Amatoya Moytoy, I, of Tellico

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Amatoya Moytoy, I, of Tellico

Also Known As: "Trader Carpenter", "Rain or Water Conjuror", "Amoadawehi", "Amahetai", "Head warrior of Tellico of the Overhills", "Trader", "Water Conjurer", ""Trader" Carpenter the 1st Moytoy Chief of Chota", "Rain Maker", "Amo-adawehi", "CHIEF OF TELLICO", "SUPREME CHIEF OF THE CHEROKE..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Shawnee, Frederick, Virginia
Death: Died in Cherokee, Cheatham, Tennessee
Place of Burial: The Great Mound, Nikwasi, Franklin, North Carolina, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Thomas Passmere "Corn Planter" Carpenter and Pride Chalakahatha
Husband of Quasty; ? of Deer Clan Moytoy; Locha Shawnee and Quatsy "Nancy" of Tellico
Father of Kanagatoga "Old Hop" Moytoy, First Beloved Man of the Cherokee; "Trader Tom" Carpenter, II; Elizabeth Williams; Oukah-Ulah Moytoy, Cherokee Emissary to England; Susan Quatsey Susan Katagusta and 17 others
Brother of Pasmere Carpenter
Half brother of Chief Amatoya of Chota C Moytoy

Occupation: Headman of Tellico, Chief of all Cherokees in 1675, Full Blood Cherokee, Chief, Cherokee Chief
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Amatoya Moytoy, I, of Tellico

Note: English name was Trader Carpenter.

Amatoya Moytoy of Chota (pronounced mah-tie) was a Cherokee town chief of the early eighteenth century in the area of present-day Tennessee. He held a prominent position among the Cherokee, and held the hereditary title Ama Matai (From the French matai and Cherokee ama--water), which meant "Water Conjurer."

Amatoya was taught by his father to “witch” for water with a willow stick. He had become so adept at water witching that the Cherokee called him "water conjurer" or Ama Matai (Ama is Cherokee for water). Ama Matai eventually became pronounced as Amatoya. It was later shortened to “Moytoy”, so he is known as Moytoy I. He ruled the town of Chota sometime between the beginning of the eighteenth century and 1730.

In 1680, Amatoya married Quatsie of Tellico. Many of their descendants went on to become prominent leaders, founding a family that effectively ruled the Cherokee for a century.

http://thejamesscrolls.blogspot.com/2009/03/indian-trail-from-amatoya-moytoy-to-my.html

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As the Headman of Tellico, Amatoya Moytoy held the title of Amedohi-The Water Traveler, often recorded as Moytoy. In his council were seven Beloved Men, elder statesmen, each representing one of the seven clans.

Moytoy presided over the council, who concerned themselves with the management of lands, the public granary, and laws. Chosen by the people, he was also a religious leader. He had veto power over the selection of the War Chief.

In 1730, Sir Alexander Cuming, unoffically an envoy of the English King, George II, made an alliance with Moytoy and gained acknowledgment of complete sovereignty of the King over the Cherokee people. On April 3, 1730, Cuming named Moytoy "Emperor of the Cherokees".

In the Cherokee town of Nequassee the Cherokee national council agreed to accept Moytoy as their "emperor" and to give their allegiance to King George II. This was accompanied by a great deal of ceremony and dancing.

Moytoy sent seven prominent members of the tribe to London to meet the King...

http://domania.us/Wizzard/1-DJW/Keys-Family/page2.html

Compiled Data

Reasonable Conclusions

MOYTOY

Born circa 1635

Children:

Nettle Carrier

Ammonscossittee

Daughter—Mother of Attakullakulla

Old Hop

Old Tassle aka Corn Tassle

Wurtuh

Eugihooti

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tnmcmin2/CherokeeData.htm

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About Chief Amatoya Moytoy

Amatoya Moytoy of Chota (pronounced mah-tie) was a Cherokee town chief of the early eighteenth century in the area of present-day Tennessee. Moytoy I is also called Amatoya Moytoy, Moytoy of Chota, and Moytoy the Elder. He held a prominent position among the Cherokee, and held the hereditary title Ama Matai (From the French matai and Cherokee ama--water), which meant "Water Conjurer". He ruled the town of Chota sometime between the beginning of the eighteenth century and 1730.

He was born around 1640, and probably died in 1730. In 1680, he married Quatsie of Tellico. Many of their descendants went on to become prominent leaders, founding a family that effectively ruled the Cherokee for a century. One of their sons became Moytoy II (Pigeon of Tellico), the Principal Chief and Emperor of the Cherokee. Another son was Kanagatucko (also Old Hop & Standing Turkey), who briefly succeeded his brother as Principal Chief and Emperor from 1760-1761. Through his eldest daughter, Nancy Moytoy, Amatoya Moytoy was the grandfather of Attacullaculla (who was called Prince of Chota by the British because of this). He was also a great-grandfather of Nancy Ward. Descendants of Moytoy I include the families of Major Ridge, Elias Boudinot, Stand Watie, and Chief Nimrod Jarrett Smith.

Nancy Ward first married Kingfisher, who was killed in Battle with the Creeks. They had two children Katie and Fivekiller. Nancy married second Bryant Ward and their child was Elizabeth Ward. Nancy Ward is buried in Benton, Polk County TN beside her son Fivekiller. See Emmett Star's book, History and Legends of the Cherokee People for a complete listing of Nancy's descendants.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moytoy_I

A-ma = Water [Am-a = Salt], Do-ya = Beaver

From the Cherokee Heritage Documentation Center (http://cherokeeregistry.firstlightonline.org)

Cherokee and the Moytoy

Thomas Pasmere Carpenter at 20 years old came to Jamestown, Virginia from England in 1627. Thomas was the son of Robert Carpenter (1578 – 1651) and Susan Pasmere Jeffery (1579 – 1651). He had a ten acre lease in Virginia, but it was later given to someone else because of his age, so he went to live with the Shawnee and made his home in a cave. Thomas was called "Cornplanter" by the Shawnee, derived from their sign language that matched as near as possible to the work of a carpenter. He married a Shawnee woman named "Pride" and bore a son around 1635 named Trader Carpenter, and a daughter Pasmere Carpenter, about 1637. Together with partners John Greenwood and Thomas Watts they began a thriving fur business.

Trader was taught to “witch” for water with a willow stick by the Shawnee. He was later known by the Cherokee as the "water conjurer" or Ama Matai (Ama is Cherokee for water). Ama Matai eventually became pronounced as Amatoya. It was also shortened to “Moytoy”, so he is known as Moytoy I.

The clan grew quickly. Trader (Amatoya / Moytoy I) married a Shawnee named Locha in 1658. Pasmere married the grandfather of Cornstalk Hokolesqua (Shawnee) in 1660. The same year the clan was driven south by the Iroquois. They moved along the Tennessee river, starting the villages of Running Water (where Thomas died in 1675), Nickajack, Lookout Mountain, Crowtown and Chota. Chota was created as a merging place of refuge for people of all tribes, history or color. It became similar to a capital for the Cherokee nation. These villages grew to about 2000 people by 1670 when the Carpenter clan moved to Great Tellico. Here Trader (Amatoya / Motoy I) married Quatsy of the Wolf Clan in 1680. They bore a daughter Nancy in 1683.

Though Amatoya (Trader) was chief of the above mentioned villages, it was his son Moytoy II (sometimes called "Trader-Tom") who was the one who actually became a Cherokee principle chief. In 1730, Trader-Tom (Moytoy II) took over as Chief, receiving what was described as the “Crown of Tannassy”. Tanasi was where the previous Chief resided and the traditional headdress was passed on to him.

Several tribes, including the Cherokee, assisted colonists in driving out their mutual enemy, the Tuscarora, in a war that lasted from 1711-1713. However, with the Tuscarora out of the way, the tribes begin to address their grievances with the colonists -- primarily the sale of Native Americans into slavery despite agreements to discontinue this practice.

The result was a war, in 1715, in which the combined tribes in the region threatened to wipe-out the South Carolina Colony.

Ultimately, the colonists were able to mass their forces and after achieving several victories the tribes began to sue for peace. Peace was made with the Cherokee who were given a large quantity of guns and ammunition in exchange for their alliance with the colony.

In 1721, a treaty was signed with South Carolina. It also established a fixed boundary between the Cherokee and the colony. Although allied with the English, the Cherokee began to favor the French who had established Fort Toulouse near present Montgomery AL. The French showed greater respect for the Indians than the British who considered them an inferior race.

To prevent a Cherokee alliance with the French, Sir Alexander Cuming visited the prominent Cherokee towns and convinced the Cherokee to select an "emperor", Chief Moytoy of Tellico, to represent the tribe in all dealings with the British. In addition, he escorted seven Cherokees to England who met with the King and swore allegiance to the crown.

A treaty was signed obligating the Cherokee to trade only with the British, return all runaway slaves, and to expel all non-English whites from their territory. In return, the Cherokee received a substantial amount of guns, ammunition, and red paint.

Although the seven Cherokee who made the trip were presented the to the king as "chiefs", only one could be considered a prominent Cherokee -- the others being young men who went for the adventure. The chiefs of the tribe declined due to their responsibilities for hunting and defense. However, one of the young men was Attacullakulla, known as "Little Carpenter", who later became a powerful and influential

According to Chief Attakullakulla's ceremonial speech to the Cherokee Nation in 1750, we traveled here from "the rising sun" before the time of the stone age man.

Amatoya's grandson (through daughter Nancy and an Algonquin named White Owl Raven who had been adopted by Trader-Tom ) was Attacullaculla, known as the "little carpenter" because of the Carpenter family name. Attacullaculla and several brothers traveled to London in 1730 with Sir Alexander Cumming to meet King George II.

The fur trading Carpenter family owned many ships. Thomas made several trips to Barbados over the years where they did banking, and even to Scotland and Ireland. On occasion he took Trader, and Trader Tom with him. This line is descended from Vicomte Guillaume de Melun le Carpentier, and that links them to the British royal family.

From James R. Hicks:

There has been a lot of confusion about the descendants of Moytoy. I think this is because some people are not aware that there were two Chief Moytoys. The first was Chief Amatoya Moytoy of Chota, b abt 1640, who married Quatsy of Tellico (of the Wolf Clan). The second is Chief Moytoy, aka the Pigeon of Tellico, b abt 1687. The second Moytoy is believed to be either the son or grandson of Amatoya Moytoy.

It is believed that Amatoya Moytoy had 3 sons and 8 daughters. These include Chief Kanagatoga "Old Hop", Nancy Moytoy, and two daughters with unknown names. Nancy Moytoy is believed to have been the mother of Chief Attakullakulla "Little Carpenter", Killaneca the Buck, Betsy and Tame Doe. Tame Doe was the mother of Tsistuna-Gis-Ke (Nancy Ward), and Longfellow of Chistatoa.

from Sharon Reed http://thejamesscrolls.blogspot.com/2009/03/indian-trail-from-amatoya-moytoy-to-my.html:

Amatoya Moytoy 1640 - 1730 Founder of a Family of Chiefs

Amatoya Moytoy of Chota (pronounced mah-tie) was a Cherokee town chief of the early eighteenth century in the area of present-day Tennessee. He held a prominent position among the Cherokee, and held the hereditary title Ama Matai (From the French matai and Cherokee ama--water), which meant "Water Conjurer."

His father was a European, Thomas Pasmere Carpenter, who was descended from the noble Anglo-Norman family of Vicomte Guillaume de Melun le Carpentier. Thus, Moytoy's European lineage can be traced to the Frankish Duke Ansegisel of Metz Meroving, Peppin II, and Charles Martel. This ancestry also makes the Cherokee Moytoys cousins to the Carpenter Earl of Tyrconnell, and thus related to the current British royal family.

The Carpenter family of Devonshire & Plymouth England were small sailing ship owners, many of which were leased out to the East India Trading Company, an affiliation dating to the formation of that company December 31, 1600. Documented ownership of fifteen different ships owned by the Carpenter family, those of which were involved with moving furs between the Gulf Ports & Glasgow, or Dublin, and trade goods for North America. These ships usually made stops both directions at Barbados where the family had banking connections set up. These ships were small and fast, often able to make the crossing from Scotland and Ireland in less than thirty days. They were shallow draft ships, capable of handling shallow water ports with ease. The first documented trip made by Thomas Pasmere Carpenter occurred April 1640, sailing from Maryland to Barbados aboard the Hopewell, and returning on the Crispian in September 1640. He made another trip in March 1659 departing Charleston South Carolina aboard the Barbados Merchant, returning on the Concord in August 1659.

Twenty year old Thomas Pasmere Carpenter came to Jamestown, Virginia from England in 1627, living in a cave near the Shawnee. Thomas was called "Cornplanter" by the Shawnee, derived from their sign language that matched as near as possible to the work of a carpenter. He married a Shawnee woman named "Pride" and bore a son around 1635 named Trader Carpenter.

Amatoya was taught by his father to “witch” for water with a willow stick. He had become so adept at water witching that the Cherokee called him "water conjurer" or Ama Matai (Ama is Cherokee for water). Ama Matai eventually became pronounced as Amatoya. It was later shortened to “Moytoy”, so he is known as Moytoy I. He ruled the town of Chota sometime between the beginning of the eighteenth century and 1730.

In 1680, Amatoya married Quatsie of Tellico. Many of their descendants went on to become prominent leaders, founding a family that effectively ruled the Cherokee for a century.

--------------------

Chief Moytoy

Son of Amatoya Moytoy

Moytoy of Tellico was a Cherokee leader from Great Tellico, recognized by British colonial authorities as the "Emperor of the Cherokee"; the Cherokee themselves used the title "First Beloved Man". His name is derived from Amo-adawehi, "rainmaker," although it is unclear whether this was his personal name or a title he held.

In 1730 Sir Alexander Cuming, a Scottish adventurer with no particular authority, arranged for Moytoy to be crowned emperor over all of the Cherokee towns. He was crowned in Nikwasi with a headdress Cuming called the "Crown of Tannassy."

Cuming arranged to take Moytoy and a group of Cherokee to England to meet King George. Moytoy declined to go, saying that his wife was ill. Attakullakulla (Little Carpenter) volunteered to go in his place. The "Crown" was laid at King George's feet along with four scalps.

On his death the British recognized his 13 year old son Amouskositte as Emperor. He had little real authority among the elder-dominated Cherokee, and by 1753 Kanagatucko (Old Hop) of Chota had emerged as the leader.

------

MOYTOY Born: before 1700. The Cherokee term for Moytoy was Amoadawehi (Amahetai) or Rain or Water Conjuror. He was from Great Hiwassee or Little Hiwassee of the Valley. He later became the head warrior of Tellico of the Overhills. In 1730, he was appointed the Emperor (British medal chief) of the Cherokee Nation by British imperialists. He died in battle in 1741. This was the same year of Caulunna's death (see Family of Oconostota). Caulunna was a significant Cherokee leader in the era of Moytoy, and was Oconostota's uncle, and Quatsis' brother It has been speculated by some that Caulunna and Moytoy were the same person- In fact, many secondary sources state that Oconostota and Attakullakulla were brothers. Attakullakulla's mother was the sister of Moytoy, and Old Hop was their brother, If Moytoy was Caulunna, he would have been both Oconostota and Attakullakulla's older uncle. He would have been responsible for the upbringing of both through manhood, This may ex-plain why some historians conclude that Oconostota and Attakullakulla were relatives. Yet, neither family ever mentioned being kin to one another. Also, Old Hop stated that Attakullakulla was his nephew. In the same statement, Old Hop mentions Oconostota without calling him his relative. There are no documented records to prove that Caulunna and Moytoy were the same person Moytoy was a Cherokee man. See: Caulunna and Old Hop.

http://www.prophecykeepers.com/chickamaugacherokee/heartoftheeagle.html

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Amatoya Moytoy of Chota (pronounced mah-tie) was a Cherokee town chief of the early eighteenth century in the area of present-day Tennessee. He held a prominent position among the Cherokee, and held the hereditary title Ama Matai (From the French matai and Cherokee ama--water), which meant "Water Conjurer."

His father was a European, Thomas Pasmere Carpenter, who was descended from the noble Anglo-Norman family of Vicomte Guillaume de Melun le Carpentier. Thus, Moytoy's European lineage can be traced to the Frankish Duke Ansegisel of Metz Meroving, Peppin II, and Charles Martel. This ancestry also makes the Cherokee Moytoys cousins to the Carpenter Earl of Tyrconnell, and thus related to the current British royal family.

The Carpenter family of Devonshire & Plymouth England were small sailing ship owners, many of which were leased out to the East India Trading Company, an affiliation dating to the formation of that company December 31, 1600. Documented ownership of fifteen different ships owned by the Carpenter family, those of which were involved with moving furs between the Gulf Ports & Glasgow, or Dublin, and trade goods for North America. These ships usually made stops both directions at Barbados where the family had banking connections set up. These ships were small and fast, often able to make the crossing from Scotland and Ireland in less than thirty days. They were shallow draft ships, capable of handling shallow water ports with ease. The first documented trip made by Thomas Pasmere Carpenter occurred April 1640, sailing from Maryland to Barbados aboard the Hopewell, and returning on the Crispian in September 1640. He made another trip in March 1659 departing Charleston South Carolina aboard the Barbados Merchant, returning on the Concord in August 1659.

Twenty year old Thomas Pasmere Carpenter came to Jamestown, Virginia from England in 1627, living in a cave near the Shawnee. Thomas was called "Cornplanter" by the Shawnee, derived from their sign language that matched as near as possible to the work of a carpenter. He married a Shawnee woman named "Pride" and bore a son around 1635 named Trader Carpenter.

Amatoya was taught by his father to “witch” for water with a willow stick. He had become so adept at water witching that the Cherokee called him "water conjurer" or Ama Matai (Ama is Cherokee for water). Ama Matai eventually became pronounced as Amatoya. It was later shortened to “Moytoy”, so he is known as Moytoy I. He ruled the town of Chota sometime between the beginning of the eighteenth century and 1730.

In 1680, Amatoya married Quatsie of Tellico. Many of their descendants went on to become prominent leaders, founding a family that effectively ruled the Cherokee for a century.

Notable members include:

Moytoy I, Chief of Chota; born around 1640 and probably died in 1730; was leading chief at the time of his death

Moytoy II, Emperor of the Cherokees and Chief of Great Tellico; son of Moytoy I; born around 1687; leading chief from 1730 to 1760

Moytoy III

Moytoy IV, Raven of Chota

Kanagatucko, Old Hop; leading chief from 1760-1761.

Attacullaculla, Prince of Chota-Tanasi; born around 1708, died around 1777; leading chief from 1761 to around 1775

Oconostota, Warrior of Chota and Beloved Man of the Cherokee; born ca. 1710 and died in 1783; was war chief of the Cherokee Nation from 1775 to 1780

Nancy Ward, Beloved Woman of the Cherokee and granddaughter of Moytoy I

Major Ridge, grandson of Oconostota and of Attacullaculla

General Stand Watie, great-grandson of Oconostota and of Attacullaculla

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Amatoya Moytoy of Chota (pronounced mah-tie) was a Cherokee town chief of the early eighteenth century in the area of present-day Tennessee. Moytoy I is also called Amatoya Moytoy, Moytoy of Chota, and Moytoy the Elder. He held a prominent position among the Cherokee, and held the hereditary title Ama Matai (From the French matai and Cherokee ama--water), which meant "Water Conjurer". He ruled the town of Chota sometime between the beginning of the eighteenth century and 1730.

He was born around 1640, and probably died in 1730. His father was a European, Thomas Pasmere Carpenter, who was descended from the noble Anglo-Norman family of Vicomte Guillaume le Carpentier de Melun. Thus, Moytoy's European lineage can be traced to the Frankish Duke Ansegisel of Metz Meroving, Peppin II, and Charles Martel. This ancestry also makes the Cherokee Moytoys cousins to the Carpenter Earl of Tyrconnell, and thus related to the current British royal family.

In 1680, he married Quatsie of Tellico. Many of their descendants went on to become prominent leaders, founding a family that effectively ruled the Cherokee for a century. One of their sons became Moytoy II (Pigeon of Tellico), the Principal Chief and Emperor of the Cherokee. Another son was Kanagatucko (also Old Hop & Standing Turkey), who briefly succeeded his brother as Principal Chief and Emperor from 1760-1761. Through his eldest daughter, Nancy Moytoy, Amatoya Moytoy was the grandfather of Attacullaculla (who was called Prince of Chota by the British because of this). He was also a great-grandfather of Nancy Ward. Descendants of Moytoy I include the families of Major Ridge, Elias Boudinot, Stand Watie, and Chief Nimrod Jarrett Smith.

Nancy Ward first married Kingfisher, who was killed in Battle with the Creeks. They had two children Katie and Fivekiller. Nancy married second Bryant Ward and their child was Elizabeth Ward. Nancy Ward is buried in Benton, Polk County TN beside her son Fivekiller. See Emmett Star's book, History and Legends of the Cherokee People for a complete listing of Nancy's descendants.

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Born in Chota, Cherokee Nation East -------------------- •ID: I61066 •Name: Amatoya Moytoy •Given Name: Amatoya •Surname: Moytoy •Suffix: Chief •Sex: M •_UID: 0BAF87FE758DC74680060E8A4B78E4DAED66 •Change Date: 30 Mar 2006 •Birth: ABT 1640 in Chota •Death: Y

Marriage 1 Quatsy b: ABT 1650 in Tellico, East Cherokee Nation •Married: Children 1. Amadohiyi Moytoy b: ABT 1687 in Tellico, East Cherokee Nation 2. Tistoe Moytoy b: ABT 1680 3. Oukah-Ulah Moytoy b: ABT 1681 4. Nancy Moytoy b: ABT 1683 5. Old Hop Moytoy b: ABT 1690 in Chota

-------------------- A-ma-do-ya Moytoy I Blood: Full Blood Cherokee Translation: A-ma = Water [Am-a = Salt], Do-ya = Beaver

Moytoy was born at Chota, City of Refuse, Cherokee Nation East, on the Little Tennessee River. Now North Carolina.

There has been a lot of confusion about the descendants of Moytoy. I think this is because some people are not aware that there were two Chief Moytoys. The first was Chief Amatoya Moytoy of Chota, b abt 1640, who married Quatsy of Tellico (of the Wolf Clan). The second is Chief Moytoy, aka the Pigeon of Tellico, b abt 1687. The second Moytoy is believed to be either the son or grandson of Amatoya Moytoy.

It is believed that Amatoya Moytoy had 3 sons and 8 daughters. These include Chief Kanagatoga "Old Hop", Nancy Moytoy, and two daughters with unknown names. Nancy Moytoy is believed to have been the mother of Chief Attakullakulla "Little Carpenter", Killaneca the Buck, Betsy and Tame Doe. Tame Doe was the mother of Tsistuna-Gis-Ke (Nancy Ward), and Longfellow of Chistatoa. -------------------- http://www.voy.com/197419/35.html

1. AMATOYOA MOYTOY-CHIEF OF TELLICO1 was born Abt. 1645 in Cherokee Nation East, Old Chota Tennessee, and died Bet. 1692 - 1749 in Cherokee Nation East. He married QUATSY- WOMAN OF THE WOLF CLAN WFT Est. 1659-1704. She was born Bet. 1650 - 1668 in Tellico, Cherokee Nation East, and died Bet. 1693 - 1755 in Cherokee Nation East.

Notes for AMATOYOA MOYTOY-CHIEF OF TELLICO: Moytoy, Supreme Chief of the Cherokee 1730 -- 1760. b. d.

More About AMATOYOA MOYTOY-CHIEF OF TELLICO: Elected: Cherokee Supreme Chief, 1730-1760

Children of AMATOYOA and QUATSY- are:

2. i. DAUGHTER # 5 MOYTOY2, b. WFT Est. 1648-1671, Cherokee Nation East; d. WFT Est. 1693-1759, Cherokee Nation East. ii. DAUGHTER # 7 MOYTOY, b. WFT Est. 1658-1681; d. WFT Est. 1703-1769. 3. iii. DAUGHTER # 6 MOYTOY, b. WFT Est. 1659-1682, Cherokee Nation East; d. WFT Est. 1705-1771, Cherokee Nation East. 4. iv. DAUGHTER # 4 MOYTOY, b. WFT Est. 1663-1705, Cherokee Nation East; d. WFT Est. 1687-1786, Cherokee Nation East. 5. v. DAUGHTER # 9 MOYTOY, b. WFT Est. 1663-1705, Cherokee Nation East; d. WFT Est. 1687-1786. 6. vi. DO-YO-STI, b. Bet. 1678 - 1701, Cherokee Nation East; d. Bet. 1723 - 1789, Cherokee Nation East. vii. OUKAH ULAH, b. Abt. 1681; d. WFT Est. 1755.

Notes for OUKAH ULAH: Full Blood Cherokee.

More About OUKAH ULAH: Attended: 1730, Delegation to King George II

7. viii. DAUGHTER #2 NANCY BON, b. Abt. 1683, Wolf Clan; d. WFT Est. 1715-1777. 8. ix. DAUGHTER # 3 MOYTOY, b. WFT Est. 1683-1706; d. WFT Est. 1728-1794. x. TISTOE, b. Abt. 1685; d. WFT Est. 1686-1775.

Notes for TISTOE: Full Blood Cherokee.

9. xi. KANA-GA-TOGA "OLD HOP", b. Abt. 1690, Chota (Echota), Cherokee Nation East; d. August 1761, Chota, on Little Tennessee River. 10. xii. MOYTOY CHIEF OF TELLICO, b. Abt. 1700, Cherokee Nation East; d. Abt. 1741.

-------------------- "water conjurer" or Ama MataiAmatoya Moytoy of Chota Amadohiyi Amadoya TRADER Carpenter I Click to view "water conjurer" or Ama MataiAmatoya Moytoy of Chota Amadohiyi Amadoya TRADER Carpenter I in the family tree View timeline for this person's branch of the family tree

"water conjurer" or Ama MataiAmatoya Moytoy of Chota Amadohiyi Amadoya was born about 1640. "water conjurer" or Ama MataiAmatoya Moytoy of Chota Amadohiyi Amadoya's father was Thomas Pasmere Passmore (father of MoyToy) Carpenter (Ancient Planter) and his mother was PRIDE, a Shawnee woman (Shawnee). His paternal grandparents were Robert CONFLICT Carpenter and Susan Pasmere Passmore Jeffery. He had a sister named Pasmere Passmore. He was the younger of the two children. He died about 1730.

"water conjurer" or Ama MataiAmatoya Moytoy of Chota Amadohiyi Amadoya TRADER Carpenter I & Quatsy Quedsi Quatsi Wolf Clan of Tellico (Ani'-Wa'ya = Wolf Clan (Quatsy)) Click to view "water conjurer" or Ama MataiAmatoya Moytoy of Chota Amadohiyi Amadoya TRADER Carpenter I & Quatsy Quedsi Quatsi Wolf Clan of Tellico (Ani'-Wa'ya = Wolf Clan (Quatsy)) in the family tree

They had three sons and three daughters, and also a child of unknown gender, named Principal Chief Oukah-Ulah Okeah-ulay or Okoukahula Okeah-ulay, Amahetai MoyToy MA'TAYI' Pigeon of Tellico, Kanagatoga Kanagatucko Old Hop, The Fire King of Chota called "Hopper" Standing Turkey), Aganunitsi Quatie, Nancy, Oo-yo-sti Otiyu, Polly, or Quali and Tistoe.

view all 29

Amatoya Moytoy, I, of Tellico's Timeline

1649
1649
Shawnee, Frederick, Virginia

Chota, Little Tennessee River, USA

1658
1658
Age 9
Shawnee, Frederick, Virginia, United Staes
1660
1660
Age 11
Running Water Village, now
1678
1678
Age 29
Cherokee, Alabama, United States
1680
1680
Age 31
Chota, TN, USA
1681
1681
Age 32
Cherokee Nation East
1682
1682
Age 33
USA
1683
1683
Age 34
Cherokee, Washington, Tennessee, United States
1683
Age 34
Old Chota, Cherokee Nation (now Tennessee)
1687
1687
Age 38
Tellico, AL, USA