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Andrew Duckett

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Grayrigg, Westmoreland, England, UK
Death: Died in Grayrigg, Westmoreland, England
Place of Burial: Queen's College, Cambridge, UK
Immediate Family:

Son of Sir Richard Ducket, Knt and Mabel Duckett
Brother of Thomas Duckett and Alice Stanley

Managed by: Holly Dianne Faulkner
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Andrew Duckett

DOKET or DUCKET, ANDREW (d. 1484), first president of Queens' College, Cambridge, was, according to Dr. Caius and Archbishop Parker, principal of St. Bernard's Hostel, of which he may probably have been the founder, and certainly was the owner. Before 1439 he was presented by Corpus Christi College to the vicarage of St. Botolph, Cambridge, of which, on the restoration of the great tithes, he became rector 21 Oct. 1444. He resigned the rectory in 1470. Subsequently he was made one of the canons or prebendaries of the royal chapel of St. Stephen's, Westminster, which preferment he exchanged in 1479 with Dr. Walter Oudeby for the provostship of the collegiate church of Cotterstock, near Oundle. In July 1467 Doket was collated to the prebend of Ryton in Lichfield Cathedral, which he exchanged for the chancellorship of the same church in 1470, an office which he resigned 6 July 1476 (Le Neve, ed. Hardy, i. 584, 622). Fuller calls him ‘a friar,’ but for this there appears to be no foundation beyond the admission of himself and his society into the confraternity of the Franciscans or Grey Friars in 1479. The great work of Doket's life was the foundation of the college, which, by his prudent administration and his adroit policy in securing the patronage of the sovereigns of the two rival lines, developed from very small beginnings into the well-endowed society of Queens' College, Cambridge. The foundation of King's College by Henry VI in 1440 appears to have given the first impulse to Doket's enterprise. In December 1446 he obtained a royal charter for a college, to consist of a president and four fellows. Eight months later, Doket having in the meanwhile obtained a better site for his proposed buildings, this charter was cancelled at his own request, and a second issued by the king 21 Aug. 1447, authorising the refoundation of the college on the new site, under the name of ‘the College of St. Bernard of Cambridge.’ With a keen sense of the advantages of royal patronage, Doket secured the protection of the young queen Margaret of Anjou for his infant college, which was a second time refounded by her, and, with an emulation of her royal consort's noble bounty, received from her the designation of ‘the Queen's College of St. Margaret and St. Bernard.’ There is no direct evidence of Margaret having given any pecuniary aid to Doket's design, but Henry VI granted 200l. to it as being the foundation of his ‘most dear and best beloved wife,’ and the names of some of her court appear on the roll of benefactors.

The foundation-stone was laid for the queen by Sir John Wenlock, her chamberlain, 15 April 1448, and the quadrangle was approaching completion when the outbreak of the wars of the Roses put a temporary stop to the undertaking. Upon the restoration of tranquillity, Doket, opportunely transferring his allegiance to the house of York, succeeded in persuading the new queen, Elizabeth Woodville [q. v.], to replace the support he had lost by accepting the patronage of the foundation of her unfortunate predecessor and former mistress. Doket was no stranger to the new queen, who must have felt a woman's pride in carrying to a conclusion a scheme in which Margaret had exhibited so much interest, and which had naturally spread to the ladies of her household. Elizabeth described herself as ‘vera fundatrix jure successionis,’ and though there is no documentary evidence of her having helped it with money, the prosperity of the college was due to her influence with her husband, and she gave it the first code of statutes in 1475. As owing its existence to two queens-consort, the college was henceforth known as ‘Queens' College,’ in the plural. Doket's policy in steering his young foundation so successfully through the waves of contending factions fully warrants Fuller's character of him as ‘a good and discreet man, who, with no sordid but prudential compliance, so poised himself in those dangerous times betwixt the successive kings of Lancaster and York that he procured the favour of both, and so prevailed with Queen Elizabeth, wife to King Edward IV, that she perfected what her professed enemy had begun’ (Hist. of Univ. of Cambr. ed. 1840, p. 162). Doket also succeeded in ingratiating himself with the king's brother, Richard, and obtained his patronage and liberal aid. As Duke of Gloucester, he founded four fellowships, and during his short tenure of the throne largely increased the emoluments of the college by grants of lands belonging (in right of her mother) to his Queen Anne, who had accepted the position of foundress and patroness of this college. These estates were lost to the college on the accession of Henry VII. The endowments were also augmented by Doket's offer to place the names of deceased persons on the bede-roll of the college in return for a gift of money. Doket governed his college prudently and successfully for thirty-eight years, having lived long enough to see his small foundation of four fellows grow into a flourishing society of seventeen, and his college richly endowed and prosperous under the patronage of three successive sovereigns. He died 4 Nov. 1484. His age is not stated, but he was probably about seventy-four. His will, dated 2 Nov. of the same year, is printed by Mr. Searle in his history of the college (p. 56). He was buried by his desire in the choir of his college chapel, ‘where the lessons are read.’ His gravestone with the matrix of his incised effigy existed in Cole's time (c. 1777), but it has now disappeared (Cole MSS. ii. 17, viii. 124). As he is styled ‘magister’ to the last, he was probably not doctor either in divinity or in any other faculty. Mr. Mullinger writes of him: ‘We have evidence which would lead us to conclude that he was a hard student of the canon law, but nothing to indicate that he was in any way a promoter of the new learning, which already before his death was beginning to be heard of at Cambridge’ (Univ. of Cambr. i. 317). In spite of the great names which add dignity and ornament to the foundation of the college, there can be no doubt that Doket must be regarded as the true founder of Queens' College, and that the words of Caius express the simple truth, that ‘his labour in building the college and procuring money was so great that there are those who esteem the magnificent work to have been his alone’ (Hist. Acad. Cant. 70), so that he is justly styled in the history of benefactors ‘primus presidens ac dignissimus fundator hujus collegii.’ He made a catalogue of the library of his college, consisting of 299 volumes, in 1472, and also an inventory of the chapel furniture in the same year.

[Searle's Hist. of the Queens' College of St. Margaret and St. Bernard, pp. 2–104, issued by the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, 1867; Mullinger's Univ. of Cambr. vol. i; Fuller's Hist. of Univ. of Cambr. pp. 161–3; Willis and Clark's Architectural Hist. of Univ. of Cambr. i. lxii–v, ii. 1–11, iii. 438.] E. V.

EARLY DOGGETT FAMILY

From the Daggett Digest: (Article by Katherine Shurlds; reference "Colonial Families," The American Historical Society, Inc., 1931) Daggett ... is believed to have begun as Thurgod of the Domesday Book, or earlier as Toget, now Toogood. It may have also come from Doget, which became Doggett, Duggett, Dugood, Duguid, Dochet, Do good. Records of families of these names show they lived in the English counties of Yorkshire, Cambridge, Oxford, Kent, Somerset, Norfolk, and Suffolk.

From doggettfam.org -- There were Doggetts living in Babergh Hundred from at least the mid-fourteenth century, but very few written records have survived. One document is a lay subsidy (assessment for taxation) levied in 1327, which lists as one of 21 residents of Bures a William Dogut. A Nicholas Dogat was taxed at the nearby parish of Hesset.

Sources: Norfolk: Norwich -1. Index to Wills, Consistory Court of Norwich, 1370-1550 2. Wills among the Norwich Enrolled Deeds, 1286-1508.

Wills proved in the Consistory Court of Norwich and now preserved in the District Probate Registry at Norwich 1370 to 1550, Norfolk, England:

1451 Doggett, Dogett, Richard, Mendham, All Sts. 109 Aleyn.

1473 Doggett, Doget, Dogett, Robert, Beccles 23, 24 Hubert.

The following Doggetts were documented, and may or may not have been siblings or peers:

MY EARLIEST KNOWN ANCESTOR:

Richard Doggett* Born before 1520. Click on name for details.

THE FOLLOWING ARE TAKEN FROM "THE DOGGET FAMILY, GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND" (Professor Doggett of Harvard, published in 1880.):

John Doget: Record from 1219; also shown as Doket, Duket, Ducket.

Robert Doggett: Granted lands in 1228 by King Henry who took them from Westacre Abbey in Appleton.

William Doggett: Mayor of Bristol in 1492.

Thomas Doggett: Rector of Burnham Parish, buried in 1496 at Norwich Cathedral.

FROM OTHER SOURCES:

MAGDELENA MUDWIN DOGGETT

Parents: Unknown

Notes: All information about this line is from the Ross G. H. Cotton Personal Library.

Spouse: CLEMENT COTTON (b. about 1445), son of Walter Cotton (b. About 1425) and Blanche (unknown).

CHILDREN OF MAGDELENA MUDWIN DOGGETT AND CLEMENT COTTON:

GREGORY COTTON (b. about 1470)

CLEMENT COTTON (b. about 1475) Married Constance Leventhorpe (b. about 1478), and they had the following children:

 JANE COTTON (b. about 1505) 
  ROGER COTTON (b. about 1505) 
 THO COTTON (b. about 1515) 
 GEORGE COTTON (b. about 1525) 

BLANCHE COTTON (b. about 1475)

JOHN COTTON (b. about 1485)

JOHN DOGGETT

Parents: UNKNOWN

Notes:

Of St. Faith' in Norfolk, England.

Spouse: JONE RYSLEY (daughter of John Rysley of Kymley (Kimberly) in Norfolk, England.)

They had the following child:

WILLIAM DOGGETT

William Dogget married Joan Norman, daughter of John Norman of Honyngham in Norfolk, England.

They had the following children:

EDMOND DOGGETT (See below)

ELIZABETH DOGGETT

EDMOND DOGGETT of Honingham.

Edmond Doggett married Elizabeth Sherborne, sister of Sir Henry Sherborne, Knight, of Sherborne in Norfolk, England.

They had the following children:

ANTHONY DOGGETT (probably died young, as a later child bore the same name)

EDMOND DOGGETT (probably died young, as a later child bore the same name)

JOHN DOGGETT

MARGARET DOGGETT

ANTHONY DOGGETT of Sherborne.

Married Ann Smallpece, daughter of Humphrey Smallpece of Hockering in Norfolk, England. Anthony and Ann had four known children, all of whom died young.)

EDMOND DOGGETT of Wrongey in Norfolk, England.

Married Elizabeth Hartley of Hartford.

           Edmond and Elizabeth had the following children: 
                THOMAS DOGGETT 
                 ANTHONY DOGGETT 
                 EDMOND DOGGETT 
                 BLYTH DOGGETT 

Sources:

1. The Visitations of Norfolk, 1563, 1589, and 1613, pg. 107, Doggett (1552).

EARLIEST HISTORY:

Source: Worldwide genetic research as presented by Dr. Spencer Wells in the PBS series 'Journey of Man.'

Modern man arose in the Kalihari Desert in South Africa, living in caves there 70,000 years ago. About 50,000 years ago, because of worldwide drought, population declined drastically, and they began migrating to the middle east, settling in small numbers along the coast toward India. During the last ice age, between 60,000 and 30,000 years ago, much more land was exposed above sea level, linking areas that were previously inaccessible.

Mankind continued to spread along the middle east and Indian coast and into Australia about 50,000 years ago, accounting for about 10 percent of the population. The other 90 percent took a different route and are the ancestors of Europeans, Asians, and American Indians. Around 45,000 years ago this second wave was in the middle east, moving northeast toward Asia. Because of the ice age, they could not yet move into glacier-covered Europe. About 40,000 years ago they were in central Asia in the area north of Afghanistan, near China. Here they branched out over Asia, and eventually into America, and Europe.

The first Europeans were the Cro-Magnons, ariving about 35,000 years ago with taller body proportions adapted to warmer weather. Over time, isolated by the ice age, they adapted to the colder weather of Europe, with lighter skin, shorter, stockier bodies. They are regarded as the ancestors of today's Europeans.

THE VIKINGS

According to archaelogical research, Norway was inhabited as early as 14,000 years ago by a hunting people with a paleolithic culture derived from western and central Europe. Later, colonies of farming people from Denmark and Sweden were established in the region. These settlers spoke a Germanic language that became the mother tongue of the later Scandinavian languages. The new arrivals settled around the large lakes and along the coasts, and formed petty kingdoms. By about the 8th century AD, aproximately 29 small kingdoms, called fylker, existed in Norway.

Inevitably the kings turned their attention to the sea, the easiest way of communication with the outside world. Ships of war were built and sent on raiding expeditions, initiating the era of the Vikings.

Eventually they invaded Ireland, England, and France and tried to establish settlements. In 878 Saxon King Alfred the Great finally drove them from England, but Charles III of France was unable to defeat them. In 911 he turned over to the Norsemen leader Rollo (860?-931?) the duchy of Normandy. By this time, the English people were a combination of the Picts (the earliest inhabitants), the Angles, and the Viking descendants who through raids and eventual intermarriage became part of the culture. But, in 1066, a descendent of Rollo, William II, Duke of Normandy, invaded England, and became King William, also known as William the Conquerer. The Normans of France were descended primarily from the Danish Vikings, and the Doggett name is considered to be Norman. --------------------

                  EARLY DOGGETT FAMILY

From the Daggett Digest: (Article by Katherine Shurlds; reference "Colonial Families," The American Historical Society, Inc., 1931) Daggett ... is believed to have begun as Thurgod of the Domesday Book, or earlier as Toget, now Toogood. It may have also come from Doget, which became Doggett, Duggett, Dugood, Duguid, Dochet, Do good. Records of families of these names show they lived in the English counties of Yorkshire, Cambridge, Oxford, Kent, Somerset, Norfolk, and Suffolk.

From doggettfam.org -- There were Doggetts living in Babergh Hundred from at least the mid-fourteenth century, but very few written records have survived. One document is a lay subsidy (assessment for taxation) levied in 1327, which lists as one of 21 residents of Bures a William Dogut. A Nicholas Dogat was taxed at the nearby parish of Hesset.

Sources: Norfolk: Norwich -1. Index to Wills, Consistory Court of Norwich, 1370-1550 2. Wills among the Norwich Enrolled Deeds, 1286-1508. Wills proved in the Consistory Court of Norwich and now preserved in the District Probate Registry at Norwich 1370 to 1550, Norfolk, England: 1451 Doggett, Dogett, Richard, Mendham, All Sts. 109 Aleyn. 1473 Doggett, Doget, Dogett, Robert, Beccles 23, 24 Hubert.

The following Doggetts were documented, and may or may not have been siblings or peers: MY EARLIEST KNOWN ANCESTOR: Richard Doggett* Born before 1520. Click on name for details.

THE FOLLOWING ARE TAKEN FROM "THE DOGGET FAMILY, GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND" (Professor Doggett of Harvard, published in 1880.): John Doget: Record from 1219; also shown as Doket, Duket, Ducket. Robert Doggett: Granted lands in 1228 by King Henry who took them from Westacre Abbey in Appleton. William Doggett: Mayor of Bristol in 1492. Thomas Doggett: Rector of Burnham Parish, buried in 1496 at Norwich Cathedral.

FROM OTHER SOURCES: MAGDELENA MUDWIN DOGGETT Parents: Unknown Notes: All information about this line is from the Ross G. H. Cotton Personal Library. Spouse: CLEMENT COTTON (b. about 1445), son of Walter Cotton (b. About 1425) and Blanche (unknown). CHILDREN OF MAGDELENA MUDWIN DOGGETT AND CLEMENT COTTON: GREGORY COTTON (b. about 1470) CLEMENT COTTON (b. about 1475) Married Constance Leventhorpe (b. about 1478), and they had the following children:

 JANE COTTON (b. about 1505)
  ROGER COTTON (b. about 1505)
 THO COTTON (b. about 1515)
 GEORGE COTTON (b. about 1525)

BLANCHE COTTON (b. about 1475) JOHN COTTON (b. about 1485)

JOHN DOGGETT Parents: UNKNOWN Notes: Of St. Faith' in Norfolk, England. Spouse: JONE RYSLEY (daughter of John Rysley of Kymley (Kimberly) in Norfolk, England.) They had the following child: WILLIAM DOGGETT William Dogget married Joan Norman, daughter of John Norman of Honyngham in Norfolk, England. They had the following children: EDMOND DOGGETT (See below) ELIZABETH DOGGETT EDMOND DOGGETT of Honingham. Edmond Doggett married Elizabeth Sherborne, sister of Sir Henry Sherborne, Knight, of Sherborne in Norfolk, England. They had the following children: ANTHONY DOGGETT (probably died young, as a later child bore the same name) EDMOND DOGGETT (probably died young, as a later child bore the same name) JOHN DOGGETT MARGARET DOGGETT ANTHONY DOGGETT of Sherborne. Married Ann Smallpece, daughter of Humphrey Smallpece of Hockering in Norfolk, England. Anthony and Ann had four known children, all of whom died young.) EDMOND DOGGETT of Wrongey in Norfolk, England. Married Elizabeth Hartley of Hartford.

           Edmond and Elizabeth had the following children:
                THOMAS DOGGETT
                 ANTHONY DOGGETT
                 EDMOND DOGGETT
                 BLYTH DOGGETT

Sources: 1. The Visitations of Norfolk, 1563, 1589, and 1613, pg. 107, Doggett (1552).

EARLIEST HISTORY: Source: Worldwide genetic research as presented by Dr. Spencer Wells in the PBS series 'Journey of Man.'

Modern man arose in the Kalihari Desert in South Africa, living in caves there 70,000 years ago. About 50,000 years ago, because of worldwide drought, population declined drastically, and they began migrating to the middle east,settling in small numbers along the coast toward India. During the last ice age, between 60,000 and 30,000 years ago, much more land was exposed above sea level, linking areas that were previously inaccessible.

Mankind continued to spread along the middle east and Indian coast and into Australia about 50,000 years ago, accounting for about 10 percent of the population. The other 90 percent took a different route and are the ancestors of Europeans, Asians, and American Indians. Around 45,000 years ago this second wave was in the middle east, moving northeast toward Asia. Because of the ice age, they could not yet move into glacier-covered Europe. About 40,000years ago they were in central Asia in the area north of Afghanistan, near China. Here they branched out over Asia, and eventually into America, and Europe.

The first Europeans were the Cro-Magnons, ariving about 35,000 years ago with taller body proportions adapted to warmer weather. Over time, isolated by the ice age, they adapted to the colder weather of Europe, with lighter skin,shorter, stockier bodies. They are regarded as the ancestors of today's Europeans.

THE VIKINGS

According to archaelogical research, Norway was inhabited as early as 14,000 years ago by a hunting people with a paleolithic culture derived from western and central Europe. Later, colonies of farming people from Denmark and Sweden were established in the region. These settlers spoke a Germanic language that became the mother tongue of the later Scandinavian languages. The new arrivals settled around the large lakes and along the coasts, and formed petty kingdoms. By about the 8th century AD, aproximately 29 small kingdoms, called fylker, existed in Norway.

Inevitably the kings turned their attention to the sea, the easiest way of communication with the outside world. Ships of war were built and sent on raiding expeditions, initiating the era of the Vikings.

Eventually they invaded Ireland, England, and France and tried to establish settlements. In 878 Saxon King Alfred the Great finally drove them from England, but Charles III of France was unable to defeat them. In 911 he turned over to the Norsemen leader Rollo (860?-931?) the duchy of Normandy. By this time, the English people were a combination of the Picts (the earliest inhabitants), the Angles, and the Viking descendants who through raids and eventual intermarriage became part of the culture. But, in 1066, a descendent of Rollo, William II, Duke of Normandy, invaded England, and became King William, also known as William the Conquerer. The Normans of France were descended primarily from the Danish Vikings, and the Doggett name is considered to be Norman. --------------------    

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Andrew Duckett's Timeline

1414
1414
UK
1484
November 6, 1484
Age 70
Grayrigg, Westmoreland, England
????
Cambridge, UK