Anna Tuthill Symmes , First Lady

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Anna Tuthill Harrison (Symmes)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Walpack, Sussex, New Jersey, United States
Death: Died in North Bend, Hamilton, Ohio, United States
Place of Burial: Harrison Tomb, North Bend,Hamilton, OH
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Judge John Cleves Symmes; John Cleves Symmes; Anna Tuthill and Anna Tuthill
Wife of William Henry Harrison and William Henry Harrison, 9th President of the United States
Mother of Rep. John Scott Harrison; John Cleves Symmes Harrison; Elizabeth Bassett Harrison; Lucy Singleton Harrison; William Henry Harrison, Jr and 15 others
Sister of Maria Symmes

Occupation: 9th First Lady of the United States of America, First Lady of the United States of America
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Anna Tuthill Symmes , First Lady

Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison (July 25, 1775 - February 25, 1864), wife of President William Henry Harrison and grandmother of President Benjamin Harrison, was nominally First Lady of the United States during her husband's one-month term in 1841, but she never entered the White House.

Anna was born at Flatbrookville, Walpack Township, New Jersey on July 25, 1775 to Judge John Cleves and Anna Tuthill Symmes of Long Island. Her father was a Chief Justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court and later became a prominent landowner in southwestern Ohio. When her mother died in 1776 her father disguised himself as a British soldier to carry her on horseback through the British lines to her grandparents on Long Island, who cared for her during the war. Her father was also a New Jersey delegate to the Continental Congress and the Chairman of the Sussex County Committee of Safety.

She grew up in Long Island, receiving an unusually broad education for a woman of the times. She attended Clinton Academy at Easthampton, Long Island, and the private school of Isabella Graham in New York City.

When she was thirteen years old, Anna went with her father and stepmother into the Ohio wilderness, where they settled at North Bend, Ohio. While visiting relatives in Lexington, Kentucky in the spring of 1795, she met Lieutenant William Henry Harrison, in town on military business. Harrison was stationed at nearby Fort Washington. Anna's father thoroughly disapproved of Harrison, largely because he wanted to spare his daughter the hardships of army camp life. Despite his decree that the two stop seeing each other, the courtship flourished behind his back.

They married on November 25, 1795 at the home of Dr. Stephen Wood, treasurer of the Northwest Territory, at North Bend (her father was away in Cincinnati on business). The couple honeymooned at Fort Washington, as Harrison was still on duty. Two weeks later, at a farewell dinner for General "Mad" Anthony Wayne, Symmes confronted his new son-in-law for the first time since their wedding. Addressing him sternly, he demanded to know how he intended to support his daughter. Not until his son-in-law had achieved fame on the battlefield did Symmes come to accept him.

The couple apparently had a happy marriage despite the succession of tragedies in the untimely deaths of five of their grown children.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_Tuthill_Symmes

Birthplace also reported as Flatbrook NJ and Morristown NJ. -------------------- http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/firstladies/ah9.html

Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison

Anna Harrison was too ill to travel when her husband set out from Ohio in 1841 for his inauguration. It was a long trip and a difficult one even by steamboat and railroad, with February weather uncertain at best, and she at age 65 was well acquainted with the rigors of frontier journeys.

As a girl of 19, bringing pretty clothes and dainty manners, she went out to Ohio with her father, Judge John Cleves Symmes, who had taken up land for settlement on the "north bend" of the Ohio River. She had grown up a young lady of the East, completing her education at a boarding school in New York City.

A clandestine marriage on November 25, 1795, united Anna Symmes and Lt. William Henry Harrison, an experienced soldier at 22. Though the young man came from one of the best families of Virginia, Judge Symmes did not want his daughter to face the hard life of frontier forts; but eventually, seeing her happiness, he accepted her choice.

Though Harrison won fame as an Indian fighter and hero of the War of 1812, he spent much of his life in a civilian career. His service in Congress as territorial delegate from Ohio gave Anna and their two children a chance to visit his family at Berkeley, their plantation on the James River. Her third child was born on that trip, at Richmond in September 1800. Harrison's appointment as governor of Indiana Territory took them even farther into the wilderness; he built a handsome house at Vincennes that blended fortress and plantation mansion. Five more children were born to Anna.

Facing war in 1812, the family went to the farm at North Bend. Before peace was assured, she had borne two more children. There, at news of her husband's landslide electoral victory in 1840, home-loving Anna said simply: "I wish that my husband's friends had left him where he is, happy and contented in retirement."

When she decided not to go to Washington with him, the President-elect asked his daughter-in-law Jane Irwin Harrison, widow of his namesake son, to accompany him and act as hostess until Anna's proposed arrival in May. Half a dozen other relatives happily went with them. On April 4, exactly one month after his inauguration, he died, so Anna never made the journey. She had already begun her packing when she learned of her loss.

Accepting grief with admirable dignity, she stayed at her home in North Bend until the house burned in 1858; she lived nearby with her last surviving child, John Scott Harrison, until she died in February 1864 at the age of 88.

  • -------------------------------------
  • The descendants of William and Elizabeth Tuttle, who came from old to New England in 1635, and settled in New Haven in 1639, with numerous biographical notes and sketches : also, some account of the descendants of John Tuttle, of Ipswich; and Henry Tuthill, of Hingham, Mass. (1883)
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/descendantsofwil01tutt#page/n71/mode/2up
  • 22. Henry Tuthill was father of Henry 2d, who was father of Henry 3d, whose dau. Anna Tuthill, m. John Cleves (s. of Rev. Timothy) Symmes, b. July 10, 1742. He was an officer in the rev. army, and after one of the judges of the Supreme court of New Jersey. Not long after the war he bought a tract of land some twenty miles in length, on the north side of the Oldo river, including the site of Cincinnati. He removed to Ohio and res. at North Bend, then called Cleves, having been appointed by Washington U. S. Dist. Judge for the North West Ter. He d. at N. B., Feb., 1614. He m. (2) Widow Halsey of N. J.; (3) Susanna, dau. of Hon. Wm. Livingston of N. J. Her sister was wife of John Jay. By 1st m. he had;
  • 1. 'ANNA, who lived with her grandfather Tuthill at Southold, educated at the female academy at E. Hampton; afterwards a pupil of Mrs. Isabella Graham, and res. in her family. In 1764 accompanied her father and step-mother to res. at No. Bend. where she m. Nov. 22, 1795, William Henry Harrison, then a young officer in command of Fort Hamilton; afterwards President of the United States, in which office he d. in the White House at Washington. She d. Feb. 25, 1861, a. 88 yrs. and 7 months. About the year 1853 the compiler while engaged in surveying a route for the Cincinnati & St. Louis R. R., accepted the proffered hospitality of one of the sons of President Harrrison, then living a few miles below North Bend (Hon. Scott Harrison.) Mr. H. referred to his Tuthill relationships, saying his family had always held them in high esteem. Rev. Joseph Tuthill Daryea, D. D., is of this family.
  • -------------------
  • Tuthill family of Tharston, Norfolk County, England and Southold, Suffolk County, New York; also written Totyl, Totehill, Tothill, Tuttle, etc (1898)
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/tuthillfamilyoft00aker#page/13/mode/2up
  • i. Henry, of Acquebogue, b. before Dec., 1715, d. 17 Sept., 1793; m. 16 Mch., 1738, Phoebe Horton (Caleb, Caleb, Caleb, Barnabas), d. 3 Nov., 1793, in her 75th yr. Henry's grand-da., 'ANNA SYMMES, m. President WM. HENRY HARRISON, and was the grandmother of President Benjamin Harrison.
  • --------------------------------------

-------------------- Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison (July 25, 1775 - February 25, 1864), wife of President William Henry Harrison and grandmother of President Benjamin Harrison, was nominally First Lady of the United States during her husband's one-month term in 1841, but she never entered the White House.

Anna was born at Flatbrookville, Walpack Township, New Jersey on July 25, 1775 to Judge John Cleves and Anna Tuthill Symmes of Long Island. Her father was a Chief Justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court and later became a prominent landowner in southwestern Ohio. When her mother died in 1776 her father disguised himself as a British soldier to carry her on horseback through the British lines to her grandparents on Long Island, who cared for her during the war. Her father was also a New Jersey delegate to the Continental Congress and the Chairman of the Sussex County Committee of Safety.

She grew up in Long Island, receiving an unusually broad education for a woman of the times. She attended Clinton Academy at Easthampton, Long Island, and the private school of Isabella Graham in New York City.

When she was thirteen years old, Anna went with her father and stepmother into the Ohio wilderness, where they settled at North Bend, Ohio. While visiting relatives in Lexington, Kentucky in the spring of 1795, she met Lieutenant William Henry Harrison, in town on military business. Harrison was stationed at nearby Fort Washington. Anna's father thoroughly disapproved of Harrison, largely because he wanted to spare his daughter the hardships of army camp life. Despite his decree that the two stop seeing each other, the courtship flourished behind his back.

They married on November 25, 1795 at the home of Dr. Stephen Wood, treasurer of the Northwest Territory, at North Bend (her father was away in Cincinnati on business). The couple honeymooned at Fort Washington, as Harrison was still on duty. Two weeks later, at a farewell dinner for General "Mad" Anthony Wayne, Symmes confronted his new son-in-law for the first time since their wedding. Addressing him sternly, he demanded to know how he intended to support his daughter. Not until his son-in-law had achieved fame on the battlefield did Symmes come to accept him.

The couple apparently had a happy marriage despite the succession of tragedies in the untimely deaths of five of their grown children.

Anna Harrison was too ill to travel when her husband set out from Ohio in 1841 for his inauguration. It was a long trip and a difficult one even by steamboat and railroad, with February weather uncertain at best, and she at age 65 was well acquainted with the rigors of frontier journeys.

As a girl of 19, bringing pretty clothes and dainty manners, she went out to Ohio with her father, Judge John Cleves Symmes, who had taken up land for settlement on the "north bend" of the Ohio River. She had grown up a young lady of the East, completing her education at a boarding school in New York City.

A clandestine marriage on November 25, 1795, united Anna Symmes and Lt. William Henry Harrison, an experienced soldier at 22. Though the young man came from one of the best families of Virginia, Judge Symmes did not want his daughter to face the hard life of frontier forts; but eventually, seeing her happiness, he accepted her choice.

Though Harrison won fame as an Indian fighter and hero of the War of 1812, he spent much of his life in a civilian career. His service in Congress as territorial delegate from Ohio gave Anna and their two children a chance to visit his family at Berkeley, their plantation on the James River. Her third child was born on that trip, at Richmond in September 1800. Harrison's appointment as governor of Indiana Territory took them even farther into the wilderness; he built a handsome house at Vincennes that blended fortress and plantation mansion. Five more children were born to Anna.

Facing war in 1812, the family went to the farm at North Bend. Before peace was assured, she had borne two more children. There, at news of her husband's landslide electoral victory in 1840, home-loving Anna said simply: "I wish that my husband's friends had left him where he is, happy and contented in retirement."

When she decided not to go to Washington with him, the President-elect asked his daughter-in-law Jane Irwin Harrison, widow of his namesake son, to accompany him and act as hostess until Anna's proposed arrival in May. Half a dozen other relatives happily went with them. On April 4, exactly one month after his inauguration, he died, so Anna never made the journey. She had already begun her packing when she learned of her loss.

Accepting grief with admirable dignity, she stayed at her home in North Bend until the house burned in 1858; she lived nearby with her last surviving child, John Scott Harrison, until she died in February 1864 at the age of 88.

------------------------------------- The descendants of William and Elizabeth Tuttle, who came from old to New England in 1635, and settled in New Haven in 1639, with numerous biographical notes and sketches : also, some account of the descendants of John Tuttle, of Ipswich; and Henry Tuthill, of Hingham, Mass. (1883)

Henry Tuthill was father of Henry 2d, who was father of Henry 3d, whose dau. Anna Tuthill, m. John Cleves (s. of Rev. Timothy) Symmes, b. July 10, 1742. He was an officer in the rev. army, and after one of the judges of the Supreme court of New Jersey. Not long after the war he bought a tract of land some twenty miles in length, on the north side of the Oldo river, including the site of Cincinnati. He removed to Ohio and res. at North Bend, then called Cleves, having been appointed by Washington U. S. Dist. Judge for the North West Ter. He d. at N. B., Feb., 1614. He m. (2) Widow Halsey of N. J.; (3) Susanna, dau. of Hon. Wm. Livingston of N. J. Her sister was wife of John Jay. By 1st m. he had;

ANNA, who lived with her grandfather Tuthill at Southold, educated at the female academy at E. Hampton; afterwards a pupil of Mrs. Isabella Graham, and res. in her family. In 1764 accompanied her father and step-mother to res. at No. Bend. where she m. Nov. 22, 1795, William Henry Harrison, then a young officer in command of Fort Hamilton; afterwards President of the United States, in which office he d. in the White House at Washington. She d. Feb. 25, 1861, a. 88 yrs. and 7 months. About the year 1853 the compiler while engaged in surveying a route for the Cincinnati & St. Louis R. R., accepted the proffered hospitality of one of the sons of President Harrrison, then living a few miles below North Bend (Hon. Scott Harrison.) Mr. H. referred to his Tuthill relationships, saying his family had always held them in high esteem. Rev. Joseph Tuthill Daryea, D. D., is of this family.

Tuthill family of Tharston, Norfolk County, England and Southold, Suffolk County, New York;

Henry, of Acquebogue, b. before Dec., 1715, d. 17 Sept., 1793; m. 16 Mch., 1738, Phoebe Horton (Caleb, Caleb, Caleb, Barnabas), d. 3 Nov., 1793, in her 75th yr. Henry's grand-da., 'ANNA SYMMES, m. President WM. HENRY HARRISON, and was the grandmother of President Benjamin Harrison.

A clandestine marriage on November 25, 1795, united Anna Symmes and Lt. William Henry Harrison, an experienced soldier at 22. Though the young man came from one of the best families of Virginia, Judge Symmes did not want his daughter to face the hard life of frontier forts; but eventualy, seeing her happiness, he accepted her choice.

Though Harrison won fame as an Indian fighter and hero of the War of 1812, he spent much of his life in a civilian career. His service in Congress as territorial delegate from Ohio gave Anna and their two children a chance to visit his family at Berkeley, their plantation on the James River. Her third child was born on that trip, at Richmond in September 1800. Harrison's appointment as governor of Indiana Territory took them even farther into the wilderness; he built a handsome house at Vincennes that blended fortress and plantation mansion. Five more children were born to Anna.

Facing war in 1812, the family went to the farm at North Bend. Before peace was assured, she had borne two more children. There, at news of her husband's landslide electoral victory in 1840, home-loving Anna said simply: "I wish that my husband's friends had left him where he is, happy and contented in retirement."

When she decided not to go to Washington with him, the President-elect asked his daughter-in-law Jane Irwin Harrison, widow of his namesake son, to accompany him and act as hostess until Anna's proposed arrival in May. Half a dozen other relatives happily went with them. On April 4, exactly one month after his inauguration, he died, so Anna never made the journey. She had already begun her packing when she learned of her loss.

Accepting grief with admirable dignity, she stayed at her home in North Bend until the house burned in 1858; she lived nearby with her last surviving child, John Scott Harrison, until she died in February 1864 at the age of 88.

-------------------- Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison (July 25, 1775 - February 25, 1864), wife of President William Henry Harrison and grandmother of President Benjamin Harrison, was nominally First Lady of the United States during her husband's one-month term in 1841, but she never entered the White House.

Anna was born at Flatbrookville, Walpack Township, New Jersey on July 25, 1775 to Judge John Cleves and Anna Tuthill Symmes of Long Island. Her father was a Chief Justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court and later became a prominent landowner in southwestern Ohio. When her mother died in 1776 her father disguised himself as a British soldier to carry her on horseback through the British lines to her grandparents on Long Island, who cared for her during the war. Her father was also a New Jersey delegate to the Continental Congress and the Chairman of the Sussex County Committee of Safety.

She grew up in Long Island, receiving an unusually broad education for a woman of the times. She attended Clinton Academy at Easthampton, Long Island, and the private school of Isabella Graham in New York City.

When she was thirteen years old, Anna went with her father and stepmother into the Ohio wilderness, where they settled at North Bend, Ohio. While visiting relatives in Lexington, Kentucky in the spring of 1795, she met Lieutenant William Henry Harrison, in town on military business. Harrison was stationed at nearby Fort Washington. Anna's father thoroughly disapproved of Harrison, largely because he wanted to spare his daughter the hardships of army camp life. Despite his decree that the two stop seeing each other, the courtship flourished behind his back.

They married on November 25, 1795 at the home of Dr. Stephen Wood, treasurer of the Northwest Territory, at North Bend (her father was away in Cincinnati on business). The couple honeymooned at Fort Washington, as Harrison was still on duty. Two weeks later, at a farewell dinner for General "Mad" Anthony Wayne, Symmes confronted his new son-in-law for the first time since their wedding. Addressing him sternly, he demanded to know how he intended to support his daughter. Not until his son-in-law had achieved fame on the battlefield did Symmes come to accept him.

The couple apparently had a happy marriage despite the succession of tragedies in the untimely deaths of five of their grown children.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_Tuthill_Symmes

Birthplace also reported as Flatbrook NJ and Morristown NJ. -------------------- http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/firstladies/ah9.html

Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison

Anna Harrison was too ill to travel when her husband set out from Ohio in 1841 for his inauguration. It was a long trip and a difficult one even by steamboat and railroad, with February weather uncertain at best, and she at age 65 was well acquainted with the rigors of frontier journeys.

As a girl of 19, bringing pretty clothes and dainty manners, she went out to Ohio with her father, Judge John Cleves Symmes, who had taken up land for settlement on the "north bend" of the Ohio River. She had grown up a young lady of the East, completing her education at a boarding school in New York City.

A clandestine marriage on November 25, 1795, united Anna Symmes and Lt. William Henry Harrison, an experienced soldier at 22. Though the young man came from one of the best families of Virginia, Judge Symmes did not want his daughter to face the hard life of frontier forts; but eventually, seeing her happiness, he accepted her choice.

Though Harrison won fame as an Indian fighter and hero of the War of 1812, he spent much of his life in a civilian career. His service in Congress as territorial delegate from Ohio gave Anna and their two children a chance to visit his family at Berkeley, their plantation on the James River. Her third child was born on that trip, at Richmond in September 1800. Harrison's appointment as governor of Indiana Territory took them even farther into the wilderness; he built a handsome house at Vincennes that blended fortress and plantation mansion. Five more children were born to Anna.

Facing war in 1812, the family went to the farm at North Bend. Before peace was assured, she had borne two more children. There, at news of her husband's landslide electoral victory in 1840, home-loving Anna said simply: "I wish that my husband's friends had left him where he is, happy and contented in retirement."

When she decided not to go to Washington with him, the President-elect asked his daughter-in-law Jane Irwin Harrison, widow of his namesake son, to accompany him and act as hostess until Anna's proposed arrival in May. Half a dozen other relatives happily went with them. On April 4, exactly one month after his inauguration, he died, so Anna never made the journey. She had already begun her packing when she learned of her loss.

Accepting grief with admirable dignity, she stayed at her home in North Bend until the house burned in 1858; she lived nearby with her last surviving child, John Scott Harrison, until she died in February 1864 at the age of 88.

------------------------------------- The descendants of William and Elizabeth Tuttle, who came from old to New England in 1635, and settled in New Haven in 1639, with numerous biographical notes and sketches : also, some account of the descendants of John Tuttle, of Ipswich; and Henry Tuthill, of Hingham, Mass. (1883) http://www.archive.org/stream/descendantsofwil01tutt#page/n71/mode/2up 22. Henry Tuthill was father of Henry 2d, who was father of Henry 3d, whose dau. Anna Tuthill, m. John Cleves (s. of Rev. Timothy) Symmes, b. July 10, 1742. He was an officer in the rev. army, and after one of the judges of the Supreme court of New Jersey. Not long after the war he bought a tract of land some twenty miles in length, on the north side of the Oldo river, including the site of Cincinnati. He removed to Ohio and res. at North Bend, then called Cleves, having been appointed by Washington U. S. Dist. Judge for the North West Ter. He d. at N. B., Feb., 1614. He m. (2) Widow Halsey of N. J.; (3) Susanna, dau. of Hon. Wm. Livingston of N. J. Her sister was wife of John Jay. By 1st m. he had; 1. 'ANNA, who lived with her grandfather Tuthill at Southold, educated at the female academy at E. Hampton; afterwards a pupil of Mrs. Isabella Graham, and res. in her family. In 1764 accompanied her father and step-mother to res. at No. Bend. where she m. Nov. 22, 1795, William Henry Harrison, then a young officer in command of Fort Hamilton; afterwards President of the United States, in which office he d. in the White House at Washington. She d. Feb. 25, 1861, a. 88 yrs. and 7 months. About the year 1853 the compiler while engaged in surveying a route for the Cincinnati & St. Louis R. R., accepted the proffered hospitality of one of the sons of President Harrrison, then living a few miles below North Bend (Hon. Scott Harrison.) Mr. H. referred to his Tuthill relationships, saying his family had always held them in high esteem. Rev. Joseph Tuthill Daryea, D. D., is of this family. -------------------- Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison (July 25, 1775 - February 25, 1864), wife of President William Henry Harrison and grandmother of President Benjamin Harrison, was nominally First Lady of the United States during her husband's one-month term in 1841, but she never entered the White House.

Anna was born at Flatbrookville, Walpack Township, New Jersey on July 25, 1775 to Judge John Cleves and Anna Tuthill Symmes of Long Island. Her father was a Chief Justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court and later became a prominent landowner in southwestern Ohio. When her mother died in 1776 her father disguised himself as a British soldier to carry her on horseback through the British lines to her grandparents on Long Island, who cared for her during the war. Her father was also a New Jersey delegate to the Continental Congress and the Chairman of the Sussex County Committee of Safety.

She grew up in Long Island, receiving an unusually broad education for a woman of the times. She attended Clinton Academy at Easthampton, Long Island, and the private school of Isabella Graham in New York City.

When she was thirteen years old, Anna went with her father and stepmother into the Ohio wilderness, where they settled at North Bend, Ohio. While visiting relatives in Lexington, Kentucky in the spring of 1795, she met Lieutenant William Henry Harrison, in town on military business. Harrison was stationed at nearby Fort Washington. Anna's father thoroughly disapproved of Harrison, largely because he wanted to spare his daughter the hardships of army camp life. Despite his decree that the two stop seeing each other, the courtship flourished behind his back.

They married on November 25, 1795 at the home of Dr. Stephen Wood, treasurer of the Northwest Territory, at North Bend (her father was away in Cincinnati on business). The couple honeymooned at Fort Washington, as Harrison was still on duty. Two weeks later, at a farewell dinner for General "Mad" Anthony Wayne, Symmes confronted his new son-in-law for the first time since their wedding. Addressing him sternly, he demanded to know how he intended to support his daughter. Not until his son-in-law had achieved fame on the battlefield did Symmes come to accept him.

The couple apparently had a happy marriage despite the succession of tragedies in the untimely deaths of five of their grown children.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_Tuthill_Symmes

Birthplace also reported as Flatbrook NJ and Morristown NJ. -------------------- http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/firstladies/ah9.html

Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison

Anna Harrison was too ill to travel when her husband set out from Ohio in 1841 for his inauguration. It was a long trip and a difficult one even by steamboat and railroad, with February weather uncertain at best, and she at age 65 was well acquainted with the rigors of frontier journeys.

As a girl of 19, bringing pretty clothes and dainty manners, she went out to Ohio with her father, Judge John Cleves Symmes, who had taken up land for settlement on the "north bend" of the Ohio River. She had grown up a young lady of the East, completing her education at a boarding school in New York City.

A clandestine marriage on November 25, 1795, united Anna Symmes and Lt. William Henry Harrison, an experienced soldier at 22. Though the young man came from one of the best families of Virginia, Judge Symmes did not want his daughter to face the hard life of frontier forts; but eventually, seeing her happiness, he accepted her choice.

Though Harrison won fame as an Indian fighter and hero of the War of 1812, he spent much of his life in a civilian career. His service in Congress as territorial delegate from Ohio gave Anna and their two children a chance to visit his family at Berkeley, their plantation on the James River. Her third child was born on that trip, at Richmond in September 1800. Harrison's appointment as governor of Indiana Territory took them even farther into the wilderness; he built a handsome house at Vincennes that blended fortress and plantation mansion. Five more children were born to Anna.

Facing war in 1812, the family went to the farm at North Bend. Before peace was assured, she had borne two more children. There, at news of her husband's landslide electoral victory in 1840, home-loving Anna said simply: "I wish that my husband's friends had left him where he is, happy and contented in retirement."

When she decided not to go to Washington with him, the President-elect asked his daughter-in-law Jane Irwin Harrison, widow of his namesake son, to accompany him and act as hostess until Anna's proposed arrival in May. Half a dozen other relatives happily went with them. On April 4, exactly one month after his inauguration, he died, so Anna never made the journey. She had already begun her packing when she learned of her loss.

Accepting grief with admirable dignity, she stayed at her home in North Bend until the house burned in 1858; she lived nearby with her last surviving child, John Scott Harrison, until she died in February 1864 at the age of 88.

------------------------------------- The descendants of William and Elizabeth Tuttle, who came from old to New England in 1635, and settled in New Haven in 1639, with numerous biographical notes and sketches : also, some account of the descendants of John Tuttle, of Ipswich; and Henry Tuthill, of Hingham, Mass. (1883) http://www.archive.org/stream/descendantsofwil01tutt#page/n71/mode/2up 22. Henry Tuthill was father of Henry 2d, who was father of Henry 3d, whose dau. Anna Tuthill, m. John Cleves (s. of Rev. Timothy) Symmes, b. July 10, 1742. He was an officer in the rev. army, and after one of the judges of the Supreme court of New Jersey. Not long after the war he bought a tract of land some twenty miles in length, on the north side of the Oldo river, including the site of Cincinnati. He removed to Ohio and res. at North Bend, then called Cleves, having been appointed by Washington U. S. Dist. Judge for the North West Ter. He d. at N. B., Feb., 1614. He m. (2) Widow Halsey of N. J.; (3) Susanna, dau. of Hon. Wm. Livingston of N. J. Her sister was wife of John Jay. By 1st m. he had; 1. 'ANNA, who lived with her grandfather Tuthill at Southold, educated at the female academy at E. Hampton; afterwards a pupil of Mrs. Isabella Graham, and res. in her family. In 1764 accompanied her father and step-mother to res. at No. Bend. where she m. Nov. 22, 1795, William Henry Harrison, then a young officer in command of Fort Hamilton; afterwards President of the United States, in which office he d. in the White House at Washington. She d. Feb. 25, 1861, a. 88 yrs. and 7 months. About the year 1853 the compiler while engaged in surveying a route for the Cincinnati & St. Louis R. R., accepted the proffered hospitality of one of the sons of President Harrrison, then living a few miles below North Bend (Hon. Scott Harrison.) Mr. H. referred to his Tuthill relationships, saying his family had always held them in high esteem. Rev. Joseph Tuthill Daryea, D. D., is of this family.

view all 24

Anna Tuthill Symmes , First Lady's Timeline

1775
July 25, 1775
Walpack, Sussex, New Jersey, United States
1795
November 22, 1795
Age 20
North Bend, Oh
1796
September 29, 1796
Age 21
September 29, 1796
Age 21
Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, United States
1798
October 28, 1798
Age 23
October 28, 1798
Age 23
Ft. Washington, now Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
1800
September 5, 1800
Age 25
September 5, 1800
Age 25
Richmond, Virginia, United States
1802
September 3, 1802
Age 27
September 30, 1802
Age 27
Knox, IN