1771 Cherokee Nation-East

Gender: Male

Parents:

   Father: Chota, Amatyoa Moytoy of Chief
   Mother: Tellico, Quatsy of

Family:

   Marriage: ABT 1702 in Cherokee Nation-East
   Spouse:
       Ani'-Ga'tge'wi, Woman of
       Birth : ABT 1686 Cherokee Nation-East
       Gender: Female
   Children:
       Oconostota, Chief
       Clogoittah,
       Birth : ABT 1706 Cherokee Nation-East
       Gender: Male
       Kitegista,
       Moytoy, Ahneewakee
       Hiwassee, Raven of
       Tanassee, Willenawah "the Great Eagle" of 

http://www.redeaglejw.net/dat404.htm#8

Notes

There were two Moytoy's which has caused a lot of confusion This Moytoy is the son of Amatoya Moytoy and Quatsy of Tellico from the Wolf Clan. Moytoy was also known as Moytoy pigeon of Tellico because that was where he was born. his Uncle "Old Hop" became chief at his death. Old Hop or Standing Turkey, also know as Fireking and Emperor of the Cherokees

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0085/g0000097.html#I92858

--------------------

--------------------

MOYTOY (II) Child of the Raven of Hiwassee. He was called Amahetai or Rain Conjuror, the same name used by his grandfather. He was a member of the Tellico faction, when Aunmouskossittee was appointed to replace Moytoy (1). He was a Cherokee man.

http://www.prophecykeepers.com/chickamaugacherokee/heartoftheeagle.html -------------------- •ID: I61057 •Name: Amadohiyi Moytoy •Given Name: Amadohiyi •Surname: Moytoy •Suffix: II •Sex: M •_UID: D61E25402496D9428D2C0078A8466621D4A9 •Change Date: 24 Jul 2008 •Note: He was the "Supreme Chief of the Cherokee" in April 1730 as noted by Anglishman Alexander Cuming, who trveld to the Cherokee country and stated Chief Moytoy appeared to be the "King" of his people. This information can be found in "The Cherokees" by Grace Steele Woodward.

He was also known as "The Pidgeon of Tellicao". •Birth: ABT 1687 in Tellico, East Cherokee Nation •Death: ABT 1741 in Cherokee Nation East

Father: Amatoya Moytoy b: ABT 1640 in Chota Mother: Quatsy b: ABT 1650 in Tellico, East Cherokee Nation

Marriage 1 Woman Of Deer Clan b: 1680 in Cherokee Nation East •Married: Children 1. Willenawah b: ABT 1710 2. Clogoittah b: ABT 1712 3. Killaque b: ABT 1714 4. Oconostota b: ABT 1716 5. Skalilosken b: ABT 1718 6. Ounaconoa b: ABT 1720 7. Kollannah b: ABT 1722 8. Oukaii-Oukah b: ABT 1726 9. Tatitowe b: ABT 1726

-------------------- Clan: Wolf Clan (Quatsy) AKA: A-ma'-he-ta-i or Rain Conjuror; I'm guessing the name "Moytoy" is an abbreviated form of A-ma'-he-ta-i = a-MA-HE-TA-I = Mahetai = Moytoy. (I also think that the "Pigeon" is a different person than Moytoy.)

The Cherokee term for Pigeon was Amoyah. He was called Woey by the white population. He was held hostage at Fort Prince George in 1759, and was released with Oconostota.

Note: Moytoy Pigeon, of Tellico Supreme Chief of the Cherokee 1730 -- 1760

  • ********************************

The Eastern Band of Cherokee, by John R Finger, Univ of TN Press, Knoxville: [Earliy Cherokee society was atomized into clans with individual chiefs]... Sir Alexander Cuming boldly addressed this problem in 1730 by traveling to Cherokee country and proclaiming a single chief, Moytoy, as the first chief and King of his people.

  • ********************************

Moytoy : a Cherokee chief recognized by the English as "emperor" in 1730. Both the correct form and the meaning of the name are uncertain; the name occurs again as Moyatoy in a document of 1793; a boy upon the East Cherokee reservation a few years ago bore the name of Matayi, for which no meaning can be found or given.

  • ********************************

Old Frontiers, by John P Brown, also details a Moytoy of Settico who was rampaging through VA after the death of "Emperor" Moytoy of Tellico.

MOYTOY Born: before 1700. The Cherokee term for Moytoy was Amoadawehi (Amahetai) or Rain or Water Conjuror. He was from Great Hiwassee or Little Hiwassee of the Valley. He later became the head warrior of Tellico of the Overhills. In 1730, he was appointed the Emperor (British medal chief) of the Cherokee Nation by British imperialists. He died in battle in 1741. This was the same year of Caulunna's death (see Family of Oconostota). Caulunna was a significant Cherokee leader in the era of Moytoy, and was Oconostota's uncle, and Quatsis' brother It has been speculated by some that Caulunna and Moytoy were the same person- In fact, many secondary sources state that Oconostota and Attakullakulla were brothers. Attakullakulla's mother was the sister of Moytoy, and Old Hop was their brother, If Moytoy was Caulunna, he would have been both Oconostota and Attakullakulla's older uncle. He would have been responsible for the upbringing of both through manhood, This may explain why some historians conclude that Oconostota and Attakullakulla were relatives. Yet, neither family ever mentioned being kin to one another. Also, Old Hop stated that Attakullakulla was his nephew. In the same statement, Old Hop mentions Oconostota without calling him his relative. There are no documented records to prove that Caulunna and Moytoy were the same person Moytoy was a Cherokee man. See: Caulunna and Old Hop. -------------------- Moytoy also known as the Pigeon Of Tellico was born ca. 1687 in Tellico, TN.

Parents:

Amatoya Moytoy m. Quatsy of Tellico issue:

1. Nancy Moytoy

2. Moytoy (Pigeon of Tellico)

3. Old Hop

(5 daughters)

Marriage to unknown. Children:

1. Oconostota born ca. 1704 died about 1783.

2. Clogoittah born ca. 1706 was one of the members of the delegation that went to England in 1730 to see King George II

3. Kitegista born ca. 1708 died aft. 1788

4. Tathtowe born ca. 1712 also was one of the delegates to King George II in 1730

5. Killaque born ca. 1714

6. Skalilosken born ca. 1718

7. Ounaconoa born ca. 1722

8. Kollannah born ca. 1724

9. Oukaii-Oukah born ca. 1726

10. Amo-Scossite "Bad Water or Dreadful Water" born ca. 1728

11. Ahna-Wakie born ca. 1730

Birth: 1687 in Tellico, East Cherokee Nation Death: 1771 Event: Clan AniWaYa - Wolf Occupation: Chief Cherokee Nation - 1730-1741 NATI: Full Blood Cherokee Note:

Moytoy Pigeon, of Tellico Supreme Chief of the Cherokee 1730 -- 1760

  • ********************************

The Eastern Band of Cherokee, by John R Finger, Univ of TN Press, Knoxville: [Earliy Cherokee society was atomized into clans with individual chiefs]... Sir Alexander Cuming boldly addressed this problem in 1730 by traveling to Cherokee country and proclaiming a single chief, Moytoy, as the first chief and King of his people.

  • ********************************

Moytoy : a Cherokee chief recognized by the English as "emperor" in 1730. Both the correct form and the meaning of the name are uncertain; the name occurs again as Moyatoy in a document of 1793; a boy upon the East Cherokee reservation a few years ago bore the name of Ma’tayi, for which no meaning can be found or given.

  • ********************************

Old Frontiers, by John P Brown, also details a Moytoy of Settico who was rampaiging through VA after the death of "Emperor" Moytoy of Tellico.

As tribes acquired firearms from Europeans and used them against neighboring tribes, a "weaponry race" began. Tribes accelerated trade to acquire firearms for military purposes. Initially the guns were purchased with furs and skins. The South Carolina Colony, established in 1670, was encouraging the tribes to trade their Native American prisoners of war which were then sold into slavery. In 1705, there were complaints from North Carolina that the South Carolina governor's trade in Native American slaves had so angered the tribes that an Indian war was inevitable.

Several tribes, including the Cherokee, assisted colonists in driving out their mutual enemy, the Tuscarora, in a war that lasted from 1711-1713. However, with the Tuscarora out of the way, the tribes begin to address their grievances with the colonists -- primarily the sale of Native Americans into slavery despite agreements to discontinue this practice.

The result was a war, in 1715, in which the combined tribes in the region threatened to wipe-out the South Carolina Colony. Ultimately, the colonists were able to mass their forces and after achieving several victories the tribes began to sue for peace. Peace was made with the Cherokee who were given a large quantity of guns and ammunition in exchange for their alliance with the colony.

In 1721, a treaty was signed with South Carolina to systematize trade but the most significant condition was the establishment of a fixed boundary between the Cherokee and the colony which was the first land cession made by the Cherokee to the Europeans. The population of the Cherokee Nation was probably 16,000-17,000 including 6,000 warriors. Although allied with the English, the Cherokee began to favor the French who had established Fort Toulouse near present Montgomery AL. The French showed greater respect for the Indians than the British who considered them an inferior race. (It should be noted that the English also considered non-English whites as inferior).

To prevent a Cherokee alliance with the French, Sir Alexander Cuming visited the prominent Cherokee towns and convinced the Cherokee to select an "emperor", Chief Moytoy of Tellico, to represent the tribe in all dealings with the British. In addition, he escorted seven Cherokees to England who met with the King and swore allegiance to the crown.

A treaty was signed obligating the Cherokee to trade only with the British, return all runaway slaves, and to expel all non-English whites from their territory. In return, the Cherokee received a substantial amount of guns, ammunition, and red paint.

Although the seven Cherokee who made the trip were presented the to the king as "chiefs", only one could be considered a prominent Cherokee -- the others being young men who went for the adventure. The chiefs of the tribe declined due to their responsibilities for hunting and defense. However, one of the young men was Attacullakulla, known as "Little Carpenter", who later became a powerful and influential chief.

About 1738, small pox, brought to Carolina by slave ships, broke out among the Cherokee with such terrible effect that nearly half the tribe died from the disease within a year. Native Americans had never been exposed to many European diseases and had no immunity to them. To make matters worse, the traditional Cherokee remedy for serious illnesses of plunging in a cold stream was the worst possible treatment.

James Adair, an English trader who lived among the Cherokee for 40 years, reported the Cherokee were so proud of their physical appearance that when they saw their disfigurement from the disease many warriors committed suicide:

Some shot themselves, others cut their throats, some stabbed themselves with knives and others with sharp-pointed canes; many threw themselves with sullen madness into the fire and there slowly expired, as if they had been utterly divested of the native power of feeling pain. The small pox epidemic was also devastating to Cherokee religious tradition. Cherokee priests, unable to cure the disease, fell from favor. The priests felt that the tribe was being punished for adopting the white man's ways and discarded their now powerless sacred objects.

The Cherokee were constantly at war with neighboring tribes. In 1715, they drove the Shawnee northward out of the Cumberland River region. They continued their hereditary war with the Creeks (Muscogee). They fought an eleven year war with the Chickasaw until they were ultimately defeated in 1768.

When the Seven Years War ("French and Indian War") began, the Cherokee would have sided with the French except for their dependance on trade with the English. Lieutenant Henry Timberlake, a young Virginian officer who visited the Cherokee a few years later, gave the reasons for their fondness for the French:

I found the nation much attached to the French, who have the prudence, by familiar politeness -- which costs but little and often does a great deal -- and conforming themselves to their ways and temper, to conciliate the inclinations of almost all the Indians they are acquainted with, while the pride of our officers often disgusts them. Nay, they did not scruple to own to me that it was the trade alone that induced them to make peace with us, and not any preference to the French, whom they loved a great deal better.... The English are now so nigh, and encroached daily so far upon them, that they not only felt the bad effects of it in their hunting grounds, which were spoiled, but had all the reason in the world to apprehend being swallowed up by so potent neighbors or driven from the country inhabited by their fathers, in which they were born and bought up, in fine, their native soil, for which all men have a particular tenderness and affection. A treaty was signed in 1754 reaffirming the Cherokee alliance with the English and, besides the usual stipulation of land cessions, provided for British forts in the Cherokee country. In spite of the treaty, the Cherokee were obviously in contact with the French and perhaps participated with other French-allied tribes in raids against the British colonists.

About 100 Cherokee accompanied a British expedition that was intended to attack the French-allied Shawnee but the campaign was abandoned when their provisions were lost while attempting to cross a swollen river. The Cherokee began home on foot in starving condition, angered at the contempt and neglect they experienced from the British. They "confiscated" some free-roaming horses belonging to Virginia colonists, feeling fully justified considering their service to the ungrateful colonists. The colonists, however, attacked the Cherokee, killing over twenty of them. The Cherokee dead were mutilated and scalped and the scalps redeemed for bounty as provided by Virginia law.

The chiefs of the Nation attempted to negotiate restitution with the colonists but the young warriors were so incensed that they began raiding border settlements. The colonists declared war, cut-off all trade, and demanded that numerous chiefs be surrendered for execution. Thirty-two prominent Cherokee, including the famous war chief Oconostota, went to Fort Prince George, in South Carolina, to attempt to negotiate peace but the British took the whole party prisoner. Chief Attacullakulla, the Little Carpenter, was able to negotiate the release of Oconostota and two others while the remaining twenty-nine chiefs remained captive.

Angered at the tactics of the British, Oconostota laid siege to Fort Prince George. The commander of the fort was called out to speak to Oconostota but when he came out he was shot and killed. The garrison of the fort immediately killed their twenty-nine captives. With war now in full swing, Oconostota's warriors begin raiding the Carolina settlements while other Cherokees laid siege to Fort Loudoun in what is now eastern Tennessee. A force of 1,600 Colonials drove Cherokees back and destroyed numerous towns. The Cherokee, however, massed a large force and in June of 1760 forced the colonists to retire leaving Fort Loudoun under siege.

Fort Loudoun surrendered to Oconostota in August on the condition that they would be allowed safe passage with sufficient arms and ammunition for the march home but delivering all other weapons and ammunition to the Cherokee. When they occupied the fort, the Cherokee discovered that powder, balls (i.e., bullets), and cannon had been buried or thrown in the river. Angered at the former garrison's deception, the Cherokees attacked the soldiers the next morning killing 29 in the first volley and taking the remainder prisoner until they were later ransomed by the colony.

The colonist demanded revenge and, despite attempts for peace by Attacullakulla, sent an 2,600 man force in 1761 which destroyed 15 Cherokee towns and "pushed the frontier seventy miles farther to the west" though incurring heavy losses in the process. Attacullakulla was able to negotiate a treaty with the South Carolina colony in September of 1761.

In November of the same year, a force of Virginians who had descended as far a present Kingsport TN were met by a delegation of Cherokees and a treaty was signed. In addition, Lt. Henry Timberlake volunteered to return with the Cherokee and lived with them for several months. Timberlake later took a delegation of chiefs to England but, since the trip was not authorized by the government, they were practically ignored and returned disgusted.

By the time France and England made peace in 1763, the tribes throughout the region had been devastated by warfare, loss of crops and orchards, and another small pox epidemic. Immigrants began to flood across the mountains. Numerous treaties were signed, each relinquishing more land to the whites, in an attempt to fix a permanent border but all were ignored by the settlers. The most significant treaty was the Henderson Purchase in 1775 which ceded lands north of the Cumberland River and included most of what is now Kentucky. A faction of the tribe, the Chickamaugas, refused to honor the treating and kept up constant raiding of settlements in this region through the turn of century.

Every treaty was essentially forced upon the Cherokee and only signed because they were assured that no further cessions would be demanded. The typical pattern was that settlers would move onto Cherokee land and refuse to leave. In spite of Cherokee raids resulting in numerous deaths, the settlers continued to arrive. Though the colonial governments promised to prevent the intrusions, this was never done. Local militia were raised to protect against Cherokee raids and eventually the Cherokee were forced to cede the land in another treaty.

It is no wonder that the Cherokee, infuriated and frustrated in their dealings with the colonists, chose to side with the British in the Revolutionary War. The British government had continued to trade with the Cherokee. British Indian agents and traders had married into the tribe and were raising families there. The British began to heavily supply arms and ammunition and even offered bounties for scalps of colonists as early as 1775.

While initially successful in striking numerous devastating blows to the frontier settlements, large expeditions of Colonial forces began to destroy Cherokee towns. Reports of the expeditions said that practically every Cherokee man or woman encountered was either killed and scalped or sold into slavery. Over 50 towns were burned and all crops and livestock taken or destroyed. A peace treaty was signed in 1777 which ceded nearly all of South Carolina to the colonists and much of north and eastern Tennessee.

The end of the Revolutionary War brought an end to British aid, however, a new European power was anxious to expand its claims in North American -- the Spanish. With France and England out of the way, Spain began to encourage the Chickamaugas to continue their raids on the colonists. Not much encouragement was needed, however, because settlers were continuing to flood across treaty boundaries onto Cherokee land.

Old Tassel had assumed responsibilities of chief upon the deaths of Attacullakulla in 1780 and Oconostota in 1782. A new era was beginning for the Cherokee. The Cherokee had a new nation to contend with -- the United States. Old Tassel's first order of business was another futile attempt to stop the intrusions onto Cherokee land.

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Current scholarship on the impact of epidemics on American Indians is inadequate to explain how Indians survived. Too often Indians are given no credit for being able to combat emergent diseases, and too often epidemics are depicted as completely undermining native religious beliefs. This article, however, examines the response of Southeastern Indians to disease and shows that Native Americans were capable of successfully retarding mortality rates and curtailing the spread of contagions. Through their innovative responses to epidemiological crises, spiritual leaders reinforced tribal customs as well as their leadership position.

Kelton, Paul. "Avoiding the Smallpox Spirits: Colonial Epidemics and Southeastern Indian Survival." Ethnohistory 51.1 (2004): 45-71. Project MUSE. [Library name], [City], [State abbreviation]. 10 Jul. 2010 <http://muse.jhu.edu/>.

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Amahetai ll MoyToy of Tellico's Timeline

1687
1687
Tellico, AL, USA
1703
1703
Age 16
Cherokee, Washington, Tennessee, United States
1706
1706
Age 19
Tellico, Cherokee, Alabama, United States
1708
1708
Age 21
Cherokee Nation - East
1710
1710
Age 23
Cherokee Nation-East
1710
Age 23
1712
1712
Age 25
1714
1714
Age 27
1716
1716
Age 29
1718
1718
Age 31