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Anson Call

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Fletcher, Franklin, Vermont, USA
Death: Died in Bountiful, Davis, Utah, USA
Place of Burial: Bountiful Cemetery, Bountiful, Davis, Utah, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Cyril Call; Cyril Call; Cyril Call; Sarah "Sally" Call; Sarah Call and 1 other
Husband of Ann Call; Mary Call; Mary Call; Margaretta Unwin Call; Ann Mariah Call and 6 others
Father of Chester Rufus Call; Anson Vasco Call; Anson Vasco Call; Cyril Moroni Call; Christopher Call and 21 others
Brother of Harvey Call ; Solomon Solomon Call; Samantha Willey; Fanny Royal Loveland (Call); Lucina Sessions (Call) and 20 others
Half brother of Josiah Howe Call

Managed by: Rebecca Sue Berg
Last Updated:

About Anson Call

Wikipedia Biographical Summary

"...Anson Call (May 13, 1810 – August 31, 1890) was a Mormon pioneer and an early colonizer of many communities in Utah Territory and surrounding states..."

"...In 1848, he crossed the plains as a Mormon pioneer. He settled in Bountiful, Utah Territory, where he served as a bishop beginning in 1850..."

"...In 1851, Call led the first company of Latter-day Saints to settle at Fillmore, Utah Territory.

Other areas Call helped colonized were Iron County, Utah, Tooele County, Utah, Carson Valley and Calville, Arizona...."

SOURCE: Wikipedia contributors, 'Anson Call', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 13 November 2010, 15:22 UTC, <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Anson_Call&oldid=396520330> [accessed 17 January 2011]

Extracts from Anson's diary:

I was born in 1810, May 13, state of Vermont, Franklin County, town Fletcher, son of Cyril and Sally Call. Cyril was the son of Joseph; Joseph was the son of John. Cyril was born in Woodstock, Windsor County, Vermont, June 29, 1785; Joseph was born in Oxford, Worcester County [Massachusetts?], 1745. My mother was the daughter of Christopher Tiffany who emigrated from Germany.

My parents were born in the state of Vermont. My father removed to the state of Ohio when I was seven years of age, Geauga County. I was sent to school in early life but after removing to Ohio, there were but little opportunities for schools owing to the newness of the country. My father's family, including myself, suffered much from sickness. We came to reduced circumstances in consequence. My father raised a large family of children. The eldest was Harvey, then Anson, Salmon, died at 1-1/2 years old, Samantha, Fanny, Lucina, Josiah, Mary, Lanora, Rosaline, Sarah, Mallissa, Omer, Homer.

I was married in the year 1833, October 3, Geauga County, town of Madison, Ohio, to Mary Flint, the daughter of Rufus and Hannah Flint. Rufus was the son of Silas. Hannah was the daughter of Eleazer Haws. My wife was born in Vermont, Orange County, town of Braintree in the year 1812, March 27. Her brothers and sisters were Electi (who married Daniel D. Robinson), Rufus (who married Olive Holman), Ebenezer (who married Sarah Dubois), Hannah (who married Joseph Oldbrook [Holbrook]), Frederick (who married Fanny Buck); my wife was the youngest of the family.

My father-in-law was a wealthy farmer who removed from Vermont but settled his children there except Hannah and Mary. He purchased a valuable farm in Madison (Ohio), willed the same to my wife and Hannah and died about three years after our marriage. In consequence of our joining the Latter-day Saints previous to his death he altered his will, and Hannah and Mary he disinherited.

I owned a farm in the same town, settled upon it the spring following my marriage. Anson Vasco was born July 9, 1834. Soon after this I made an addition to my farm of 30 acres, and prospered well in my business during the year. Mary Vashti was born March 27, 1836.

My father joined the Church of Latter-day Saints in 1831. My father and family belonged to the Methodist Church. He was baptized by John Murdock. Elders frequently preached in our town, Brigham Young, John P. Greene, Almon W. Babbitt and others.

Their preaching created much excitement in our town but had little effect for nearly three years. It was a constant annoyance to my feelings. I became dissatisfied with all denominations and myself. In the elders' passing through our country, they frequently stopped at my house, and in discussing with them the principles of the gospel, they would cuff me about like an old pair of boots. I came to the conclusion that the reason for my being handled so easily was because I did not understand the Bible and the Book of Mormon.

I resolved to prepare myself for the conflict by investigating the two books. I accordingly furnished myself with the Book of Mormon. I then commenced the Book of Mormon and the Bible, compared the two and read my Bible from Genesis right through, praying and searching diligently for six months. When I finished the two books I became a firm believer in the Book of Mormon. I was then taught by the spirit to obey the principles of the gospel. My feelings were not known by any but my wife. I was proud and haughty and to obey the gospel was worse than death. I labored under those feelings for three months, becoming at times almost insane.

To be called a Mormon, I thought, was more than I could endure. I lamented that my lot was cast in this dispensation. My dreams and my meditations made me miserable. I at last covenanted before the Lord that if he would give me confidence to face the world in Mormonism, I would be baptized for the remission of my sins; before I arose from my knees the horrors of my mind were cleared; I feared no man, no set of men.

The next day I went to the Methodist meeting and declared unto them the truth of Mormonism. I told them I should obey it as soon as I could get to Kirtland. I accordingly went immediately there and was baptized by William Smith, Joseph's brother. My wife accompanied me. I was confirmed in the Kirtland Temple by David Whitmer. I immediately returned to Madison and was then prepared to tell my Methodist brethren many things they were strangers to. I improved every opportunity in their meetings, class meetings not excepted. There were my brothers, my mother and my schoolmates. I was much desirous that they should obey the gospel with me.

Almon Babbitt soon commenced preaching in our town. He approved of the course I was taking and said before many months I should have them with me. Within three months, he raised a branch of 20 members which consisted mostly of the Methodists, including my wife and father's family, my mother excepted. After this was accomplished, I sold a part of my farm and removed to Kirtland. I remained there until we received general orders to go to Missouri.

Maroni was born in Kirtland, February 6, 1838. On March 20, the same year, I started for Missouri in company with my father and brother Harvey. We journeyed to Wellsville on the Ohio River. I left my family to journey up with Almon Babbitt and others. The next summer I went to prepare a place for them and others. At Wellsville, I fell in company with Asael Smith and wife, Joseph Smith's uncle and aunt, and George Ghee [Gee] and wife. We went to Missouri on board a steamboat together. We had a pleasant trip with the exception of some delays.

While passing up the Missouri River there was a gentleman who came to our room and said that he had learned there were Mormons on the boat. Brother Smith spoke: "Yes, we are Mormons. . . ." The gentleman said, "Where are you going?" "To Far West, sir," was the reply. The man then remarked, "I am sorry to see so respectable a looking company journeying to that place." Brother Smith said, "Why so?" He replied, "Because you will be driven from there before six months." "By whom?" "By the Missourians, gentlemen," said he. My father spoke and said,"Are there not human beings in that country as well as others?" He said, "Gentlemen, I presume you are not aware of the gentleman you are talking to." The reply was, "A Missourian, I presume." The gentleman again spoke, "Yes, gentlemen, I am Colonel Wilson of Jackson County. I was one of the principal actors in driving the Mormons from that county and expect to be soon engaged in driving them from Caldwell County." (And he accordingly was.)

He advised us to stop in some other place, for if we went to Far West we were surely to be butchered. We told him we were no better than our brethren and if they died, we were willing to die with them. "Gentlemen," he said, "you appear to be very determined in your minds. Mormonism must and shall be put down." He read to us a letter which he had just received from Newell, which consisted of a bundle of falsehoods concerning our people in Kirtland. "Thrice as false, Joe's career must and shall be stopped." He then started for the door. I then remarked, "If you will stop a moment or two, I will tell you the way it can be done, for there is but one way of accomplishing it." "What is that, Sir?" he said. I answered, "Dethrone theAlmighty and Joe's career is ended and never until then." He left us very abruptly.

We soon landed at Jefferson City. I went off the boat in connection with other passengers. Wilson then gave me an introduction to about a dozen of the Jackson County boys, Governor Boggs included. He told them I was a Mormon going to Caldwell County. They then said, "Ha, ha," with a sneer.

We landed at Jack's Landing, from whence we journeyed on foot to Far West, 40 miles, leaving Asael Smith and wife, George Ghee [Gee] and wife at the landing. We then met with our brethren at Far West, with some of whom we were acquainted. We shortly commenced looking for farming land in Caldwell County. We accordingly purchased 80 acres at $4.00 per acre and 40 acres at $8.00 per acre. We were not able to purchase a suitable quantity of land to accommodate all of those that we wanted land for. My father started back to forward the families and counselled me to purchase a tract of land where it could be obtained cheaper. I accordingly purchased a large tract of land owned by two Missourians, O'Niel and Culp, at the three forks of the Grand River, the title preemption (1,000 acres.)

I have forgotten to say that shortly after I joined the Church, I was administered to for my stammering of speech from which I was relieved. I was also ordained an elder and preached the gospel to my old companions and schoolmates in the section of country round about. After moving to Kirtland, I was ordained to the quorum of the seventies in February 1836 by Zera Pulsipher and Henry Herriman.

I rented a farm in company with George Ghee [Gee] at Ray County and planted 40 acres of corn. The tract of land I had purchased contained 30 acres of improvement and I planted 15 acres of that in corn. After celebrating the 4th of July at Far West, on the 5th I started back to meet my family. I met them 25 miles west of the Mississippi River in company with Alwin Babbitt [Almon W. Babbitt], John Schnider [Snyder] and others. I found them well but much fatigued from their long tedious journey. Also, my wife's sister, Hannah Flint, was with my family.

I travelled with the same company and my family to Far West. After resting about one week at Far West, I proceeded tothe three forks of the Grand River to my farm in company with Phineas Young, John Schnider, Joel Terrill and some others. I immediately commenced preparing for my father's family and others, purchasing stock and employing men for cutting hay.

In the month of September [1838], I received a visit from Joseph, Hyrum and Sidney Rigdon. Joseph stated that he had come to visit us on a special errand. It was on the Sabbath; the day of his arrival the brethren were congregated at my house for the purpose of meeting in connection with a number of Missourians. After meeting was out he told me he wished to see the brethren together, on which he availed himself of the opportunity of slipping off into the cornfield with about 12 of the brethren. He then stated to us we must leave for there were going to be difficulties. We inquired of him from what source. He said it was not for him to say; the message he had received was for us to leave and go to Far West or Adam-ondi-Ahman. We unanimously agreed to do so. We then inquired whether it was necessary for us to go forthwith or whether we could stay and save our crops and sell our farms. He said you need not sell your farms and he presumed we should have time to get away, but how much time he knew not. They then immediately left us after the dinner.

The next day we counselled together to know what course to take and when to start. We were very anxious to save our crops and we concluded we would do so if we could. It was agreed on by the brethren that I should travel through Daviess, Caldwell and Ray counties and see if there was any stir among the people; by doing so we thought we could ascertain what time we could allow ourselves for leaving. I accordingly started the next day and discovered no excitement among the people. We therefore concluded we could give ourselves sufficient time to secure our crops. After doing so we decided we could take a spree at bee hunting.

After a seven days' hunt, we loaded our wagons with honey and returned home, finding all peace and since we had done so well, we decided to take another. The weather was stormy and we accomplished but little. We concluded we would return home and go to Adam-ondi-Ahman with our families. We found the whole country in arms on our return, between us and Adam-ondi-Ahman and Far West. Neal Gillium had a company of mobbers placed to prevent the Mormons from going to and from either place. We were watched by day and night to see that we did not leave the country. They sought to kill Phineas Young. He hid himself in a bunch of corn stalks. I carried him food and water for four days, and we became uneasy and dissatisfied with our situation. We could not get any intelligence from the Missourians as to what was going on in the county. They told us that if we stayed we should not be harmed, but that if we attempted to go away, it would be death.

Phineas and myself concluded we would make the attempt. After all was still in the evening, we started out to work ourselves by Neal Gillium's company. We were 30 miles from Adam-ondi-Ahman and 40 miles from Far West. We succeeded in getting to Adam-ondi-Ahman about daylight the next morning. There we learned of Bogard battle, the difficulty at Gallatin. The brethren were all in at Far West and Adam-ondi-Ahman that could get in. No help could be obtained to assist us. We accordingly, the next night, made our way to our families.

We found the Missourians much agitated about my absence. They demanded of me to know where I had been. I told them I did not know it was any of their business. They said, "We suppose you have been to Adam-ondi-Ahman." I told them I had. They said, "We suppose you can tell us what is going on there." I told them I would tell them as much as they had told me. They became very angry and abused my family and threatened us with sudden death if we attempted to leave.

We made as much preparation through the day for leaving as possible. After dark, I placed a wagon and four-horse team before my door. Phineas Young and wife, Jackson and wife, my wife and her sister loaded a portion of their clothing and bedding in the wagon. My brother Harvey and self and six other of the brethren immediately started for Adam-ondi-Ahman. Previous to our starting, two Missourians came and said they would show us the devil before we got far.

We left most of our property, with the exception of our clothing, upon the farm. The night being dark, we took a prairie route that the mob did not calculate we would, so they did not find us. The next day at 12 o'clock, we landed safely at Adam-ondi-Ahman. Here we found our brethren, some living in tents, some few in houses, but the most of them with but little to cover themselves. I commenced searching for a location for my family. I selected an oak tree top. After clearing away the brush, spreading some blankets on the limbs and building a fire in front, we then found ourselves comfortably situated for the times.

I then went to the horse mill with some corn to get some meal for supper. After supper we were all called together at general orders and received instructions from Lyman Wight and Reynolds Cahoon. They said that in consequence of the much fatigue the brethren had had, we might all go to our lodgings with the exception of 25 men whom they had selected. They said they had been expecting an attack from the mob for the last three days and we must load our arms and lay them under our heads and not take off our clothes. If the bugle sounded, we might consider that the mob was upon us and all hands were immediately to rally at that place.

About one o'clock the next morning, the bugle sounded; there was the running of horses, the hollering, "Turn out, turn out, the mob is upon us." The brethren immediately rallied. The women dressed themselves and children and prepared for the conflict. We immediately rushed, as we supposed, toward our enemies, but we found it to be a company of brethren from Far West. We then learned that Far West was surrendered and that the presidency was given up in the hands of the mob. We were informed that we would be called upon to surrender about ten o'clock in the morning.

Presently, Colonel Parks made his appearance with 500 armed men. Forming a hollow square, they ordered, "Within one hour every man is to be within the square with all his arms and ammunition." This, we learned, was the order of Brother Joseph. We accordingly obeyed the order. After our surrender, General Parks left 200 men to guard us from those that he said would injure us, but those he left were the worst men in all the land. He gave us ten days to leave the country. The general gave me a passport to Far West that we might travel and not be killed, to-wit: I permit Anson Call to remove to Far West and from thence out of the state. Signed General Parks.

While tarrying at Adam-ondi-Ahman, two of the guards came to the tree top where my family and I were sitting, eating our dinner and asked me some questions. He said I was a damned liar and said he would shoot me. He cocked his gun and put it to my face. My family screamed, and he lowered his gun and rode off. The second night after the surrender, the snow fell about six inches deep. I then started with my family to Far West. My children nearly froze to death. One of them froze his fingers so that he lost a part of his nails. His name was Maroni. After riding to Far West, the weather continued severely cold so that many of the mob were obliged to leave. They killed our cattle, stole our horses, burned our houses, constantly killing and abusing all that they met with, insulted our women and murdered some of our children.

We were not permitted to leave Far West, only to get our firewood. We had not the privilege of hunting our cattle and horses, yet we were told that we had to immediately leave the state. We were deprived of holding meetings of any kind. Joseph Smith, Sr. and Brigham Young were our principal counsellors. We received two or three epistles from Joseph who was at that time in Liberty Jail, Clay County. Some few times in the course of the winter, we slyly congregated ourselves in a schoolhouse about two miles from Far West to receive instructions from Joseph and others.

On the 23rd of December [1838], I went to Ray County unbeknownst to the guard and mob who were around us to make sale of the corn I had raised which was 30 acres and two-thirds of it mine. The next day I was taken by ten men and an old Negro. They took me into the back part of a store and ordered me to disarm myself. I told them I had no arms about my person. They said I was a damned liar for the Mormons always carried arms. They ordered me to take the things out of my pockets and lay them in a chair. I refused. They threatened me and flourished their knives about me and said if I did not do it they would take my life. I accordingly removed everything out of my pockets. They said, "Turn your pockets wrong side outwards." I did so. They then ordered me to put my things back into my pockets. I accordingly did so. They then told me to draw my coat. I did it. They then said, "He carries his arms at his back," and they examined me until they became satisfied I had no arms about me. They then commenced tantalizing and saying I was a damned Mormon and was in the Bogard battle. Each of them had a rifle which they set up against the house. They set themselves down and went to whittling with butcher knives.

One of them by the name of James Ogle said that he had suffered by the Mormons and that I had to atone for it. He said they had felt my back and they would see it bare before morning and I would feel hickory upon it. He then commenced beating me with the flat hand in the face. He then said he would not abuse a man that was not armed. He threw his butcher knife at my feet and told me to pick it up and fight. I told him I did not wish to fight. He said I had to fight or die. He then picked up the knife and put it to my hand and told me to take it. I discovered all the rest of them had their knives in their hands. I refused to take it and leaned up against the side of the house. I then said in my heart, "Oh Lord, preserve me or they will take my life." I immediately became satisfied that I would be delivered from their hands. He thrust a knife within an inch of my breast and said he would rip my guts out. He then struck me repeatedly between my eyes with the back of his knife. He tantalized me in this manner for over two hours and struck me in the face with the back of the knife and his flat hand about 50 times. He said it was getting near night and we must make a finish of the business.

They then took me into the street and said they would serve me as they served a Mormon the other day, strip me and tie me to a hickory and leave me until morning. While they were making arrangements to accomplish this deed, a grocery keeper was looking out of the window at us. I told him I wanted a bottle of liquor, for I wished to treat the company, on which he handed me a bottle and tumbler through the window.

We were arranged in a double file. I stood in front between the two forward men. I stepped a step or two out of rank and took the bottle. I drank them a toast and told them they were men after my own heart, the bravest set of men I had ever met with and before we went any further with the business I was going to drink with them and wished them to be merry, for tomorrow was Christmas and we must prepare ourselves for it. I handed the bottle to my right-hand man who fired off his gun and set it up against the grocery store and took the bottle. Every man set his gun up against the grocery also. He then poured the liquor into the tumbler and I discovered every man's eyes were fixed on it. I then sprang into the hazel brush which was within three or four rods of where we stood. (This was a little town situated in Ray County called Fredericksburg, a new place just commenced in the woods; it was surrounded with hazel and hickory brush.) They then pursued me and hollered, "Catch him, damn him, catch him." I squatted in the brush and they passed by me. They went one way and I went another. My legs served me well for five miles and probably saved my back from being severely lacerated.

My course was towards Far West. I came to a family of Missourians where I had preached a number of times the summer before. The mistress of the house belonged to the Church. I went into the house and they discovered I was badly bruised which created some excitement at first. I related to them some of the circumstances that had taken place. The man of the house stated that he dared not have me stay, for they would burn his house and destroy him. I told him that I would leave, but he said I must stop and get some supper. While I was eating the lady told him that I had better stay, that it was dark and cold, and it would be impossible for me to find my way across the prairie to Far West which was about 20 miles away. She said I could lay down in the back room with my clothes on and leave the back door open. They would not be able to get to the house without the dogs notifying me of their approach and then I could pass through the back door into the cornfield and not be discovered by them. He accordingly consented. I got a good night's rest and the kind sister prepared me a breakfast before daylight.

By daylight I found myself out of the neighborhood and on the road to Far West. About 11 o'clock I reached home Christmas Day [1838]. My wife then prepared me a dinner of parched corn. She said that in consequence of my absence, we had missed our turn of grinding in the horse mill. Nothing further happened during the day worth mentioning.

What to do I knew not. I had to leave the state soon and my animals were all gone but one. Most of the animals that were owned by the brethren were stolen. Some were saved by tying them with a lock chain around a tree and locking them up.

I then counselled with Father Smith and Brigham Young concerning my going to the three forks of Grand River to try to obtain some property there so that I could leave the state. They gave it as their opinion that I had better not go for I probably would fare worse than I did in Ray County. I, being anxious to obtain something to make out a team, accordingly mounted the horse I had left and started. I arrived at my farm on New Year's Day [1839] and discovered that a man by the name of George Washington O'Neil had it in possession. I passed by to a family about two miles off by the name of Day who had removed from the eastern states but a few weeks before I was driven away. This family took no part with the mob. I found the lady at home. She commenced giving me a history concerning my property.

She said if O'Neil and Culp knew that I was in the place they would shoot me for they had gotten nearly all I had left, and Henderson and others would be willing to help them. I had sold quite a number of the citizens store goods and was to wait until Christmas for pay. She said she had frequently heard them say that if I came there, they would pay me in the way that the Mormons ought to be paid.

O'Neil and Culp came into the house while we were conversing. They demanded of me my reasons for being there. I told them I was attending to my own business. They said I had no business in that country, and if I got away alive, I should be damned smart. I told them there was time enough to be afraid when I saw danger and that I considered myself a white man and went and came as I pleased. They said they would as soon kill me as kill a dog and there would be no more notice taken of it. This I very well understood. They told me they supposed I had come to get my property. I told them I had. They told me there was none for me. After repeated threatenings I became satisfied that it was in vain to think of obtaining anything. I started for my horse which was hitched at the yard fence about five rods from the door. They followed me.

O'Neil picked up the end of a hoop pole. Mr. Day had been hooping a barrel and left some pieces. O'Neil struck me upon the head and nearly brought me to the ground. I looked for a club, but there was none in sight. He repeated the blows and my having on my head a thick woolen cloth cap saved my skull. Mrs. Day threw the door open and hollered, "Murder!" The knife that hung by his side deterred me from clutching him. I started for the door. He then hit me in the face and repeated the blows two or three times before I reached it. The house, standing about two feet from the ground . . . I clenched the door post when he gave me a blow over the eye, the scar of which I carry to this day. I sprang into the house and clutched the fire shovel. Mrs. Day shut the door that I should neither go out nor they come in. They then ran past the window.

She said, "They have gone after their guns," at which I mounted my horse and started for Far West as fast as I could consistently ride. My head and face soon commenced swelling on which I washed them and made up my mind that I would not let anybody know what had happened to me from the fact that Father Smith and Brigham had told me not to go.

I arrived home about 11 o'clock at night and went to bed without making a light in the house. I thought I would not let my wife know what had happened to me. In the morning I sprang out of bed and I instantly found myself lying on the floor on the other side of the house. My wife screamed and wanted to know what was the matter. I then returned to bed and found myself under the necessity of telling her what had happened, but sought to keep it from my family. Father Smith soon found it out and came to see me, telling me it would do me good but he was glad they didn't kill me. In a few days I was around and attending to my business.

On the 15th of January [1839], Lyman Cowdery came to my house and inquired after me, telling my wife he wished to see me that evening and he should like to meet me at W. W. Phelps. I accordingly met with him there and David Whitmer, William McLellin, Burr Riggs, (Riggs and) a number of other apostates. Mr. Cowdery stated that he had come from the Ohio to see me on some special business. He said that I had taken his brother Oliver and David with a warrant for stealing my goods somewhere between Wellsville on the Ohio River and that place and that he had come to settle with me. He said he knew the cause of my taking them because Joe had told me to and I was not particularly to blame. W. W. Phelps frequently remarked in the conversation, "damned tall oath" and other similar expressions.

Cowdery said he had been acquainted with me a number of years in the Ohio and he did not consider that I was to blame, for I had to do as Joe told me, "but he is now where he will not lead anybody into difficulty again. Justice will soon overtake him."

"And now, Anson, you are young, inexperienced in law, and I am sorry to find you in this fix. This has caused my brother and Mr. Whitmer much difficulty. You swore to that which is not true; the goods you swore were yours. I have a bill in my pocket of the purchase of them in Cincinnati. Notwithstanding all this, I feel disposed to show you leniency. I will propose two ways of settling this; you can take your choice. I sympathize much with you. In the first place, I will show you the law upon this point. A crime of this kind would be punished by imprisonment in the penitentiary, not less than three years and the payment of all damages sustained which would not be less than 2,000 dollars. This is what you are subject to. Now I will propose another way. If you will go to the court with me at Richmond tomorrow and state that you did this because Joe told you so, that will then settle the matter and let the blame rest where it ought to."

He then asked me if I had made up my mind which to do. I told him that I had. I then arose and told him that I was prepared to prove what I had sworn to by Vincin [Vinson] Knight, who helped me select the goods from a store in the Ohio, and I should have done it at the sitting of the court at Liberty if a Mormon had been permitted to have been there, and I wished him to understand that when I took an oath that I only was responsible and he might take the course that he thought proper. I then left the room and have not heard from him since.

Shortly after this, a mare that was taken from me by the mob returned home to my great surprise, which made me out a team and about the middle of February we took up our line of march for Illinois. The weather was cold and severe, with snow to the depth of one foot. The first night our wagon tipped over into the creek; the second day we had to cross a long prairie and were not able to reach the settlement. It was a very cold and blustering night. We raised the wagon tongue, put some clothes over it, placing our beds underneath. We found campfires and tent poles already stuck nearly all the way after this. We found the Missourians universally unwilling to receive us into their homes.

We arrived at Palmyra, Missouri, the third day of March [1839]. There I found my father and his family and cousin Orvis Call and family. Here I stopped with my family and my father and I went into Illinois to hunt a place for our families. My father rented a farm in Hancock County, five miles east of Warsaw. I took a subcontract for some railroad. We then immediately returned to our families and started with our families for Illinois. We travelled upon the west side of the Mississippi to Warsaw. The road was almost entirely new and it was with great difficulty that we got through. We chose this route on account of the number of families waiting upon the ferry boat.

We arrived at our destination the 25th of April [1839]. I soon commenced hiring the brethren to work upon the railroad. I hired none but the brethren. I kept from 12 to 14 during the season. I paid my men 20 dollars per month, and I made very little more than those I hired. About the middle of May, I was one day travelling to Warsaw when to my great surprise I met Brothers Joseph and Hyrum. I asked him when and how he had made his escape from Missouri. He said, "I am in a great hurry, for my enemies are pursuing me. I will say in short to you, the prayers of the brethren brought me here." He then inquired of me where I lived. He said, "In about a week I will be at your house; then I will relate the whole matter to you." He passed on in great haste. I was filled with great joy to see our Prophet after more than six months, suffering by chains and dungeons, once more in the enjoyment of liberty.

He came to my house about the appointed time, had his dinner and spent the principal part of the afternoon in conversation. Hyrum, Sidney Rigdon, and Vincent Knight were with him. He related to us some of the circumstances of his escape from Missouri. He also stated that he had purchased a tract of land in Commerce, a place for the Saints to gather to, now called Nauvoo. In the course of the summer, my wife had a very severe sickness, chills and fever, from which she would probably have died had it not been for her being healed by the laying on of the hands.

On the 15th of October [1839] my wife and myself with our youngest child journeyed to the Ohio to visit Mother Flint, leaving the two children and Hannah Flint with them. She had a very severe sickness in our absence. I spent most of the winter in Ohio, preaching in company with Lester Brooks. We returned in the spring in company with Chester Loveland and family and Jeremiah Willy. We arrived home on the 14th of April [1840]. Chester Loveland and myself rented a farm in Carthage where we spent the summer and raised a good crop of corn. We worked for the Carthaginians and supported our families. I preached to them a few times in the courthouse but they were very religious and did not wish to inquire much about Mormonism. __________________________________________ From Sons of Utah Pioneers website about monuments and trails: http://www.sonsofutahpioneers.org/monuments-trails/

In 1854, Anson Call of Bountiful erected a Grist Mill on the south side of Deuel Creek just southeast of this marker. The mill was a three-story building made from Centerville Canyon rock, with the machinery on the top floor. The miller kept a portion of the grain as his pay. The power to turn the grinding wheels was generated by water flowing down Deuel Creek, which ran from two holding ponds on the hillside above the mill and then to a water wheel that turned the drive shaft. The larger pond also served as a baptismal font, for swimming and winter ice production. The mill was demolished in 1944. -------------------- The Autobiography of Anson Call, 1810-1890

(Selections from his journal up to 1839)

Source: Anson Call, "Autobiography of Anson Call," typescript, BYU-S

I was born in 1810, May 13, state of Vermont, Franklin County, town Fletcher, son of Cyril and Sally Call. Cyril was the son of Joseph; Joseph was the son of John. Cyril was born in Woodstock, Windsor County, Vermont, June 29, 1785; Joseph was born in Oxford, Worcester County [Massachusetts?], 1745. My mother was the daughter of Christopher Tiffany who emigrated from Germany.

My parents were born in the state of Vermont. My father removed to the state of Ohio when I was seven years of age, Geauga County. I was sent to school in early life but after removing to Ohio, there were but little opportunities for schools owing to the newness of the country. My father's family, including myself, suffered much from sickness. We came to reduced circumstances in consequence. My father raised a large family of children. The eldest was Harvey, then Anson, Salmon, died at 1-1/2 years old, Samantha, Fanny, Lucina, Josiah, Mary, Lanora, Rosaline, Sarah, Mallissa, Omer, Homer.

I was married in the year 1833, October 3, Geauga County, town of Madison, Ohio, to Mary Flint, the daughter of Rufus and Hannah Flint. Rufus was the son of Silas. Hannah was the daughter of Eleazer Haws. My wife was born in Vermont, Orange County, town of Braintree in the year 1812, March 27. Her brothers and sisters were Electi (who married Daniel D. Robinson), Rufus (who married Olive Holman), Ebenezer (who married Sarah Dubois), Hannah (who married Joseph Oldbrook [Holbrook]), Frederick (who married Fanny Buck); my wife was the youngest of the family.

My father-in-law was a wealthy farmer who removed from Vermont but settled his children there except Hannah and Mary. He purchased a valuable farm in Madison (Ohio), willed the same to my wife and Hannah and died about three years after our marriage. In consequence of our joining the Latter-day Saints previous to his death he altered his will, and Hannah and Mary he disinherited.

I owned a farm in the same town, settled upon it the spring following my marriage. Anson Vasco was born July 9, 1834. Soon after this I made an addition to my farm of 30 acres, and prospered well in my business during the year. Mary Vashti was born March 27, 1836.

My father joined the Church of Latter-day Saints in 1831. My father and family belonged to the Methodist Church. He was baptized by John Murdock. Elders frequently preached in our town, Brigham Young, John P. Greene, Almon W. Babbitt and others.

Their preaching created much excitement in our town but had little effect for nearly three years. It was a constant annoyance to my feelings. I became dissatisfied with all denominations and myself. In the elders' passing through our country, they frequently stopped at my house, and in discussing with them the principles of the gospel, they would cuff me about like an old pair of boots. I came to the conclusion that the reason for my being handled so easily was because I did not understand the Bible and the Book of Mormon.

I resolved to prepare myself for the conflict by investigating the two books. I accordingly furnished myself with the Book of Mormon. I then commenced the Book of Mormon and the Bible, compared the two and read my Bible from Genesis right through, praying and searching diligently for six months. When I finished the two books I became a firm believer in the Book of Mormon. I was then taught by the spirit to obey the principles of the gospel. My feelings were not known by any but my wife. I was proud and haughty and to obey the gospel was worse than death. I labored under those feelings for three months, becoming at times almost insane.

To be called a Mormon, I thought, was more than I could endure. I lamented that my lot was cast in this dispensation. My dreams and my meditations made me miserable. I at last covenanted before the Lord that if he would give me confidence to face the world in Mormonism, I would be baptized for the remission of my sins; before I arose from my knees the horrors of my mind were cleared; I feared no man, no set of men.

The next day I went to the Methodist meeting and declared unto them the truth of Mormonism. I told them I should obey it as soon as I could get to Kirtland. I accordingly went immediately there and was baptized by William Smith, Joseph's brother. My wife accompanied me. I was confirmed in the Kirtland Temple by David Whitmer. I immediately returned to Madison and was then prepared to tell my Methodist brethren many things they were strangers to. I improved every opportunity in their meetings, class meetings not excepted. There were my brothers, my mother and my schoolmates. I was much desirous that they should obey the gospel with me.

Almon Babbitt soon commenced preaching in our town. He approved of the course I was taking and said before many months I should have them with me. Within three months, he raised a branch of 20 members which consisted mostly of the Methodists, including my wife and father's family, my mother excepted. After this was accomplished, I sold a part of my farm and removed to Kirtland. I remained there until we received general orders to go to Missouri.

Maroni was born in Kirtland, February 6, 1838. On March 20, the same year, I started for Missouri in company with my father and brother Harvey. We journeyed to Wellsville on the Ohio River. I left my family to journey up with Almon Babbitt and others. The next summer I went to prepare a place for them and others. At Wellsville, I fell in company with Asael Smith and wife, Joseph Smith's uncle and aunt, and George Ghee [Gee] and wife. We went to Missouri on board a steamboat together. We had a pleasant trip with the exception of some delays.

While passing up the Missouri River there was a gentleman who came to our room and said that he had learned there were Mormons on the boat. Brother Smith spoke: "Yes, we are Mormons. . . ." The gentleman said, "Where are you going?" "To Far West, sir," was the reply. The man then remarked, "I am sorry to see so respectable a looking company journeying to that place." Brother Smith said, "Why so?" He replied, "Because you will be driven from there before six months." "By whom?" "By the Missourians, gentlemen," said he. My father spoke and said,"Are there not human beings in that country as well as others?" He said, "Gentlemen, I presume you are not aware of the gentleman you are talking to." The reply was, "A Missourian, I presume." The gentleman again spoke, "Yes, gentlemen, I am Colonel Wilson of Jackson County. I was one of the principal actors in driving the Mormons from that county and expect to be soon engaged in driving them from Caldwell County." (And he accordingly was.)

He advised us to stop in some other place, for if we went to Far West we were surely to be butchered. We told him we were no better than our brethren and if they died, we were willing to die with them. "Gentlemen," he said, "you appear to be very determined in your minds. Mormonism must and shall be put down." He read to us a letter which he had just received from Newell, which consisted of a bundle of falsehoods concerning our people in Kirtland. "Thrice as false, Joe's career must and shall be stopped." He then started for the door. I then remarked, "If you will stop a moment or two, I will tell you the way it can be done, for there is but one way of accomplishing it." "What is that, Sir?" he said. I answered, "Dethrone theAlmighty and Joe's career is ended and never until then." He left us very abruptly.

We soon landed at Jefferson City. I went off the boat in connection with other passengers. Wilson then gave me an introduction to about a dozen of the Jackson County boys, Governor Boggs included. He told them I was a Mormon going to Caldwell County. They then said, "Ha, ha," with a sneer.

We landed at Jack's Landing, from whence we journeyed on foot to Far West, 40 miles, leaving Asael Smith and wife, George Ghee [Gee] and wife at the landing. We then met with our brethren at Far West, with some of whom we were acquainted. We shortly commenced looking for farming land in Caldwell County. We accordingly purchased 80 acres at $4.00 per acre and 40 acres at $8.00 per acre. We were not able to purchase a suitable quantity of land to accommodate all of those that we wanted land for. My father started back to forward the families and counselled me to purchase a tract of land where it could be obtained cheaper. I accordingly purchased a large tract of land owned by two Missourians, O'Niel and Culp, at the three forks of the Grand River, the title preemption (1,000 acres.)

I have forgotten to say that shortly after I joined the Church, I was administered to for my stammering of speech from which I was relieved. I was also ordained an elder and preached the gospel to my old companions and schoolmates in the section of country round about. After moving to Kirtland, I was ordained to the quorum of the seventies in February 1836 by Zera Pulsipher and Henry Herriman.

I rented a farm in company with George Ghee [Gee] at Ray County and planted 40 acres of corn. The tract of land I had purchased contained 30 acres of improvement and I planted 15 acres of that in corn. After celebrating the 4th of July at Far West, on the 5th I started back to meet my family. I met them 25 miles west of the Mississippi River in company with Alwin Babbitt [Almon W. Babbitt], John Schnider [Snyder] and others. I found them well but much fatigued from their long tedious journey. Also, my wife's sister, Hannah Flint, was with my family.

I travelled with the same company and my family to Far West. After resting about one week at Far West, I proceeded tothe three forks of the Grand River to my farm in company with Phineas Young, John Schnider, Joel Terrill and some others. I immediately commenced preparing for my father's family and others, purchasing stock and employing men for cutting hay.

In the month of September [1838], I received a visit from Joseph, Hyrum and Sidney Rigdon. Joseph stated that he had come to visit us on a special errand. It was on the Sabbath; the day of his arrival the brethren were congregated at my house for the purpose of meeting in connection with a number of Missourians. After meeting was out he told me he wished to see the brethren together, on which he availed himself of the opportunity of slipping off into the cornfield with about 12 of the brethren. He then stated to us we must leave for there were going to be difficulties. We inquired of him from what source. He said it was not for him to say; the message he had received was for us to leave and go to Far West or Adam-ondi-Ahman. We unanimously agreed to do so. We then inquired whether it was necessary for us to go forthwith or whether we could stay and save our crops and sell our farms. He said you need not sell your farms and he presumed we should have time to get away, but how much time he knew not. They then immediately left us after the dinner.

The next day we counselled together to know what course to take and when to start. We were very anxious to save our crops and we concluded we would do so if we could. It was agreed on by the brethren that I should travel through Daviess, Caldwell and Ray counties and see if there was any stir among the people; by doing so we thought we could ascertain what time we could allow ourselves for leaving. I accordingly started the next day and discovered no excitement among the people. We therefore concluded we could give ourselves sufficient time to secure our crops. After doing so we decided we could take a spree at bee hunting.

After a seven days' hunt, we loaded our wagons with honey and returned home, finding all peace and since we had done so well, we decided to take another. The weather was stormy and we accomplished but little. We concluded we would return home and go to Adam-ondi-Ahman with our families. We found the whole country in arms on our return, between us and Adam-ondi-Ahman and Far West. Neal Gillium had a company of mobbers placed to prevent the Mormons from going to and from either place. We were watched by day and night to see that we did not leave the country. They sought to kill Phineas Young. He hid himself in a bunch of corn stalks. I carried him food and water for four days, and we became uneasy and dissatisfied with our situation. We could not get any intelligence from the Missourians as to what was going on in the county. They told us that if we stayed we should not be harmed, but that if we attempted to go away, it would be death.

Phineas and myself concluded we would make the attempt. After all was still in the evening, we started out to work ourselves by Neal Gillium's company. We were 30 miles from Adam-ondi-Ahman and 40 miles from Far West. We succeeded in getting to Adam-ondi-Ahman about daylight the next morning. There we learned of Bogard battle, the difficulty at Gallatin. The brethren were all in at Far West and Adam-ondi-Ahman that could get in. No help could be obtained to assist us. We accordingly, the next night, made our way to our families.

We found the Missourians much agitated about my absence. They demanded of me to know where I had been. I told them I did not know it was any of their business. They said, "We suppose you have been to Adam-ondi-Ahman." I told them I had. They said, "We suppose you can tell us what is going on there." I told them I would tell them as much as they had told me. They became very angry and abused my family and threatened us with sudden death if we attempted to leave.

We made as much preparation through the day for leaving as possible. After dark, I placed a wagon and four-horse team before my door. Phineas Young and wife, Jackson and wife, my wife and her sister loaded a portion of their clothing and bedding in the wagon. My brother Harvey and self and six other of the brethren immediately started for Adam-ondi-Ahman. Previous to our starting, two Missourians came and said they would show us the devil before we got far.

We left most of our property, with the exception of our clothing, upon the farm. The night being dark, we took a prairie route that the mob did not calculate we would, so they did not find us. The next day at 12 o'clock, we landed safely at Adam-ondi-Ahman. Here we found our brethren, some living in tents, some few in houses, but the most of them with but little to cover themselves. I commenced searching for a location for my family. I selected an oak tree top. After clearing away the brush, spreading some blankets on the limbs and building a fire in front, we then found ourselves comfortably situated for the times.

I then went to the horse mill with some corn to get some meal for supper. After supper we were all called together at general orders and received instructions from Lyman Wight and Reynolds Cahoon. They said that in consequence of the much fatigue the brethren had had, we might all go to our lodgings with the exception of 25 men whom they had selected. They said they had been expecting an attack from the mob for the last three days and we must load our arms and lay them under our heads and not take off our clothes. If the bugle sounded, we might consider that the mob was upon us and all hands were immediately to rally at that place.

About one o'clock the next morning, the bugle sounded; there was the running of horses, the hollering, "Turn out, turn out, the mob is upon us." The brethren immediately rallied. The women dressed themselves and children and prepared for the conflict. We immediately rushed, as we supposed, toward our enemies, but we found it to be a company of brethren from Far West. We then learned that Far West was surrendered and that the presidency was given up in the hands of the mob. We were informed that we would be called upon to surrender about ten o'clock in the morning.

Presently, Colonel Parks made his appearance with 500 armed men. Forming a hollow square, they ordered, "Within one hour every man is to be within the square with all his arms and ammunition." This, we learned, was the order of Brother Joseph. We accordingly obeyed the order. After our surrender, General Parks left 200 men to guard us from those that he said would injure us, but those he left were the worst men in all the land. He gave us ten days to leave the country. The general gave me a passport to Far West that we might travel and not be killed, to-wit: I permit Anson Call to remove to Far West and from thence out of the state. Signed General Parks.

While tarrying at Adam-ondi-Ahman, two of the guards came to the tree top where my family and I were sitting, eating our dinner and asked me some questions. He said I was a damned liar and said he would shoot me. He cocked his gun and put it to my face. My family screamed, and he lowered his gun and rode off. The second night after the surrender, the snow fell about six inches deep. I then started with my family to Far West. My children nearly froze to death. One of them froze his fingers so that he lost a part of his nails. His name was Maroni. After riding to Far West, the weather continued severely cold so that many of the mob were obliged to leave. They killed our cattle, stole our horses, burned our houses, constantly killing and abusing all that they met with, insulted our women and murdered some of our children.

We were not permitted to leave Far West, only to get our firewood. We had not the privilege of hunting our cattle and horses, yet we were told that we had to immediately leave the state. We were deprived of holding meetings of any kind. Joseph Smith, Sr. and Brigham Young were our principal counsellors. We received two or three epistles from Joseph who was at that time in Liberty Jail, Clay County. Some few times in the course of the winter, we slyly congregated ourselves in a schoolhouse about two miles from Far West to receive instructions from Joseph and others.

On the 23rd of December [1838], I went to Ray County unbeknownst to the guard and mob who were around us to make sale of the corn I had raised which was 30 acres and two-thirds of it mine. The next day I was taken by ten men and an old Negro. They took me into the back part of a store and ordered me to disarm myself. I told them I had no arms about my person. They said I was a damned liar for the Mormons always carried arms. They ordered me to take the things out of my pockets and lay them in a chair. I refused. They threatened me and flourished their knives about me and said if I did not do it they would take my life. I accordingly removed everything out of my pockets. They said, "Turn your pockets wrong side outwards." I did so. They then ordered me to put my things back into my pockets. I accordingly did so. They then told me to draw my coat. I did it. They then said, "He carries his arms at his back," and they examined me until they became satisfied I had no arms about me. They then commenced tantalizing and saying I was a damned Mormon and was in the Bogard battle. Each of them had a rifle which they set up against the house. They set themselves down and went to whittling with butcher knives.

One of them by the name of James Ogle said that he had suffered by the Mormons and that I had to atone for it. He said they had felt my back and they would see it bare before morning and I would feel hickory upon it. He then commenced beating me with the flat hand in the face. He then said he would not abuse a man that was not armed. He threw his butcher knife at my feet and told me to pick it up and fight. I told him I did not wish to fight. He said I had to fight or die. He then picked up the knife and put it to my hand and told me to take it. I discovered all the rest of them had their knives in their hands. I refused to take it and leaned up against the side of the house. I then said in my heart, "Oh Lord, preserve me or they will take my life." I immediately became satisfied that I would be delivered from their hands. He thrust a knife within an inch of my breast and said he would rip my guts out. He then struck me repeatedly between my eyes with the back of his knife. He tantalized me in this manner for over two hours and struck me in the face with the back of the knife and his flat hand about 50 times. He said it was getting near night and we must make a finish of the business.

They then took me into the street and said they would serve me as they served a Mormon the other day, strip me and tie me to a hickory and leave me until morning. While they were making arrangements to accomplish this deed, a grocery keeper was looking out of the window at us. I told him I wanted a bottle of liquor, for I wished to treat the company, on which he handed me a bottle and tumbler through the window.

We were arranged in a double file. I stood in front between the two forward men. I stepped a step or two out of rank and took the bottle. I drank them a toast and told them they were men after my own heart, the bravest set of men I had ever met with and before we went any further with the business I was going to drink with them and wished them to be merry, for tomorrow was Christmas and we must prepare ourselves for it. I handed the bottle to my right-hand man who fired off his gun and set it up against the grocery store and took the bottle. Every man set his gun up against the grocery also. He then poured the liquor into the tumbler and I discovered every man's eyes were fixed on it. I then sprang into the hazel brush which was within three or four rods of where we stood. (This was a little town situated in Ray County called Fredericksburg, a new place just commenced in the woods; it was surrounded with hazel and hickory brush.) They then pursued me and hollered, "Catch him, damn him, catch him." I squatted in the brush and they passed by me. They went one way and I went another. My legs served me well for five miles and probably saved my back from being severely lacerated.

My course was towards Far West. I came to a family of Missourians where I had preached a number of times the summer before. The mistress of the house belonged to the Church. I went into the house and they discovered I was badly bruised which created some excitement at first. I related to them some of the circumstances that had taken place. The man of the house stated that he dared not have me stay, for they would burn his house and destroy him. I told him that I would leave, but he said I must stop and get some supper. While I was eating the lady told him that I had better stay, that it was dark and cold, and it would be impossible for me to find my way across the prairie to Far West which was about 20 miles away. She said I could lay down in the back room with my clothes on and leave the back door open. They would not be able to get to the house without the dogs notifying me of their approach and then I could pass through the back door into the cornfield and not be discovered by them. He accordingly consented. I got a good night's rest and the kind sister prepared me a breakfast before daylight.

By daylight I found myself out of the neighborhood and on the road to Far West. About 11 o'clock I reached home Christmas Day [1838]. My wife then prepared me a dinner of parched corn. She said that in consequence of my absence, we had missed our turn of grinding in the horse mill. Nothing further happened during the day worth mentioning.

What to do I knew not. I had to leave the state soon and my animals were all gone but one. Most of the animals that were owned by the brethren were stolen. Some were saved by tying them with a lock chain around a tree and locking them up.

I then counselled with Father Smith and Brigham Young concerning my going to the three forks of Grand River to try to obtain some property there so that I could leave the state. They gave it as their opinion that I had better not go for I probably would fare worse than I did in Ray County. I, being anxious to obtain something to make out a team, accordingly mounted the horse I had left and started. I arrived at my farm on New Year's Day [1839] and discovered that a man by the name of George Washington O'Neil had it in possession. I passed by to a family about two miles off by the name of Day who had removed from the eastern states but a few weeks before I was driven away. This family took no part with the mob. I found the lady at home. She commenced giving me a history concerning my property.

She said if O'Neil and Culp knew that I was in the place they would shoot me for they had gotten nearly all I had left, and Henderson and others would be willing to help them. I had sold quite a number of the citizens store goods and was to wait until Christmas for pay. She said she had frequently heard them say that if I came there, they would pay me in the way that the Mormons ought to be paid.

O'Neil and Culp came into the house while we were conversing. They demanded of me my reasons for being there. I told them I was attending to my own business. They said I had no business in that country, and if I got away alive, I should be damned smart. I told them there was time enough to be afraid when I saw danger and that I considered myself a white man and went and came as I pleased. They said they would as soon kill me as kill a dog and there would be no more notice taken of it. This I very well understood. They told me they supposed I had come to get my property. I told them I had. They told me there was none for me. After repeated threatenings I became satisfied that it was in vain to think of obtaining anything. I started for my horse which was hitched at the yard fence about five rods from the door. They followed me.

O'Neil picked up the end of a hoop pole. Mr. Day had been hooping a barrel and left some pieces. O'Neil struck me upon the head and nearly brought me to the ground. I looked for a club, but there was none in sight. He repeated the blows and my having on my head a thick woolen cloth cap saved my skull. Mrs. Day threw the door open and hollered, "Murder!" The knife that hung by his side deterred me from clutching him. I started for the door. He then hit me in the face and repeated the blows two or three times before I reached it. The house, standing about two feet from the ground . . . I clenched the door post when he gave me a blow over the eye, the scar of which I carry to this day. I sprang into the house and clutched the fire shovel. Mrs. Day shut the door that I should neither go out nor they come in. They then ran past the window.

She said, "They have gone after their guns," at which I mounted my horse and started for Far West as fast as I could consistently ride. My head and face soon commenced swelling on which I washed them and made up my mind that I would not let anybody know what had happened to me from the fact that Father Smith and Brigham had told me not to go.

I arrived home about 11 o'clock at night and went to bed without making a light in the house. I thought I would not let my wife know what had happened to me. In the morning I sprang out of bed and I instantly found myself lying on the floor on the other side of the house. My wife screamed and wanted to know what was the matter. I then returned to bed and found myself under the necessity of telling her what had happened, but sought to keep it from my family. Father Smith soon found it out and came to see me, telling me it would do me good but he was glad they didn't kill me. In a few days I was around and attending to my business.

On the 15th of January [1839], Lyman Cowdery came to my house and inquired after me, telling my wife he wished to see me that evening and he should like to meet me at W. W. Phelps. I accordingly met with him there and David Whitmer, William McLellin, Burr Riggs, (Riggs and) a number of other apostates. Mr. Cowdery stated that he had come from the Ohio to see me on some special business. He said that I had taken his brother Oliver and David with a warrant for stealing my goods somewhere between Wellsville on the Ohio River and that place and that he had come to settle with me. He said he knew the cause of my taking them because Joe had told me to and I was not particularly to blame. W. W. Phelps frequently remarked in the conversation, "damned tall oath" and other similar expressions.

Cowdery said he had been acquainted with me a number of years in the Ohio and he did not consider that I was to blame, for I had to do as Joe told me, "but he is now where he will not lead anybody into difficulty again. Justice will soon overtake him."

"And now, Anson, you are young, inexperienced in law, and I am sorry to find you in this fix. This has caused my brother and Mr. Whitmer much difficulty. You swore to that which is not true; the goods you swore were yours. I have a bill in my pocket of the purchase of them in Cincinnati. Notwithstanding all this, I feel disposed to show you leniency. I will propose two ways of settling this; you can take your choice. I sympathize much with you. In the first place, I will show you the law upon this point. A crime of this kind would be punished by imprisonment in the penitentiary, not less than three years and the payment of all damages sustained which would not be less than 2,000 dollars. This is what you are subject to. Now I will propose another way. If you will go to the court with me at Richmond tomorrow and state that you did this because Joe told you so, that will then settle the matter and let the blame rest where it ought to."

He then asked me if I had made up my mind which to do. I told him that I had. I then arose and told him that I was prepared to prove what I had sworn to by Vincin [Vinson] Knight, who helped me select the goods from a store in the Ohio, and I should have done it at the sitting of the court at Liberty if a Mormon had been permitted to have been there, and I wished him to understand that when I took an oath that I only was responsible and he might take the course that he thought proper. I then left the room and have not heard from him since.

Shortly after this, a mare that was taken from me by the mob returned home to my great surprise, which made me out a team and about the middle of February we took up our line of march for Illinois. The weather was cold and severe, with snow to the depth of one foot. The first night our wagon tipped over into the creek; the second day we had to cross a long prairie and were not able to reach the settlement. It was a very cold and blustering night. We raised the wagon tongue, put some clothes over it, placing our beds underneath. We found campfires and tent poles already stuck nearly all the way after this. We found the Missourians universally unwilling to receive us into their homes.

We arrived at Palmyra, Missouri, the third day of March [1839]. There I found my father and his family and cousin Orvis Call and family. Here I stopped with my family and my father and I went into Illinois to hunt a place for our families. My father rented a farm in Hancock County, five miles east of Warsaw. I took a subcontract for some railroad. We then immediately returned to our families and started with our families for Illinois. We travelled upon the west side of the Mississippi to Warsaw. The road was almost entirely new and it was with great difficulty that we got through. We chose this route on account of the number of families waiting upon the ferry boat.

We arrived at our destination the 25th of April [1839]. I soon commenced hiring the brethren to work upon the railroad. I hired none but the brethren. I kept from 12 to 14 during the season. I paid my men 20 dollars per month, and I made very little more than those I hired. About the middle of May, I was one day travelling to Warsaw when to my great surprise I met Brothers Joseph and Hyrum. I asked him when and how he had made his escape from Missouri. He said, "I am in a great hurry, for my enemies are pursuing me. I will say in short to you, the prayers of the brethren brought me here." He then inquired of me where I lived. He said, "In about a week I will be at your house; then I will relate the whole matter to you." He passed on in great haste. I was filled with great joy to see our Prophet after more than six months, suffering by chains and dungeons, once more in the enjoyment of liberty.

He came to my house about the appointed time, had his dinner and spent the principal part of the afternoon in conversation. Hyrum, Sidney Rigdon, and Vincent Knight were with him. He related to us some of the circumstances of his escape from Missouri. He also stated that he had purchased a tract of land in Commerce, a place for the Saints to gather to, now called Nauvoo. In the course of the summer, my wife had a very severe sickness, chills and fever, from which she would probably have died had it not been for her being healed by the laying on of the hands.

On the 15th of October [1839] my wife and myself with our youngest child journeyed to the Ohio to visit Mother Flint, leaving the two children and Hannah Flint with them. She had a very severe sickness in our absence. I spent most of the winter in Ohio, preaching in company with Lester Brooks. We returned in the spring in company with Chester Loveland and family and Jeremiah Willy. We arrived home on the 14th of April [1840]. Chester Loveland and myself rented a farm in Carthage where we spent the summer and raised a good crop of corn. We worked for the Carthaginians and supported our families. I preached to them a few times in the courthouse but they were very religious and did not wish to inquire much about Mormonism.

Random note for Anson Call:

Letter from Anson Call to Sidney Rigdon, Feb 24th 1839

Mister S. Rigdon, I under stand that the Brotheren are requested to make out a bill [of] damageres and loses that we have sustaned by the Missori mob and grieveances when [I] [th]ink of the sufferanges of many many of [our] Brotheren I think at times I ought to be silant but I will give a short history [A]t the commencement of the Mormon difficulty I lived in Clinton Co. I was left Clinton and removed to in Davis Co. here I remained un till we ware all driven out. I then went to Ray Co. to harvest a field of Corn that I rased there I was taken by a mob of ten men I was searched they found I had know weapons they then drew their knives and swor they would kill me for i was a mormon they beat me with with there flat hand and then struck me in the fase with their knives time affter time I made my ascape from them a bout dark they per sude me but in vane I then re turned to Clinton Co. to attend to my bisness there I found a family in my House he said there was no law for the mormons and bat me severely with a club I was glad to git a way a live and and leave my farm and other proprty. I will give a statement of my damages two Preemption rights one for my Father and one for my self and secured 800 acres of timbered land and all pade for worth 300 hundred dollars each$600.00

Property left on farm and damage of moving from Clinton 150.00

Corn lost in Ray Co. fifteen acres 150.00

pade 560 dollars for land in Caldwell Co. not sold no value recd 560.00

pade 220 dollars for land in Ray Co. no value recd 220.00

200 hundred dollars totl gods stolen 200.00

Notes and acconts lost 440.00

$2,320.00

Seven months lost time self and Family.

Moving from Missorei to Illenoi.

FILLMORE, the first capital of Utah Territory, the judicial seat of Millard County, Utah, and the headquarters of the Millard Stake of Zion, is pleasantly situated on Chalk Creek, near the foot of the mountains, on the east side of the great Pauvant Valley. It is the terminus of the Fillmore branch of the Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad and the center of a fertile farming district. Among the historic buildings in Fillmore is the wing of the former Territorial Capitol, now used as a museum. In the city also there are two modern L. D. S. meeting houses and other substantial public buildings and a number of modern residences. Fillmore is 34 miles southeast of Delta, and 184 miles southwest of Salt Lake City.

Pauvant Valley became well known to the Utah pioneers at a very early day. Captain Jefferson Hunt of Mormon Battalion fame and others passed through it in the fall of 1847, en route from Salt Lake Valley to southern California, and again, in 1849, Captain Hunt took a company of gold seekers through the valley on their way to California. Returning members of the Mormon Battalion passed through the valley in 1848, and then Parley P. Pratt's company of explorers was there in 1849, and some of them spent part of the winter of 1849–1850 on Chalk Creek. But no attempt was made to found settlements in Pauvant Valley until it was decided by the Territorial Legislature on Oct. 4, 1851, to locate the capital of the Territory of Utah (which was to be named Fillmore) on Chalk Creek, in the newly organized Millard County, named in honor of Millard Fillmore, then president of the United States. Soon afterwards, Governor Brigham Young and others visited Pauvant Valley, and on Oct. 28, 1851, located the place for the territorial capital, the present site of Fillmore being chosen, and Jesse W. Fox, one of the company, immediately commenced to survey a city and mark the site chosen for the territorial government building. Bishop Anson Call of Davis County was appointed to take charge of a company of colonists who soon erected a number of cabins in fort style, built a grist mill and a saw mill and brought a considerable amount of land under cultivation. In 1852 the erection of a state capitol, built of rock and cement, was commenced. Indians caused some difficulty at first and Dimick B. Huntington was sent by Governor Brigham Young to negotiate terms of peace with them. In December, 1855, Governor Young and most of the members of the Utah Legislature arrived in Fillmore, and the fifth annual session of the legislature was commenced there Dec. 10, 1855. The legislature again met in Fillmore in December, 1856, but on Dec. 15, 1856, a resolution was passed changing the capital of Utah from Fillmore to Great Salt Lake City. The state house then became the court house of Millard County, as well as being used for other public purposes.

Bishop Anson Call presided over the settlement of Fillmore from the beginning until 1853, when John A. Ray was made Bishop, at which time the ward had a membership of 304.

Now occurred an incident which Brigham could not forbear talking about later. Called to accompany Joseph Smith, Hyrum his brother, David W. Patten, Sidney Rigdon and Thomas B. Marsh on a mission to the east, Brigham was joined by A. P. Rockwood. (A mission has various purposes. Today, to go on a mission means normally to go with the purpose of proselyting, but in that day it meant any trip or errand having to do with the business of the Church.) They were jarred from their peaceful and pleasant conversation as they passed through Painsville. Enemies, apparently told in advance about this journey, were lying in wait for them.

Brigham said, telling of the adventure later:

"When we arrived at Painesville, the Prophet was arrested by an officer for some pretended debt. Joseph immediately entered into trial before the court, which found no cause of action. After his release he was again arrested and brought before the court, when he was again dismissed. He was arrested the third time, and on examination was held over to trial. Brother Anson Call, who had lately joined the Church, stepped forward and proffered to become his bail.

"The Sheriff, who was personally acquainted with Anson Call, took him to one side and advised him strongly against being bail for the Prophet, asserting the Prophet would be sure to abscond, and he would lose his farm; but Brother Call willingly became his bail. On being released he was arrested a fourth time, for a debt of a few dollars, which was paid forthwith, and the fifth time he was arrested, which cause was soon disposed of, and he concluded to return to Kirtland for the night. As he got into his buggy, an officer also jumped in, and catching the lines with one hand, put his other hand on Joseph's shoulder and said, 'Mr. Smith, you are my prisoner.'

Joseph inquired what was the cause of action. The officer informed him that a gentleman, a few months previous, had left a stove with him, for the price of which he was sued. Brother Joseph replied, 'I never wished to purchase the stove, but the gentleman insisted on putting it up in my house, saying it would bring him custom.' Joseph left his watch and other property in security, and we returned home to Kirtland.

"Next day we started again, and travelled by land as far as Ashtabula, shunning Painesville and other places where we suspected our enemies were laying in wait to annoy Joseph. We tarried in Ashtabula through the day, wandering over the bluffs, through the woods and on the beach of the lake, bathing ourselves in her beautiful waters, until evening, when a steamboat arrived from the west. We went on board and took passage for Buffalo."

As night fell they retired for rest. In Brigham's words:

"I gave the Prophet my valise for a pillow, and I took his boots for mine, and we all lay down on the deck of the vessel for the night."

Ever it has been the joy of loyal men to minister to the comfort of the Prophet of the Lord. It was so in that day; it is so today. Brigham was filled with satisfaction to be able to give the Prophet that much more comfort as he slept. Certainly an 1830-style traveling bag was softer than a pair of boots. And wise prophets accept a certain amount of this loving attention. Love is fed by acceptance as well as by giving. Few there are who can accept constant attention graciously and not become vain over the attention. Joseph Smith had no guile and knew that the spirit prompting the attention was right; that satisfaction came to the giver. Brigham gave and was satisfied and happy; Joseph was glad to accept. Thus great and good men feed their love.

At Buffalo they separated, Joseph and the other brethren proceeding to Canada, while Brigham and A. P. Rockwood "took the cars" to Lockport, then the "line boat" on the Erie Canal. Brigham's business took him to Auburn, Albany-with a quick side trip to West Stockbridge, Massachusetts, to visit Uncle Joseph Richards-then back to Albany and by steamer to New York.

Here he sought out Parley P. Pratt and found him preaching on board a schooner at the foot of Canal Street. He stayed in the city long enough to hold three meetings. He ordained A. P. Rockwood an Elder, and predicted at the same time that the Rockwood family should all be gathered into the kingdom, and that there would be a branch established at Holliston, Massachusetts (the Rockwood home town), and he set apart Brother Rockwood to preside over the branch when it should be established. Then he started for home. By August 18, he had arrived in Buffalo, where he took steamer for Fairport. When the vessel was about three-fourths of a mile out, a woman fell from the stern into the water. Asmall boat was launched to search for her. The mate, seeing her about ten feet under water, dived. He was gone about a minute, then surfaced with her, holding her by the back of the neck at arm's length so that she could not grasp him. She was quickly pulled into the boat and was soon able to speak. The passengers took up a purse of $60 as a reward for the mate for saving her life. Brigham's comment was, "Here I learned something I did not know before, that the motion of the water caused by the paddles will keep a person from sinking." Whether this is true or not we have no way of proving in this day of screw propellers. The next day Brigham was home once more. It was a good thing. He was needed, and needed badly.

HONEYVILLE WARD, Box Elder Stake, Box Elder Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in a farming district, or precinct, known as Honeyville, lying north of Brigham City. The ward extends north to Deweyville, east to the mountains, south to the Harper Ward and west to Bear River. The village of Honeyville is a station on the Oregon Short Line Railroad situated 1 1/2 mile east of Bear River, and about the same distance west of the base of the mountains. It is also four miles by road or 2 1/2 miles in a straight line northeast of Bear River City, ten miles northwest of Brigham City and 69 miles northwest of Salt Lake City. The village, as well as the surrounding farms, contain fine dwellings, and the farming land, within the limits of the ward, though quite limited, is fertile and watered by small mountain streams. Honeyville, as a settlement, dates back to 1861, when a ferry across Bear River was established at a point about 1 1/2 mile northwest of the present site of Honeyville. Anson Call built a sawmill at Honeyville about 1861, north of the present mill site on Salt Creek, or Hot Springs. This mill finally passed into the hands of Abraham Hunsaker, who ran the mill quite successfully for a number of years. In an early day, when a name was wanted for the settlement, it was suggested that the place be named Hunsaker in honor of the original founder, Abraham Hunsaker, but as Brother Hunsaker himself objected to this, the name of Honeyville was adopted instead. The Honeyville settlement formed a part of the so-called Call's Fort district, but Abraham Hunsaker presided over the few saints in Honeyville from the beginning until Aug. 19, 1877, when the saints residing in and near Hunsaker's Mill were organized as a ward named Honeyville, with Abraham Hunsaker as Bishop. He was succeeded in that capacity in 1889 by Benjamin H. Tolman, who was succeeded in 1893 by Thomas Wheatley, jun., who in 1921 was succeeded by Leo Hunsaker, who in 1928 was succeeded by Abinadi Tolman, who presided Dec. 31, 1930. The Church membership of the Honeyville Ward on that date was 436, including 94 children. The total population of Honeyville Precinct was 494 in 1930.

HARPER WARD, Box Elder Stake, Box Elder Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing immediately north of Brigham City at the foot of the Wasatch Mountains. The ward extends north to Honeyville, east to the mountains, south to Brigham City and west to Bear River City. The center of the ward, or the place where the meeting house stands, is about seven miles northwest of Brigham City and 3 1/2 miles southeast of Honeyville. Nearly all the inhabitants are L. D. S. farmers, who irrigate their land from the Harper Springs which are situated near the base of the mountains. From these springs quite an irrigation stream is conducted on to the farms both north and south. A few small mountain streams in the north end of the ward also supply some of the farms with water for irrigation purposes. The new Harper Ward meeting house stands about midway between Call's Fort and the Lakeside school house. Harper Ward was originally known as Call's Fort and later as the North Ward of the Box Elder Stake. John Gibbs and George Foster were the first settlers to take up land in that district of country now included in the Harper Ward. These brethren commenced to cultivate land in 1853, and other families who moved in spent the winter of 1853–1854 in that part of the country now included in Harper Ward. John Gibbs was the first presiding Elder of the little settlement; he presided from 1853 to 1856 when he was succeeded by Joseph B. Tomlinson, who acted until the time of the “Move” in 1858. Anson Call opened a large farm about eight miles northwest of Brigham City. In the autumn of 1854, when the brethren built a fort as a means of protection against the Indians, the place became known as Call's Fort. John Gibbs, who returned to Call's Fort after the “Move”, presided from 1858 to 1860. Like his predecessors, he acted under the direction of Bishop Alvin Nicholls of Brigham City. Chester Loveland took charge of meetings at Call's Fort from 1860 to 1865; he was succeeded in 1865 by James May, who was succeeded in 1866 by Thomas Harper.

When the Box Elder Stake was organized Aug. 19, 1877, Thomas Harper, who had presided over the branch since 1866, was sustained as Bishop of the saints residing immediately north of Brigham City, then organized into a ward and named the North Ward. Bishop Harper died Nov. 7, 1889; he was succeeded by Thomas Yates, who in 1911 was succeeded by Thaddeus Wight, who in 1919 was succeeded by Henry Yates, who presided Dec. 31, 1930. On that date the Church membership of the Harper Ward was 151, including 31 children. The total population of Calls Fort Precinct, which included the Harper Ward, was 238 in 1930.

Carolyn Jackson raised the first silk in St. George in 1869. In Ogden Mariana Comb Bens was independently producing silk before the Relief Society took it on. By 1870, most ward Relief Societies produced silk, and by 1880 every Relief Society in the territory had a silk project. Important promoters of silk culture were A. K. Thurber in Spanish Fork, Daniel Graves in Provo, and Anson Call and Mary Carter in Layton. Susan B. Anthony and Mrs. Rutherford B. Hayes both enjoyed gifts of silk articles.

January 7, 1839, Anson Call returned [page 6] to his farm near the forks of Grand River endeavoring to secure some of his property which he had been forced to leave behind when he was driven away by the mob. He was overtaken by the mob and severely beaten with a hoop pole about his limbs, body and head. The wielder of the pole was one George W. O'Neal, an active member of the mob. With difficulty Brother Call made his way back to Far West realizing that it was useless to attempt to retrieve any of his property. This kind of treatment was given to any member of the Church

Disobedience to Counsel, By Anson Call.

DRIVEN FROM MY PROPERTY BY THE MOB-DESIRE TO RETURN AND RECOVER SOME OF IT-COUNSELED BY THE CHURCH AUTHORITIES NOT TO GO-PERSIST IN GOING-VISIT A FRIENDLY FAMILY-AMIABLE INTENTION OF MY DEBTORS-MEET TWO OF THEM-THEY THREATEN MY LIFE-DESPAIR OF GETTING ANYTHING AND TRY TO START HOME-BEATEN OVER THE HEAD WITH A POLE-BARELY ESCAPE WITH MY LIFE-ASHAMED TO HAVE MY FRIENDS KNOW IT-THE LESSON I LEARNED.

To some persons it may appear strange that the Elders of the Church in their addresses to the Saints, should so frequently dwell upon the necessity of constant obedience to counsel. But although this may seem strange, still the experience of both the Elders and the Saints goes to prove that "to obey is better than sacrifice, and to hearken than the fat of rams."

The Bible, the Book of Mormon and the Book of Doctrine and Covenants contain many instances of the blessings that have attended obedience, and the serious consequences that have followed disobedience.

I will not, however, refer to any one of these divine books; but will give my readers an instance of the consequence of disobedience which occurred to me in my early experience in the Church, in the commencement of the year 1839.

At that time I was living with the Saints in Far West, though I owned property, which I had been driven from, at the Three Forks of Grand River, distant from Far West about thirty miles.

As I wished to learn whether I could dispose of this property or not, I asked Father Joseph Smith and President Brigham Young for counsel about visiting Grand River for this purpose. They counselled me not to go; but to stay at home.

I had been driven from my property by the mob that came against the Saints, and as the Saints were obliged to leave the State I desired to go with them to Illinois. But I did not want to be burdensome to others. If I could sell my property on Grand River I would not be, so I concluded that there could not be much harm in my going to Grand River, and I set out.

How I succeeded the following extract from my journal will show.

December 31, 1838, being anxious to obtain means to make a team, that I might be able to go with the Saints, I this morning mounted the only horse I had left, and started for the Three Forks of Grand River.

I arrived at my farm on new year's day, and learned that a man by the name of George Washington O'Niel had it in his possession.

I passed on two miles further to a family by the name of Day, who had come in from the Eastern States a few weeks before I was driven away. This family had taken no part with the mob. I found the lady at home, and received from her a history of my property. She informed me that O'Niel and Culp, Missouri mobbers, had said that if ever I came to the place they would kill me; and that one Henderson and others would help them.

The story of Anson Call's beating:

Thurs. 27 1839, Anson Call was brutally whipped by a mob, near Elk Horn, Ray County, Mo.

" When on my farm I had sold store goods to a number of the citizens, who were to pay me for them at Christmas. She said she had heard many of them say that if I came there, they would pay me just as "Mormons" should be paid. Just at this time O'Niel and Culp came into the house. They demanded of me my reasons for being there. I told them that I was attending to my business. They said I had no business there, and if I got away from there I would be smart. I replied that I was a white man, that it was time enough to be afraid when I saw danger, and that I should go when I pleased. They told me that they would as soon kill me as a dog, and that there would be no more notice taken of my death than if a dog were killed. This I very well understood. They then told me that they supposed I had come to get my property. I informed them I had; to which they replied that there was no property for me. After repeated threatenings I became convinced that it was in vain to think of obtaining anything, and started for my horse, which was hitched at the yard fence about five rods from the door. They followed me. O'Niel picked up the end of a hoop pole which Mr. Day had left there, he having been hooping a barrel. With this pole he struck me a blow upon the head, which nearly brought me to the ground. I looked around for a club with which to defend myself, but there was none in sight. He continued striking me, and would doubtless have killed me, had it not been for a very thick woolen cap on my head. Mrs. Day threw open the door and cried murder. I ran for the house to get something, if possible, to defend myself with; but before I reached the door, he struck me repeatedly, and gave me one blow over the eye, the scar of which I carry to this day. As soon as I got into the house I clutched the fire shovel. At that moment Mrs. Day closed the door, so that I could not get out nor O'Niel in. He and Culp then passed the window, on which Mrs. Day supposed they had started for their guns, so I mounted my horse and rode for Far West as fast as I could.  My head and face soon commenced swelling. On my way home I washed myself, and resolved not to inform any one what had happened, as Father Smith and President Young had both told me not to go.
I reached home about eleven o'clock at night, and went to bed without making a light. In the morning I arose, and just as soon as I got out of bed, I fell upon the floor. My wife was alarmed and screamed. I told her what had happened; but told her to keep the matter from my family. Father Smith, however, soon heard of the occurrence, and came to see me. He hoped, he said, that the lesson would do me good, and that he was glad that I was not quite killed. Had I obeyed the words "do not go, but stay at home," I should not have fallen into this trouble. May you who read this be wise, and in this particular, profit by my experience."

CALLS SETTLEMENT, Davis County. See Bountiful below.

BOUNTIFUL, Davis County is eight miles north of Salt Lake City. It was initially settled in 1847 by Perrigrine Sessions, Jezreel Shoemaker, and John Perry and their families. It has the distinction of being the second city settled by the Mormon pioneers in the Utah Territory. The name has been changed on several occasions. It was originally known as Calls Settlement for Anson Call, who stopped to visit the area. The name was then changed to Sessions Settlement* for Perrigrine Sessions. For a time it was called North Mill Creek Canyon Ward to distinguish it from Mill Creek Canyon Ward, east of Salt Lake City. This name was soon shortened to North Canyon Ward. In 1854 the first post office identified the town as North Canyon Settlement. The town was also known as Stoker in honor of John Stoker, the first Mormon bishop in the area. He finally suggested the name "Bountiful" after an ancient city mentioned in the Book of Mormon. Bountiful was unanimously accepted and the name has remained unchanged since February 27, 1855.

-------------------- Anson Call

During the year of 1842, Anson Call witnessed Joseph Smith prophecy that the Saints would leave Nauvoo, Illinois and then go to the Rocky Mountains. Once the Saints arrived to the Rocky Mountains, Joseph Smith prophesied that they would become a great an mighty people. Anson Call was one of the few people that recorded this prophecy.

Anson wrote these words about Joseph Smith describing the Rocky Mountains, “There is Anson. He shall and assist in building cities from one end of the country to the other...and you shall perform as great a work as had been done by man, so that the nations of the earth shall be astonished, and many of them will be gathered in that land and assist in buildings cities and temples, and Israel shall be made to rejoice.”

Anson Call fulfilled this calling and these prophetic words. He helped colonize our beautiful city of Bountiful. Brigham Young entrusted the building of the Bountiful Tabernacle upon Anson. He was responsible for raising the money in one year’s time and to help push the project to completion. He was able to raise between $40,000-$50,000 to complete the Bountiful Tabernacle. In addition, Anson Call assisted in the building up of Parowan, Fillmore and Call’s Fort, Utah.

(Suggested Reading: Anson Call and the Rocky Mountain Prophecy by Gwen Marter Barney)

Taken from http://www.bountifulutah.gov/HistoricalCommission/AnsonCallBiog01.html -------------------- Son of Cyril and Sally or Sarah Tiffany Call married Mary Flint and later joined the Mormon Church. "He was closely associated with the Prophet Joseph [Smith, 1805-1844], and with the saints was driven from his home. He had a great love for the Prophet and did all he could to protect him from the mobs." Smith once said of Call: "There is Anson. He shall go [to the West] and shall assist in building cities from one end of the country to the other." Call started West in a company led by Brigham Young, the second president of the LDS Church. Call came to Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1848. He helped settle Bountiful, the Little Salt Lake Valley, "Pauvant Valley" (Fillmore), Box Elder and Davis Counties, all in Utah, and Carson Valley, Nevada.

Also married to his brother Josiah's widow Henrietta Williams Call.


Family links:

Parents:
 Cyril Call (1785 - 1873)
 Sarah Tiffany Call (1790 - 1856)

Spouses:
 Ann Clark Call (1817 - 1893)
 Mary Flint Call (1812 - 1901)
 Ann Mariah Bowen Call (1834 - 1924)
 Margaretta Unwin Clark Call (1826 - 1908)
 Emma Summers Call (1828 - 1912)
 Henrietta Caroline Williams Call (1826 - 1900)*

Children:
 Anson Vasco Call (1834 - 1867)*
 Chester Rufus Call (1841 - 1908)*
 Ruth Call Davids (1850 - 1919)*
 Vilate Call (1852 - 1862)*
 Israel Call (1854 - 1938)*
 Vententia Call (1856 - 1862)*
 Ann Call Sessions (1858 - 1926)*
 Viola Call George (1858 - 1930)*
 Mary Call Waddoups (1858 - 1915)*
 Cylista Call Waddoups (1860 - 1907)*
 Fannie Call Barlow (1860 - 1916)*
 Samantha Evoline Call Mann (1861 - 1948)*
 Lucina Call Perkins (1862 - 1957)*
 Anson Bowen Call (1863 - 1958)*
 Cynthia Call Waddoups (1864 - 1946)*
 Willard Call (1866 - 1945)*
 Harriet Louisa Call Mann (1866 - 1932)*
 Aaron Call (1868 - 1954)*
 David Call (1868 - 1943)*
 Sarah Call Barlow (1870 - 1944)*

Siblings:
 Harvey Call (1808 - 1849)*
 Anson Call (1810 - 1890)
 Salmon Call (1812 - 1813)*
 Samantha Call Willey (1814 - 1905)*
 Fanny Call Loveland (1816 - 1898)*
 Lucina Call Sessions (1819 - 1904)*
 Josiah Howe Call (1821 - 1858)*
 Mary Call Sessions (1824 - 1865)*
 Sonora Rosaline Call Dustin (1826 - 1906)*
 Sarah Call Hanchett (1828 - 1886)*
 Melissa Cynthia Call Brownell (1830 - 1888)*
 Omer Call (1834 - 1909)*
 Homer Call (1834 - 1908)*
view all 62

Anson Call's Timeline

185
February 24, 185
1810
May 13, 1810
Fletcher, Franklin, Vermont, USA
1833
October 3, 1833
Age 23
Madison,Lake,OH
1834
May 21, 1834
Age 24
May 21, 1834
Age 24
July 9, 1834
Age 24
Madison,Lake,Ohio,USA
July 9, 1834
Age 24
Madison, Lake County, OH, USA
1836
March 27, 1836
Age 25
Madison County, Ohio, USA
May 21, 1836
Age 26
1838
February 6, 1838
Age 27