Anarawd ap Rhodri Mawr

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Anarawd ap Rhodri Mawr

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Caer Seiont, Caernarvonshire, Wales
Death: Died in Anglesey, Wales
Immediate Family:

Son of Rhodri Mawr ap Merfyn and Angharad verch Meurig, Queen (Consort) of Wales
Husband of NN . ferch Meurug, Queen of Gwynedd
Father of Idwal Foel ab Anarawd and Elisedd ab Anarawd
Brother of Merfyn / Meurig ou "King of Powys" ap Rhodri Mawr, Brenin Powys; Cadell ap Rhodri Mawr, King of Seisyllwg, Dyfed and Deheubarth; Aeddan ap Rhodri Mawr; Tudwal Gloff ap Rhodri Mawr; Rhodri Fychan ap Rhodri Mawr and 3 others

Occupation: King of Gwynedd (878 - 916)
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Anarawd ap Rhodri Mawr

ID: I107306

Name: Anarawd Ap Rhodri Mawr

Prefix: Prince Of Gwynedd

Sex: M

Birth: Bet 853 and 857 CE in Gwynedd, Wales

Death: 916 CE 1

Occupation: Prince Of Gwynedd (North Wales) Bet 878 and 916 CE

Change Date: 20 Nov 2007 at 20:00

Father: Rhodri The Great Ap Merfyn b: Bet 789 and 809 CE in Caer Seiont, Carnarvonshire, Wales

Mother: Angharad ferch Meurig b: 825 CE in Ceredigion, , Wales

Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown

Married:

Change Date: 13 Jan 2009

Children

Idwal I Foel The Bald Ap Anarawd b: 883 CE in Aberffraw, Anglesey, Wales
Elise Ap Anarawd b: Abt 883 CE

Sources:

Abbrev: Sutton Folk Family Tree 3175463.ged

Title: Sutton Folk Family Tree

Sutton Folk Family Tree 3175463.ged

Author: Folk, Linda Sutton

Publication: www.worldconnect.rootsweb.com

--------------------

Anarawd ap Rhodri (died 916) was a King of Gwynedd, also referred to as "King of the Britons" by the Annals of Wales.

Anarawd's father Rhodri the Great had eventually become ruler of most of Wales, but on his death in 878 his kingdom was shared out between his sons, with Anarawd inheriting the throne of Gwynedd. Anarawd and his brothers Cadell and Merfyn are recorded as cooperating closely against the rulers of the remaining lesser kingdoms of Wales. Earl Aethelred of Mercia invaded Gwynedd in 881, but Anarawd was able to defeat him with much slaughter in a battle at the mouth of the River Conwy, hailed in the annals as "God's vengeance for Rhodri", Rhodri having been killed in battle against the Mercians.

Anarawd then made an alliance with the Danish king of York in an attempt to guard himself against further Mercian attacks. When this alliance proved unsatisfactory, he came to an agreement with Alfred the Great of Wessex, visiting Alfred at his court. In exchange for Alfred's protection Anarawd recognised the supremacy of Alfred. This was the first time a ruler of Gwynedd had accepted the supremacy of an English king, and formed the basis for the homage which was demanded by the English crown from then on.

In 894 Anarawd was able to repel a raid by a Danish host on North Wales, and the following year raided Ceredigion and Ystrad Tywi in southern Wales. He is reported as having some English troops under his command for these raids. In 902 an attack on Ynys Môn (Anglesey) by some of the Danes of Dublin under Ingimund was repulsed. Anarawd died in 916 and was succeeded by his son Idwal Foel (Idwal the Bald).

Anarawd would establish the princely house of Aberffraw, taking the name from his principal seat of government on Ynys Môn. His descendants would rule Gwynedd until the Edwardian conquest of the late 13th century.

--------------------

Anarawd ap Rhodri (died 916) was a King of Gwynedd, also referred to as "King of the Britons" by the Annals of Wales.

Anarawd's father Rhodri the Great had eventually become ruler of most of Wales, but on his death in 878 his kingdom was shared out between his sons, with Anarawd inheriting the throne of Gwynedd. Anarawd and his brothers Cadell and Merfyn are recorded as cooperating closely against the rulers of the remaining lesser kingdoms of Wales. Earl Aethelred of Mercia invaded Gwynedd in 881, but Anarawd was able to defeat him with much slaughter in a battle at the mouth of the River Conwy, hailed in the annals as "God's vengeance for Rhodri", Rhodri having been killed in battle against the Mercians.

Anarawd then made an alliance with the Danish king of York in an attempt to guard himself against further Mercian attacks. When this alliance proved unsatisfactory, he came to an agreement with Alfred the Great of Wessex, visiting Alfred at his court. In exchange for Alfred's protection Anarawd recognised the supremacy of Alfred. This was the first time a ruler of Gwynedd had accepted the supremacy of an English king, and formed the basis for the homage which was demanded by the English crown from then on.

In 894 Anarawd was able to repel a raid by a Danish host on North Wales, and the following year raided Ceredigion and Ystrad Tywi in southern Wales. He is reported as having some English troops under his command for these raids. In 902 an attack on Ynys Môn (Anglesey) by some of the Danes of Dublin under Ingimund was repulsed. Anarawd died in 916 and was succeeded by his son Idwal Foel (Idwal the Bald).

Anarawd would establish the princely house of Aberffraw, taking the name from his principal seat of government on Ynys Môn. His descendants would rule Gwynedd until the Edwardian conquest of the late 13th century.

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Historical Event: The Holy Roman emperor Otto I, called Otto the Great, was the most powerful western European ruler after Charlemagne. He organized a strong German state and expanded his authority over Burgundy and Italy.

He extended the frontiers of the German kingdom, winning territory from the Slavs in the east, forcing the Bohemians to pay tribute (950), and gaining influence in Denmark and Burgundy. In 951 Otto became king of the Lombards and married the queen of Italy. He quelled a rebellion by his son in 955 and defeated the Magyars in the Battle of Lechfeld. Crowned emperor by Pope John XII in 962, he deposed John in 963 and replaced him with Leo VIII. He returned to Italy (966 – 72) to subdue Rome, and he betrothed his son, Otto II, to a Byzantine princess (972). He also extended his authority over the church and promoted missionary activity in lands he had conquered. By his death, Otto had created the most powerful state in western Europe and laid the foundation for the later Holy Roman

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Anarawd ap Rhodri

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Anarawd ap Rhodri (died 916) was a King of Gwynedd, also called King of the Britons by the Annals of Wales.

Anarawd's father Rhodri the Great had eventually become ruler of most of Wales, but on his death in 878 his kingdom was shared out between his sons, with Anarawd inheriting the throne of Gwynedd. Anarawd and his brothers Cadell and Merfyn are recorded as cooperating closely against the rulers of the remaining lesser kingdoms of Wales. Earl Aethelred of Mercia invaded Gwynedd in 881, but Anarawd was able to defeat him with much slaughter in a battle at the mouth of the River Conwy, hailed in the annals as "God's vengeance for Rhodri", Rhodri having been killed in battle against the Mercians.

Anarawd then made an alliance with the Danish king of York in an attempt to guard himself against further Mercian attacks. When this alliance proved unsatisfactory, he came to an agreement with Alfred the Great of Wessex, visiting Alfred at his court. In exchange for Alfred's protection Anarawd recognised the supremacy of Alfred. This was the first time a ruler of Gwynedd had accepted the supremacy of an English king, and formed the basis for the homage which was demanded by the English crown from then on.

In 894 Anarawd was able to repel a raid by a Danish host on North Wales, and the following year raided Ceredigion and Ystrad Tywi in southern Wales. He is reported as having some English troops under his command for these raids. In 902 an attack on Ynys Môn (Anglesey) by some of the Danes of Dublin under Ingimund was repulsed. Anarawd died in 916 and was succeeded by his son Idwal Foel (Idwal the Bald).

Anarawd would establish the princely house of Aberffraw, taking the name from his principal seat of government on Ynys Môn. His descendants would rule Gwynedd until the Edwardian conquest of the late 13th century.

References

John Edward Lloyd (1911). A history of Wales: from the earliest times to the Edwardian conquest. Longmans, Green & Co.. -------------------- Anarawd ap Rhodri (died 916) was a King of Gwynedd, also called King of the Britons by the Annals of Wales.

Anarawd's father Rhodri the Great had eventually become ruler of most of Wales, but on his death in 878 his kingdom was shared out between his sons, with Anarawd inheriting the throne of Gwynedd. Anarawd and his brothers Cadell and Merfyn are recorded as cooperating closely against the rulers of the remaining lesser kingdoms of Wales. Earl Aethelred of Mercia invaded Gwynedd in 881, but Anarawd was able to defeat him with much slaughter in a battle at the mouth of the River Conwy, hailed in the annals as "God's vengeance for Rhodri", Rhodri having been killed in battle against the Mercians.

Anarawd then made an alliance with the Danish king of York in an attempt to guard himself against further Mercian attacks. When this alliance proved unsatisfactory, he came to an agreement with Alfred the Great of Wessex, visiting Alfred at his court. In exchange for Alfred's protection Anarawd recognised the supremacy of Alfred. This was the first time a ruler of Gwynedd had accepted the supremacy of an English king, and formed the basis for the homage which was demanded by the English crown from then on.

In 894 Anarawd was able to repel a raid by a Danish host on North Wales, and the following year raided Ceredigion and Ystrad Tywi in southern Wales. He is reported as having some English troops under his command for these raids. In 902 an attack on Ynys Môn (Anglesey) by some of the Danes of Dublin under Ingimund was repulsed. Anarawd died in 916 and was succeeded by his son Idwal Foel (Idwal the Bald).

Anarawd would establish the princely house of Aberffraw, taking the name from his principal seat of government on Ynys Môn. His descendants would rule Gwynedd until the Edwardian conquest of the late 13th century. -------------------- Anarawd ap Rhodri

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Anarawd ap Rhodri (died 916) was a King of Gwynedd, also referred to as "King of the Britons" by the Annals of Wales.

Anarawd's father Rhodri the Great had eventually become ruler of most of Wales, but on his death in 878 his kingdom was shared out between his sons, with Anarawd inheriting the throne of Gwynedd. Anarawd and his brothers Cadell and Merfyn are recorded as cooperating closely against the rulers of the remaining lesser kingdoms of Wales. Earl Aethelred of Mercia invaded Gwynedd in 881, but Anarawd was able to defeat him with much slaughter in a battle at the mouth of the River Conwy, hailed in the annals as "God's vengeance for Rhodri", Rhodri having been killed in battle against the Mercians.

Anarawd then made an alliance with the Danish king of York in an attempt to guard himself against further Mercian attacks. When this alliance proved unsatisfactory, he came to an agreement with Alfred the Great of Wessex, visiting Alfred at his court. In exchange for Alfred's protection Anarawd recognised the supremacy of Alfred. This was the first time a ruler of Gwynedd had accepted the supremacy of an English king, and formed the basis for the homage which was demanded by the English crown from then on.

In 894 Anarawd was able to repel a raid by a Danish host on North Wales, and the following year raided Ceredigion and Ystrad Tywi in southern Wales. He is reported as having some English troops under his command for these raids. In 902 an attack on Ynys Môn (Anglesey) by some of the Danes of Dublin under Ingimund was repulsed. Anarawd died in 916 and was succeeded by his son Idwal Foel (Idwal the Bald).

Anarawd would establish the princely house of Aberffraw, taking the name from his principal seat of government on Ynys Môn. His descendants would rule Gwynedd until the Edwardian conquest of the late 13th century.

[edit]References

Lloyd, John Edward (1911), A History of Wales from the Earliest Times to the Edwardian Conquest, I (2nd ed.), London: Longmans, Green, and Co (published 1912)

  • Anarawd ap Rhodri Prince of Gwynedd

born about 0857 Gwynedd, Wales

died 0916

father:

  • Rhodri "Mawr" ap Merfyn "Roderick the Great"

born 0789, 0809 or 0822 Caer Seiont, Carnarvonshire, Wales

died 0878 (in battle) Anglesey, Wales

mother:

  • Angharad verch Meurig

born about 0825 Ceredigion, Wales

siblings:

  • Cadell ap Rhodri born about 0861 Deheubarth, Wales died 0910
  • Merfyn ap Rhodri born about 0859 Caer Seiont, Carnarvonshire, Wales died 0900
  • Nest verch Rhodri born about 0870 Wales

Tudwal "Gloff" ap Rhodri born about 0863 Caer Seiont, Carnarvonshire, Wales

Meurig ap Rhodri born about 0865 Caer Seiont, Carnarvonshire, Wales

Gwriad ap Rhodri born about 0867 Caer Seiont, Carnarvonshire, Wales

Gwyddelig ap Rhodri born about 0869 Caer Seiont, Carnarvonshire, Wales

Angharad verch Rhodri born about 0871 Caer Seiont, Carnarvonshire, Wales

Rhodri "Fychan" ap Rhodri born about 0866 Wales

Miss verch Rhodri born about 0871 Wales

Aeddan ap Rhodri born about 0862 Wales

spouse:

unknown

children:

  • Elise ap Anarawd born about 0885 Aberffro, Malltraeth, Anglesey, Wales died 0942 Wales
  • Idwal "Foel" ap Anarawd born about 0883 Aberffro, Malltraeth, Anglesey, Wales

died 0942

biographical and/or anecdotal:

notes or source:

LDS

-------------------- Anarawd ap Rhodri (died 916) was a King of Gwynedd, also referred to as "King of the Britons" by the Annals of Wales. Anarawd's father Rhodri the Great had eventually become ruler of most of Wales, but on his death in 878 his kingdom was shared out between his sons, with Anarawd inheriting the throne of Gwynedd. Anarawd and his brothers Cadell and Merfyn are recorded as cooperating closely against the rulers of the remaining lesser kingdoms of Wales. Earl Aethelred of Mercia invaded Gwynedd in 881, but Anarawd was able to defeat him with much slaughter in a battle at the mouth of the River Conwy, hailed in the annals as "God's vengeance for Rhodri", Rhodri having been killed in battle against the Mercians. Anarawd then made an alliance with the Danish king of York in an attempt to guard himself against further Mercian attacks. When this alliance proved unsatisfactory, he came to an agreement with Alfred the Great of Wessex, visiting Alfred at his court. In exchange for Alfred's protection Anarawd recognised the supremacy of Alfred. This was the first time a ruler of Gwynedd had accepted the supremacy of an English king, and formed the basis for the homage which was demanded by the English crown from then on. In 894 Anarawd was able to repel a raid by a Danish host on North Wales, and the following year raided Ceredigion and Ystrad Tywi in southern Wales. He is reported as having some English troops under his command for these raids. In 902 an attack on Ynys Môn (Anglesey) by some of the Danes of Dublin under Ingimund was repulsed. Anarawd died in 916 and was succeeded by his son Idwal Foel (Idwal the Bald). Anarawd would establish the princely house of Aberffraw, taking the name from his principal seat of government on Ynys Môn. His descendants would rule Gwynedd until the Edwardian conquest of the late 13th century. -------------------- Anarawd ap Rhodri (died 916) was a King of Gwynedd, also referred to as "King of the Britons" by the Annals of Wales. Anarawd's father Rhodri the Great had eventually become ruler of most of Wales, but on his death in 878 his kingdom was shared out between his sons, with Anarawd inheriting the throne of Gwynedd. Anarawd and his brothers Cadell and Merfyn are recorded as cooperating closely against the rulers of the remaining lesser kingdoms of Wales. Earl Aethelred of Mercia invaded Gwynedd in 881, but Anarawd was able to defeat him with much slaughter in a battle at the mouth of the River Conwy, hailed in the annals as "God's vengeance for Rhodri", Rhodri having been killed in battle against the Mercians. Anarawd then made an alliance with the Danish king of York in an attempt to guard himself against further Mercian attacks. When this alliance proved unsatisfactory, he came to an agreement with Alfred the Great of Wessex, visiting Alfred at his court. In exchange for Alfred's protection Anarawd recognised the supremacy of Alfred. This was the first time a ruler of Gwynedd had accepted the supremacy of an English king, and formed the basis for the homage which was demanded by the English crown from then on. In 894 Anarawd was able to repel a raid by a Danish host on North Wales, and the following year raided Ceredigion and Ystrad Tywi in southern Wales. He is reported as having some English troops under his command for these raids. In 902 an attack on Ynys Môn (Anglesey) by some of the Danes of Dublin under Ingimund was repulsed. Anarawd died in 916 and was succeeded by his son Idwal Foel (Idwal the Bald). Anarawd would establish the princely house of Aberffraw, taking the name from his principal seat of government on Ynys Môn. His descendants would rule Gwynedd until the Edwardian conquest of the late 13th century. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anarawd_ap_Rhodri

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Anarawd ap Rhodri Mawr's Timeline

857
857
Caer Seiont, Caernarvonshire, Wales
883
883
Age 26
Aberffro, Malltraeth, Anglesey, Wales
885
885
Age 28
Malltraeth, Anglesey, Wales
916
916
Age 59
Anglesey, Wales
????
????