Ambrose Dixon, Sr

Is your surname Dixon?

Research the Dixon family

Ambrose Dixon, Sr's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Ambrose Dixon, Sr

Birthdate:
Birthplace: London, England
Death: Died in Somerset, Maryland, United States
Place of Burial: Annamessex, Somerset, Maryland, USA Meeting House
Immediate Family:

Husband of Mary Peddington Dixon
Father of Sarah Beauchamp; Thomas Dixon; Mary Cottingham; Ambrose Dixon, Jr; Elizabeth Dukes and 3 others

Occupation: North Hampton, Virginia, USA., Caulker of boats
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Ambrose Dixon, Sr

Ambrose was born in England, most likely in London or Cambridge, Middlesex as that is where his parents lived.

When he came to the States, he settled in the Northampton area of VA where he met his wife Mary.

They moved to Somerset Co, Maryland on the Eastern Shore. He was a Soldier, a Farmer, an innkeeper, and an elected official, and he started a small Quaker community.

He was a member of the Lower House of the Maryland Assembly in 1671.

Soldier in 1675, rack unknown. Was paid along with his son Thomas for their service in the late expedition against the Nanticoke Indians in 1678.

Born in 1620 in England, died testate and buried on April 12, 1687. He wrote his will on April 7, 1686, but not probated until Aug,10 1688. Mary Dixon is listed as his widow.

As an innkeeper, it was said that due to his Quaker faith, he did not tolerate bearing arms, fighting, drinking nor taking oaths.

Re: Colonial Maryland Soldiers & Sailors 1634-1734, by Henry C. Peden.

More information:

Ambrose Dixon: The Man and the Legacy

By: James Edward Jensen B.A.

Introduction

Throughout this bio-sketch on Ambrose Dixon, primary and secondary sources have been used. In order to facilitate a clear reading of this text, modern punctuation and spelling have been used in direct quotations throughout the paper. In addition, five appendices will help the reader in grasping a clear understanding of Ambrose Dixon, his surroundings, and a clue about his personality and personal success.

Ambrose Dixon, a man of principle and action, was one of the Eastern Shore's premier individuals. He was known as an active Quaker, a dissident, and a leader among his peers. After arriving in the colony of Virginia in the early 1600s, Dixon settled in Northampton County on the lower Eastern Shore of Virginia before moving to Annamessex Hundred in Maryland during the early 1660s. As both a caring husband and loving father of eight children and a full participant in the public life of the growing settlements, Ambrose Dixon glowed like a light, guiding those who followed him into Maryland, a new land of new freedoms.

SEARCH * SUPPORT

Contents : Essays

Settlers & Sites Index

   < < Ambrose Dixon

About these essays

The Early Years

The first appearance Ambrose Dixon makes in the Northampton County court records dates to September 7th, 1640. The court record of that date states,

"... there are certain wages due unto Ambrose Dixon and some others, for there service and labor done and performed [on the pi]nnace called the Accomack, which as yet remains unsatisfied. It is thereupon thought fit and so ordered, by this court, that as well the said Ambrose Dixon, as also the rest, whose wages are remaining behind and unpaid, shall be satisfied and discharged unto them and either of them by, and out of, the cargo that lately came in the said vessel called the Accomack as aforesaid, viz."1

From this singular document two important discoveries emerge. First, and most important, Ambrose appears in court, is referred to by name, and appears to be representing himself, unlike his unpaid co-workers who remain anonymous in this case. Aside from the fact that Ambrose is shown as an aggressive individual who will not be kept from receiving his due wages, this passage also provides a valuable clue to attributing an age to the defendant, since all men2 are considered to be of legal age at twenty-one years old.3 Hence, through careful analysis Ambrose Dixon can be said to have been at least twenty-one by September 7th, 1640. He must have been born at least by 1619. Second, Ambrose is named as being among the workers laboring on a boat named the Accomack. This provides an additional clue to the work he did, indicating that Ambrose was a laborer who worked on boats. Further, among the more obvious statements one can make concerning this document is that Ambrose Dixon resided in Northampton County, Virginia, in 1640. From his first appearance in the court records, Ambrose is revealed to be a strong-minded individual, a characteristic which followed him throughout the remainder of his life.

The exact date of Ambrose Dixon's arrival in the province of Virginia is yet unknown.4 From observing colonial court documents, which list neither a wife nor child by 1645, one can assume that he was a bachelor and therefore most likely only a young man, as noted above. Throughout the early court records leading up to 1645, Ambrose appears only five times. The first appearance has been previously discussed, but of the remaining four instances, one document stands out and merits specific attention. On the eighteenth of September, 1643, Ambrose appears once more in the court records. The document reads as follows:

"Be it known unto all men by these presents that I William Scott of the city of London, mariner, have made constitute, and authorize my true and loving friend Ambrose Dixon in the county of Northampton, ship carpenter, to be my true and lawful attorney. For me and in my name, place, and stead all such goods, debts, [and] merchandise as I have belonging to myself or, lawful attorney, and to make such returns of the same as I shall give. Further order, giving, and by these presents granting unto my said attorney full power and authority to do and deal as effectively in the promises as I myself might or could effect. Ratifying and confirming whatsoever my said attorney shall do, or cause to be done, in or concerning the promises, by virtue of these presents, and the same to stand as firm in law as I myself were there personally present. In witness, whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal, this eighteenth of September 1643."5

From this entry several facts emerge. First, within this document Ambrose Dixon is titled a ship carpenter, which further supports the previously discussed record. In addition, this employment would enable Dixon to have constant interaction with ship owners, merchants, and other professional people; not to mention the independence he would experience by being self-employed. Second, he is given the legal right to represent William Scott, a fellow mariner, as his lawful attorney and to carry out the respective duties otherwise attended to by William Scott when present. This also serves as both an example of his personal connections among sea-farers and of his friendliness. Third, this record discloses the first sign of Ambrose's upward mobility among his peers, where he now takes on the additional title of a legal representative. Hence, this new title not only displays his heightened social status, but also highlights Ambrose as a trusted man - one held in high regard. Although, perhaps the most interesting discovery held within the words of this small court entry is the reference that William Scott makes concerning his native home. Here William Scott states that he is not only a mariner, but also a resident of London. In addition, William Scott refers to Ambrose Dixon as his true and loving friend. Therefore, even though there are no documents existing in the early colonial records that cite Ambrose Dixon's origins, it becomes more convincing to assert that he was once living in London where he befriended the ocean-traveling William Scott.

The only other instances where Dixon appears in these early are two court ordered debt payments6 and one instance where Ambrose Dixon supplies a court testimony.7

First Residence

Ambrose Dixon is listed among fourteen persons claimed as head rights by Richard Baily on the fifteenth of September, 1649, in Northampton County, Virginia.8 This date would most likely represent only the year by which Richard Baily would have had the time and money to pay for the fees connected with surveying and patenting land. Therefore, coupled with the 1640 reference of Ambrose Dixon's wage dispute, previously discussed, one can understand how irrelevant these dates can be. One extremely relevant piece of information is however obtained through this head right, that being the place where Richard Baily patented his land - the land near Naswattocks Creek. In addition, Henry Peddington claimed eleven persons, including Mary his wife and his son Henry junior, as head rights to acquire 550 acres of land in Northampton County on the tenth of July, 1646, at Naswattocks Creek.9 One question remains: how did Ambrose Dixon come to cross the Atlantic Ocean to Virginia? Two plausible explanations arise. One possibility incorporates the fact that Ambrose Dixon worked on boats as a ship carpenter. Therefore, one plausible explanation would entail his journey from England aboard a ship, perhaps one that his friend William Scott sailed on and, once landing in Northampton County, made a deal with Richard Baily whereby he could claim Ambrose as a head right. Another optional route would have Ambrose, once landed in Northampton County, needing to have someone pay for his passage to the colony, hence having to serve as an indentured servant for Richard Baily. This would leave Dixon living on Baily's land for at least several years. In addition, with no listing of Ambrose Dixon having to pay taxes and after finding no mention of him in any Tithable Lists10, one could assume that he resided on someone else's land during his early years on the Eastern Shore.11 Therefore, he most likely rented land until 1652.12 Which ever the case may be, it remains most convincing that Ambrose did reside at Nuswattocks Creek - since that area of Northampton County also housed both Henry senior and Mary Peddington, the latter being the future wife of Ambrose Dixon.13

Settling Down: The Beginnings of a Family

After settling in Northampton County Ambrose Dixon married Mary Peddington, the widow of Henry Peddington. Henry Peddington is cited as deceased in his inventory dating to the 4th of July, 1647.14 Mary Peddington makes her last appearance in the court records, under the name Peddington, when she is granted a commission of administration concerning the estate of her late husband that same year15. In addition, Ambrose Dixon is referred to as having married the relict and administatrix of Henry Peddington within two separate court documents referencing the settling of debts, the earliest dating to the 28th of October 1647 and one in November of 1648.16 Therefore, it would appear that Ambrose and Mary Dixon were married between the 4th of July and the 28th of October in the year 1647. Mary brought with her into the "new" family her son Henry Peddington Junior from her previous marriage.

After their marriage in 1647, Ambrose and Mary began a family of their own, which would come to include Mary, Sarah, Thomas, Ambrose junior, Elizabeth, Grace, Alice, Hanna17, and the orphaned Henry Peddington. In one obscure court document Ambrose Dixon assumes the responsibility for his wife's son from her previous marriage. The document begins, "Certificate was this day granted unto Ambrose Dixon for three hundred acres of land providing that the said Ambrose, his executors or assigns, shall be responsible unto the said Henry Peddington Jr., for one indenture when it shall be requested."18 In addition, below this entry Mary Dixon is written as one of the six individuals who signed as attesting witnesses, which marks her first appearance as a wife and no longer as the widow Peddington. While living in Northampton County, the Dixon family grew to include seven children, six of which were born from this union19. The exact dates of birth for these children are not yet known, but through examining head right claims, one can be certain that all six were born and raised in the vicinity of Nuswattocks Creek20.

A New Residence: Further Independence

Ambrose Dixon was an enterprising man who sought to expand his property holdings. On the twelfth of October, 1652, both Ambrose Dixon and Stephen Horsey Junior claimed twelve persons as head rights and acquired 600 acres of land in Northampton County - among the dozen new arrivals was Mary Dixon.21 Ambrose Dixon obviously did not transport his wife from overseas; however, since there was no system to verify the validity of each claim the standard practice was simply to register the head rights in court.

The Rebel

Ambrose Dixon was a family man, but by no means was he a simple and quiet man. Dixon is referred to as a man who's actions remain "contrary to the known laws of Virginia and the League of Trade with the Indians."22 Despite his service as both a jury member and as a testator in court, his acts of defiance caused him to be grouped among others, acquiring the label "delinquent."23 In essence it was Dixon's defiant character and Quaker beliefs that forced him to leave Virginia and seek religious asylum in Maryland.

In a court document dating to the tenth of May, 1651, an interesting case unfolded, where fifty odd individuals were to be held in the custody of the Sheriff until they "enter into bond to make their personal appearance at James City."24 Basically, these fifty people had to post bail in order to be set free prior to their appearance in the James City court. What they had done was cited in the court document as follows:

"Where as Mr. Edmund Scarburgh, Mr. Thomas Johnson, Mr. Richard Vaughn, Captain John Dalling, John Robinson, Toby Norton, Richard Baily, Ambrose Dixon, Richard Hill, Jenkins Price, and diverse other inhabitants and free men in the upper part of the parish in the County of Northampton did in a hostile manor, upon the 28th day of April past, raised a party of men to be number of fifty persons, with arms and ammunitions and upon the aforementioned day marched among the Indians with a resolute to take or kill the Queen of Pocomoke, shot at Indians, slashed and cut their bowels, took Indians prisoner, and bound one of them with a chain, which said account caused the Indians to gather themselves in great numbers to invade the County, to the great danger of our lives and estates."25

While there are no further entries concerning this case it would appear that the persons involved in the raid on the Indians were not severely punished. Perhaps due to the previous Indian raids on the Western Shore, particularly the massacre in James City, the "Governor and committee"26 would have favored the colonists.

Through the years of 1654 to 1655, Ambrose Dixon would appear in court seven times in Northampton County, each time as either a jury member27, receiving a payment owed to him28, or as receiving a commission of administration29. Following this, during the years 1655 and 1657, Ambrose Dixon appeared thrice more, without charges being laid against him. He appears once in connection with a case where he receives payments owed to him30 and once as providing testimony31, but perhaps the strangest case involved his dog32. The latter document mentions that a dog belonging to Ambrose Dixon followed Thomas Ward down a road , were Thomas was later discovered by a servant, belonging to Mr. John Tilnage, with two sheep that were bitten by the same dog and died.33 In a shocking manner, the court found that from that day forth all who traveled with a dog were responsible for its actions, making the servant rather than the owner responsible.

In the years from 1657 to 1661, Ambrose Dixon appears for a total of six times, where the familiar rebellious Dixon and fellow Quakers34 are persecuted for their outlawed religious activities. The initial persecution of Eastern Shore Quakers starts during this time period. The first assault comes under the guise of a dispute over the payment of church dues, mentioning Levin Denwood, Stephen Horsey, and Ambrose Dixon as being ordered to pay a sum of fifty-three pounds of tobacco each to be given to Mr. Thomas Teackle, according to an order of Vestry.35 The two subsequent entries in the court records referring to Ambrose Dixon only mention his name in passing36. Dixon is then named in a document which states,

"Upon the presentment of Ambrose Dixon concerning his meeting and speaking amongst people commonly called Quakers, and whereas the said Ambrose Dixon acknowledged his said meeting and speaking... it being contrary to the laws of this Country, the Court taking the premise into their serious consideration have remitted executing the rigor of the law and have left him, the said Ambrose Dixon, to the mercy of the Honorable Governor and Council and for the present discharged paying Sheriff and Clerk fees."37

It would therefore seem as if the Court had decided to be lenient towards Dixon, since he appears in the court records as having paid thee pounds of tobacco to the Sheriff38 without any subsequent mention of this case before the Governor and committee.

The last reference to Ambrose Dixon in the Northampton Court records appears towards the end of 166139 and dates to January 27th 1661/62.40 It remains significant to briefly discuss the document directly preceding Dixon's final appearance. Here there is an account which lists seventeen men, among them individuals such as Henry White, Robert Hill, and William Coulbourne, who appear in court and are subsequently ordered to make payments due to Hungers Parish for their delinquent accounts dating back to 165441. These men were not alone in their delinquency. Directly below the previously discussed entry is one which reads:

"Whereas several persons of Hungers Parish delinquent in payment of the dues belonging to the Minister of the said Parish and other parish dues belonging to the Church had action entered at them by the Church Wardens of the said Parish of Hungers and by Sheriff returned non est inventus.42 Its therefore ordered that attachment forthwith proceed at the suit of the said Church Wardens against the estate of the persons underwritten for so much tobacco as they shall justly make appear due to the Minister and other parish dues belonging to the Church with Court charges where the same shall be found in Northampton County to be responsible until further order; Ambrose Dixon, Robert Hart, Alexander Draper, William Smith, and Stephen Horsey."43

However these last five men were no longer in Virginia, since Dixon and Stephen Horsey, along with the other three men, had fled north to Maryland to escape religious persecution.

Oddly enough, Mr. Edmund Scarburgh, a man who had punished the Indians with the help of citizens like Ambrose Dixon, would ultimately turn his dreams of dominance towards other colonists, ending in a rash attempt to seize control of the lower Eastern Shore of Maryland. Once named a Colonel44, Scarburgh seemed unstoppable amidst his delusions of grandeur. One clear example of Colonel Edmund Scarburgh's power driven madness may be seen in the Court held at the house of John Dolby on the second of March, 1644.45 Within this Court document, it states:

"Whereas it appears complaints have made to the Honorable Governor Sir William Berkley, by George Hack, John Alford, and Daniel Maclary, that they were about to remove themselves and goods for Maryland, but have been hindered by some of the Officers at Accomack County...(upon demanding who had stopped them) Daniel Maclary declared that Colonel Edmund Scarburgh had stopped him..."46

In addition, there was also a continuation of this story in the Court records deriving from a letter addressed to Colonel John Stringer and Lieutenant Colonel William Kendall, the Commissioners of both the Counties of Northampton and Accomack, written by William Berkley on the twenty-fifth of January, 1664, and entered into the records on the 7th of March, 1664.47 In summary, the letter addresses the fact that the Governor of Virginia had personally received complaints that some persons had been given the advice to move into Maryland, but that they have been hindered by some Officers of Accomack County and that the Commissioners were to resolve the matter. Further, within this Court document, the Governor states that evidence is to be gathered concerning this claim, but that "Colonel Scarburgh" is to be given legal notice when the evidence is taken.48 Therefore, since the Governor names the Colonel as the suspected agent, hindering the passage of settlers to Maryland, Colonel Scarburgh's power-mad days near their end.

Ambrose Dixon did not end his rebellious days with his move to Maryland; rather, on the contrary, Dixon made an appearance in the Somerset County Court records. One record, dating to the 13th of May, 1677, states:

"Ambrose Dixon, of this County, and this following writing from the Honorable Governor was read : Whereas Complaint has this day been made to me that Ambrose Dixon of the County of Somerset, planter, did in or near about the month of February last, past at the Tobacco house of him the said Dixon upon his plantation alter the mark and dispose of five hogsheads of Tobacco which was by William Stevens, under Sheriff to Capt. Thomas Walker of the said County, marked with the broad arrow and intended to be weighed and received of him the said Dixon towards defraying of his public dues & his Lopps rents and that when the said William Stevens did accordingly go about to weigh the same and to make an exact account thereof both for his own satisfaction and for the satisfaction of him the said Dixon. That then the said Dixon, in Contempt of the power and authority to him, the said Stevens, given and in Contempt of the laws of the Honorable Lord proprietor of this province did openly and violently by force and arms and divers threatening abusive Speeches withstand and oppose the said under-sheriff."49

Therefore, in a pattern that sticks true to his form, Ambrose Dixon continued his defiance of the colonial bureaucracy. He was never going to let himself be taken advantage of, or let the governing system take what he believed truly belonged to him. Dixon continued to appear in the Somerset Court records through the years 1670 to 1688, but not always in defense of his rebellious actions.

The Maryland Migration

The Dixon family moved to Maryland in the later months of 1661, and Ambrose Dixon soon entered into the Maryland Court records his claim of rights for transporting himself, his wife Mary, his son Ambrose, Thomas, Mary, Sarah, Elizabeth, and Grace, as well as Daniel Moore, Margarett Franklin, and Cornelius Ware in 1661.50 In addition, Dixon reenters these same rights, soon after, in a document which reads: "Ambrose Dixon Enters these, his rights, that is to say: himself, Mary Dixon his wife, Thomas Dixon his son, Mary, Sarah, Elizabeth and Grace Dixon his daughters. Cornelius Ware, Daniel More, Thomas Williams, Margarett Franklin."51 From this latter document, written in 1663,52 it seems evident that the young Ambrose junior did not survive the migration to Maryland, perhaps due to illness. In place of Ambrose Dixon junior the later document simply replaces the deceased child's name with that of Thomas Williams. This name may have been substituted for congruency to maintain the same number of individuals

claimed as head rights, although Ambrose Dixon most likely transported Thomas Williams within that same year.

The land which Ambrose Dixon first surveyed and patented, in the province of Maryland, was located in Annamessex Hundred53 next to that of his friend Mr. Stephen Horsey.54 Within the Certificate of Survey55 and the Land Patent56 records, the exact location of Ambrose Dixon's five hundred and fifty acres is laid out in meets and bounds57. This migration to Maryland was not the only thing to change for Ambrose; since he not only brought his family to Maryland, but also experienced a degree of social mobility. Included within the text of his Land Patent Ambrose Dixon is, for the first time, identified as a "planter."58 This change in title signifies not only his change in occupation, but also a change in social station, where Ambrose has once again displayed his capacity for upward mobility by acquiring a plantation on the southern side of the Annamessex River. The land Ambrose patented was named "Dixon's Choice"59 and would remain occupied by his descendants for hundreds of years.60

Dixon would come to acquire another parcel of land in Annamessex, called Dixon's Lott.61 This plot of land, totaling three hundred acres, was situated on the west side of the Morumsco Creek and by the early years of the 1700s was occupied by George and William Wilson who had purchased it.62

For further information on the neighbors of the Dixon family, one needs only to peruse the Rent rolls for Annamessex Hundred63, which offer the reader a greater insight into the families surrounding his home on the South side of the Annamessex River. The families listed include the names: Horsey, Coleburn, Johnson, Waters, Beauchamp, Hall, Boston, Price, Williams, Roach, Mattux, Rhodes, Furnace, Stevens, and Armstrong. New acquaintances would assist Dixon in Maryland, in addition to the families who had existing ties to the Dixon household, specifically those who chose to flee Virginia for a more prosperous future in Maryland, such as the aforementioned Stephen Horsey.

The Legacy

Despite the sad loss both Ambrose Dixon and his family suffered with the premature deaths of two of his children, Ambrose junior and Hanna, his eagerness to succeed and persevere continued to shine through his own financial, social and public success and through his numerous offspring. During his life, Ambrose Dixon amassed a fortune that placed him among the wealthiest of the early Eastern Shore inhabitants.64

The exact date of Ambrose Dixon's death is unknown. His will was probated on the 10th of August, 1686, when his wife Mary took the oath as Executrix.65 Since Dixon's will was written on the 7th of April, 1686, while he was ill yet still able to think clearly, it becomes evident that he passed away between the 7th of April, 1686, and the 10th of August, 1688.66

Ambrose Dixon's Will is rather lengthy and within its pages unfolds not only his demeanor, but also his strongly-founded principles. First, his kindness is seen through his division of his personal property among his son, adopted son, son-in-laws, daughters, friends, and neighbors.67 Perhaps the most interesting information is where Dixon states that, "one acre of land where the meeting house now is, running up to the divisional line on the Southermost side of a branch arbited between William Planner and myself, to have and to hold the said one acre of land and meeting house, Thomas Everdon of this County and George Johnson of Accomack... and all the rest of friends whatsoever and forever."68

Therefore, with the reference of "friends" and of a meetinghouse, one can conclude that Ambrose was in fact a Quaker, but also the leader among his friends, since he supplied both a cemetery69 and a meetinghouse. Second, his strict belief in principles can be seen through two entries found within his will. Dixon includes in his will, under an entry concerning his grandchild Thomas Potter, that it is his "desire that the said Thomas Potter be sent to School to learn reading, writing, and Arithmetic."70 Ambrose valued education in principle; however he remained illiterate, along with his wife Mary, having never signed their names to a single court record.71 Yet another account of his strongly-founded principles can be seen in the closing comment found within his Will which states that should any of his children, son, or son in-laws "trouble or molest illegally [his] beloved wife [his] Executrix, Mary Dixon, in or about concerning this [his] Last Will and Testament, that then their and each of their shares... be void and of no effect and to be divided equally among the rest of [his] said sons that cause no disturbance..."72

Ambrose Dixon was also a man of distinction. In the Somerset Court records dating from 1670 to 1671, Ambrose achieves two recognitions. Firstly, he is named, among four others, to serve in a General Assembly as Deputy and Delegate for Somerset County.73 Secondly, on the second Tuesday of November, 1671, Ambrose was ordered to attend an assembly as Overseer of the High Ways.74 Throughout the following years, Ambrose appears in the records nearly a dozen times, as a plaintiff75, a witness76, having the court judge the age of his servant77, and finally as deceased.78 Throughout his years in Somerset, Ambrose was well-viewed by the society and carved a place for not only himself, but his family as well.

The next Generations

Through examining Somerset County's unique Liber IKL, which, due to Provincial order, required each County Court to enter into record the vital statistics of its inhabitants, the birth, death, baptism, and marriage information on almost all residents of Somerset County during the years 1649 through to 1720 can be quickly acquired. Therefore, valuable information on the children of Ambrose Dixon, in addition to his grandchildren, may be found.79

Beginning with Ambrose and Mary Dixon's daughters, Mary Dixon married Thomas Cottingham80. The matrimonial ceremony, which took place in Somerset, was conducted by Mr. Henry Boston the Justice of the Peace on the 8th of July, 1666. The Cottinghams had six children: Mary, born at Annamessex on the 30th of August, 1668; Thomas, born at Annamessex on the 13th of July, 1670; Sarah, born the 31st of August, 1673; Charles, born on the 1st of August, 1676; John, born on the 15th of September, 1678; and Esther, born about twelve noon on the 25th of April, 1681.

Sarah Dixon married Edmund Beauchamp81. Their marriage took place in Annamessex on the 11th of June, 1668, and was legalized by Mr. Stephen Horsey, who was the Chief Judge of the court.82 It is interesting that Sarah Dixon, the daughter of a Quaker, was baptized on the 20th of April, 1671. The Beauchamps parented five children: Thomas, born in Annamessex at two hours before day break, the 26th of December, 1670 - was also baptized when his mother Sarah was; Alice, born in Annamessex on the 13th of May, 1674, was baptized on the 17th of May, 1674; Edmund, born in Annamessex on the 24th of January, 1676, was baptized on the fifth of July, 1677; John was born in Annamessex on the 1st of April, 1679; and Dogett was born one hour before daylight breaking on the 15th of July, 1681.

Elizabeth Dixon, the third daughter of Ambrose and Mary Dixon, married Robert Dukes83. Their marriage was performed by George Johnson (an avid Quaker supporter) as Justice of the Peace, in Somerset County, during the month of April, 1677. Elizabeth Dukes died on the last day of February, 1687, and was buried at the meetinghouse in Annamessex, but not before she produced five children: Elizabeth who was born at Marumsco on the 7th of February, 1674; Mary, born at Annamessex on the 11th of July, 1677; Robert born on the 12th of November, 1679; John born on the 13th of June, 1684; and Sarah born at two in the morning on the 5th of August, 1687.

Grace Dixon married John Richards.84 Since no further information is found concerning their children in Maryland, Grace most likely moved back to Virginia with her husband, but may have traveled north as well.

Alice Dixon married Henry Potter85. Alice was the first child born to Ambrose and Mary Dixon following their move to Maryland; she was born at Annamessex on the 14th of February, 1663. Alice and Henry Potter had only three children: Thomas, born at Annamessex on the 14th of December, 1679; Sarah, born on the 15th of May, 1687; and Hannah who was born the 13th of June, 1689.

Hanna Dixon was the second and last child born to Ambrose and Mary Dixon after their migration to Maryland; she was born at Annamessex on the 9th of September, 1666, but died soon after in October, 1667.

Ambrose and Mary Dixon had only two sons. The eldest son Thomas Dixon married Christiana Potter. They were married by Captain William Colebourne, the Justice for the County, on the 12th of August, 1672. They had five offspring: Ambrose, born at Annamessex on the 13th of November, 1673 and was baptized on the 17th of May, 1674; Thomas, born at Annamessex on the 25th of April, 1677; Mary, born at about four o'clock in the fore noon, died at Annamessex on the 1st of March, 1687; Adria was born at Annamessex on the 25th of November, 1685; and William who was born at Annamessex on the 17th of August, 1686.

Ambrose Dixon junior, the youngest son of Ambrose and Mary Dixon, is not listed in the Liber IKL, although one can assume he passed away between May of 1662 and 166386.

Therefore, after a closer examination of the first and second generations, it becomes clear to see that Ambrose Dixon left his mark on the Eastern Shore. With eight children and twenty-for known grandchildren, his legacy lived on.

The Daughters of Ambrose and Mary Dixon

(Listed to the left of their respective spouse followed by their children)

Mary = Thomas Cottingham Sarah = Edmund Beauchamp Elizabeth = Robert Dukes

 1) Mary			  1) Thomas		    	  1) Elizabeth
 2) Thomas		  	  2) Alice		    	  2) Mary
 3) Sarah		  	  3) Edmund		    	  3) Robert
 4) Charles		  	  4) John			  4) John
 5) John			  5) Dogett		    	  5) Sarah
 6) Esther

Grace = john Richards Alice = Henry Potter Hanna

children unknown 1) Thomas died in infancy

 2) Sarah
 3) Hannah	

The Sons of Ambrose and Mary Dixon

(Listed to the left of their respective spouse followed by their children)

Thomas = Christiana Potter Ambrose

 1) Ambrose						died in infancy
 2) Thomas
 3) Mary
 4) Adria
 5) William

On Wealth and Family

After the death of Ambrose Dixon, his goods and chattels were evaluated and appraised as was the norm in colonial times. Appraised by both Captain William Colebourne and Mr. John West and entered into the record the 10th of August, 1688, the total value of Ambrose Dixon's wealth was tabulated to the sum of three hundred and twenty-six pounds and six shillings (£326.06.00).87 This amount marks Ambrose as one of the wealthiest men on the Eastern Shore in the late 17th Century. It remains important to note that Ambrose Dixon's land holdings are not included in the appraisal of his goods and chattels, but one can see the wealth and affluence of this prominent Quaker through examining the items listed within his Inventory. Perhaps one of the more striking aspects of Dixon's Inventory is that it provides a room-by-room listing and indicates a total value of the items found within each named room: first the Hall, which contained a bed and furniture, chairs, cloth, and chests; second the closet adjoining the Hall, which contained a coat, a chest, eight bottles, and other items like yarn; then in another closet, there were items such as nails, a pewter dish, and five small bottles; the Kitchen contained only an old chest, table, one bread tray, a sifter, and a pillion; his Milk House housed items such as a little basin, a few pewter dishes, and five harrow axes; Within his porch chamber were napkins, towels, and items such as a feather bed and furniture; which in total arrived at fifty-seven pounds and one shilling (£57.01.00).88 Ambrose Dixon' s Inventory continued with the contents of his Wainscot Chamber housing one old feather bed and furniture; through the adjacent Chamber, with three pewter dishes and other trifling things; then on through the Negroes Quarters, which listed not only iron pots, kettles, and one brass mortar and pestle, but also other items and people - namely Watt, a negro man and two negro women with three and five children respectively; then ending with a room without doors, which housed one mare, one colt, three yearlings (one two years old), six cows, some calves, draught oxen, sheep, hogs, and twenty-eight young cattle, not to mention a cart with wheels; which total arrived at three hundred and nine pounds and two shillings (£309.02.00).89 Then after subtracting due fees of seventeen pounds and one shilling (£17.01.00), Ambrose Dixon's goods and chattel come to total three hundred and twenty-six pounds and six shillings (£326.06.00).

Therefore, after residing for approximately forty-six years90 on the Eastern Shore, Ambrose Dixon succeeded in climbing the social ladder and in raising a large family, a legacy that lives on through his only surviving son Thomas Dixon and his daughters.

The Dixon Name Lives On

The only surviving son of Ambrose and Mary Dixon was Thomas Dixon. Thomas was survived by three sons91 and acquired the title of Captain Thomas Dixon Attorney.92 In addition, Thomas Dixon is cited as among those, who on the 28th of November, 1689, signed a list that referenced all of the inhabitants of Somerset County who swore an oath of fidelity as loyal subjects to the crown of England.93 The fact that Thomas signed this oath of fidelity leaves one certain that he did not follow his father's Quaker beliefs, since Quakers followed a strict code - one that would not allow them to swear an oath for any reason. The Quakers were thus differentiated them from their Protestant peers and further segregated in terms of their lack of involvement in any court proceedings requiring the swearing of an oath. Therefore, in an effort to achieve a higher social station, Thomas may have chosen to deviate from his father's Quaker beliefs in order to fully participate in the Eastern Shore's political arena. Thomas Dixon's life, however, was not without incident, as seen through an example found in the early Court records of Somerset County, where he is mentioned in one entry as the owner of a servant named Mary Berly, who unlawfully gave birth to a bastard child, yet it remains uncertain as to who the father was.94 Although, Thomas Dixon was otherwise not in the spotlight of scandalous events and in contrast seems somewhat less confrontational than his father and appeared as a member of the jury95, served as a witness96, and is listed as present when he had the court age one servant.97 The Dixon line lived on through Thomas and his children - adding numerous pages to the history on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

Footnotes:

1 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1640 - 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 2, folio 10, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland. Here it must be noted that the original document, viewed on microfilm, was misarranged with folio eleven placed prior to folio ten. As one can imagine, this example of the difficulty experienced when working with primary material is crucial in understanding the lengthy process of uncovering information form seventeenth century documents.

Click here for information about this image

2 By "men" it is assumed that the reference applies to free-men; that is to say, all males that are not slaves, since during the seventeenth century English colonial slaves were viewed as personal property and not as their owner's equal.

3 Houston, William R. M. M.D. & Mihalyka, Jean M. Colonial Residents of Virginia's Eastern Shore: Whose Ages Were Proven Before Court Officials of Accomack and Northampton Counties, Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1985, page vi, state, "A male usually was considered of legal age at 21 years and a female at 18 years..."

4 Ambrose is believed to be from London England, but any documents pertaining to this would be found only within scattered church records in England - providing they have survived.

5 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1640 - 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 2, folio 175.

6 See Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1640 - 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 2, folio 100 and page 103.

7 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1640 - 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 2, page 236, concerning a court case involving the questionable completion of a boat belonging to Randall Revell.

8 Nugent, Nell Marion. Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1623 - 1666, Vol. I, Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1979, page 184. Here it should be noted that the land in question was patented on the 2nd of March 1646 in Nuswattocks, Northampton County, Virginia.

9 Nugent, Nell Marion. Cavaliers and Pioneers, page 171.

10 Hening, William Waller. Hening's Statutes at Large, Virginia: Charlottesville, University Press of Virginia, 1969, I: 361, cites as "At a Grand Assembly: held at James City the 10th day of October 1649 [Charles I was beheaded] 1st of the commonwealth, Act II... in that all under the age of sixteen years are exempted from the lists, and that once passing under that age they are seldom or never acknowledged to exceed the same, in respect of the impossibility of, or at least unlikelihood of producing convincing proofs against them:... that all male servants imported here-after into the colony, of what age so ever they be, shall be brought into the list and shall be liable to pay country levies, excepting in this act such as are natives of this colony and such as are imported free, either by their parents or otherwise, who are exempted from levies, being under the said age of sixteen years." Therefore, it would appear that Ambrose Dixon was of both taxable age and status, but did not own a house and was therefore counted beneath someone else's name. This would support the theory of Ambrose having rented from someone, perhaps Richard Baily.

11 The first time that Ambrose Dixon pays taxes appears in the Northampton County Court Records for 1657 - 64, see Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1657 - 1664, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 46, folio 103. Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland. This will be discussed later in the subsection entitled The Rebel.

12 Nugent, Nell Marion. Cavaliers and Pioneers, page 259. See subsection entitled A New Residence: Further Independence, for the explanation of the missing date in Nugent's book, which is found on page 264.

13 Marshall, James Handley. Abstracts of the Wills and Administrations of Northampton County, Virginia: 1632 - 1802, Maine: Rockport, Picton Press, 1994, page 307 and 224-5.

14 Henry Peddington, Inventory, 1645 - 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 3, folio 83, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

15 Henry Peddington, Account, 1645 - 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 3, folio 88.

16 Marshall, James Handley. Abstracts of the Wills and Administrations of Northampton County, Virginia: 1632 - 1802, Maine: Rockport, Picton Press, 1994, page 307 and 224-5, respectively.

17 The names of the first six children are found in Maryland Land Office, Patent Records, 1661 - 1664, 5, 225, microfilm SR 7347, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland and the names of the last two daughters are found in Maryland Land Office, Vital Statistics, 1649 - 1720, IKL, microfilm CR 50 078, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

18 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1651 - 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 3, page 87.

19 These six children born in Virginia would later come to include two more after the Dixon family's move to Maryland.

20 Maryland Land Office, Patent Records, 1661 - 1664, 5, 73, microfilm SR 7347. See the subsection entitled, The Maryland Migration.

21 Nugent, Nell Marion. Cavaliers and Pioneers, page 259. It should be noted that there is no year printed in the abstract provided by Nugent. However, on page 264, under the name John Robinson junior, it states that 700 acres of land was granted him based on head rights on the 12th of October, 1652, for transporting fourteen persons; but, this excerpt also states that the land lies adjacent to the land of both Ambrose Dixon and Stephen Horsey, thereby providing a no-later-than date for Dixon's land grant.

22 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1651 - 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 3, page 40.

23 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1651 - 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 3, folio 123.

24 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1651 - 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 3, page 40.

25 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1651 - 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 3, page 40.

26 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1651 - 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 3, page 40, according to the original document, the "Governor and committee, upon the XXth [20th] day of this present month [May, 1651] at the suit of our Sovereign Lord King."

27 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1654 - 1655, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 4, folios 5 and 72. Here Ambrose appears twice as a member of the jury. It should be noted that Quakers can not take an oath and since Ambrose takes an oath as a member of the jury he was perhaps not yet a Quaker; or perhaps he only took from Quaker beliefs what suited him best, that is to say the refusal to pay church dues.

28 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1654 - 1655, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 4, folio 61, Ambrose Dixon receives payment owed to him that was ordered by the court.

29 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1654 - 1655, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 4, folios 75 and 78, and pages 77 and 151. Within these documents Ambrose Dixon first receives a commission of administration then appears three more times as the administrator, all concerning the estate of George Richards.

30 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1655 - 1657, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 5, page 18, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

31 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1655 - 1657, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 5, folio 3.

32 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1655 - 1657, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 45, page 9, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

33 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1655 - 1657, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 45, page 9.

34 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1657 - 1664, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 46, folio 82. This is the first time that Ambrose Dixon is termed as being among Quakers. Along with Ambrose, Thomas Leatherberry, Henry White, and Mr. Henry Voss are also charged with breaching the law concerning Quakers.

35 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1657 - 1664, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 46, folio 36. In this document the three individuals are not termed Quakers, yet the reason for their original refusal to pay dues was based on their religious affiliation - although Virginia did have laws that forbid its inhabitants from speaking with, meeting, or importing the people called Quakers, see folio 82.

36 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1657 - 1664, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 46, folio 47 and page 81.

37 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1657 - 1664, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 46, folio 82.

38 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1657 - 1664, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 46, folio 103, here among pages of entries are the names of everyone that had paid an individually calculated sum, including Ambrose Dixon.

39 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1657 - 1664, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 46, folio 123.

40 The old calendar system concludes its year in March, whereas the present day calendar system begins January first, therefore this date would be congruent to a present day interpretation of January 27th 1662.

41 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1657 - 1664, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 46, page 123.

42 A Latin reference denoting absence, as someone not present.

43 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1657 - 1664, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 46, folio 123.

44Colonel Edmund Scarburgh, Order, 1657 - 1664, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 46, page 123, see reference of the title of Colonel being applied to Edmund Scarburgh.

45 Colonel Edmund Scarburgh, Order, 1664 - 1674, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 4, folio 2, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

46 Colonel Edmund Scarburg, Order, 1664 - 1674, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 4, folio 2.

47 Colonel Edmund Scarburgh, Order, 1655 - 1657, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 5, page 211.

48 Colonel Edmund Scarburgh, Order, 1655 - 1657, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 5, page 211.

49 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1675 - 1677, in Atwood S. Barwick, trans., Somerset County Court: Judicial Records (1675 - 1677), Maryland State Archives, Accession No. CR 45 670-1, page 110, digital media disc, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

50 Maryland Land Office, Patent Records, 1661 - 1664, 5, 73, microfilm SR 7347. This entry dates to the 14th of May 1662, that is to say, about four months after his departure from Virginia. It should also be noted here that the Dixon family name was spelt Dickeson within this document.

51 Maryland Land Office, Patent Records, 1661 - 1664, 5, 255, microfilm SR 7347. Here it is relevant to note that the name Ambrose, his son, is missing and has been replaced with another, namely Thomas Williams.

52 This date of 1663 is applied as per the note in Gust Skordas' book, The Early Settlers of Maryland, Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1979, page 135.

53 Somerset County, Tax Records. Microfilm 84 13, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland. See Appendix D, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003.

54 Maryland Land Office, Patent Records, 1661 - 1664, 5, 608 and 609, microfilm SR 7347, a transcription of Liber AA, folio 270 and 271; where both the Certificate of Survey and the Land Patent are found, respectively. Here it should be noted that in Maryland records there could be multiple folio numbers on a single page when documents are transcribed from one liber to another.

55 See appendix A, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003.

56 See appendix A, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003.

57 The meets and bounds system used by early surveyors was later replaced by the more precise use of degrees of both longitude and latitude, further divided into minutes.

58 See appendix A, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003, which states, "know yee that we for and in consideration that Ambrose Dickson of this province planter hath due unto him Five hundred and fifty acres of land..."

59 See appendix A, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003.

60 See appendix E, where a map within the 1877 Atlases and Other Early Maps of the Eastern Shore of Maryland: Bicentennial Edition, page 26, shows the homes of Dixon families that still lived near the Annamessex River by 1877, further representative of the legacy left behind by Ambrose Dixon and his only surviving son Thomas.

61 See appendix D, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003.

62 See appendix D, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003, under Dixons Lott.

63 See appendix D, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003.

64 Ambrose Dixon, Probate Inventory, 1678 - 1725, EB 14, 250, 251, and 252. Microfilm CR 64 654, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland. See appendix C, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003. His inventory totals three hundred and twenty-six pounds and three shillings (£326.06.00).

65 Ambrose Dixon, Will, Somerset County Will Book, 1664 - 1710, EB 5, 164 and 165, microfilm CR 43 742.

66 Ambrose Dixon, Will, Somerset County Will Book, 1664 - 1710, EB 5, 164 and 165. Microfilm CR 43 742, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland. See appendix B, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003. Here it is important to note that only an incomplete original copy of Ambrose Dixon's will is found in Liber EB No 5, folios 164 and 165; therefore to acquire the missing portion one can refer to Ambrose Dixon, Maryland Prerogative Court Wills, 1688 - 1700, 6, transcribed from Liber H, pages 22 and 23. Microfilm SR 4402, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

67 For a more detailed distribution of his personal property, see appendix B, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003, in its entirety.

68 See appendix B, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003.

69 See the following subsection entitled The Next Generations where Elizabeth Dukes is cited as having deceased on the last day of February, 1687, and then buried at the meetinghouse in Annamessex.

70 See appendix B, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003, under the name Thomas Potter.

71 Through viewing documents such as the Will of Ambrose Dixon, where he places his mark and not his signature, and the document where Mary Peddington (Dixon) receives a commission of Administration, where Mary places her mark and not her signature, it becomes apparent that both were illiterate. Their marks are present in Ambrose Dixon, Will, Somerset County Will Book, 1664 - 1710, EB 5, 164 and 165, microfilm CR 43 742 and Henry Peddington, Account, 1645 - 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 3, folio 88, respectively. For further reference, both Ambrose and his wife place their respective marks on a deed as well, found in Somerset County Land Records, 1668 - 1706, B 1/2, 4, Clerk of the Court, Somerset County Courthouse, Princess Anne, Maryland, dating to 1669. Microfilm CR 34 361, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

72 See appendix B, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003.

73 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1670 - 1671, in Atwood S. Barwick, trans., Somerset County Court: Judicial Records (1670 - 1671), Maryland State Archives, Accession No. CR 44 861, page 56, digital media disc, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

74 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1670 - 1671, in Atwood S. Barwick, trans., Somerset County Court: Judicial Records (1670 - 1671), Maryland State Archives, Accession No. CR 44 861, page 209.

75 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1667 - 1675, in Atwood S. Barwick, trans., Somerset County Court: Judicial Records (1667 - 1675) Part Two, Maryland State Archives, Accession No. CR 45 669, page 43 and 52 - 54, digital media disc, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

76 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1667 - 1675, in Atwood S. Barwick, trans., Somerset County Court: Judicial Records (1667 - 1675) Part Two, Maryland State Archives, Accession No. CR 45 669, page 46.

77 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1667 - 1675, in Atwood S. Barwick, trans., Somerset County Court: Judicial Records (1667 - 1675) Part Three, Maryland State Archives, Accession No. CR 45 669, page 219, digital media disc, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

78 Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1687 - 1689, in Atwood S. Barwick, trans., Somerset County Court: Judicial Records (1687 - 1689), Maryland State Archives, Accession No. CR 45 671-1, page 83, digital media disc, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland. Here the name Ambrose Dixon is referred to as late of this County, followed by the name Mary, the widow Dixon.

79 To avoid cluttering the following statistics with footnotes all dates provided in this subsection entitled The Next Generations have been compiled from the Maryland Land Office, Vital Statistics, 1649 - 1720, IKL, microfilm CR 50 078, with all exceptions footnoted.

80 In support of this marriage see appendix B, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003, to facilitate searches the names of individuals have been typed in a bold print.

81 In support of this marriage see appendix B, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003.

82 Pleasants, J. Hall, ed., Archives of Maryland: Proceedings of the County Courts of Kent (1648 - 1676), Talbot (1662 - 1674), Somerset (1665 - 1668), Maryland: Baltimore, Maryland Historical Society, 1937, LIV: 714, transcribed from Liber B, page 117-8. Here Stephen Horsey is listed as the Chief Judge of the court within a document dating to the 13th of June, 1668.

83 In support of this marriage see appendix B, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003.

84 In support of this marriage see appendix B, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003.

85 In support of this marriage see appendix B, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003.

86 See subsection entitled Maryland Migration for the estimated date.

87 Ambrose Dixon, Probate Inventory, 1678 - 1725, EB 14, 250, 251, and 252, microfilm CR 64 654, also found in Ambrose Dixon, Maryland Prerogative Court Inventories, 1679 - 1694, 12, 98, microfilm Roll 65-4, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland. See appendix C, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003.

88 Ambrose Dixon, Probate Inventory, 1678 - 1725, EB 14, 250, 251, and 252, microfilm CR 64 654. See appendix C, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003.

89 Ambrose Dixon, Probate Inventory, 1678 - 1725, EB 14, 250, 251, and 252, microfilm CR 64 654.

90 This period of time is based on both the earliest record of Ambrose Dixon, appearing in Ambrose Dixon, Order, 1640 - 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 2, folio 10, and the last court document, his Inventory, appearing in Ambrose Dixon, Probate Inventory, 1678 - 1725, EB 14, 250, 251, and 252, microfilm CR 64 654.

91 Maryland Land Office, Vital Statistics, 1649 - 1720, IKL, microfilm CR 50 078. See also the subsection entitled The Next Generations.

92 See Appendix D, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2003, under the entries for both Londons Advisement and Johnsons First Choice.

93 Browne, William H., ed., Archives of Maryland: Proceedings and Acts of the General Assembly of Maryland, 1687 - 1693, Maryland: Baltimore, Maryland Historical Society, 1890, VIII: 139.

94 Thomas Dixon, Order, 1687 - 1689, in Atwood S. Barwick, trans., Somerset County Court: Judicial Records (1687 - 1689), Maryland State Archives, Accession No. CR 45 671-1, page 107.

95 Thomas Dixon, Order, 1687 - 1689, in Atwood S. Barwick, trans., Somerset County Court: Judicial Records (1687 - 1689), Maryland State Archives, Accession No. CR 45 671-1, page 28. Here Thomas Dixon, on the 8th of March, 1687, takes an oath as he sits upon a jury.

96 Thomas Dixon, Order, 1675 - 1677, in Atwood S. Barwick, trans., Somerset County Court: Judicial Records (1675 - 1677), Maryland State Archives, Accession No. CR 45 670-1, page 97.

97 Thomas Dixon, Order, 1667 - 1675, in Atwood S. Barwick, trans., Somerset County Court: Judicial Records (1667 - 1675) Part Three, Maryland State Archives, Accession No. CR 45 669, page 79.

Works Used

~-Books-~

Ames, Susie M. (Ed.). County Court Records of Accomack - Northampton, Virginia 1640 - 1645. Virginia: Charlottesville, The University of Virginia Press, 1940.

Browne, William H. (Ed). Archives of Maryland, Vol. VIII, 1687-1693. Maryland: Baltimore, Maryland Historical Society, 1890.

Evan, Barbara. A to Zax: A Comprehensive Dictionary for Genealogists & Historians. Virginia: Alexandria, Hearthside Press, 1995.

Graham, John L, AIA (Ed). The 1877 Atlases and Other Early Maps of the Eastern Shore of Maryland: Bicentennial Edition. Maryland: Salisbury, Wicomico Bicentennial Commission. 1976.

Greer, George Cabell. Early Immigrants: 1623 - 1666. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1978.

Hening, William Waller. Hening's Statutes at Large. Virginia: Charlottesville, University Press of Virginia, Vol. I, 1969.

Houston, William R. M. M.D. & Mihalyka, Jean M. Colonial Residents of Virginia's Eastern Shore: Whose Ages Were Proven Before Court Officials of Accomack and Northampton Counties. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1985.

Mackey, Howard Dr., & Grooves, Alma Hinkley CG. (Eds). Northampton County Virginia Record Book: Orders, Deeds, Wills & r, 1645 - 1651, Vol. 3. Maine: Rockport, Picton Press, 2000.

Mackey, Howard Dr., & Grooves, Alma Hinkley CG. (Eds). Northampton County Virginia Record Book: Deeds, Wills & r, 1655 - 1657. Maine: Rockport, Picton Press, 2000.

Marshall, James Handley (Ed). Abstracts of the Wills and Administrations of Northampton County, Virginia: 1632 - 1802. Maine: Rockport, Picton Press, 1994.

Meyer, Virginia M. (1974 - 81) & Dorman, John Frederick F.A.S.G. (1981 - 87) (Revised and Edited). Adventures in Purse and Person Virginia 1607 -1624/25 3rd Edition. Virginia: Richmond, The Dietz Press Inc., 1987.

Nugent, Nell Marion. Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1623 - 1666 Vol. I. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1979.

Perry, James R. The Formation of a Society on Virginia's Eastern Shore 1615 - 1655, North Carolina: Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press, 1990.

Pleasants, J. Hall, Editor. Archives of Maryland LIV: Proceedings of the County Courts of Kent (1648-1676), Talbot (1662-1674), Somerset (1665-1668) Counties Court Series 7. Maryland: Baltimore, Maryland Historical Society, 1937.

Skordas, Gust. The Early Settlers of Maryland, Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1979.

Walczyk, Frank V. (Ed.). Northampton County Virginia Record Book: Orders, Deeds & Wills, 1651 - 1654, Vol. 4. New York: Coram, Peter's Row, 1998.

~-Microfilm-~

Northampton County: Court Records 1640 - 1645 Orders, Deeds, Wills, Vol. 2. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCR 2) Reel# 2, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Northampton County: Court Records 1645 - 1651 Orders, Deeds, Wills, etc., Vol. 3. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCR 3) Reel# 3, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Northampton County: Court Records 1651 - 1654 Orders, Deeds, Wills, etc., Vol. 4. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCR 3) Reel# 3, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Northampton County: Court Records 1654 - 1655 Orders, Deeds, Wills, etc., Vol. 5. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCR 4) Reel# 4, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Northampton County: Court Records 1655 - 1657 Orders, Deeds, Wills, etc., Vol. 6. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCO 1) Reel# 45, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Northampton County: Court Records 1655 - 1657 Orders, Deeds, Wills, etc., Vol. 7. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCR 5) Reel# 5, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Northampton County: Court Records 1657 - 1664 Orders, Deeds, Wills, etc., Vol. 8. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCO 2) Reel# 46, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Northampton County: Court Records 1664 - 1674 Orders, Deeds, Wills, etc., Vol. 9. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCR 4) Reel# 4, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Somerset County, Land Records. Liber B 1/2. Clerk of the Court, Somerset County Courthouse, Princess Anne, Maryland. Microfilm (SL 5) CR 34, 361, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Somerset County, Will Book. Liber EB 5. Clerk of the Court, Somerset County Courthouse, Princess Anne, Maryland. Microfilm (SPW 2) CR 43, 742, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Somerset County, Wills, Accounts & Inventories Book. Liber EB 14. Clerk of the Court, Somerset County Courthouse, Princess Anne, Maryland. Microfilm (SPI 1) CR 64, 654, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Maryland Land Office, Land Patent. Liber 5, transcription of Liber X and AA. Microfilm (ML 38) SR 7347, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Wills of the Prerogative Court of Maryland. Liber 6. Microfilm (MPW 7) MSA SM 16. SR 4402, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Somerset County, Land Records: Births, Deaths & marriages. Liber IKL, 1649 - 1720. Clerk of the Court, Somerset County Courthouse, Princess Anne, Maryland. Microfilm (SL 3) CR 50, 078, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Somerset County, Tax Records: The Calvert Papers. Somerset Tax Records: Rent Rolls: Somerset & Worcester Counties 1663 - 1723. Microfilm (ST 1) 84.13, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Maryland Prerogative Court Inventories & Accounts Book. Liber 12. Microfilm (MPI&A 6) Roll 65-4, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

(The reference number located between parentheses is only applicable to the microfilm shelves of The Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture.)

~-Digital Sources-~

Barwick, Atwood S., trans. Somerset County Court: Judicial Records (1667-1675) Part Two, Maryland State Archives, Accession No. CR45, 669.

Barwick, Atwood S., trans. Somerset County Court: Judicial Records (1667-1675) Part Three, Maryland State Archives, Accession No. CR45, 669.

Barwick, Atwood S., trans. Somerset County Court: Judicial Records (1670-1671), Maryland State Archives, Accession No. CR44, 861.

Barwick, Atwood S., trans. Somerset County Court: Judicial Records (1675-1677), Maryland State Archives, Accession No. CR45, 670-1.

Barwick, Atwood S., trans. Somerset County Court: Judicial Records (1687-1689), Maryland State Archives, Accession No. CR45, 671-1.

--------------------

Below is copied and pasted from:

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&amp;db=ginorio&amp;id=I1692

Dixon Information provided by Kate and Bill Matthews.

Ambrose Dixon, the Immigrant and a Quaker is well-known in Lower Eastern Shore history as being one of the "Guiding Lights" of early Somerset County. He married Mary Wilison, daughter of George Wilison, widow of Henry Peddenden. She had a son Henry, by her first marriage. Ambrose and Mary had issue: Mary, born circa 1650, married July 8, 1666, Thomas Cottingham, died 1681/6; Sarah, born circa 1653, married June 11, 1668 by Mr. Stephen Horsey, to Edmund Beauchamp, their son Thomas married Mary Turpin (see BEAUCHAMP); Thomas; Ambrose, 1655-1662/3; Elizabeth, born circa 1657, married Robert Dukes, their issue: Elizabeth, Mary, Robert, John, and Sarah. Elizabeth Dukes died February 28, 1687, and was buried with her father, Ambrose Dixon, in God s Acre at the Annemessex Meeting House; Grace, born circa 1659; Alice, born February 14, 1663/4, married Henry Potter, son Thomas, 1679-1727 and daughter Hannah, born June 13, 1689; and Hannah, born September 9, 1666, died October 1667 at Annemessex, Somerset County, MID.

Upon their arrival in the Colonies about 1649, the Dixons lived in Northampton County, Virginia, then moved to Somerset County, Maryland, about 1661 (three years before its establishment) because of religious conflicts, leading to civil disagreements with the Government of Virginia. Lord Baltimore, Proprietor of Maryland, had persistently urged his provincial authorities to protect his territorial rights of the Eastern Shore. Lord Baltimores Maryland boundary was being encroached in the north (now Delaware) by Lord de la Warre; the southern borders were being manipulated by the machinations of the power-mad Colonel Edmund Scarburgh. Lord Baltimore anxiously offered land to those disaffected by the happenings in Virginia. Ambrose Dixon and his fellow Quakers and Dissenters, predominately Stephen Horsey (see STEPHEN HORSEY), Thomas Price, Henry Boston, George Johnson, William Coulbourne, Robert Hart, and Alexander Draper, accepted Lord Baltimore's offer of land in religion-tolerant Maryland. They settled on the Annemessex River. Ambrose patented land known as "Dixon s Choice", his homeplace, now known as the Sol Tull farm west of Marion Station, Somerset County, Maryland. It is thought that the back of the farmhouse now on that farm was the original dwelling built by Ambrose and Mary. Looking at it in reality and from an aerial photograph, it looks as though this could be true. Ambrose also held a piece of property on the west side of Marumsco Creek called "Dixon s Lott". In his following years, he accumulated other properties, one of which was "Dame s Quarter", a marsh suitable for grazing cattle. Ambrose was a caulker by trade, but he amassed a comfortable property of fertile lands and several Negroes.

Even after Ambrose s entry into Maryland, he and his fellow Quakers and Dissenters were persecuted. Colonel Edmund Scarburgh, ardent Virginian and noted Indian-baiter, in his contrivance to force the settlers of the Annemessex and Manokin Rivers into Virginia s jurisdiction, continued to harass the settlers. He would bring his troops into Annemessex, try to arrest Ambrose and his friends, and upon their "disappearance" would paint "ye broad arrow of confiscation" (a broad yellow arrow) on the doors of their homes. Once he called Ambrose, "a prater of great nonsense, much lead by ye spirit of ignorance"; in 1663, he referred to Ambrose as, "A receiver of many Quakers, his house a place of their resort.".

In November 1661, Ambrose appears as one of the first "surveyors for ye highways" for the State of Maryland. In November 1666, Ambrose Dixon, Ambrose London, Paul Marsh, and Roger Woolford were elected delegates to represent Somerset County in the Lower House of the General Assembly of the province to be convened March-April 1671, however, when the assembly met, only Marsh and Woolford appeared as Somerset delegates. No explanation was given for why Dixon and London did not attend. (Could it be because they were both Quakers and could not ‘swear an oath ?)

Undoubtedly, through the years, Ambrose and Mary s home served as a meeting place for Quakers in the area, confirming Scarburgh s reference to it as a "place of their resort". Ambrose gave the land for the Quaker Meeting House, God s Acre, from his property sometime before 1687, for it is recorded that "Ambrose Dixon, Senr died and was buried at the meeting house in Annemessex the 12th day of Aprill Annoq Dotm one Thousand Six Hundred eighty & seaven".

Ambrose Dixon I, born 1628 in London, Middlesex, England; died April 12, 1687 in Annamessex, Somerset Co., MD, Colonies of GB in America; married Mary Peddington Abt. 1649 in Westmoreland, VA, Colonies of GB in America.

Ambrose Dixon came to the Eastern Shore of VA about 1649. He married Mary, widow of Henry Pennington. He was a Quaker and after Charles II came to the throne of England, Ambrose and his family, including his wife's son, Henry Pennington, moved to Maryland. He took land there in about 1661-62.

See "Old Somerset on the Eastern Shore of Maryland" by Torrence.

The first mention of Ambrose DIXON is in Accomack/Northampton County

Court Records dated 7 Sept. 1640. Here are the exact words and spellings:

Forasmuch as it hath appeared unto this Court this present day that there is certen wages due unto Ambrose DIXON and unto some others For theire service and Labour done and performed [on board the] Pinnace called the Accomack which as yet remayneth unsatisfied It is thereupon thought Fitt and

soe ordered By this Courte that as well the said Ambrose DIXON as allsoe the rest whose wages are remayninge behind and unpayed shall Bee satisfied and discharged unto them and eyther of them By and out of the Cargoe that lately came in the said Vessell called the Accomack as afforesaid fiz. For soe

much as they and eyther of them shall justly make appeare to bee Due

Ambrose DIXON married the widow Mary Peddington, their first 6 children are born in Northampton Co. starting with Mary DIXON c1650, Thomas DIXON c1651, Sarah DIXON c1653, Ambrose DIXON c1655 (died young), Elizabeth DIXON c1657, and Grace DIXON c1659.

In 1651 he joined Edmund Scarburgh and several others in riding against the Indians in defiance of the law. A Court Order of 10 May 1651 says: Whereas Mr Edmund Scarburgh, Mr Thomas Johnson, Mr Richard Vaughan, Captain John Dollinge, John Robinson, Toby Norton, Richard Baily, Ambrose

DIXON, Richard Hill, Jenkin Price And divers others Inhabitants and free men in the Upper parte of the parish in the Countie of Northampton Did in a Hostile manner (contrary to the knowne Lawes of Virginia And the League made with the Indians) upon the 28th day of Aprill last past Rayse a partie of men to the

number of fiftie persons with Armes and ammunicon And upon the aforesaid daie marched amonge the Indians with a Resolucon to take or kill the Queene of Pocamoke, shott att Indians, slashed and cut [can't read], Took Indyans prisoner, And bound one of them with a Chayne, which said Accons caused

the Indyans To Invade the Countie, to the great danger of our Lives and Estate, It is therefore ordered That the Sherriff shall forthwith Arrest the Bodies of all the abovesaid parties... (goes on to say they are to remain in custody until they post bonds to appear in person at James Citty to answer the

Governor and Council on 21 May) The same year, 1651, Ambrose DIXON is among those that signed the Oath of Fidelity to the Commonwealth (The king had been beheaded and the monarchy dissolved, Cromwell was in power)

29 Oct. 1655 - Whereas it appeareth to ye Courte that a dogg and bitch of Ambrose DIXON followed one Tho: Ward and was by a servant of Mr Jno Tilnage found aworrying of two sheep of ye said Tilnage which dyed of the biting of ye said dogge and bitch It is ordered that ye said Tho: Ward shall

forthwith make payment unto ye said Mr Jno Tilnage 360 lbs tob. and caske with court charge It is further ordered if any man or woman for further time shall walk with a dogge or bitch that shall kill any sheep that it be thereby charged that the party soe offending shall pay the full value of the sheep worried or killed This is from Old Somerset on the Eastern Shore of Maryland by Torrence:page 299 -

"As early as November, 1658, Ambrose Dixon (and 3 others) was before Northampton Court at the suit of the Reverend Thomas Teackle, rector of Hungar's Parish, for non-payment of minister's and church dues, having been formerly ordered by the vestry to pay them. The court sustained the vestry's order."

page 303-304 - " In November, 1660, Ambrose DIXON (and 4 others) were brought before the court of Northampton County for breach of the law concerning Quakers. Ambrose DIXON was arraigned for having met with and spoken amongst the people called Quakers, while fearlessly (and perhaps stubbornly) he "acknowledged the same."... "In January 1661/2, when the delinquents in payment of minister's and other parish dues, in Hungar's Parish, were ordered by the Northampton Court to make payment of amounts that appeared to be due by them from the year 1654, Ambrose DIXON was among those who were returned by the authorities as non est inventus (he had left Virginia and could not be found)."DIXON moved into Maryland, settling in Annamessex in 1661. Resentment was very strong in Virginia over the

encouragement the governor of Maryland was giving to people to come and settle in Somerset County. Col. Edmund Scarburgh swore that this part of the Eastern Shore really belonged to Virginia. In 1663 he took some of the commissioners and 40 horsemen and invaded the newly formed county with an

eye to forcing the inhabitants to swear loyalty to Virginia, not Maryland. The party reached Annamessex on Sunday night, the 11th of October. The next day they went to the house of one of the commissioners, Stephen Horsey, and demanded he swear his obedience to Virginia. Horsey said he could not

because he could be hanged by the governor of MD. The broad arrow of confiscation was placed on his door and he was arrested. The party next proceeded to the house of Ambrose DIXON. Two other Quakers who had fled Virginia were there with him. Scarburgh again demanded submission, but DIXON refused. In Scarburgh's own words DIXON was, "a caulker by profession that lived longe in ye lower parts, was often in question for his quaking profession, removed to Anamessicks, there to Act what hee could not

be here permitted, Is a prater of nonsense, and much led by ye spirit of Ignorance, for which he is followed, A receiver of many quakers, his house ye place of their Resort, and a Conveyor of our ingaged persons out of the County, averse to Government, for which hee stands arrested, and ye broad

arrow on his doore, but bids defiance until severer course reforme him."

Scarburgh then proceeded to Manokin where all but 2 of the inhabitants subscribed alligance to Virginia. In all of the about 50 freemen living in the area only 8 refused to give in to the colonel. He then left feeling that he had secured the area for Virginia. On the 10th of November 1663 the Court at Accomack

sent on officer to rally the subscribers to come together and defend themselves against the Quakers. By June, 1664 Governor Calvert complained to Governor Berkeley of Virginia of Scarburgh's invasion, beating and imprisoning the people of Annamessex and Manokin. Berkeley replied that Scarburgh had no authoriy and had acted alone. The boundary was finally settled at a later date, and even later Scarburgh was finally reprimanded for his actions. The high regard in which DIXON was held was shone when he was named in 1666 one of the first surveyors of the highways for the county. The same year he was elected to represent the county as a delegate in Annapolis. He did not go, however, perhaps because as a Quaker he could not be sworn in. Quakers refused to "swear". At a later date they were allowed to "affirm" where swearing in would be required of non-Quakers.

Since coming into Annamessex, Ambrose and Mary DIXON had had 2 more children - Alice born 14 Feb. 1663/64 and Hannah (who died young) born 9 Sept. 1666. From then until his death in 1687, DIXON appears 14 more times in the court record for various reasons. That he remained defiant and

independent-minded into his old age can be seen in a court case in was involved in in 1677.

Ambrose remained an independent thinker all of his long life. When he was in his late 50's he again got into trouble with the authorities. It seems that he disposed of tobacco that the Aunder-sheriff had confiscated on his property to pay his overdue rents and taxes. The "broad arrow" that is mentioned here is the same mark that was put on the door of his house by Col. Scarburgh in 1663. Since almost no one could read in those days, a sign that everyone understood was used. The "Broad arrow" was the sign that property had been confiscated by the authorities and no longer belonged to the previous owner.

In 1677 (from Judicial Records 1675-1677) it says:

Whereas complaint hath this day beene made to me against Ambrose DIXON of the county of Somerset planter did in or neare about in month of ffebruary last past at ye tobacco house of ye said DIXON upon his plantation after ye marke and dispose of 5 hogsheads of tobacco which was by William Stevens

undersheriff to Captain Thomas Waller of Somerset County marked with an broad arrow and intended to be weighed and received of him ye said DIXON towards defraying of his publick dues and his lordships rents and that when ye said William Stevens did accordingly goe about to weigh ye same and to take

an exact accompt thereof both for his owne satisfaction and for ye satisfaction of him ye said DIXON that then ye said DIXON (in contempt of ye power and authority of ye said Stevens) did openly and violently by force of armes and divers threatening and abusive speeches withstand and oppose ye said

undersheriff and would not suffer him to execute his office but disposed of ye said tobacco aforesaid If therefore ye said DIXON shall not attend ye next county court to bee held in ye said county repaire to it ye said court and therefore before ye commissioners of ye same openly and in public view of ye

whole court prostrate himselfe upon his knees and acknowledge his great error to his said Lord Proprietor and crave pardon and forgiveness for ye same promising ammendment for ye same and ye future then and you are hereby strictly willed and required to have ye body of him ye said DIXON at ye next provincial court to bee held att St Maries on ye 19th day of June next to suffer such punishment for ye same as his said Lordships Justices shall think fitt to inflict upon him Ambrose DIXON openly and in publique view of ye whole court did acknowledge his great error and humbly craves pardon and

forgiveness for ye same DIXON had clearly gotten in over his head this time and the justices were quick to make an example of him. Whether they then sent him to St. Marys is never said, but probably they made do with his apology.

Ambrose DIXON wrote had his will written the 7th of April 1686:

Dau Elizabeth wife of Robert Dukes one negro woman Called Betty Ginney and her increase also 1 horse grandchild Thomas Potter sonn of Henry Potter 1 cow and calf 1 mare and her female increase 1 young female negro Thomas Potter to be put to scoole there to learne reading and writting and arethmatik son in law Edmund Beauchamp 1 cow and calf 1 young black mare called Ginney ye Younger Elizabeth Willson ye wife of George Willson mare of ye bay coller with a whitestar in her forehead called by ye name of Jinneywifes son Henry Penington one negro girl about 10 years old James Brown 1000 lbs of good Merchantible tobacco in caskrest to wife Mary Dixon except part Thomas Dixon lives onson Thomas Dixon, son in law Thomas Cottingham, son in law Edmund Beauchamp, son in law Robert Dukes, son in law John Richards, son in law Henry Potter after decease of Wife to be equally dividedif Mary intermarry she is to injoy and posess 1/3 only promised to make over to friends 1 acre of land for ye consideration of 12 pence in money received where meeting house now is Mary Dixon executrix Signed with his marke A codicil - if any of my said children and sons in law shall in any way trouble or molest illegaly my beloved wife, my executrix Mary Dixon in or about or concerning this my last will and testament their shares to be void Ambrose Dixon AD his marke

1688 (on August 14) the appraisers of his estate took their inventory room by room. Here it is, let's take the tour:

In Ye Hall

Ambrose Dixon's bed and furniture (that means blankets, sheets, pillows, etc)

13 yards of single serge (fabric)

8 3/4 of course kearsey (more fabric)

1 small carpett, 3 cupboard clothes

12 old turkey worked chairs (meand tooled leather)

6 old leather chairs

5 small pieces of old pewter

1 pair of iron doggs (you lay logs on them in fireplace)

1 warming pann (to warm the bed before you get in)

1 small round table and cupboard

3 old chests In ye Closset adjoining to ye Hall

1 match coat (heavy wool coat)

1 chest and 8 botles

1 ild baskett and a littel yarneIn the other little closset

15 nailes (these were very valuable)

1 little sauce pann and skilettIn ye Kitchen

1 old chest and table 1 bread tray and sifter and pillian

(as you can see this was a winter kitchen - in August and during hot weather all

cooking was done in the negroes quarter as you can tell from the inventory

there.)

In ye Milke House

3 peuter dishes one little bason

1 frying pan

5 narrow axes and 1 grubbing how

1 box and 8 botles

(hard to tell if this was a shed attached to the house as they often were or a

separate building. My money's on shed because it's listed in the middle of the

listings of rooms in the house. This concludes the downstairs, then then went

upstairs)

In the Porch Chamber

1 feather bed and furniture

1 feather bed and furniture

2 diaper table clothes 14 napkins 2 towells (diaper was a type of cloth)

1 small parcell of silke

1 chest and box

3 chaimber potts

(the word chamber always meant an upstairs room, in this case we know he

had a porch because this chamber was over it...also you'll notice Dixon's own

bed was downstairs, again because it was summer and it would be cooler

downstairs)

In ye Wainscott chaimber

1 old feather bed and furniture

In ye Chaimber adjacent

1 old small feather bed

6 diaper napkins

3 pewter dishes 10 plates

1 head of a still and 6 spoons

1 iron box with heaters with several trifling things

(the "iron box" was a box iron with heaters used to iron material - wondering

why only spoons? forks were not in use in America at this date. There were a

few in England but they hadn't made it to the colonies yet)

In the nigroes quarter

8 iron potts

3 old kettles

2 racks

2 spitts

5 paire pott hooks

1 brass mortar and pestle

1 old tankard

4 wedges

1 driping and 1 frying pan

1 peicher (pitcher) basin and 2 pr tongs

1 old caske

1 broken kettle 1 gring stone

1 broken iron pott

1 white servant his time 1 year

1 nigroe man named Watt

1 nigroe woman and 3 children

1 nigroe woman and 5 children

1 hand mill and 2 old gunns

(so 11 people all slept in the quarter and you'll notice there are no beds)

Without Doors

1 mare, 1 colt, 1 horse, 3 yearlings, 1 two-year old

3 cowes and calves

3 cowes and yearlings

2 drought oxen

28 young cattele

8 sheep

1 parcel of hoggs

1 cart and wheeles

sum 328-3-0 (pounds-shillings-pence) This was a well-to-do amount

Are you wondering why he had 18 chairs, but only "1 small round table"? In those days boards were usually laid across chests or cross-bucks and covered with a cloth for meals. Also children were usually expected to stand during meals while adults sat. The large number of chairs are because Quaker

"meetings" were held at his house although a meeting house had recently been built on an acre of ground near DIXON's own house.

Remember in the will that Ambrose DIXON wrote he added a codicil stating that if any of the children or sons-in-law bothered his wife in any way they would forfeit their part of his estate? It would seem their son Thomas DIXON did not want to take any chances. About 6 years after his father's death Thomas had drawn up the following "obligation" to make it clear to the law that he had done all he could to make his mother comfortable in her old age. The understanding was that he could then run the plantation on his own and not be accused of "troubling or molesting her".

Ambrose DIXON is listed as a headright in 1649. As Nugent says in her book Pioneers and Cavaliers, land for headrights was often, if not usually, claimed years after the person had actually come into the country. The reason was that it cost money to do the paperwork and surveying that was involved in patenting land and few early settlers had money to spare until they had been in the colony for some years. Henry Peddington is first mentioned in the Court Records in 1635 but doesn't claim his free land until 1638. Ambrose DIXON is first mentioned in the Court Records in 1640, but isn't named as a headright until 1649.

20 Sept.1644

less

view all 15

Ambrose Dixon, Sr's Timeline

1623
January 1, 1623
London, England
1638
July 4, 1638
Age 15
Northhampton, Virginia, United States
1639
1639
Age 16
MD, USA
1651
1651
Age 28
Northampton Co., VA
1653
April 20, 1653
Age 30
Annemessex, Somerset, Maryland, United States
1655
1655
Age 32
Northampton Co., VA
1658
1658
Age 35
Northampton, Virginia, United States
1659
1659
Age 36
Northampton Co., VA
1663
February 14, 1663
Age 40
Crisfield, MD, USA
1666
September 9, 1666
Age 43
Crisfield, MD, USA