Anthony Thompson of New Haven, immigrant

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Anthony Thompson

Birthdate:
Birthplace: England
Death: Died in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Unknown father of Anthony Thompson and Unknown mother of Anthony Thompson
Husband of Unknown first wife of Anthony Thompson and Katherine Thompson Camp
Father of Bridget Bowers (Thompson); John Thompson, "the Mariner"; Anthony Thompson, Jr.; Hannah Stanton; Lydia Thompson and 1 other
Brother of John Thompson, Sr. and William Thompson

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Anthony Thompson of New Haven, immigrant

Anthony Thompson of New Haven, CT

Parents unknown. Name of first wife unknown. Origins unknown.

Below from http://web.pdx.edu/~davide/gene/Thompson_Anthony.htm

Anthony Thompson, immigrant, was one of three brothers that founded the New Haven Branch of the American Thompson family. It is believed that he, his wife, two children, and his two brothers, John and William, landed at Boston either on June or July 26, 1637, having traveled in the ship Hector, which had embarked at London probably in April under master William Fernes.1,2

"Although, Cutter asserted that the three Thompson brothers originally came from the midlands, perhaps, Warwickshire or the City of Coventry, it is more probable that Anthony Thompson was a native of London or its close environs as Reynolds has suggested. In any case, they were religious dissenters from the Church of England (commonly called Puritans) and came to America among a group of like minded individuals to escape the persecution that was then prevalent under Archbishop Laud during the reign of Charles I. It is believed that the members of the immigrant party were generally men of wealth and energy who followed their pastor, Rev. John Davenport, in his choice of location for settlement at Quinnipiac, later called New Haven, where the company arrived on April 24, 1638. It has been reported by Reynolds, Cutter, and Dodd as well as others, that Anthony Thompson signed the original Colony Constitution, but this does not seem to be factual since his name is not included in modern published lists of the fifty-four free planters who assented to the Fundamental Agreement of the Colony of New Haven on June 4, 1639.3 Even so, Dodd further reports that there were sixty-three original signers, rather than fifty-four, and furthermore, that fifty more names were added soon after the originals. Therefore, it is possible that Anthony's signature was included among these. Of course, there were many more colonists than just these founders, and such circumstances suggest that Anthony was, perhaps, considerably younger or of more humble origin than the leaders of the party. Nevertheless, he received property in the first and second divisions of the land in 1640 and his name was included on the map of the original nine squares which appears as the frontispiece of Atwater's History of the Colony of New Haven.4 (If the map is considered accurate, then Anthony owned a small lot (not included in the nine squares) which at present would lie within the modern city of New Haven somewhere along South Church Street just north of its intersection with Columbus Avenue.) Subsequently, it has been reported that he took the oath of allegiance to the colony in 1644. Accordingly, it appears that Anthony's status in the colony may then have become significantly higher. Indeed, Atwater's history records that at a general court (i.e., town meeting) held on March 10, 1646 (1647 N. S.), Anthony Thompson was assigned a place in the center of the meetinghouse in the sixth seat (probably a bench or pew) directly behind the governor and magistrate. Likewise, his brother, William, was assigned a place in the seventh seat and Sister Thompson, probably Anthony's wife, was assigned a place in the seventh of the women's seats. (Nine years later, Goody Thompson was, again, assigned to the seventh seat, however, this individual cannot have been Anthony's widow because she had remarried by this time.) It is further thought that during his lifetime he was called Brother Anthony Thompson and was a devout member of the church. The name of the first wife of Anthony Thompson is not known. However, it is known that she came with him from England and that their two oldest surviving children were born in England. It is a plausible inference that their daughter, Bridget, was born in Massachusetts before the immigrant company moved on to New Haven. Alternatively, she may have been born in New Haven as Savage seems to indicate.5 Even so, it would appear that Anthony Thompson's first wife died sometime about 1640. Subsequently, he then married a Katherine or Kathern, whose maiden name remains unknown.6 Their first child, Hannah or Anna, was probably born in the spring of 1645 since she was christened June 8, 1645. Anthony made his will on March 23, 1647 (1648 N. S.) and probably died the following September. The will was proved May 27, 1650. This chronology supports Savage's conclusion that Anthony's youngest son, Ebenezer, was born posthumously, since his birth did not occur until October of 1648. Moreover, after Anthony's death, his widow remarried to Nicholas Camp of Milford on July 14, 1652, and Katherine and her second husband seem to have continued to provide support for the six children of Anthony Thompson."

"A number of researchers propose additional wives for Anthony Thompson among which were Mary Welby or Welbe, Mirable Fitch, and, perhaps, Ruth Curtis. However, the chronology of these hypothesized marriages is very confused at best. Although, it is possible that one of these women was the unnamed first wife of Anthony Thompson (the most likely candidate would seem to be Mary Welby), it is more probable that they are due to conflation of identities and, hence, entirely spurious."

Arrived in New England in 1637, in either June or July. Emigrated with his wife (name unknown), two children and brothers, John and William. They settled in New Haven (see below). Anthony Thompson signed the Colonial Constitution, June 4, 1639, and appears in the original list as having shares in the first and second divisions of land. He took the oath of allegiance in 1644. His will was made March 23, 1648, shortly before his death.

The name of his first wife is unknown. His second wife was Katherine (Kathern). By first wife he had two sons and a daughter, and by second wife two daughters and a posthumous son.

Children of Anthony Thompson:

by first wife:

  1. John
  2. Anthony, born in England, December, 1634, died at the age of twenty years
  3. Bridget, born 1637, married Rev. John Bowers, of Guilford, New Haven, and Derby, Connecticut

by second wife, Katherine:

  1. Anna, baptized June 8, 1645, married Staunton
  2. Lydia, baptized July 24, 1647, married, September 20, 1665, Isaac Crittenden, of Guilford
  3. Ebenezer, baptized October 15, 1648, married, June, 1671, Deborah Dudley

The Thompson brothers were the ship "Hector" and were in the company of Governor Eaton and Reverend Davenport. They settled with Davenport in Quinnioiack or New Haven, Connecticut. The Thompson brothers were allotted lands and became leading citizens. John Thompson lived at East Haven, where he died December 11, 1674. The farm he owned is said to be yet in the possession of descendants. He married but left no male issue. William made his will October 6, 1682, dying the same year. He resided and died in New Haven.

Source

  1. Genealogical and family history of southern New York and the Hudson River Valley: a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the building of a nation, Volume 3 (Google eBook) by Cuyler Reynolds. Lewis Historical Pub. Co., 1914, page 1066-7.

Notes (from above Source for which copyright is expired)

The Thompson family of THOMPSON Troy, New York, whose ancestry is herein recorded, descended from Anthony Thompson, of England, who came to America in 1637, and is the founder of the American family of Thompson known as the New Haven branch. It is not known from what part of England he came, but as Rev. Davenport (with whom he came) had been a minister in London, and Eaton, Hopkins and others had been merchants in that city, the inference is that he was a native of or near London. The name nas long been known in England, Scotland and Ireland under different spellings—Tompson, Tomson, Thomson and Thompson. In a later generation the line crossed another Thompson family, not known to be related, beginning with John Thompson, of England and Stratford, Connecticut. Through this line descent is gained from Elder William Brewster, of the "Mayflower," Sir Richard Saltonstall, Lion Gardiner and other famous colonial and revolutionary families. The Thompson arms: Or, on a fesse dancettee az, three etailes ar, on a canton of the second, the sun in glory ppr. Crest: An arm erect vested gu, cuff ar. holding in the hand ppr. five ears of wheat or. Motto: In luiuine luce.

(I) Anthony Thompson, with- his wife (name unknown), two children, and brothers, John and William Thompson, embarked at London, England, on the ship "Hector," for America, where they arrived June 26, 1637, according to Winthrop's Journal, but according to Cotton Mather, the date was July 26, 1637. They landed at Boston. They were a part of the company which came with Governor Eaton and Rev. Davenport, dissenters from the Church of England, who left their homes to take up a residence in the new world, where they would be free from the constant persecutions which characterized the reign of Charles I. The company was composed of men of wealth and energy, and after careful selection they decided to follow their pastor, Rev. Davenport, in his choice of location, which was Quinnioiack or New Haven, Connecticut. The Thompson brothers were allotted lands and became leading citizens. John lived at East Haven, where he died December 11, 1674. The farm he owned is said to be yet in the possession of descendants. He married but left no male issue.

William made his will October 6, 1682, dying the same year. He resided and died in New Haven. Anthony Thompson signed the Colonial Constitution, June 4, 1639, and appears in the original list as having shares in the first and second divisions of land. He took the oath of allegiance in 1644. His will was made March 23, 1648, shortly before his death. It was probably made "in extremis." It was drawn up by Rev. John Davenport, pastor, and Robert Newman, ruling elder of the church. He is called Brother Anthony Thompson, and seems to have been a devout member of the church. The name of his first wife is unknown. His second wife was Kathern. By first wife he had two sons and a daughter, and by second wife two daughters and a posthumous son. Children of Anthony Thompson, the emigrant: John, see forward; Anthony, born in England, December, 1634, died at the age of twenty years; Bridget, born 1637, married Rev. John Bowers, of Guilford, New Haven, and Derby, Connecticut; Anna, baptized June 8, 1645, married Staunton; Lydia, baptized July 24, 1647, married, September 20, 1665, Isaac Crittenden, of Guilford; Ebenezer, baptized October 15, 1648, married, June, 1671, Deborah Dudley.

(II) Captain John Thompson, eldest son of Anthony Thompson, was born in England, in 1632. He is called Skipper John Thompson and John Thompson, the "Mariner." This to distinguish him from "farmer" John Thompson. He was a seafaring man and a resident of New Haven. He married Hellena, who died April 8, 1690. Captain John

Thompson survived her until June 2, 1707. Children: 1. John, born May 12, 1657; was called Lieutenant John; married Rebecca Daniel; children: Anna, married Thomas Ives; Daniel, married Mary Ball; Rebecca, married Caleb Mix; Elizabeth, married John Bassett; John; Anthony. 2. William, born 1660; married Hannah Glover; children: James, Abigail, Mary, married John Hitchcock; Josiah, Benjamin. 3. Joseph, born April 8,

1664; married Elizabeth Smith; children: Anna, Joseph, Ebenezer. 4. Samuel, see forward.

-------------------- Anthony was a signer of the "Compact" in New Haven, Ct with Governor Eaton & Rev. John Davenport 1639 was a "soldier in the Indian Troubles" ( 1642 )

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Anthony Thompson of New Haven, immigrant's Timeline

1612
August 30, 1612
England
1631
1631
Age 18
England
1634
December 1634
Age 22
New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut
1638
1638
Age 25
New Haven, New Haven Colony, (Present Connecticut), (Present USA)
1641
September 10, 1641
Age 29
England
1641
Age 28
Connecticut
1645
June 8, 1645
Age 32
Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts Bay Colony
1647
July 16, 1647
Age 34
New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut
1648
March 16, 1648
Age 35
New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
October 15, 1648
Age 35
Guilford, New Haven, Connecticut