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Andrew Warner

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Great Waltham, Essex, England
Death: Died in Hadley, Hampshire County, Massachusetts Bay Colony
Place of Burial: Old Hadley Cemetery, Hadley, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of John Warner, of Broad Oak; John Warner; Mary Warner and Mary Warner
Husband of Mary Warner; Mary Warner and Hester Selden
Father of Isaac Warner, Sr.; Andrew Warner, Jr; Ruth Kellogg; Mary Hills; John Warner of Fairfield and 7 others
Brother of Edward Warner; Joan Warner; Rose Sanford (Warner); Thomas Warner; John Warner, of Broad Oak and 2 others

Occupation: maltster
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Andrew Warner

Andrew came to America near the beginning of the great tide of emigration which started in 1629.

Records show that as early as 1632-3 Andrew Warner was residing in America and was a member of the Cambridge colony. He was born about 1595, so he was at this time 37 years old. The reason for his removal to America we can only know by inference. It was during the reign of Queen Elizabeth that Protestantism was restored to England, and it was also during her reign that Puritanism appeared. Towards the close of her life, the persecutions of the Puritans, who were non-conformists to the established church, became severe and under her successor, James I, matters became decidedly worse for them both in civil and religious affairs (Warner, & Nichols, p 14).

Of the first wife of Andrew Warner we have not been able to discover a single record. The family tradition is that her name was Mary, but we find no positive proof. Not far from the time of Andrew Warner's removal to Hadley, he was married to Esther or Hester Wakeman Selden, baptized June 15, 1617, died in Hadley in 1693, daughter of Francis Wakeman of Bewdley, Worcestershire, England, and his wife Anne Good. Her first husband was Thomas Selden who died in 1655. They had 8 children, Thomas, John, Mary, Esther (1), Joseph, Hannah, Esther (2), and Sarah. The first mention of Esther Selden in connection with Andrew Warner is a record of the Connecticut Probate Court, Dec 3, 1663, in which a complaint is entered against Andrew Warner because he had not given proper security to the Court for the payment of the legacies due from the estate of Thomas Selden to his children (p 26).

Children (probable order):

  • 1. Mary Warner, m. (1) John Steel, Jr; (2) William Hills
  • 2. Andrew Warner, m. Rebecca Fletcher
  • 3. Robert Warner, m. (1) Elizabeth Grant; (2) Deliverance (Bissell) Rockwell
  • 4. John Warner, m. Anna ______
  • 5. Hannah Warner, m. Daniel Pratt
  • 6. Daniel Warner, m. (1) Mary ______; (2) Martha Boltwood.
  • 7. Isaac Warner, m. Sarah Boltwood
  • 8. Ruth Warner, m. John Kellogg (?)
  • 9. Jacob Warner, m. (1) Rebecca _____; (2) Elizabeth Goodman

Source: Warner, L.C. & Nichols, J.G. (1919). The Descendants of Andrew Warner. New Haven, CT: The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Co. Pages 28-29. -------------------- along with Rev. Thomas Hooker - Original Proprietors of Hartford -------------------- Came from Hertfordshire, Eng., to Boston in 1630; was in Newtown, Mass., now Cambridge; one of the founders thereof; in 1636 removed with others in a Colony to Hartford, Conn., which they founded; has six sons and a daughter Ruth; removed in 1659 to Hadley, Mass., with three of his sons and daughter; helped found three colonies.

-------------------- (ref: Gen of Hadley Families - Boltwood, pg 146; Families of Early Hartford, Connecticut - Barbour, pg 631-632; New England Marriages Prior to 1700 - Torrey, pg 780; History of Cambridge, Massachusetts - Paige, pg 678; Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England - Savage, Vol 4, pg 418;The Great Migration Begins- Anderson, pg 1928-30;) Andrew migrated in 1633 to Cambridge where he lived until he removed to Hartford in 1635, then to Farmington in 1638 and back to Hartford in 1650 and to Hadley in 1659. He was literate, signed his will and left books in his estate. There is no date for the death of his first wife or the marriage to the second but Winthrop's medical records help date the marriage. Jacob was 2 years old on 22 July 1660 so would have been born in 1658. Warner's first wife would have been too old to have Jacob. From November of 1657 to March of 1658, Winthrop treated Andrew's wife for lack of menstruation, she must have been pregnant.

Andrew Warner was born in Essex, England, in 1600, and died in Hadley, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, on December 18, 1684. Mary Humphrey was baptized in Great Waltham, Essex, England, on Saturday, February 13, 1602, and died probably in Hartford, Connecticut, before 1659. They were married in Thaxted, Essex County, England, on Tuesday, October 5, 1624. She took the name Mary Warner. He is the son of John and Mary (Purchas) Warner. She is the daughter of Robert and Ann (Holland) Humphrey. They had nine children:

  1. i. Mary Warner was born in Hatfield, Essex, England, about 1620. She married first John Steele, and second William Hills.
  2. ii. Andrew Warner was born in Hatfield about 1622, and died on January 26, 1681. He married Rebecca Fletcher.
  3. iii. Robert Warner was born in Hatfield about 1626, and died on April 10, 1690. He married first Elizabeth Grant on 1 Feb 1654. He married second Deliverance Bissell Rockwell.
  4. iv. John Warner was born in Hatfield about 1629. He married first Ann Norton on 28 Jun 1649. He married second Martha Boltwood, daughter of Robert and Mary (Gernor) Boltwood. John and Isaac married sisters: Martha and Sarah.
  5. v. Daniel Warner was born in Hatfield about 1635, and died on April 30, 1692. He married Mary _____.
  6. vi. Hannah Warner was born in Hartford, Connecticut, about 1639, and died on September 3, 1682. She married Daniel Pratt.
  7. vii. Isaac Warner [#258]: He was born in Hardford, Connecticut, about 1645, and died in Deerfield, Franklin County, Massachusetts, in 1691.
  8. viii. Ruth Warner was born in Hatfield about 1655. She married John Kellogg in 1689.
  9. ix. Jacob Warner was born about 1637. He married first Rebecca _____. He married second Elizabeth Goodwin. The Mormon family record sheet gives Jacob's birth date as 1637 while The Gilbert Family states that he is known to be the youngest child. Jacob is known to be the youngest child and it is possible that his mother was Andrew's second wife, Esther.

His second marriage was to Esther (Wakeman) Selden. They had no children except possibly Jacob.

It is probable that Andrew was born in Great Waltham, Essex, England, and lived there until he was about 12 when he moved with his parents to Hatfield Broad Oak. It is likely that he married and that at least two their first two children were born here. No record has been found of this marriage or of his wife, but Warner tradition has it that her name was Mary. The will of Andrew's mother, Mary, made May 12, 1627, gives 20 shillings to "the Two Children of Andrew my sonne". As Andrew was sole executor of her estate, he must have been living in England at the time.

The reason for Andrew to uproot his young family and move to America was probably not the desire to own land but religious persecution. Since his family was fairly prosperous and he became a land owner soon after his arrival in America, he probably owned land in England. In 1625, Charles I ascended the throne of England. He at once assumed all the power of Church and State and escalated the existing war against Puritanism. The ministers of that religion were driven from their livings, or into exile, and the laymen were tortured and forced from their homes. Many sought refuge in the New World.

Among those who dared to oppose this policy was the brilliant preacher, Thomas Hooker, Rev.. He was silenced as a minister of the church in 1626 but continued to speak as a lecturer in Chelmsford, Essex County, until 1629, when the persecution became so great that he left and escaped to Holland. At this, a large number of his followers emigrated to America, being known as the "Hooker Company" and also as the "Braintree Company", from Braintree, the town in Essex from which many of them came. Andrew and his family likely belonged to this company. Hooker arrived in America from Holland on the Griffin on September 4, 1633, to become the pastor of the church at Cambridge, made up primarily of his followers.

Andrew's parents lived in Hatfield Broad Oak after 1609. This town is only 20 miles from Braintree and 16 miles from Chelmsford where Hooker lectured. Andrew and his family must have lived in or near Hatfield at this time as he was the executor of his mother's estate. Therefore, he had every opportunity to become a follower of Thomas Hooker, and his emigration coincided with that of the company. And since Andrew later followed Hooker to Hartford and was a deacon in his church, it is all together likely that he and his family left England to avoid religious persecution.

The first direct mention of Andrew Warner in America is an entry in the town records of Cambridge, Massachusetts, then known as "Newtowne". On January 7, 1632/3, there are recorded several votes regarding the erection of houses in the town and the division of the fence to enclose the common, with the number of rods of fence each settler was to build. This is the first entry made in the records of the town save a single item on December 24 calling a monthly meeting. Of the 42 names given, the eleventh was "Andrew Warner, 20 Rod". Only 11 of the 42 settlers built as much as 20 rods of fence while 24 built less than 10 rods each. This would indicate that Andrew Warner was already a resident of Cambridge and was among the more wealthy members. There are many references to Andrew in the town records the nature of which indicate that he was prominent and well respected. On May 14, 1634, he was made a freeman of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

It is interesting to note that Andrew Warner and his family came to America near the beginning of that great tide of emigration which started in 1629. By that time Plymouth and Salem had been settled, but the total English population of New England was hardly more that 800. In April of 1630, John Winthrop, first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, left for America. Later that year he was followed by 17 ships bearing over 1000 people. By 1634 the annual emigration had reached 4000. In 1640 the Long Parliament met, the power of Charles I was checked, religious persecution declined, and the flood of emigrants ceased. In those 11 years the population of New England grew from 800 to 26,000.

The "Mary (Humphrey) Warner" source gives her birth as before 13 Feb 1603, Thaxted, Essex County, England

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sources: The Descendants of Andrew Warner, 1909 Mary (Humphrey) Warner, The American Genealogist, vol. 26 (1950) , pg. 219 Clues in Records of Essex, England to the Origin of Connecticut Colony Settlers, The American Genealogist, vol. 26 Directories of New England Families, 1620–1700 Andrew Warner b. Eng. 1600; settled Cambridge, Mass. 1632; removed to Hartford, Conn. 1635; removed to Hadley, Mass. where he died 1684 "Dinghy Magazine", vol. 1, June, 1988 (Mary Humphrey's baptism date, provided by Joan (Gilbert) Tatro January, 2002. "American Genealogist", pp 217–219 year? (Mary Humphrey's baptism date, provided by Joan (Gilbert) Tatro, January, 2000. Some (unconfirmed) information and sources found at the site of Bob and Mary Beth Wheeler, January, 1999. http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/p/e/i/Laurie-Peirick/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0061.html

Cutter: (I) Andrew Warner, the immigrant ancestor, was born in England about 1600. He came to America in 1632 and was a proprietor of Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1633. He was admitted a freeman May 14, 1634. In 1635 he was living in Cambridge on the northeasterly side of Eliot street, about midway between the westerly end of Winthrop street and Brighton street. He owned also several other lots in Cambridge. He sold his property in Cambridge to Captain George Cooke, December 20, 1636, and removed to Hartford, Connecticut. He removed to Had- ley, Massachusetts, about 1659, and was one of the first settlers. He died there December 18, 1684. His will was dated June 18, 1681, and proved March 31, 1685. He bequeathed to his wife Esther; sons Jacob, Daniel, Isaac, Andrew, Robert, John; daughters Ruth Pratt and Hills; and Mary, wife of John Taylor. He married (first), Esther, widow of Thomas Seiden. She died in 1693, as is inferred from the fact that her inventory was taken December i, 1693. Children: i. Andrew, married Rebecca Fletcher, and died in Middletown, Connecticut, January 26, 1681. 2. Robert, married, February, 1654, Elizabeth Grant; (second) Deliverance Rockwell, widow, and he died in Middletown, April 10, 1690. 3. Jacob, died November 29, 1711. 4. Daniel, mentioned below. 5. Isaac, born about 1645. 6. Ruth, living in 1677 and presented to the court for wearing silk. 7. Daughter married John or Daniel Pratt. 8. Mary, married John Steel, and William Hills. 9. John, resided in Middletown.

-------------------- Andrew Warner was the first Warner to come to America in about 1630. Settled in Newtown, now named Cambridge, Mass.

Source of all this Warner pedigree is: Film # 1036394 LDS FHL

It is probable that Andrew was born in Great Waltham, Essex, England, and lived there until he was about 12 when he moved with his parents to Hatfield Broad Oak. It is likely that he married and that at least two their first two children were born here. No record has been found of this marriage or of his wife, but Warner tradition has it that her name was Mary. The will of Andrew's mother, Mary, made May 12, 1627, gives 20 shillings to "the Two Children of Andrew my sonne". As Andrew was sole executor of her estate, he must have been living in England at the time.

The reason for Andrew to uproot his young family and move to America was probably not the desire to own land but religious persecution. Since his family was fairly prosperous and he became a land owner soon after his arrival in America, he probably owned land in England. In 1625, Charles I ascended the throne of England. He at once assumed all the power of Church and State and escalated the existing war against Puritanism. The ministers of that religion were driven from their livings, or into exile, and the laymen were tortured and forced from their homes. Many sought refuge in the New World.

Among those who dared to oppose this policy was the brilliant preacher, Rev. Thomas Hooker. He was silenced as a minister of the church in 1626 but continued to speak as a lecturer in Chelmsford, Essex County, until 1629, when the persecution became so great that he left and escaped to Holland. At this, a large number of his followers emigrated to America, being known as the "Hooker Company" and also as the "Braintree Company", from Braintree, the town in Essex from which many of them came. Andrew and his family likely belonged to this company. Hooker arrived in America from Holland on the Griffin on September 4, 1633, to become the pastor of the church at Cambridge, made up primarily of his followers.

Andrew's parents lived in Hatfield Broad Oak after 1609. This town is only 20 miles from Braintree and 16 miles from Chelmsford where Hooker lectured. Andrew and his family must have lived in or near Hatfield at this time as he was the executor of his mother's estate. Therefore, he had every opportunity to become a follower of Thomas Hooker, and his emigration coincided with that of the company. And since Andrew later followed Hooker to Hartford and was a deacon in his church, it is all together likely that he and his family left England to avoid religious persecution.

The first direct mention of Andrew Warner in America is an entry in the town records of Cambridge, Massachusetts, then known as "Newtowne". On January 7, 1632/3, there are recorded several votes regarding the erection of houses in the town and the division of the fence to enclose the common, with the number of rods of fence each settler was to build. This is the first entry made in the records of the town save a single item on December 24 calling a monthly meeting. Of the 42 names given, the eleventh was "Andrew Warner, 20 Rod". Only 11 of the 42 settlers built as much as 20 rods of fence while 24 built less than 10 rods each. This would indicate that Andrew Warner was already a resident of Cambridge and was among the more wealthy members. There are many references to Andrew in the town records the nature of which indicate that he was prominent and well respected. On May 14, 1634, he was made a freeman of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

It is interesting to note that Andrew Warner and his family came to America near the beginning of that great tide of emigration which started in 1629. By that time Plymouth and Salem had been settled, but the total English population of New England was hardly more that 800. In April of 1630, John Winthrop, first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, left for America. Later that year he was followed by 17 ships bearing over 1000 people. By 1634 the annual emigration had reached 4000. In 1640 the Long Parliament met, the power of Charles I was checked, religious persecution declined, and the flood of emigrants ceased. In those 11 years the population of New England grew from 800 to 26,000.

On 14 May 1634 Deacon Andrew Warner was listed as a freeman. He resided at at Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, in 1636. He resided at at Farmington, Connecticut, in 1648. He resided at at Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, in 1650. He married Esther Wakeman after December 1655 at Probably, Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut. Deacon Andrew Warner married Esther Wakeman before 1657. Deacon Andrew Warner resided at at Hadley in 1659. He left a will on 18 June 1681. He died on 18 December 1684 at Hadley, Hampshire County, Massachusetts. The Inventory of Deacon Andrew Warner was taken on 22 December 1684. His estate was proved on 31 March 1685.

-------------------- Andrew Warner, immigrant ancestor in America, was born in England about shoo. He came to America in 1632, and was a proprietor of Cambridge in 1633. He was admitted a freeman, May 14, 1634. In 1635 he was living in Cambridge on the northeasterly side of Eliot Street, about midway between the westerly end of Winthrop and Brighton streets. He owned also several other lots in Cambridge, but sold his property there to Captain George Cooke, December 30, 1636, and moved to Hartford, Connecticut. He moved to Hadley, Massachusetts, about 1659, and was one of the first settlers. He died there December 18, 1684.

It is probable that Andrew was born in Great Waltham, Essex, England, and lived there until he was about 12 when he moved with his parents to Hatfield Broad Oak. It is likely that he married and that at least two their first two children were born here. No record has been found of this marriage or of his wife, but Warner tradition has it that her name was Mary. The will of Andrew's mother, Mary, made May 12, 1627, gives 20 shillings to "the Two Children of Andrew my sonne". As Andrew was sole executor of her estate, he must have been living in England at the time.

The reason for Andrew to uproot his young family and move to America was probably not the desire to own land but religious persecution. Since his family was fairly prosperous and he became a land owner soon after his arrival in America, he probably owned land in England. In 1625, Charles I ascended the throne of England. He at once assumed all the power of Church and State and escalated the existing war against Puritanism. The ministers of that religion were driven from their livings, or into exile, and the laymen were tortured and forced from their homes. Many sought refuge in the New World.

Among those who dared to oppose this policy was the brilliant preacher, Thomas Hooker, Rev.. He was silenced as a minister of the church in 1626 but continued to speak as a lecturer in Chelmsford, Essex County, until 1629, when the persecution became so great that he left and escaped to Holland. At this, a large number of his followers emigrated to America, being known as the "Hooker Company" and also as the "Braintree Company", from Braintree, the town in Essex from which many of them came. Andrew and his family likely belonged to this company. Hooker arrived in America from Holland on the Griffin on September 4, 1633, to become the pastor of the church at Cambridge, made up primarily of his followers.

Andrew's parents lived in Hatfield Broad Oak after 1609. This town is only 20 miles from Braintree and 16 miles from Chelmsford where Hooker lectured. Andrew and his family must have lived in or near Hatfield at this time as he was the executor of his mother's estate. Therefore, he had every opportunity to become a follower of Thomas Hooker, and his emigration coincided with that of the company. And since Andrew later followed Hooker to Hartford and was a deacon in his church, it is all together likely that he and his family left England to avoid religious persecution.

The first direct mention of Andrew Warner in America is an entry in the town records of Cambridge, Massachusetts, then known as "Newtowne". On January 7, 1632/3, there are recorded several votes regarding the erection of houses in the town and the division of the fence to enclose the common, with the number of rods of fence each settler was to build. This is the first entry made in the records of the town save a single item on December 24 calling a monthly meeting. Of the 42 names given, the eleventh was "Andrew Warner, 20 Rod". Only 11 of the 42 settlers built as much as 20 rods of fence while 24 built less than 10 rods each. This would indicate that Andrew Warner was already a resident of Cambridge and was among the more wealthy members. There are many references to Andrew in the town records the nature of which indicate that he was prominent and well respected. On May 14, 1634, he was made a freeman of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

It is interesting to note that Andrew Warner and his family came to America near the beginning of that great tide of emigration which started in 1629. By that time Plymouth and Salem had been settled, but the total English population of New England was hardly more that 800. In April of 1630, John Winthrop, first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, left for America. Later that year he was followed by 17 ships bearing over 1000 people. By 1634 the annual emigration had reached 4000. In 1640 the Long Parliament met, the power of Charles I was checked, religious persecution declined, and the flood of emigrants ceased. In those 11 years the population of New England grew from 800 to 26,000.

The "Mary (Humphrey) Warner" source gives her birth as before 13 Feb 1603, Thaxted, Essex County, England

http://www.otal.umd.edu/~walt/gen/htmfile/516.htm -------------------- Note: "Soldiers of King Philip's War, 1675" by George M. Bodge, Boston, 1906 lists an Andrew Warner from Hartford, CT enlisted in 1658 in an organized troop of horse (37 members) under the command of Major John Mason, commander of military forces in Connecticut. It's unknown if this is the same as Andrew Warner. -------------------- Due to persecution of the Puritans by Archbishop Laud, Warner left England. He came to America with Reverend Hooker (probably on the Ship Griffin, arriving 4 Sep 1633) and was a "freeman of the Mass. Bay Colony." He lived in Cambridge a few yards from Harvard College until selling his home and moving to Hartford, CT. From 1647 to 1650, he lived in Farmington CT, but returned to Hartford in 1650. Samuel Stone succeeded Rev. Hooker in 1647, causing a rift in the church that created the Second Church of Hartford. Stone moved to found the community of Hadley MA and was elected Select Man three times, in 1660, 1667, and 1673. Warner was a "malster," having learned the brewing business from his parents. -------------------- Geneology source: http://www.familyhistorypages.com/Warner.htm

Though Anderson (Great Migration Begins, p. 1928) says he migrated in 1633, Andrew might have arrived in Massachusetts as early as 2 November 1631. The Abbe Genealogy (p. 36) finds him in 1632 in Cambridge, where he took the freeman's oath, 14 May 1634 (NEHGR 3:92). In 1636, he joined Thomas Hooker's trek to Connecticut and participated in the founding of Hartford, where he was surveyor of highways (NEHGR, 94:280) and, by February 1640, deacon (Anderson). He appears to have been one of the original patentees for the settlement at Farmington, but may not have moved there (Anderson notwithstanding). In any event, we find him again in Hartford in 1650. In 1659, as a result of a dispute between church leaders, Andrew with his new wife, Esther Wakeman, widow of Thomas Seldon, removed to Hadley, where they were among the earliest settlers (Davis Warner, Warner Wanderings, Vol. 1, no. 1). On 16 February 1668, Andrew signed the petition against imposts in Hadley. Other signers included Joseph Wariner, Danille Wardner, John Warner, and Isack Warner (NEHGR 9:90). Well into his 80's, Andrew took the oath of allegiance in Hadley, 8 February 1679. He died there in 1684; his widow, Esther, died in 1693. See also Savage 4:418 and Warner and Nichols, The Descendants of Andrew Warner (New Haven, 1919). --------------------

   family moved to Hatfield Broad Oak about 1609; Andrew received some education and accumulated some property before he left England in 1631 on the ship Lyon. He lived in Cambridge (then called Newtowne) MA in 1632. He moved to Hartford CT about 1636 and was a deacon in Thomas Hooker's church. His name is on the Founders' Monument in Hartford.
   After Hooker died in 1647 Andrew and several others had disputes with Hooker's associate Samuel Stone and left Hartford to establish a community at Hadley MA in 1659.
   Besides being a deacon Andrew was a malster, owned considerable acres of land, and was active in local government his entire adult life. There is no grave marker in Hadley MA but Mount Warner is nearby.

-------------------- The Founders of Hartford

Andrew Warner1 came from Hatfield, Co. Gloucester, son of John Warner, yeoman in said Shire and Town; Cambridge, 1632, freeman May 14, 1634;2 one of the Commissioners for ordering affair at Connecticut, March, 1635-6 ; an original proprietor at Hartford, where his home-lot in 1639 was on the south bank of the Little River. He m. in Hartford, prob. as second wife, Hester, widow of Thomas Selden; he was chosen Deacon of the First Church, Oct., 1633 ; removed to Hadley in 1659, with Elder Goodwin and the “withdrawers;” took the oath of allegiance at Hadley, Feb. 8, 1679, and d. there Dec. 18, 1684, or possibly the month following, a. almost 90. His widow, Hester, d. 1693.

1 From old acct. book of Jabez Warner, of Middletown, b. 1710, quoted by Andrew F. Warner in letter to R. R. Hinman, May 14, 1849.

--------------------


Andrew Warner Birth 1595 in Cambridge, Essex, , England Death 18 Dec 1684 in Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States

Parents John Warner 1568 – 1614 Mary Purchase 1568 – 1627 Spouse & Children Mary Humphrey 1601 – 1672 Mary Warner 1626 – Mercy Warner 1626 – 1646 Robert Warner 1626 – 1690 Robert Warner 1626 – 1690 John WARNER 1629 – 1700 Hannah Warner 1632 – 1682 Andrew Warner 1632 – 1681

Daniel "Lieut" Warner

1633 – 1692 Ruth Warner 1639 – 1732 Jacob WARNER 1641 – 1711 Spouse & Children Esther Wakeman 1617 – 1693

Timeline(View details) 1595 Birth Cambridge, Essex, , England 5 source citations 1624 15 Oct Age: 29 Marriage to Mary Humphrey Thaxted, Essex, , England 1633 Age: 38 Arrival Cambridge, Massachusetts 1 source citation 1636 -1925 Age: 41 Residence 1 source citation 1650 -1800 Age: 55 Residence Connecticut, USA 1 source citation 1660 Age: 65 Marriage to Esther Wakeman Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States 2 source citations 1684 18 Dec Age: 89 Death Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States 2 source citations Origin Hatfield Broadoak, Essex, England

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Andrew Warner 1595-1684

ANDREW WARNER

ORIGIN: Hatfield Broadoak, Essex MIGRATION: 1633 FIRST RESIDENCE: Cambridge REMOVES: Hartford 1636, Farmington 1648, Hartford 1650, Hadley 1659 OCCUPATION: Maltster [ Goodwin Anc 1:28-29, citing John Pynchon account book]. CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: Admission to Cambridge church prior to 14 May 1634 implied by freemanship. Hartford deacon by February 1639[/40] [ HaBOP 57]. FREEMAN: 14 May 1634 [ MBCR 1:369]. EDUCATION: He signed his will. His inventory included "books" valued at 10s. OFFICES: Committee to prepare inventory of Cambridge lands, 3 February 1634/5 [ CaTR 12]; chosen Cambridge selectman, 23 November 1635 [CaTR 14]; hired by town to build fences, 8 February 1635/6 [CaTR 17]; licensed to haul alewives from the weir, and appointed to "see a cartway made to the weir," 23 April 1636 [CaTR 22]. ESTATE: On 4 November 1633 granted one acre for a cowyard in Cambridge [CaTR 6]; on 5 January 1633/4 the town of Cambridge sold to Andrew Warner a parcel of "swamp ground by the Old Field" [CaTR 7]; granted three acres of planting ground in the neck of land, 2 February 1633/4 [CaTR 7]; received a proportional share of five in the undivided meadow ground, 20 August 1635 [CaTR 13]; granted four acres of land, 8 February 1635/6 [CaTR 16].

  In the inventory of Cambridge lands, on 4 June 1635, Andrew Warner held seven parcels: one house and about one rood for a backside and a garden in town; one acre in the West End; three acres and a half in the Ox Marsh; half an acre with a house in the Ox Marsh; twelve acres and a half in the Old Field; eighteen acres in the neck; and fifteen acres and a half in the Great Marsh [ CaBOP 11-12]. On 20 December 1636 sold to George Cooke "my dwelling house in Newtowne with the yards, cowhouse, cowyard & my part in the Ox Marsh, and all other parcels of land, meadow, saltmarsh & ox pasture ..." [CaBOP 41-42].
  In February 1639[/40] lands recorded to "Andrew Warner Deacon to the Church of Christ there" included: "one parcel on which his dwelling house now standeth with other out houses, yards or gardens ... two acres"; "one parcel lying partly in the south meadow and partly in the oxpasture ... forty-six acres"; "one parcel lying in the south meadow ... three acres"; "one parcel in the forty acres containing ... seven acres more or less"; "one parcel lying in Hockanum ... eleven acres"; "one parcel lying in the little meadow ... one acre and two roods"; "one parcel of woodland ... thirty acres" [HaBOP 57-8].
  By February 1639[/40] Andrew Warner sold four acres of land owned by John Sabell to John Beddell [HaBOP 118].
  By March of 1648 Andrew Warner had acquired land at Farmington, but in 1650 he sold the land and returned to Hartford [Goodwin Anc 22, citing Farmington LR 2:36, 68].
  In the mill rates of 1655-59, Andrew Warner paid moderate sums, showing an upper middle class standing [HaBOP 497].
  On 18 November 1659 Andrew Warner sold his "now dwelling house," with his house lot and garden and orchard belonging to it, with "a parcel of upland" [HaBOP 58]. In February 1671[/2] the proportion in the undivided lands in Hartford assigned to Andrew Warner was forty-two acres [HaBOP 549]. 
  In his will, dated 18 June 1681 and proved 31 March 1685, Andrew Warner bequeathed "my loving wife Easter Werner according to a former agreement signed under my hand one hundred pounds to be paid out of my moveable estate"; to "my wife one half of my now dwelling house ..., the use of half the garden plot adjoining ..., the use of half the orchard ..., & the use of half the yards adjoining to the house" during her natural life; to "my son Jacob Werner the one half of my dwelling house and the whole of the said house at his mother's decease with the houselot containing eight acres with all the edifices & buildings thereon"; to "my son Jacob Werner also ten acres of meadow land lying in the great meadow belonging to Hadley viz: my six acre lot of plowing land & four acres of grassland lying in the swamp or Aquevitie commonly so-called," he to maintain his mother for the rest of her life; to "my son Isaack Werner the one-half of my allotment in Hoccanum"; to "my daughter Ruth Werner four acres of meadow in the great meadow abutting against the middle highway"; to "my son Andrew Werner" 10s.; to "my son Robert Werner" 10s.; to "my son John Werner" 10s.; to "my daughter Hills" 10s. and to "my daughter Pratt" 10s.; residue to executors "only paying out five pounds which I give to Mary Taylor the wife of John Taylor"; "my dear wife Easter Werner and my loving son Dan[ie]ll Werner" to be executors [ HamPR 1:248-49; Goodwin Anc 1:32-34].
  The inventory of the estate of "Andr[ew] Warner Sr. deceased who died December 18, 1684, aged about [88?] years," taken 22 December 1684, totalled £356 11s. 4d., of which £253 was real estate: "4 acres land in Hoccanum," £20; 2 acres & a rood at the burying yard," £5; "house & homestead," £65; "6 acres in the great meadow on the south side of the middle way," £30; "4 acres in the swamp," £32 [given as £8 for all four acres, but this must be the value per acre to produce the final sum given in the right column]; "4 acres in said meadow," £24; "4½ acres in Hoccanum," £20; "one piece of skirts there," £2; and "12 acres of land over the river," £55 [HamPR 1:249].
  The inventory of the estate of Esther Warner, dated 11 December 1693, totalled £99 15s. 3d., offset by £9 15s. 03d. in debts [Goodwin Anc 1:35, citing HamPR 3:5].

BIRTH: By about 1599 (based on date of marriage), son of John and Mary (Purchase) Warner [ TAG 26:152-53]. DEATH: Hadley 18 December 1684 (from inventory). MARRIAGE: (1) Thaxted, Essex, 5 October 1624 "Andrew Warner of Hatfield Magna married Mary Humfrey daughter of Robert of Thaxted" [TAG 26:152, 217]; she was baptized at Thaxted 13 February 1602[/3?], and was daughter of Robert and Ann (Holland) Humfrey [TAG 26:217-19]. She died by 1657.

  (2) By 1657 Esther (Wakeman) Selden, widow of Thomas Selden (inventory December 1693) and sister of SAMUEL WAKEMAN; she died by 27 September 1693 when Thomas and Joseph Selden [her sons with her first husband] took out administration on her estate [Goodwin Anc 1:35, citing HamPR Box 129, File 9].

CHILDREN:

   With first wife
   i   JOHN, b. say 1625; m. Hartford 1649 [day and month not given] Anna Norton [ HaVR 608; TAG 27:153-56].
   ii   MARY, b. say 1626; m. (1) Hartford 22 January 1645/6 John Steele [HaVR 606], son of JOHN STEELE; m. (2) in late 1655 or early 1656 WILLIAM HILLS.
  iii   ANDREW, b. say 1628; m. Milford 10 October 1653 Rebecca Fletcher, daughter of John Fletcher [Milford VR Barbour].
   iv   ROBERT, b. say 1630; m. (1) Middletown [blank] February 1654[/5?] Elizabeth Grant [ MidVR Barbour 476]; m. (2) Windsor 2 February 1674[/5] Deliverance (Hayes) Rockwell [ CTVR 13].
   v   HANNAH, b. say 1635; m. by 1655 Daniel Pratt (their child Hannah aged three years 10 May 1658 [ WMJ 110, 166]) [Goodwin Anc 1:37].
   vi   RUTH, b. about 1641 ("Wariner ___ about 16 y" 10 December 1657 [WMJ 369]); living unmarried on 18 June 1681 (date of father's will); perhaps m. John Kellogg [Warner Harrington 705].
   vii   DANIEL, b. say 1642; m. (1) by 1667 Mary _____ (Daniel Warner two and one quarter years old, son of Daniel Warner of Farmington, 19 May 1669 [WMJ 916]); m. (2) Hatfield 1 April 1674 Martha Boltwood [ Pynchon VR 48].
   viii   ISAAC, b. about 1644 (aged thirteen and a half 24 April 1658 [WMJ 106]); m. Hadley 31 May 1666 Sarah Boltwood [Pynchon VR 223].
  With second wife
   ix   JACOB, b. about 1658 (aged two years 22 July 1660 [WMJ 211]); m. (1) Rebecca _____; m. (2) by 1690 Elizabeth Goodman, daughter of RICHARD GOODMAN.

ASSOCIATIONS: One of the witnesses to the will of Andrew Warner was Mark Warner of Hadley, son of John Warner of Ipswich, Brookfield and Hadley, who was in turn son of William Warner of Ipswich. Both Andrew Warner and William Warner named sons Daniel. COMMENTS: The record of 3 March 1635/6 which names Andrew Warner one of the Massachusetts Bay commissioners for the new settlements on the Connecticut is an error for ANDREW WARD [MBCR 1:171].

  There is no date of death for the first wife of Andrew Warner and no date of marriage to his second wife, but the Winthrop medical records assist us in approximating the second event. Andrew Warner's youngest child, Jacob, was two years old on 22 July 1660 and therefore born about the middle of 1658 [WMJ 211]. Warner's first wife, baptized in 1603, would be far too old to have borne this child, and so Jacob must have been son of Warner's second wife. Beginning in November 1657 and continuing until March of the following year Winthrop treated Andrew Warner's wife (given name not stated) for lack of menstruation [WMJ 56, 63, 68, 79, 90]. Neither the doctor nor the patient thought she was pregnant, but she surely was, given Jacob's approximate date of birth.

BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: In 1915 Frank Farnsworth Starr compiled an excellent and exhaustive study of Andrew Warner and his family, with much greater detail than is given above on all aspects of his life, including his landholding [Goodwin Anc 1:17-37]. The Great Migration Begins Sketches PRESERVED PURITAN View Full Context

-------------------- Andrew Warner was of Hatfield Magna, Essex Co., England when he married Mary Humphrey of Thaxted, Essex Co. there in 1624. She was the Mayor's daughter.

Andrew Warner is first mentioned in America in Cambridge, then called "New Town," MA, on 7 January 1633 in the second entry in town records regarding the erection of houses and the division of the pale to enclose the common with the number of rods each settler was to build. 42 names are listed including Andrew Warner , 20 rods. 24 of the 42 built less than 10 rods and only 11 built as much as 20 rods, indicating the possibility that Andrew was already a resident of Cambridge and among the wealthier of the town. He was made a Freeman 14 May 1634 and served in many public positions in the town.

"The Descendants of Andrew Warne r" indicates that Andrew may have settled first at Mt. Wollaston, later Quincy, MA, as a member of the Braintree Co., but no proof has been established. It is believed that Andrew was an adherent of the outspoken minister, Rev. Hooker, a nd may have known of his preaching in Essex Co., England before Hooker's remova l to Holland and, later, America. It is known that the Braintree Company was kn own as "Hooker's Company" and they later removed to Newtowne.

"The homestead occupied by Andrew Warner is thus described in the 'Proprietor's records of the town of Cambridge:' 'June The 4th (1635)' 'Andrew Warner In the Towne one How se and about one Roode for a Backside and garden, March Lane on the south west, Creeke Lane on the northwest, Will Kellsey northeast, Mathew Allen on the sout heast.' According to Paige's History of Cambridge, Marsh Lane corresponds to th e present Elliot Street, and Creek Lane to Brattle Square. This places Andrew W arner's early home within a few rods of Harvard University, in the very heart o f Cambridge. Besides this home lot he also owned six other parcels land of land in Cambridge..." (The Descendants of Andrew Warner," pg. 16)

On 20 December 1636 Andrew Warner sold his dwelling house and all his other lands in Cambridg e to Capt. George Cook and either before or after this moved to Hartford, CT wi th Rev. Hooker and a group from the Cambridge area. The first mention of Andrew Warner in Hartford records describes his home lot in February, 1639, on the no rth side of the present Charter Oak Ave., a little east of Main Street. He also had 4 other parcels, totalling about 80 acres. He was described as Deacon of t he Church of Christ in Hartford and it is believed that he was made deacon whil e still in Cambridge. He was active in civic affairs while in Hartford, acting as Surveyor of Highways in 1639 & 1647, surveyor to divide the lands on the eas t side of the river in 1640, appointed to lay out highways in January, 1640, an d more. Andrew's name is listed on the Founders Monument in Hartford.

His na me does not appear in Hartford records from Jan. 1648 to April, 1650 and he may have resided in Farmington, CT during this time. In March, 1648, he owned 4 pa rcels of land in that town, but sold his property there by Feb. 1650 and return ed to Hartford.

After the death of Rev. Hooker in 1647, Rev. Stone was in ch arge of the church, but differences arose between Stone's position on some doct rinal issues regarding baptism, membership, and discipline. Andrew was of the a nti-Stone faction, known as the "Withdrawers." The result was that in 1659 a gr oup of 59 people from Hartford, Wethersfield and Windsor, moved from their home s and established the new town of Hadley, MA, up the Connecticut River. Andrew was about 65 years old at this time and had been a resident of Hartford for 20 years. Others in the group included Thomas Graves and Nathaniel Dickinson (see these names elsewhere in this genealogy). Andrew sold his Hartford homestead 17 Nov. 1659 to William Loveridge for 130 pounds, to be paid 1/3 in peas, 1/3 in wheat and 1/3 in hats - suggesting that, perhaps, Andrew was in the mercantile business or a trader. However, subequent entries.

Andrew was living in Hadley by 8 Oct. 1660, one of the first settlers, when a meeting was held at his house. His homestead was located on the west side of the street leading to the river at both ends, the 12th lot from the north end. The road from Amherst to Northhampton runs to the south of his lot. He later also owned 8 other pieces of poroperty totalling 42 acres. Andrew was also active in civic affairs in Hadley, despite his age, being named Selectman in 1660, 1667 and 1673.

Andrew died in Hadley 18 Dec. 1684 at age 90; son Daniel was executor of his estate. His will was probated 31 March 1685 in Hampshire Co. court. The inventory valued the estate at 365 pounds, 11, 4 and included 9 parcels of land, some at Hoccanum, Hartford Township

Made Freeman on General Court, May 14th, 1634.

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Andrew Warner's Timeline

1595
1595
Great Waltham, Essex, England
1595
Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England
1595
Or, Cambridge, , England
1595
Or, Cambridge, , England
1595
OR, Cambridge, , England
1595
OR, Cambridge, England
1595
or, Cambridge, , England
1595
Or, Cambridge, , England
1615
1615
Age 20
Hatfield Heath, Essex, England, (Present UK)
1620
1620
Age 25
Hatfield, Essex, England