Anne Françoise Roland (c.1697 - 1758)

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Birthplace: St Germain, Paris, Ile-de-France, France
Death: Died in Point Coupee Parish, Louisiana
Managed by: Joel Scott Cognevich
Last Updated:

About Anne Françoise Roland

Anne Francoise Roland (1700-1758) packed a great deal of living into her comparatively short 58 years. Born in Paris, the daughter of merchant Jean Baptiste Ambrosie Roland (Rolland), her mother evidently died when she was a young girl, and after that time her father was unable to control her. By her teenage years she had become the Eighteenth Century equivalent of a juvenile delinquent, and had evidently been arrested several times. By 1719, her father was at the end of his patience and resourcefulness as to how to deal with his headstrong daughter. He sent a petition to DeMachault, the Chief of Police in Paris, the content of which is preserved in the records of the Bastille (#10,673): "My Lord: Ambroise Jean Baptiste Roland, employed (as a clerk) in the offices of the Paris Market petitions very humbly as well as the nearest relations of Anne Francoise Roland, age approximately twenty-two years, daughter of your suppliant and of the late Jeanne Catherine Lucas her mother, that although the said Roland her father has been able to give her a good education, he has had the misfortune not to have succeeded in his attempts. On the contrary this young woman having revealed from her youngest years indications of a bad disposition, her father although without the means to prevent future troubles made every effort, bringing her into a (religious) community in order that she might learn her religious duties and so to try to repress her bad habits, in which Community she remained for two and on-half years, whence her father had made her leave at the age of seventeen to place her with an accomplished dressmaker, there to learn a trade, at which the girl hardly applied herself, but on the contrary increased her bad habits as she grew older, and deprecating the pleas and warnings of her father, she finally abandoned herself to such a libertine existence that she dishonored her family, as you can see, my Lord, by the statement of her relatives given to commissioner LeVergee and the affidavit of the Curate of St. Germain L'Auxerrois, her parish of residence, as well as that of her father............" The other statements referred to go into further detail as to the young girl's excesses, which principally consisted in staying out late, consorting with the wrong people, disobeying her stepmother, and perhaps the most scandalous: frequenting the public dance hall. The result of the aggrieved family's petition is that Anne Francoise was sent to the Selpetriere, a " house of detention", where she was to be "reformed". For this service her father paid 100 livres!

An article that appeared in Volume IV, Number 2 of the The Imperial St. Landry Genealogical and Historical Society publication adds an interesting fact to the story of Anne Francoise's early years:

"...Thanks to her overly strict father and jealous stepmother, she was jailed in Selpetriere prison in France and ruled suitable to be sent to the islands. The women that she was placed in prison with were said to be extraordinarily deprived of morals. 1719: Anne Francoise Rolland, eighteen years old of Paris, was charged with debaucheries and public prostitution."

The article goes on to say that there was never any concrete evidence to show that the charge of prostitution was valid and that the crimes that Anne was accused of would be laughed at today. Anne's worst crime was probably the fact that she was a free spirit and rebelled at the strict treatment handed out to her by her step- mother. If this is true, it would indicate that Anne's mother, Jeanne Bonnet was deceased before 1719. - Anne Francoise was listed as godmother to someone in Mobile on 8-10-1721

Anne listed her parents differently on 2 marriage documents: as Francois Roland & Madeleine Charbonnier, and earlier as Jean Baptiste Roland & Jeanne Bonnet. After Gab.Laurent's death, Anne married Jean Stephan Roquancourt 23 Feb 1737, had two more children

Notes from "My Louisiana Lineage" by Cathy Lemoine Sturgell. - GENERAL - Anne Francoise was born in Paris c1699 (year of birth based on 1745 Census record), Parish of St. Germain (l'Aurerois) - The daughter of a merchant, Jean Baptiste Ambroise Roland (Rolland, Rolard) and his wife, Jeanne Bonnet, Anne arrived in the New World in 1719 aboard the vessel, "Mutine". According to Albert J. Robichaux, Jr. in German Coast Families: European Origins and Settlement in Colonial Louisiana, the vessel La Mutine carried five private passengers and ninety-six females sent from Paris by order of the King. The ship was commanded by M. de Martonne and sailed from Le Havre after October 20, 1719, arriving at Dauphin Island on February 28, 1720. For a complete passenger listing, see Glenn Conrad's First Families of Louisiana, Volume I. - Supposedly, her mother had died when Anne was young and her father felt unable to control her.

"By her teenage years, she had become the equivalent of an 18th century juvenile delinquent, and had evidently been arrested several times. By 1719, her father was at the end of his patience and resourcefulness as to how to deal with his headstrong daughter. He sent a petition to De Machault, the Chief of Police in Paris reporting her behavior. Anne Francoise Roland, at the age of 21, was put aboard the sloop, 'La Mutine' in June of 1719 at Le Havre with approximately 100 other women, with the designation of 'sent from Paris by order of the King'. France was glad to rid itself of these troublesome women, and it is probable that despite the sure knowledge of the hard life awaiting them in desolate Louisiana, many were glad of the opportunity to begin their lives anew."

- CENSUS INFORMATION -There is a "Sarrazin" listed on the November 24, 1721 Census of New Orleans with a wife and no children. Cannot confirm if this is Nicolas Sarrazin and Anne Francoise Roland. -Listed on 1726 Census of New Orleans with husband, Sarrazin. -"Sieur Sarrazin", wife and 3 children are living on Chartres Street as of the July 1, 1727 Census of the Department of New Orleans -Pointe Coupee 1745 Census Jean Stephan, called Rocancourt age 47 Anne Francoise Rolland, his wife age 46 Nicolas Bordelon age 15 Antoine Bordelon age 12 Anne and Perine Rocancourt, their daughters 7 & 4 years - Slaves: 6 Black - Horses 2, Cattle 11, Muskets 4, Powder 4, Lead & Balls 8, Corn 60, Beans 4, Tobacco 4, Land Cultivated 28

- BURIAL -Anne Francoise Roland was buried at Pointe Coupee Parish according to the "Diocese of Baton Rouge Catholic Church Records" (PCP-3, 21 also PCP-1, 183)

Notes for Anne Francoise Roland: ANNE FRANCOISE ROLLAND AND HER EARLY YEARS IN PARIS

Transcribed and submitted by Barbara Allemand Translated, edited and with a brief introduction by Winston DeVille F. A. S. G. (Source: Bibliothe'que de J. I'Arsenal, Archives de la Bastille, no. 10, 673.)

Anne Francoise Rolland was surely one of the most prolific ancestors of early 18th century Louisiana: Shortly after her arrival in the colony, she married Nicolas Sarrazin who was, before his death, keeper of the colony's storehouse. In New Orleans, in 1730, as a widow, she married Laurent Bordelon, an employee of the Company of the Indies and a son of a highly-stationed Havre de Grace family. After her second husband's death, she then married Jean Stephan dit Rocancourt and by 1745, they were living at Pointe Coupee She had children by all three husbands and many present-day Louisianians are descended from this remarkable lady. (For general references, see: Barron, CENSUS OF POINTE COUPEE: 1745; DeVille, THE NEW ORLEANS FRENCH: 1720-1733; DeVille, FIRST SETTLERS OF POINTE COUPEE.)

The purpose of this article is not to explore the Rolland genealogy to coordinate earlier-known data with this present document. Rather, our purpose is to share with LGHS members a most exciting and revealing documentary discovery which sheds light on an important and often controversial aspect of migration to colonial Louisiana. In the same archive dossier no. 12692 contains a list entitled "persons jailed in the Salpetriere prison suitable to be sent to the islands (Louisiana)". A note at the end of the list reads, "This report contains the names of 209 persons imprisoned at the Salpetriere who are suitable to be sent to the islands, these women not being able to cause anything but public harm, being extraordinarily deprived of morals. In custody this 27 June 1719. Page six shows the name "Anne Francoise Rolland, eighteen years old of Paris. (Charged with) debaucheries and public prostitution.

It should be added that, except for hearsay testimony, there is no good evidence in the file to indicate that the charge of prostitution was valid. Certainly, after Anne Francoise's arrival in Louisiana, there is no local evidence to indicate that she was anything but a model of decorum; all her husbands were of the highest standing and respectability in the Louisiana community. One must consider the social and moral environment of early 18th century France-and perhaps an overly strict father and step- mother --before making moral judgments. But that this lady was an independent and free spirit there can be little doubt--she must have been ideally suited to the frontier challenges of her new home.

"Complaint" of the father and kin:

In the year 1719, Monday, the thirteenth of the present month of February, in the afternoon, appeared in the hostel of Claude De La Vergee King's councilor, commissioner at the Chastelet of Paris, Ambroise Jean Baptiste Rolland, Commis (bookkeeper, clerk, shop-assistant ?) for the fresh fish sellers of Paris, Nicolas Lucas, Maistre Ecrivain Jurez (licensed public letter -writter ?) at Paris, and Jacques Rolland, master pewterer also at Paris - Who jointly rendered to us a complaint against Anne Francoise Rolland, a girl of more than twenty-two years and (they) told us (the following), to wit:

He, Sieur Ambroise Jean Baptiste Rolland, father of the said girl, born of his first marriage with demoiselle Jeanne Catherine Lucas, her (Anne Francoise's) mother, that from all times he has taken all the care imaginable for the instruction and education of the said Rolland, his daughter, that he almost never -lost sight of is responsibility and in spite all his attentiveness, he noticed that, little by little, she was going bad and going wrong morally and in spite of all his remonstrances which he gave her from time to time, accompanied by kindness as well as by severity, depending on the circumstances, and from which the girl gained little, continuing daily the same faults, and gaining, in fact, in bad inclinations as she grows older and the plaintiff had the misfortune to realize that certain sagacious precautions which he had given were ignored, that the said girl absented herself from the house (and) stayed out all night several times (and) this had happened very frequently last year without the plaintiff being able to find out nor discover where she was and whom she was with.

Such a scandalous life has begun to dishonor the plaintiff and his family, and his said daughter, not being content with causing such a scandal and affront, she has, since the beginning of this year, redoubled her debaucheries in staying out all night more often and (she) earmarks the good feast days and chooses them for her debaucheries in spite of all the remonstrances -and punishment by the plaintiff .

That which occasioned his being informed more exactly of her movements and learning that his said daugb+er frequented public dance halls along with flunkies {laquais) and other people of the same repute with whom she (also) went to cabarets notably (on) Candlemas Day (just) past, his said daughter, having left the house at nine o'clock in the morning whither she did not return until about eleven o'clock at night, with the door being opened, after she knocked on it, by demoiselle the wife of the plaintiff, her step-mother who awaited her with quietude and she (the step-mother) was very astonished to find (Anne Francoise) with three unknown persons, one of whom said (to Anne Francoise): "Enter your bordello; it is open which so shocked the said wife of the plaintiff that she remains ill (to this day).

And on Sunday, the fifth of the present month, the plaintiff, after having given new remonstrances to his said daughter regarding her bad conduct and her disorderliness, he did not want to (let her out of his sight), and that evening at about four or five o'clock, his said daughter, on the pretext of going to the toilet (aux commoditees), she absented herself, left him, and did not return to the house until ten o'clock at night, which she similarly did yesterday, without having returned home (even) up to now.

And as this conduct is so horrible and scandalous because of the (very nature) of so much disorder which became known to him, Sieur Nicolas Lucas, her maternal uncle and subrogate tutor, and to him, Jacques Rolland, her paternal uncle, that is why they join Sieur the plaintiff to render the present complaint in order jointly to proceed against the said Rolland girl to show her reason and to use against her all the needed and reasonable ways (of correction). And (they) signed in our record. (signed) De Lavergee"

Volume XXVII Number 2 June 1980 (c) 1960 by The Louisiana Genealogical and Historical Society P. 0. Box 3454, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70821

Anne Francoise was born in Paris c1699 (year of birth based on 1745 Census record), Parish o f St. Germain (l'Aurerois) - The daughter of a merchant, Jean Baptiste Ambroise Roland (Rolla nd, Rolard) and his wife, Jeanne Bonnet, Anne arrived in the New World in 1719 aboard the ves sel, "Mutine". According to Albert J. Robichaux, Jr. in German Coast Families: European Ori gins and Settlement in Colonial Louisiana, the vessel La Mutine carried five private passeng ers and ninety-six females sent from Paris by order of the King. The ship was commanded by M . de Martonne and sailed from Le Havre after October 20, 1719, arriving at Dauphin Island o n February 28, 1720. For a complete passenger listing, see Glenn Conrad's First Families of L ouisiana, Volume I. - Supposedly, her mother had died when Anne was young and her father fel t unable to control her. "By her teenage years, she had become the equivalent of an 18th c entury juvenile delinquent, and had evidently been arrested several times. By 1719, her fathe r was at the end of his patience and resourcefulness as to how to deal with his headstrong da ughter. He sent a petition to De Machault, the Chief of Police in Paris reporting her behavio r. Anne Francoise Roland, at the age of 21, was put aboard the sloop, 'La Mutine' in June o f 1719 at Le Havre with approximately 100 other women, with the designation of 'sent from Pa ris by order of the King'. France was glad to rid itself of these troublesome women, and it i s probable that despite the sure knowledge of the hard life awaiting them in desolate Louisia na, many were glad of the opportunity to begin their lives anew." - An article that appeare d in Volume IV, Number 2 of the The Imperial St. Landry Genealogical and Historical Society p ublication adds an interesting fact to the story of Anne Francoise's early years: "...Thank s to her overly strict father and jealous stepmother, she was jailed in Selpetriere prison i n France and ruled suitable to be sent to the islands. The women that she was placed in priso n with were said to be extraordinarily deprived of morals. Can you imagine? And this was 1719 . Anne Francoise Rolland, eighteen years old of Paris, was charged with debaucheries and publ ic prostitution." The article goes on to say that there was never any concrete evidence to s how that the charge of prostitution was valid and that the crimes that Anne was accused of wo uld be laughed at today. Anne's worst crime was probably the fact that she was a free spiri t and rebelled at the strict treatment handed out to her by her step- mother. If this is true , it would indicate that Anne's mother, Jeanne Bonnet was deceased before 1719. - Anne Franco ise was listed as godmother to someone in Mobile on 8-10-1721 - MARRIAGE INFORMATION - Ann e was married 3 times: - Married to Nicolas Sarrazin (c1720??) - 3 children: 1. Francois Bor n ?? / died about 20 May 1763 2. Antoine Born c1721 married Marie Colon in 1747, widow of Jea n Rondot Family Group Sheet for Marie Colon & Jean Rondot 3. Michel Born c1728 / burial 31 Ju ly 1746 in Pointe Coupee - Married to Gabriel Laurent Bordelon on 20 February 1730 in New Orl eans - 2 children: 1. Nicolas Born 1730 Family Group Sheet 2. Antoine Born 1733 Family Grou p Sheet - Married to Jean Stephan on 22 February 1737 (date of marriage contract), Pointe Cou pee - 3 children: 1. Perine 2. Anne Born 1738 Family Group Sheet 3. Petronille Born 1742 - C ENSUS INFORMATION -There is a "Sarrazin" listed on the November 24, 1721 Census of New Orlean s with a wife and no children. Cannot confirm if this is Nicolas Sarrazin and Anne Francoise Roland. -Listed on 1726 Census of New Orleans with husband, Sarrazin. -"Sieur Sarrazin", wif e and 3 children are living on Chartres Street as of the July 1, 1727 Census of the Departmen t of New Orleans -Pointe Coupee 1745 Census Jean Stephan, called Rocancourt age 47 Anne Franc oise Rolland, his wife age 46 Nicolas Bordelon age 15 Antoine Bordelon age 12 Anne and Perin e Rocancourt, their daughters 7 & 4 years - Slaves: 6 Black - Horses 2, Cattle 11, Muskets 4 , Powder 4, Lead & Balls 8, Corn 60, Beans 4, Tobacco 4, Land Cultivated 28 - BURIAL -Anne F rancoise Roland was buried at Pointe Coupee Parish according to the "Diocese of Baton Rouge C atholic Church Records" (PCP-3, 21 also PCP-1, 183) Notes for Anne Francoise Roland: ANN E FRANCOISE ROLLAND AND HER EARLY YEARS IN PARIS Transcribed and submitted by Barbara Allema nd Translated, edited and with a brief introduction by Winston DeVille F. A. S. G. (Source: B ibliothe'que de J. I'Arsenal, Archives de la Bastille, no. 10, 673.) Anne Francoise Rollan d was surely one of the most prolific ancestors of early 18th century Louisiana: Shortly afte r her arrival in the colony, she married Nicolas Sarrazin who was, before his death, keeper o f the colony's storehouse. In New Orleans, in 1730, as a widow, she married Laurent Bordelon , an employee of the Company of the Indies and a son of a highly-stationed Havre de Grace fam ily. After her second husband's death, she then married Jean Stephan dit Rocancourt and by 17 45, they were living at Pointe Coupee She had children by all three husbands and many present -day Louisianians are descended from this remarkable lady. (For general references, see: Barr on, CENSUS OF POINTE COUPEE: 1745; DeVille, THE NEW ORLEANS FRENCH: 1720-1733; DeVille, FIRS T SETTLERS OF POINTE COUPEE.) The purpose of this article is not to explore the Rolland gene alogy to coordinate earlier-known data with this present document. Rather, our purpose is t o share with LGHS members a most exciting and revealing documentary discovery which sheds lig ht on an important and often controversial aspect of migration to colonial Louisiana. In th e same archive dossier no. 12692 contains a list entitled "persons jailed in the Salpetrier e prison suitable to be sent to the islands (Louisiana)". A note at the end of the list reads , "This report contains the names of 209 persons imprisoned at the Salpetriere who are suitab le to be sent to the islands, these women not being able to cause anything but public harm, b eing extraordinarily deprived of morals. In custody this 27 June 1719. Page six shows the nam e "Anne Francoise Rolland, eighteen years old of Paris. (Charged with) debaucheries and publi c prostitution. It should be added that, except for hearsay testimony, there is no good evid ence in the file to indicate that the charge of prostitution was valid. Certainly, after Ann e Francoise's arrival in Louisiana, there is no local evidence to indicate that she was anyth ing but a model of decorum; all her husbands were of the highest standing and respectabilit y in the Louisiana community. One must consider the social and moral environment of early 18t h century France-and perhaps an overly strict father and step- mother --before making moral j udgements. But that this lady was an independent and free spirit there can be little doubt--s he must have been ideally suited to the frontier challenges of her new home. "Complaint" o f the father and kin: In the year 1719, Monday, the thirteenth of the present month of Febru ary, in the afternoon, appeared in the hostel of Claude De La Vergee King's councilor, commis sioner at the Chastelet of Paris, Ambroise Jean Baptiste Rolland, Commis (bookkeeper, clerk , shop-assistant ?) for the fresh fish sellers of Paris, Nicolas Lucas, Maistre Ecrivain Jure z (licensed public letter -writter ?) at Paris, and Jacques Rolland, master pewterer also a t Paris - Who jointly rendered to us a complaint against Anne Francoise Rolland, a girl of mo re than twenty-two years and (they) told us (the following), to wit: He, Sieur Ambroise Jea n Baptiste Rolland, father of the said girl, born of his first marriage with demoiselle Jeann e Catherine Lucas, her (Anne Francoise's) mother, that from all times he has taken all the ca re imaginable for the instruction and education of the said Rolland, his daughter, that he al most never -lost sight of is responsibility and in spite all his attentiveness, he noticed th at, little by little, she was going bad and going wrong morally and in spite of all his remon strances which he gave her from time to time, accompanied by kindness as well as by severity , depending on the circumstances, and from which the girl gained little, continuing daily th e same faults, and gaining, in fact, in bad inclinations as she grows older and the plaintif f had the misfortune to realize that certain sagacious precautions which he had given were ig nored, that the said girl absented herself from the house (and) stayed out all night severa l times (and) this had happened very frequently last year without the plaintiff being able t o find out nor discover where she was and whom she was with. Such a scandalous life has begu n to dishonor the plaintiff and his family, and his said daughter, not being content with cau sing such a scandal and affront, she has, since the beginning of this year, redoubled her deb aucheries in staying out all night more often and (she) earmarks the good feast days and chos es them for her debaucheries in spite of all the remonstrances -and punishment by the plainti ff . That which occasioned his being informed more exactly of her movements and learning tha t his said daugb+er frequented public dance halls along with flunkies {laquais) and other peo ple of the same repute with whom she (also) went to cabarets notably (on) Candlemas Day (just ) past, his said daughter, having left the house at nine o'clock in the morning whither she d id not return until about eleven o'clock at night, with the door being opened, after she knoc ked on it, by demoiselle the wife of the plaintiff, her step-mother who awaited her with quie tude and she (the step-mother) was very astonished to find (Anne Francoise) with three unknow n persons, one of whom said (to Anne Francoise): "Enter your bordello; it is open which so sh ocked the said wife of the plaintiff that she remains ill (to this day). And on Sunday, th e fifth of the present month, the plaintiff, after having given new remonstrances to his sai d daughter regarding her bad conduct and her disorderliness, he did not want to (let her ou t of his sight), and that evening at about four or five o'clock, his said daughter, on the pr etext of going to the toilet (aux commoditees), she absented herself, left him, and did not r eturn to the house until ten o'clock at night, which she similarly did yesterday, without hav ing returned home (even) up to now. And as this conduct is so horrible and scandalous becaus e of the (very nature) of so much disorder which became known to him, Sieur Nicolas Lucas, he r maternal uncle and subrogate tutor, and to him, Jacques Rolland, her paternal uncle, that i s why they join Sieur the plaintiff to render the present complaint in order jointly to proce ed against the said Rolland girl to show her reason and to use against her all the needed an d reasonable ways (of correction). And (they) signed in our record. (signed) De Lavergee" Vo lume XXVII Number 2 June 1980 (c) 1960 by The Louisiana Genealogical and Historical Society P . 0. Box 3454, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70821

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Anne Françoise Roland's Timeline

1697
1697
St Germain, Paris, Ile-de-France, France
1720
1720
Age 23
1721
1721
Age 24
New Orleans, Louisiana
1722
1722
Age 25
1727
1727
Age 30
1728
1728
Age 31
1730
January 1730
Age 33
Natchez, Adams, Mississippi, Louisiana Territory
February 20, 1730
Age 33
St Louis Parish,New Orleans,Louisiana,USA
1733
June 1733
Age 36
New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana
1737
February 22, 1737
Age 40
Pointe Coupee Post, Louisiana