Anne de Kiev reine consort de France

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Анна Агнесса Ярославна

Russian: Анна Агнесса Ярославна, королева-супруга Франции
Nicknames: "Анна (Агнеса) Ярославна", "Anna/Agnesa Yaroslavna/ (Anna of Kiev Queen of France)aroslavna", "Anne of /Kiev/", "Anne of Kiev", "Anna Yaroslavna", "Queen", "Agnesa", "Jaroslavna Kiev", "Anne of Russia", "Ruthenian Queen Consort of Henri I", "Anne Yaroslavna", "Agnes", "Anne of..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Kiev, Russia (now Kiev, Ukraine)
Death: Died in West Francia
Place of Burial: Abbaye Villiers-aux-Nonnains, La Ferté-Alais, Ile-de-France, France
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Yaroslav I the Wise Grand Prince of Kiev; Jaroslav, Grand Duke of Kiev; Ingegerd "Anna of Novgorod" Olafsdotter, Princess of Sweden and Ingegerd van Zweden
Wife of Henri I, roi de France and Raoul III "le Grand" de Mantes, Comte de Valois et d'Amiens et du Vexin
Mother of Emma Capet de France, Princesse; Philippe I, roi de France; Robert Capet de France, (mort jeune); Hugues Magnus, comte de Vermandois and Hugh "the Great", Count of Vermandois, Duke of Burgundy
Sister of Izyaslav Yaroslavich; Vladimir Grand Prince of Novgorod; Anastasia of Kiev; Svyatoslav II Yaroslavich; Vsevolod I Yaroslavich prince of Kiev and 7 others

Occupation: Queen of France, Princess of Kiev, Drottning av Frankrike, Grand Dutchess of Kiev
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Anne de Kiev reine consort de France

http://genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007647&tree=LEO

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Russia Rurikid (covering her birth family):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#AnnaIaroslavnadied1075

IAROSLAV Vladimirovich, son of VLADIMIR I "Velikiy/the Great" Grand Prince of Kiev & his first wife Rognoda of Polotsk ([978]-Vyshgorod 20 Feb 1054, bur Kiev Church of St Sophia).

Prince of Rostov 988-1010.

Prince of Novgorod 1013-1015.

He rebelled against his father and refused to pay tribute from Novgorod in 1014. Challenged by his cousin Sviatopolk I Grand Prince of Kiev, following the latter's accession in Kiev, he defeated Sviatopolk at Liubech [1016] and forced him to flee to Poland, succeeding as IAROSLAV I "Mudriy/the Wise" Grand Prince of Kiev.

Sviatopolk returned in Jul 1018 with an army led by his father-in-law, Bolesław I King of Poland, and defeated Iaroslav at the Western Bug and forced him to retire to Novgorod. Sviatopolk entered Kiev again 14 Aug 1018 and resumed his rule.

After King Bolesław returned to Poland, Iaroslav advanced once more on Kiev. Sviatopolk fled south to raise another force with the Pechenegs but was finally defeated by the river Alta in 1019, when Iaroslav resumed power in Kiev[140].

In 1024, his half-brother Mstislav Prince of Tmutorokan moved his headquarters north to Chernigov to challenge Iaroslav, whom he defeated at Listven. The half-brothers agreed a division of territories, Iaroslav taking the land on the western bank of the Dnieper including Kiev and Novgorod.

While Iaroslav was absent in Novgorod, the Pechenegs laid siege to Kiev, but were defeated after Iaroslav returned with a formidable army to relieve the siege[141].

He succeeded in the territories of his half-brother Mstislav on the latter's death in 1036, becoming sole ruler or "Autocrat of the land of the Rus"[142].

His greatest project was the conquest of Constantinople but his armies were defeated in decisive battles in 1043[143].

He supervised the rapid expansion of the city of Kiev, modelled on Constantinople. His law code Rus'ka Pravda also contributed to the development and consolidation of his administration especially in the area around Kiev, although it appears to have had little impact in the north[144].

The Primary Chronicle records the death of Iaroslav 19 Feb 1054 at Vyshgorod aged 76 and his burial place[145]. He left a testament dividing his territories between his sons, the substance of which is recorded in the Primary Chronicle[146] although no original text has survived.

[m firstly ---. The fact of Iaroslav´s first marriage is indicated by the chronology of his oldest son, although as noted below no primary source has yet been identified which refers to this oldest son. Nevertheless, Iaroslav´s birth date, if accurate as shown above, does suggest that an earlier marriage is likely.]

m [secondly] (1019) INGIGERD Olafsdottir of Sweden, daughter of OLOF "Skotkonung" King of Sweden & his wife Estrid of the Obotriten ([1000/03]-10 Feb 1050).

Adam of Bremen names "filius Iacobus et filia Ingrad" as the children of "Olaph rex Sueonum" & his wife Estred, specifying that Ingrad married "rex sanctus Gerzlef de Ruzzia"[147]. Her birth date range is estimated based on the birth of her oldest child in 1020, and her youngest known child in [1036]. Morkinskinna names “Queen Ingigerđr the daughter of King Óláfr the Swede” as wife of “King Yaroslav [of] Russia”[148]. Snorre records the betrothal of "Ingegerd the king's daughter" and "King Jarisleif…from Russia"[149]. The Historia Norwegie records the marriage of "sororem Olaui Sueonensis…Margaretam" and "rex Iarezlafus de Ruscia" at her brother's instigation, after her betrothal to Olav of Norway was terminated[150]. It is more probable that she was the daughter rather than sister of King Olof if it is correct that she had ten children by her husband.

She is referred to as IRINA in Russian sources[151].

The Primary Chronicle records the death of "the Princess wife of Yaroslav" 10 Feb [1048/50][152].

Grand Prince Iaroslav & his first wife had one child:

1. [ILIYA Iaroslavich (-1020). Prince of Novgorod 1015.]

Grand Prince Iaroslav & his second wife had ten children:

2. VLADIMIR Iaroslavich (1020-Novgorod 1052, bur Novgorod Church of St Sophia).

His father installed him in 1043 as Prince of Novgorod. He subjugated the Finnic tribe of Yam to secure Novgorod's control over the Gulf of Finland[156].

m --- ([1022]-1066). The name of Vladimir´s wife is not known. Baumgarten identifies the wife of Vladimir as Oda, daughter of Luitpold Graf von Stade & his wife Ida von Elstorf [Brunswick][159].

Vladimir & his wife had one child.

3. ANASTASIA Iaroslavna ([1023]-[1074/1096], bur Admont Abbey).

After her husband's death in 1060, she and her sons took refuge at the court of Heinrich IV King of Germany but, leaving her elder son there, she and her younger son went to Austria[164].

Became a nun at Admont in 1074 as AGMUNDA.

m ([1039]) as his second wife, ANDRÁS of Hungary, son of VÁSZOLY [Vazúl] Prince of Hungary Duke between March and Gran & --- of the Bulgarians ([1014]-Zirc autumn 1060, bur Tihany, Abbey of St Anian). He succeeded in 1047 as ANDRÁS I "the Catholic" King of Hungary.

4. IZIASLAV Iaroslavich (1024-killed in battle Nezhatinaia Niva 3 Oct 1078 bur Kiev).

Succeeded in 1054 as IZIASLAV I Grand Prince of Kiev.

5. IELIZAVETA Iaroslavna (-after 25 Sep 1066)

m (1044) HARALD Sigurdson, son of SIGURD Syr King of Ringeringe & his wife Asta Gudbrandsdatter (1015-killed in battle Stamfordbridge 25 Sep 1066). He succeeded in 1047 as HARALD III "Hardråde" King of Norway.

6. SVIATOSLAV Iaroslavich (1027-27 Dec 1076, bur Chernigov, Church of the Saviour).

The Primary Chronicle records the birth of Svyatoslav "a third son" to Vladimir in 1027[170].

He succeeded in 1054 as Prince of Chernigov, and in 1073 as SVIATOSLAV II Grand Prince of Kiev.

7. VSEVOLOD Iaroslavich (1030-13 Apr 1093, bur Kiev St Sofia).

Succeeded in 1054 as Prince of Pereyaslavl.

Succeeded in 1076 as VSEVOLOD I Grand Prince of Kiev.

8. VIACHESLAV Iaroslavich ([1033/36]-Smolensk [1055/57]).

Succeeded in 1054 as Prince of Smolensk.

m ---. The name of Viacheslav´s wife is not known.

Viacheslav & his wife had one child.

---

9. ANNA Iaroslavna (1036-5 Sep ([1075/78], bur Abbaye Villiers near La-Ferté-Alais).

The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "filiam regis Russorum Annam" with King Henri[176]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Anna filia Georgii regis Sclavonum" as wife of King Henri[177].

She was consecrated Queen Consort at Reims on her wedding day.

Queen Anna caused a scandal in France by her second marriage and was forced to leave the court, although she returned after his death in 1074[178]. The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "Anna, Henrici relicta" and "Rodulfo comitis"[179].

"Rodulphus…Ambianensis comes" donated property to Sainte-Marie d'Amiens, with the consent of "Simon filius meus et Gualterus, Gualteri Tyrelli natus", by charter dated 1069, subscribed by "Anna uxor eius"[180].

m firstly (Reims 19 May 1051) as his second wife, HENRI I King of France, son of ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles [Provence] ([end 1009/May 1010]-Palais de Vitry-aux-Loges, forêt d’Orléans, Loiret 4 Aug 1060, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

m secondly ([1061]) as his third wife, RAOUL III “le Grand” Comte de Valois, son of RAOUL II Comte de Valois & his wife Aliénor de Champagne (-Péronne 23 Feb or 8 Sep 1074, bur Montdidier, later transferred to Crépy-en-Valois, église collégiale Saint-Arnoul).

---

10. IGOR Iaroslavich ([1036]-1060).

Succeeded in 1054 as Prince of Volynia.

Succeeded in 1057 as Prince of Smolensk.

m ---. The name of Igor´s wife is not known.

Igor & his wife had two children.

References:

[140] Franklin, S and Shepard, J. (1998) The Emergence of Rus 750-1200 (Longman), pp. 186-87.

[141] Franklin & Shepard (1998), p. 207.

[142] Franklin & Shepard (1998), p. 187-88.

[143] Chirovsky, N. L. Fr., (1973) A History of the Russian Empire, Vol. 1 Grand-Ducal Vladimir and Moscow (Peter Owen, London), pp. 144-5.

[144] Chirovsky (1973), p. 145.

[145] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 1054, p. 143.

[146] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 1054, p. 142.

[147] Adami, Gesta Hammenburgensis Ecclesiæ Pontificum II.37, MGH SS VII, p. 319.

[148] Andersson, T. M. and Gade, K. E. (trans.) (2000) Morkinskinna (Cornell), 1, p. 89.

[149] Snorre, Saga of Olaf Haraldson Part III, 95.

[150] Ekrem, I. and Mortensen, L. B. (eds.) Fisher, P. (trans.) (2003) Historia Norwegie (Copenhagen) XVIII, p. 104.

[151] Franklin & Shepard (1998), p. 202.

[152] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 1048-1050, p. 139.

[156] Chirovsky (1973), p. 54.

[159] Baumgarten (1927), p. 9, citing Baumgarten, N. de Oda de Stade et son fils Rostislaw, no page reference cited.

[164] Hóman, Geschichte, p. 269, cited in Kerbl, R. (1979) Byzantinische Prinzessinnen in Ungarn zwischen 1050-1200 und ihr Einfluß auf das Arpadenkönigreich (VWGÖ, Vienna), p. 14.

[170] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 1027, p. 136.

[176] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 388.

[177] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1052, MGH SS XXIII, p. 789.

[178] Kerrebrouck, P. Van (2000) Les Capétiens 987-1328 (Villeneuve d'Asq), p. 66.

[179] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 389.

[180] Cartulaire du chapitre de la cathédrale d´Amiens, Tome I, Mémoires de la société des antiquaires de la Picardie, Tome XIV (Amiens, 1905) ("Amiens") I, 5, p. 9, and Labanoff de Rostoff, Prince A. (ed.) (1825) Recueil de pieces historiques sur la reine Anne ou Agnès épouse de Henri 1er roi de France et fille de Iarosslaf 1er grand duc de Russie (Paris) ("Anne de France") XV, p. 34.

-----------------------------

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on France Capetian Kings (covering her married family):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#HenriIdied1060B

HENRI de France, son of ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles [Provence] ([end 1009/May 1010]-Palais de Vitry-aux-Loges, forêt d’Orléans, Loiret 4 Aug 1060, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and Constance[219].

His father installed him as Duke of Burgundy 25 Jan 1016 after completing his conquest of the duchy[220]. He was consecrated associate-king 14 May 1027, at Notre-Dame, Reims, despite the opposition of his mother.

He rebelled against his father, together with his brother Robert, 1029-1031, and captured Dreux, Beaune and Avallon[221]. He succeeded his father in 1031 as HENRI I King of France, at which time the duchy of Burgundy was given to his younger brother Robert.

In light of his mother’s continuing opposition to his succession, he was obliged to take refuge briefly in Normandy in 1033. He regained control with the help of Robert II Duke of Normandy.

The Annales Nivernenses record the death "1060 II Non Aug" of "Henricus rex, Rotberti regis filius"[222]. The necrology of the Eglise Cathédrale de Paris records the death "IV Non Aug" of "Henrici regis Francorum"[223]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "II Non Aug" of "Henricus rex"[224]. The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 4 Aug of "Henricus rex Franciæ"[225].

Betrothed (May 1033) to MATHILDE of Germany, daughter of Emperor KONRAD II King of Germany & his wife Gisela of Swabia ([Oosterbecke] 1027[226]-Worms 1034, bur Worms Cathedral).

Wipo names "filia imperatoris Chuonradi et Giselæ, Mahthilda" when recording her death and burial at Worms in 1034, specifying that she was betrothed to "Heinrico regi Francorum"[227]. Her marriage was arranged to confirm a peace compact agreed between King Henri and Emperor Konrad at Deville in May 1033[228]. Her absence from the list of deceased relatives in the donation of "Chuonradus…Romanorum imperator augustus" to the church of Worms by charter dated 30 Jan 1034 suggests that Mathilde died after that date, while her absence from the list of the children of Emperor Konrad named in the same charter is explicable on the basis of her youth[229].

m firstly (1034) MATHILDE, daughter of --- ([1025/26]-Paris 1044, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

Rodolfus Glaber records that King Henri married "Mathildem…de regno eius ex Germanie nobilioribus"[230]. Her precise origin is not known. A manuscript entitled "Excerptum Historicum" records the marriage of "rex Henricus" and "neptem Henrici Alamannorum Imperatoris", commenting that the couple had a daughter who died young and that King Henri's wife died soon after[231]. The Historia of Monk Aimon records that King Henri married "neptem Henrici Alamaniæ Imperatoris" in 1034[232].

Szabolcs de Vajay[233] suggests that she was Mathilde, daughter of Liudolf Markgraf von Friesland [Braunschweig] & his wife Gertrud von Egisheim, her supposed father being the uterine half-brother of Emperor Heinrich III.

The Historia Francica records the death in 1044 of "Mahildis Regina"[234]. The Miracula Sancti Bernardi records the death in Paris in 1044 of "Mahildis regina…ex Cæsarum progenie", and her burial "monasterio Sancti Dionysii"[235].

---

m secondly (Reims 19 May 1051) as her first husband, ANNA Iaroslavna, daughter of IAROSLAV I Vladimirovich "Mudriy/the Wise" Grand Prince of Kiev & his second wife Ingigerd Olafsdottir of Sweden (1036-5 Sep ([1075/78], bur Abbaye Villiers near La-Ferté-Alais).

---

King Henri I & his first wife had one child:

1. daughter ([1040]-1044 or before).

A manuscript entitled "Excerptum Historicum" records the marriage of "rex Henricus" and "neptem Henrici Alamannorum Imperatoris", commenting that the couple had a daughter who died young[240]. She died before her mother, under 5 years old[241].

King Henry I & his second wife had four children:

2. PHILIPPE de France (1052-Château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye Saint Benoît-sur-Loire).

The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri and Anna[242].

He was consecrated Associate-King 23 May 1059, Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims. He succeeded his father in 1060 as PHILIPPE I King of France.

3. EMMA de France (1054-). The Historia Francorum names "Emmamque filiam" in addition to the three sons of King Henri and Anna[243].

4. ROBERT de France (before Jun 1054-[1063]).

The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri & Anna, specifying that "Rotbertus inmatura morte decessit"[244]. This is confirmed by the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines which names (in order) "Philippum, Robertum et Hugonam" as the three sons of King Henri, specifying that "Robertus iuvenis mortuus est"[245].

5. HUGUES de France (1057-Tarsus 18 Oct 1102, bur Tarsus, church of St Paul).

The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri and Anna[246]. William of Tyre records "dominus Hugo Magnus" as brother of Philippe I King of France[247].

Comte de Vermandois et de Valois by right of his wife.

Leader of the French contingent in the First Crusade Aug 1096. Albert of Aix records that "Hugonem Magnum fratrem regis Franciæ, Drogonem et Clareboldum" were held in chains in prison by the emperor at Constantinople but were released after the intervention of "Baldewinus Hainaucorum comes et Heinricus de Ascha" who were sent as envoys by Godefroi de Bouillon[248].

He returned to France after the victory of Antioch 1098 to raise another army.

The Alexeiad names "a certain Hugh, brother of the king of France" when recording that he "sent an absurd message to the emperor proposing that he should be given a magnificent reception" after arriving in Constantinople[249].

He set out again Mar 1101, but died from wounds received fighting the Greeks at Tarsus in Cilicia.

m (after 1067) as her first husband, ADELAIS Ctss de Vermandois, de Valois et de Crépy, daughter and heiress of HERIBERT IV Comte de Vermandois [Carolingian] & his wife Alix Ctss de Crépy ([1062]-28 Sep [1120/24]).

The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses names "Odonem et Adelam sororem" as the two children of "comes Herbertus", specifying that the husband of Adela was "Hugoni le Magne", referring to her second husband "comes de Claromonte" and specifying that her daughter by the latter married Charles Count of Flanders[250]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Adelidem comitissam Viromandensium, defuncto priore viro, scilicet Hugone Magno" as wife of "comes Rainaldus [de Claromonte]"[251].

She succeeded her father in [1080] as Ctss de Vermandois, de Valois et de Crépy.

She married secondly (1103) as his first wife, Renaud de Clermont [en-Beauvaisis].

References:

[219] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.

[220] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 55.

[221] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 65.

[222] Annales Nivernenses 1060, MGH SS XIII, p. 90.

[223] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Eglise Cathédrale de Paris, p. 163.

[224] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 323.

[225] Histoire d'Auxerre, Tome IV, p. 16.

[226] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Mathilde, Reine de France inconnue', Journal des Savants (Oct-Dec 1971), pp. 241-60, 244 footnote 17.

[227] Wiponis, Vita Chuonradi II Imperatoris 32, MGH SS XI, p. 271.

[228] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 65.

[229] D K II 204, p. 275.

[230] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum IV.23, p. 211.

[231] Excerptum Historicum, RHGF XI, p. 157.

[232] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 276.

[233] Vajay 'Mathilde', pp. 248-54.

[234] Ex Historiæ Francicæ Fragmento, RHGF XI, p. 161.

[235] Miracula Sancti Benedicti, auctore Andreæ monachi Floriacensis quartus, Liber VII, III, p. 252.

[241] Bautier, R.-H. 'Anne de Kiev, reine de France, et la politique royale au XIe siècle. Etude critique de la documentation', Aspects des relations intellectuelles entre la France et la Russie, Revue des etudes slaves (Paris, 1985) t. 57, pp. 539-64, citing Certain, E. de (ed.) (1858) André de Fleury Miracula sancti Benedicti, VII, ch III, p. 252, cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 70 footnote 46.

[242] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 389.

[243] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 388, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.

[244] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 389.

[245] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1060, MGH SS XXIII, p. 792.

[246] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 389.

[247] RHC, Historiens occidentaux I, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer"), (“WT”) I. XVII, p. 45.

[248] RHC, Historiens occidentaux, Tome IV (Paris, 1879), Alberti Aquensis Historia Hierosolymitana ("Albert of Aix (RHC)"), Liber II, Cap. VII-VIII, pp. 304-5.

[249] Sewter, E. R. A. (trans.) (1969) Anna Comnena The Alexiad (Penguin Books), Book 10, p. 313.

[250] De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses MGH SS, p. 257.

[251] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 15, MGH SS XIII, p. 255.

-----------------------------

From Epistolae: Medieval Women's Latin Letters, biography on Anne of Kiev:

http://epistolae.ccnmtl.columbia.edu/woman/116.html

Anne of Kiev (Anna Yaroslavna), sometimes called Agnes, daughter of Yaroslav I of Kiev and Princess Ingegerd of Sweden; Yaroslav was grand-duke of Kiev and described in medieval histories as king of the Russians “rex Russorum” (Hugh of Fleury, Aubry des Trois Fontaines, and Raoul Tortaire).

Jaroslav’s sister was married to Casimir, king of Poland. Jaroslav and Ingegard had nine children, several of whom were married to royalty: Anastasia to Andrew I of Hungary, Elisabeth to Harold of Norway and later to Sven of Denmark, Isiaslav to the sister of Casimir of Poland, Vsevolod to a daughter of the Byzantine emperor, Vladimir to a niece of a former queen of France, Matilda of Stade.

Anne was married in 1051 to Henry I [1], king of France, whose first two wives [2] had died; she was consecrated queen at Reims when Liebert, bishop of Cambray was consecrated. Anne brought no land to the marriage, but did bring connections and wealth, probably including a jacinth which Suger later mounted in the reliquary of St. Denis (Bauthier, 550; Hallu,168, citing Comptes de Suger).

Anne and Henry had three sons, Philip I [3], born 1052, Robert, born 1054, died young, and Hugh, born 1057, who became count of Vermandois by marriage.

Anne is associated in four of Henry’s acts, towards the end of his reign:

1. In 1058, a charter of concession to the monastery St. Maur-les-Fosses [4], “annuente mea conjuge Anna et prole Philippo, Roberto ac Hugone” (HGF, 11.600, XXXII); 2. A donation of Villas to the monastery of Hasnon, with the signatures of Henrici regis, Philippi Regis pueri, A. Reginae (HGF 11.599, XXXI);

3. In 1059, assent to giving restored church to abbey of Coulombs, signed by Henry king, Anna queen his wife (Reginae uxoris ejus), and Philip, son of the king (HGF, 11.604, XXXV); and

4. A concession to St. Martin des Champs, which the king, queen, and son Philip with his brothers confirm with their signatures, “Ego ipse Rex Henricus, et Regina pariter, et Philippus filius meus cum fratribus suis manufirmatam corroboravimus” (HGF, 11.605-6, XXXVI).

But when Henry died in 1160, Anne participated in the government of her son, although Baldwin V of Flanders, married to Henry’s sister, Adele, was technically regent. Baldwin described himself as “procurator et bajulus regni” but the bishop of Chartres speaks of Philip and Anne as his sovreigns (Prou, document VI, 1060).

Philip declares that as a child he took up the kingdom together with his mother (“ego, Philippus, filius ejus [Henrici] admodum parvulus, regnum unacum matre suscepissem,” Prou, XIII, 1061).

Anne signed various royal acts during Philip’s reign:

I, see Prou,

II, reconfirmation of a document of Henry’s confirming a donation to a monastery St. Pere de Chartres,“Philipus rex cum matre regina, hanc cartam firmavit”;

III, confirming consent to the donation of a church to the abbey of St Pere, “Concessit autem hoc domnus meus rex Philipus, cum regina matre sua”;

IV, gift to the abbey of St. Denis at the request of his paternal aunt, Adele, and the intervention of his mother, “per interventum matris mee A,” who signed it;

V, renunciation of certain royal rights over a monastery of St. Lucien de Beauvais, “per interventum matris nostrae,” with her signature;

VI, confirmation of a charter to abbot of Marmoutier to build a church, with the advice and will also of our most pious royal lords, “dominorum nostrorum piisimorum regum, Philippi scilicet et matris ejus, Agnetis”;

X, donation to St. Nicaise of Reims, with the counsel of our beloved mother “consilioque dilectissime matris nostre Anne”;

XI, grants exemption to basilica of St. Adrieu in the presence of the queen “Interfuerunt autem etiam huic adstipulationi Agnes regina, …”;

XVI, concession to abbey of St. Crepin, which is signed apparently by Anne’s hand in Cyrillic, Anna queen; XVIII, confirming a gift to the abbey of St. Benoit-sur-Loire, signed Anna regina;

XIX, confirmation of his father’s gift to St. Martin-des-Champs, with the good-will of his mother and count Baldwin, “favente matre atque comite Balduino”;

XXXII, confirmation of renunciation of certain customs, signed Anna regina; according certain freedoms extended to other royal churches to a church restored by his mother, at her request, “mater mea, nomine Anna, divina inspirante”;

LXXV, confirms the charter founding the monastery of Pontlevoy, signed Anne, matris Philippi regis.

Documents II-VI are dated 1060,

X, XI, 1061,

XVI, 1063;

XVIII, XIX,1065,

XXXII, 1067,

XLIII, 1069,

LXXV, 1075.

When Anne signs, it is either the first signature listed, or the first following the king’s (in XXXII, several bishops precede the signatures of the king and the queen).

There is also a confirmation by Henry of a donation to St. Peter of Chartres, dated 1059, which Philip and his mother signed in 1062, after Henry’s death, “Post mortem autem Henrici Regis, secundo anno regni sui Philippus Rex cum Regina matre sua … manu propria firmavit” (HGF, 11.602-4, XXXIV). Hallu lists 23 acts of Philip's which mention Anne or carry her signature, four of them probably after her death, 185ff.

In 1061, Anne remarried to a powerful ally of the king, Raoul, count of Crepy and Valois, the Vexin, Amiens, Bar-sur-Aube, Vitry, Peronne, and Montdidier, who repudiated his wife, accusing her of adultery, to marry Anne. But the wife, Eleanor of Champagne, appealed to the pope; Alexander II responded to her complaint, asking the archbishop of Reims to investigate, try to save the marriage or take appropriate steps. Raoul refused to take her back and was excommunicated.

Nonetheless, he remained an important royal ally, signing some of Philip’s acts. Raoul died in 1074 and Anne returned to Philip’s court.

There is one document of Raoul’s which Anne signed along with Raoul’s son, mentioned in HGF 11.433, dated 1069, a concession to a castle.[5]

---

Biographical notes:

1 Henry was a son of Robert the Pious and Constance of Arles who preferred her younger son Robert to Henry to succeed his father, but primogeniture prevailed. See Jean Dunbabin, “What’s in a Name? Philip, King of France,” Speculum 68 (1993), 949-68 and Chronica Regum Francorum, HGF 11.393.

---

2 Robert-Henri Bauthier notes that Henry was betrothed first to a Matilda, daughter of Conrad II of Burgundy and Gisela, who died before the marriage was consumated, then to another Matilda, daughter of Liudolf of Stade, granddaughter of the same Gisela, and niece of Henry III (Anne de Kiev reine de France et la politique royale au Xe siècle, revue des Etudes Slaves, Vol. 57, 1985, 543-45).

---

3 Anne is said to have introduced the Greek name Philip into the French royal family. Though, as Dunbabin notes, there is no recorded Philip in the Jaroslav family, the choice was probably meant to please her, as the name of an apostle important in the Greek tradition.

---

4 According to Hallu, p.72, this document included a prohibition to the king's cooks to make abusive requisitions of cattle for the royal table.

---

5 This biography draws on the following studies of Anne:

Bauthier, Robert-Henri. Anne de Kiev reine de France et la politique royale au Xe siècle, revue des Etudes Slaves, Vol. 57, 1985, 539-64.

Caix de Saint-Amour, Anne de Russie, reine de France et comtesse de Valois au Xie siecle, 2nd ed. 1896.

Fliche, Augustin, Le Regne de Philippe Ier, Roi de France 1060-1108 (1912, repr. Geneva: Slaktkine, 1975).

Hallu, Roger, Anne de Kiev, reine de France (Rome: Universita cattolica ucraina, 1973)

Prou, Maurice, Recueil des Actes de Philippe I, Roi de France (Paris: Klincksieck, 1908).

---

Birth date: between 1024 and 1032?

Death date: 1075?

-----------------------------

From the FrancoGene page on Anne of Kiev:

http://www.francogene.com/quebec--genealogy/010/010404.php

The family of Henri Ier de FRANCE and Anne de KIEV ou de RUSSIE

[10404] FRANCE (de), Henri Ier (Robert II le Pieux & Constance de PROVENCE [10405]), roi de France, born about 1005, died 1060-08-04 Vitry-aux-Loges (Loiret : 450346), France, buried Saint-Denis (Seine-Saint-Denis : 930066), France

married 1051-05-19 Reims (Marne : 510454), France

KIEV ou de RUSSIE (de), Anne (..)

1) Philippe Ier, roi de France, born 1053, died 1108-07-29 Melun (Seine-et-Marne : 770288), France, buried Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire (Loiret : 450270), France, married .. (France) 1071 or 1073 Berthe de HOLLANDE

Bibliographie : Histoire de la maison royale de France (Père Anselme); Mémoires (Société généalogique canadienne-française)

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From Darryl Lundy's Peerage page on Anne of Kiev:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10318.htm#i103174

Anne of Kiev[1]

F, #103174, b. circa 1024, d. circa 1075

Last Edited=7 Mar 2007

Anne of Kiev was born circa 1024. She was the daughter of Jarislaus I, Grand Duke of Kiev and Ingegarde of Sweden.[1],[2]

She married Raoul Crepi.[3]

She married Henri I, Roi de France, son of Robert II, Roi de France and Constance d'Arles, on 29 January 1044.[1]

She died circa 1075.

Children of Anne of Kiev and Henri I, Roi de France

1. Philippe I, Roi de France+1 b. c 1052, d. 29 Jul 1108

2. Hugh de Crépi, Comte de Vermandois et de Valois

+3 b. 1057, d. 18 Oct 1102

Citations

1. [S45] Marcellus Donald R. von Redlich, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, volume I (1941; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2002), page 63. Hereinafter cited as Pedigrees of Emperor Charlemagne, I.

2. [S262] Russia, online http://www.friesian.com/russia.htm. Hereinafter cited as Russia.

3. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 64. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.

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Død efter 1074

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From the English Wikipedia page on Anne of Kiev:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_of_Kiev

Anne of Kiev or Anna Yaroslavna (between 1024 and 1032 – 1075), daughter of Yaroslav I of Kiev and his wife Princess Ingegerd of Sweden, was the queen consort of France as the wife of Henry I, and regent for her son Philip I.

Marriage

After the death of his first wife, Matilda, King Henry searched the courts of Europe for a suitable bride, but could not locate a princess who was not related to him within illegal degrees of kinship. At last he sent an embassy to distant Kiev, which returned with Anne (also called Agnes or Anna).

Anne and Henry were married at the cathedral of Reims on 19 May 1051.

As a curious fact, several daughters of Yaroslav got married with catholic occidental monarchs; Anne's older sister Anastasia of Kiev, got married around 1039 with the king Andrew I of Hungary.

Children

With Henry I of France:

1. Philip (23 May 1052 – 30 July 1108) - Anne is credited with bringing the name Philip to Western Europe. She imported this Greek name (Philippos, from philos (love) and hippos (horse), meaning "the one that love horses") from her Eastern Orthodox culture.

2. Hugh (1057 – 18 October 1102) - called the Great or Magnus, later Count of Crépi, who married the heiress of Vermandois and died on crusade in Tarsus, Cilicia.

3. Robert (c. 1055–c. 1060)

Regency

For six years after Henry's death in 1060, she served as regent for Philip, who was only seven at the time. She was the first queen of France to serve as regent. Her co-regent was Count Baldwin V of Flanders. Anne was a literate woman, rare for the time, but there was some opposition to her as regent on the grounds that her mastery of French was less than fluent.

A year after the king's death, Anne, acting as regent, took a passionate fancy for Count Ralph III of Valois, a man whose political ambition encouraged him to repudiate his wife to marry Anne in 1062. Accused of adultery, Ralph's wife appealed to Pope Alexander II, who excommunicated the couple.

The young king Philip forgave his mother, which was just as well, since he was to find himself in a very similar predicament in the 1090s.

Ralph died in September 1074, at which time Anne returned to the French court. She died in 1075, was buried at Villiers Abbey, La-Ferte-Alais, Essonne and her obits were celebrated on 5 September.

Note

In 1717, Tsar Peter the Great stopped in the cathedral in Reims where the French monarchs were crowned. He was shown the missal on which all French kings since the 11th century swore their coronation oaths. To everyone's surprise, he began reading from the missal which was written in Old Church Slavonic, the ancestor of all literary Slavonic languages, and used in Christian Orthodox Churches during the services; its function was the same as Latin in Western Europe.

Anna had brought the missal with her from Kiev to the Church where she and Henry had taken their vows. All French monarchs, save the Bonapartes, were crowned after swearing their oaths on it.

Autograph of Anne: АNА РЪНNА which is understood either as Ane reine in Old French or Anna regina in Latin; among the oldest samples of the Cyrillic script.

Sources

Bauthier, Robert-Henri. Anne de Kiev reine de France et la politique royale au Xe siècle, revue des Etudes Slaves, Vol. 57, 1985

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http://www.wumag.kiev.ua/index2.php?param=pgs20054/44

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Unattributed Portuguese information:

Após a morte de Matilde da Frísia, sua primeira esposa, Henrique I de França procurou uma esposa adequada nas cortes da Europa, mas não conseguiu encontrar uma princesa que não lhe fosse relacionada por parentesco ilegal. Por fim enviou uma embaixada à distante Kiev, que regressou com Ana (também chmada de Inês). Apesar da sua fé ortodoxa, diferente da fé católica romana de Henrique (que entrariam em conflito no Grande Cisma do Oriente de 1054), casaram-se na catedral de Reims a 19 de Maio de 1051

O primogénito foi o primeiro príncipe da Europa ocidental a receber o prenome - na época exótico - de Filipe, cuja escolha é atribuída a Ana. A sua avó materna era descendente da dinastia macedónica de Bizâncio, que afirmava remontar a Alexandre o Grande e a Filipe da Macedónia, e na qual este nome era comum. [2]

Depois da morte do seu esposo em 1060, foi regente do seu filho Filipe I, com apenas sete anos de idade, sendo a primeira rainha de França a desempenhar essa função, juntamente com o seu cunhado Balduíno V, conde da Flandres. Era uma mulher alfabetizada, o que era raro no seu tempo, mas havia alguma oposição à sua regência declarando que o seu domínio da língua francesa não era adequado.

Um ano após a morte de Henrique I, Ana enamorou-se do conde Raúl III de Valois, cuja ambição política o encorajou a repudiar sua esposa para casar-se com Ana em 1063. Ana foi acusada de adultério pela ex-esposa de Raúl, que apelou ao papa Alexandre II. Este excomungou o casal em 1064, [2] mas o jovem rei Filipe perdoaria a sua mãe, e curiosamente seria também excomungado mais tarde por motivos semelhantes. Ana mandou construir uma igreja consagrada em 1065, e uma abadia dedicada a São Vicente. Quando Raúl morreu, em Setembro de 1074, regressou à corte francesa.

Morreu em data incerta, 1075, 1076, 1079 ou 1089, segundo diferentes fontes. Foi sepultada na abadia de Villiers, Cerny, Essonne. [3] Abadia de Villiers foi destruída na revolução francesa depois de ser votada na assembleia nacional uma lei/decreto sobre a destruição de mausoléus. Posteriormente as pedras serão usadas para a construção de casas em La-Ferte-Alais, uma localidade próxima à abadia.

--------------------

Source: The book, 'Kings & Queens of Europe'

--------------------

Birthdate 1024 or 1036

  • BIRTHDATE CONFLICT* NEED TO RESOLVE FOR MERGES. 08/09/10 comment added. There are 22 profiles same person with mixed data.

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10318.htm#i103174 shows DOB 1024.

Others claim a range from C:1024-1032 such as Wikipedia source below.

Several profiles are split on 1036 or 1024 as date.

Perhaps some definitive research is in order?

Ben Angel notes: The site that uses the most primary sourcing is the Society for Medieval Genealogy, which gives the date of 1036 (although the exact source for this specific date is not cited).

The sources they cite for their information on Anna are:

[236] Record of marriage with Henri: Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 388.

[237] Record of marriage with Henri: Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1052, MGH SS XXIII, p. 789.

[238] Record of marriage with Raoul III le Grand de Valois: Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 66.

[239] Record of marriage with Raoul (Rodulfo): Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 389.

Darryl Lundy's Peerage page on Anne of Kiev does indeed cite as date of birth c. 1024, but also does not specifically cite a source. The sources he cites for his information on Anne:

[S45] Record of Parentage and Birth of Eldest Son: Marcellus Donald R. von Redlich, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, volume I (1941; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2002), page 63. Hereinafter cited as Pedigrees of Emperor Charlemagne, I.

[S262] Record of Parentage: Russia, online http://www.friesian.com/russia.htm. Hereinafter cited as Russia.

[S16] Record of Birth of Second Son (to survive to adulthood): Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 64. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.

Russian Wikipedia sites the following sources for their three possible dates:

1024 - Балязин В. Н. Неофициальная история России or V.N. Balyazin, An Unofficial History of Russia, published 2007, ISBN 978-5-373-01229

c. 1032 - Древняя Русь и Франция в XI веке. Судьба русской царевны Анны Ярославны or a magazine article from the online magazine "Science and Life" entitled "Ancient Russia and France in the 11th century. The fate of Russian Princess Anna Yaroslavna":

http://www.nkj.ru/archive/articles/3626/

1036 - a webpage entitled: Anna Agnesa Yaroslavna Grand Duchess Of Kiev (1036-1076)

http://www.mathematical.com/yaroslavnaanna1036.html

The third source backs its assertions from the LDS church (though this source is regarded as sometimes inaccurate).

The same three dates are given in the French Wikipedia page for Anna. English Wikipedia cites only 1024 and 1032 without further references as to how they came up with the dates.

Other sources cited for Anna to this date by contributors to this profile included a Quebecois source on the Genealogy of French in North America, which lists her as being born in 1053, apparently two years after her marriage with Henri. No source is given.

Doing a Google search, a well-researched family tree on Ancestry.com by Hal W. Bradley (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hwbradley/aqwg714.htm#11869) lists her as being born in 1036, and cites the following sources (without indicating which suggests her date of birth):

1. Roberts, Gary Boyd, The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1993.), p. 425, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.273 R644-1.

2. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (7th ed., Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1992.), 53-22, 101-22, 141-22, 241-6, Los Angeles Public Library, Gen 974 W426 1992.

3. von Redlich, Marcellus D. R., "Descent of Gen. Douglas McArthur from Emperor Charlemagne," NEHGR 97:4 (Oct 1943) (New England Historic, Genealogical Society.), p. 342, Los Angeles Public Library.

4. Schwennicke, Detlev, Europдische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europдischen Staaten (Marburg: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1978-), II-11, II-128, III-657, Family History Library, 940 D5es.

5. Brial, M. J. J., Recueil des Historiens des Gaules et de la France (Paris: Aux Dйpens des Librairies, 1738-1904.), 11:161, UCLA Library, DC3 .R24.

6. Mladjov, Ian S. R., "Reconsidering Agatha, Wife of Eadward the Exile," The Plantagenet Connection Summer/Winter 2003, p. 29.

7. Mladjov, I. S. R., Reconsidering Agatha, Wife of Eadward the Exile, p. 66.

8.Roberts, Gary Boyd, The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2004.), pp. 524, 528, 530, Family History Library, 273 D2rrd.

To me, it seems that the most well-researched online articles show her as being born in 1036, and would propose that date for this profile. Would welcome other input.

There is also some mystery on her date of death. She died on September 5, but the year is contested. The Foundation for Medieval Genealogy posts her year of death as 1075/78. French Wikipedia says that she died between 1076 and 1089, most likely in 1079. English Wikipedia sets it as 1075. Russian Wikipedia cites 1075/1089 without giving a source. Likely the reason for setting her early death date as 1075 is that she survived her second husband, Raoul, who died in 1074. Once he had died, she was allowed to return to the Court of France (her marriage to Raoul was something of a controversy). Again, I would suggest using FMG for the death date, setting it at the later date of 1078.

Note that none of these sources list a place of death. Further, he place of burial is apparently not altogether certain. The abbey in which she is cited as having been buried was actually not built until 1220, nearly a century and a half after her death. Further, the abbey was destroyed in the French Revolution for reasons that it was regarded as a shrine by the Ancien Regime (its stones were used to build several nearby buildings). However, a pre-Revolution record indicated that her burial stone did exist at the abbey before its destruction. This is perhaps why FMG lists it as her place of burial. But her date of burial is in question (she could have been buried there at death, and the abbey built there later, or she could have been transfered there from some other place after the abbey was founded).

Also, someone had apparently confused Anna with Anastasia. There were four daughters of Yaroslav (their pictures remain within the St. Sophia Cathedral in Kiev) that were married off to widely diverse lands (apparently a diplomatic effort of the Grand Prince of Rus):

1. Agatha was speculated as being married to English heir Edward the Exile.

2. Elisabeth was married to Harald III Sigurdarson of Norway.

3. Anastasia was married to King Andrew of Hungary (according to Polish sources - Russian and Hungarian sources do not mention her by name)

4. Anna, apparently the youngest daughter, was married to King Henri I of France.

Lastly, please note, Yaroslavna is a middle name, not a maiden name. Russian middle names are always a patronym (carrying the name of the father, with a suffix of -vich for sons, or -vna for daughters), even to present day. The patronym is part of a Russian woman's married name as well, in exactly the same way as an English or American woman's middle name likewise becomes part of her married name.

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Bulgarian explanation, apparently along the same lines as Rurik being "Lachin", and again assertion without sources:

In English:

One of the sons of the world, Anna and Volyumir (or Vladimir) Yaroslav (or Georgi) was born a daughter - Anna of Kiev, Queen of France, married Henry I, and brought with her the Sacred Covenant (Bible?) of King Simeon, the Bulgarian Gospel of the Cyrillic alphabet.

(Ben M. Angel notes: Old Church Slavonic, the language with which the Bible that Anna of Kiev had brought was written, was developed in Macedonia by the monks Cyril and Methodius, and so the description of the Bible that was later found by a visiting Peter the Great being "Bulgarian" is not that unreasonable - modern Bulgarian and Russian writing developed from this same Slavonic -, but the assertion that the Russian royal family was of Bulgarian origin has not been adequately demonstrated or documented - no primary sources have been referenced as yet.)

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NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH:

The page of Anna's sister, Anastasia of Kiev:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anastasia_of_Kiev

Anastasia of Kiev (c. 1023 – 1074/1096) was Queen of Hungary as the wife of King Andrew the White. She was the eldest daughter of Grand Prince Yaroslav I the Wise of Kiev and Ingigerd of Sweden, and the older sister of Anne of Kiev, Queen consort of Henry I of France.

Around 1039, Anastasia was married to Duke Andrew of Hungary, who had settled down in Kiev after his father Vazul took part in a failed assassination attempt aimed at King Stephen I of Hungary.

In 1046, her husband returned to Hungary and ascended the throne as King Andrew I after defeating King Peter I. Anastasia followed her husband to the kingdom. It was probably she who persuaded her husband to set up a lavra in Tihany for hermits who had come to Hungary from the Kievan Rus'. The royal couple did not have a son till 1053, when Anastasia gave birth to Solomon. However, Solomon's birth and later coronation caused an embittered conflict between King Andrew I and his younger brother Duke Béla, who had been the heir to the throne till the child's birth.

When Duke Béla rose in open rebellion against King Andrew in 1060, the king sent his wife and children to the court of Adalbert, Margrave of Austria. King Andrew was defeated and died shortly afterwards, and his brother was crowned King of Hungary on 6 December 1060.

Anastasia sought the help of King Henry IV of Germany, whose sister, Judith had been engaged to the child Solomon in 1058. By the time the German troops entered to Hungary to give assistance to Solomon against his uncle, King Béla I died on 11 September 1063 had died and his sons, Géza, Ladislaus and Lampert fled to Poland.

The young Solomon was crowned around 27 September 1063. On the occasion of her son's coronation, Anastasia presented the alleged sword of Attila the Hun to Duke Otto II of Bavaria who was the leader of the German troops. Between 1060 and 1073 King Solomon governed his kingdom in collaboration with his cousins, Dukes Géza, Ladislaus and Lampert who had returned to Hungary and accepted his rule. However, in 1074 the three brothers rebelled against their cousin, and defeated him on 14 March 1074. King Solomon run to the Western borders of Hungary where he could only maintain his rule only over the counties of Moson and Pozsony (Slovak: Bratislava).

Anastasia followed her son, but they began to argue with each other and she moved to Admont Abbey where she lived as a nun till her death. She was buried in the Abbey.

Marriage and children

  1. c. 1039: King Andrew I of Hungary (c. 1015 – before 6 December 1060)

1. Adelaide (c. 1040 – 27 January 1062), wife of king Vratislaus II of Bohemia

2. King Solomon of Hungary (1053 – 1087 or after)

3. David of Hungary (after 1053 – after 1094)

Sources

   * Kristó, Gyula - Makk, Ferenc: Az Árpád-ház uralkodói (IPC Könyvek, 1996)
   * Korai Magyar Történeti Lexikon (9-14. század), főszerkesztő: Kristó, Gyula, szerkesztők: Engel, Pál és Makk, Ferenc (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1994)
   * Magyarország Történeti Kronológiája I. – A kezdetektől 1526-ig, főszerkesztő: Benda, Kálmán (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1981)

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Darryl Lundy's Peerage page on Anna's sister Anastasia of Kiev (Forrás / Source):

http://www.thepeerage.com/p11298.htm#i112976

Anastasia of Kiev (1)

F, #112976

Last Edited=8 Mar 2007

Anastasia of Kiev is the daughter of Jarislaus I, Grand Duke of Kiev and Ingegarde of Sweden. (1) She married Andreas I Arpád, King of Hungary, son of unknown Arpád.(2)

Child of Anastasia of Kiev and Andreas I Arpád, King of Hungary

1. Salamon Arpád, King of Hungary d. 1087 (2)

See also / Lásd még:

http://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaszt%C3%A1zia_magyar_kir%C3%A1lyn%C3%A9

http://www.ukrajinci.hu/arhiv/hromada_92/tortenelem/anasztazia.html

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_of_Kiev

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_of_Kiev

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She had two brothers named Vsevolod and Svyatopolk. She was the second oldest of the three children. -------------------- Anne of Kiev (or Anna Yaroslavna) (between 1024 and 1032 – 1075), daughter of Yaroslav I of Kiev and his wife Princess Ingegerd of Sweden, was the queen consort of France as the wife of Henry I, and regent for her son Philip I.

Marriage

After the death of his first wife, Matilda, King Henry searched the courts of Europe for a suitable bride, but could not locate a princess who was not related to him within illegal degrees of kinship. At last he sent an embassy to distant Kiev, which returned with Anne (also called Agnes or Anna). Anne and Henry were married at the cathedral of Reims on 19 May 1051. As a curious fact, several daughters of Yaroslav married Catholic monarchs; Anne's older sister Anastasia of Kiev, was married around 1039 to the king Andrew I of Hungary.

Regency

For six years after Henry's death in 1060, she served as regent for Philip, who was only eight at the time. She was the first queen of France to serve as regent. Her co-regent was Count Baldwin V of Flanders. Anne was a literate woman, rare for the time, but there was some opposition to her as regent on the grounds that her mastery of French was less than fluent.

A year after the king's death, Anne, acting as regent, took a passionate fancy for Count Ralph III of Valois, a man whose political ambition encouraged him to repudiate his wife to marry Anne in 1062. Accused of adultery, Ralph's wife appealed to Pope Alexander II, who excommunicated the couple. The young king Philip forgave his mother, which was just as well, since he was to find himself in a very similar predicament in the 1090s. Ralph died in September 1074, at which time Anne returned to the French court. She died in 1075, was buried at Villiers Abbey, La-Ferte-Alais, Essonne and her obits were celebrated on 5 September. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_of_Kiev

Об {profile::pre} (Русский)

На единия от синовете на СВЕТА АННА И БОЛЮМИР = ВЛАДИМИР ЯРОСЛАВ = ГЕОРГИ се ражда дъщеря - АННА-КИЕВСКА, КРАЛИЦАТА НА ФРАНКИТЕ, ОМЪЖЕНА ЗА ХЕНРИ І, КОЯТО НОСИ СЪС СЕБЕ СИ КАТО СВЕЩЕН ЗАВЕТ ОТ ЦАР СИМЕОН БЪЛГАРСКОТО ЕВАНГЕЛИЕ НА КИРИЛИЦА.

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Anne de Kiev reine consort de France's Timeline

1035
1035
Rheims, Champagne-Ardenne, France
1036
1036
Kiev, Russia (now Kiev, Ukraine)
1051
May 19, 1051
Age 15
Rheims, Champagne-Ardenne, France
May 19, 1051
- August 4, 1060
Age 15
France
1052
1052
Age 16
1054
June 1054
Age 18
Rheims, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France
1057
1057
Age 21
Vermandois, Normandy, France
1060
August 4, 1060
Age 24
1075
September 5, 1075
Age 39
West Francia
1075
Age 39
La Ferté-Alais, Ile-de-France, France