Anthony Trabue, Sr. (1667 - 1724) MP

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Nicknames: "Antoine Trabue"
Birthplace: Montauban, (Present Tarn-et-Garrone Departement), Quercy Province, France
Death: Died in Manakin Town, King William Parish, Henrico County (Present Powhatan County), Province of Virginia
Occupation: "the Immigrant"
Managed by: Daniel Dupree Walton
Last Updated:

About Anthony Trabue, Sr.

Antoine, along with other Huguenot refugees, was brought to a spot fifteen miles up the James River from what is now Richmond, Virginia. There a colony was formed on a grant of ten thousand acres of land, stretching for five miles along the south side of the river, and centering on the abandoned settlement of the Monacan Indians. In order to further aid these Manakin Town Huguenots, on Dec 5, 1700 the Virginia House passed an act making the French refugee inhabitants at Manikin town and the parts adjacent a distinct parish by themselves, and exempted them from the payment of public and county levies for seven years. This act, declaring that the parish would be called King William Parish, did much to encourage the Huguenots to establish a permanent settlement, for it allowed them to collect parish titles, which they could use to support their church and other community needs. The religious and political refugees who had sacrificed and endured so much to gain freedom of worship lost no time in establishing their own church. In early 1701 they built the first Huguenot church in Manakin Town. Antoine served on the church vestry and was made a church Ward in 1708. Probably the most authentic picture we have of this community of pioneers is that painted in the vernacular of Daniel Trabue in his journal (19).

It was a Desireable tract of Rich and furtail land. They went Emediately to hard work, building houses and clereing and tilling the earth. ... Some of these people fetched some little mony with them but the most of them was poor people. Their industery and hard work soon got them to live very well. The nearest mill they had was at Col. Bird's, who lived at the falls of James River which was 15 Miles. So some of them made use of hand mills. I think they brought some hand mills with them from Ingland. Their was a great many wild Deer in the woods but as these French men was not accumtomed to hunting they did not attempt it or but very little but soon Raised cattle and hogs a plenty. ... ... This Col. Bird was a great man in those Days and laid off these Frenchman's land and furnished Corn, etc., and Regesterd all their names. And some of the French names appeard so strange to Col. Bird he altered some of them, and their land titles or grants was according to the way that Col. Bird spelt them. My Grand Father's name was Anthony Straboo but Col. Bird set in (it) Down Anthony Trabue and so we write our names to this Day. My Grandfather brought a certificate with him wrote on parchment from France that was spelt Straboo as well as I can recolect. (13)

Other research suggests Trabec -------------------- Antoine fled from France to Lausanne, September 15, 1687, with other Huguenots, and spent several years in Holland, then came via England, to Virginia, settling in Manikin Town in 1700. In 1699 Sieur Antoine Strabo married, Magdelaine La Flournoy, in Holland, the year before they came to America. She was also a French Huguenot. In 1700 King William of England offered to the French refugees not only free passage to America, but also the promise of a grant of land and freedom of worship to all who accepted his offer.


I understood that my Grandfather Anthony [Antoine] Trabue had an estate but concluded he would leave it if he possibly could make his escape. He was a young man and he and a another young man took a cart and loaded it with wine and went on to sell it to the furthermost Guard. And when night came they left their horses and Cart and made their escape to an Inglish ship who took them in. And they went over to ingland, leaving their estates and native country, their relations and every other thing for the sake of Jesus who Died for them. (Daniel Trabue journal)

Beginning in the spring of 1700, four ships carrying approximately two hundred passengers each, embarked at intervals of several months from England with a destination of the new colonies in America. The Marqis de la Muce was designated as the official leader of the expedition and with them were three ministers of the gospel and two physicians. The name of Antoine Trabuc does not appear on any of the published ship lists, so it is assumed that he arrived in Virginia aboard the third ship for which there are no exact records. Antoine, along with other Huguenot refugees, was brought to a spot fifteen miles up the James River from what is now Richmond, Virginia. There a colony was formed on a grant of ten thousand acres of land, stretching for five miles along the south side of the river, and centering on the abandoned settlement of the Monacan Indians. In order to further aid these Manakin Town Huguenots, on Dec 5, 1700 the Virginia House passed an act making the French refugee inhabitants at Manikin town and the parts adjacent a distinct parish by themselves, and exempted them from the payment of public and county levies for seven years. This act, declaring that the parish would be called King William Parish, did much to encourage the Huguenots to establish a permanent settlement, for it allowed them to collect parish titles, which they could use to support their church and other community needs. The religious and political refugees who had sacrificed and endured so much to gain freedom of worship lost no time in establishing their own church. In early 1701 they built the first Huguenot church in Manakin Town. Antoine served on the church vestry and was made a church Ward in 1708.

It was a Desireable tract of Rich and furtail land. They went Emediately to hard work, building houses and clereing and tilling the earth. ... Some of these people fetched some little mony with them but the most of them was poor people. Their industery and hard work soon got them to live very well. The nearest mill they had was at Col. Bird's, who lived at the falls of James River which was 15 Miles. So some of them made use of hand mills. I think they brought some hand mills with them from Ingland. Their was a great many wild Deer in the woods but as these French men was not accumtomed to hunting they did not attempt it or but very little but soon Raised cattle and hogs a plenty. ... ... This Col. Bird was a great man in those Days and laid off these Frenchman's land and furnished Corn, etc., and Regesterd all their names. And some of the French names appeard so strange to Col. Bird he altered some of them, and their land titles or grants was according to the way that Col. Bird spelt them. My Grand Father's name was Anthony Straboo but Col. Bird set in (it) Down Anthony Trabue and so we write our names to this Day. My Grandfather brought a certificate with him wrote on parchment from France that was spelt Straboo as well as I can recolect. (13)

Although the parentage of Antoine Trabue is uncertain, it is almost certain that the original name in France was Trabuc, not Straboo, a name, which is not even French. Experts from the book, Histoire de la Ville Montauban by Abbe’ le Bret, translated by George Trabue, are further verification of this fact. The names of Trabuc and Trabue have the same pronunciations, as the final “c” is silent in the French language, and it is understandable that Col. Byrd registered the name as Trabue on Antoine’s arrival in Virginia. (19) Daniel Trabue is said to have written his journal in the 1820’s, while living in the house he built in Columbia, Kentucky, the town he founded. He was in his sixties at the time. When Daniel was born in 1760, his grandfather Antoine had been dead for thirty-six years. His father, John James Trabue, died in 1775 when Daniel was fifteen years old, considering all factors, it is not unreasonable that his “recollection” could be faulty

Other sources suggest Trabuc

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Anthony Trabue, Sr.'s Timeline

1667
July 5, 1667
Montauban, (Present Tarn-et-Garrone Departement), Quercy Province, France
1699
1699
Age 31
Holland
1705
1705
Age 37
Manakin, Virginia
1709
1709
Age 41
Manakin, Virginia
1712
1712
Age 44
Manakin, Virginia
1722
1722
Age 54
Manakin Town, Henrico County (Present Powhatan County, Province of Virginia
1724
January 29, 1724
Age 56
Manakin Town, King William Parish, Henrico County (Present Powhatan County), Province of Virginia
2000
April 7, 2000
Age 56
2003
March 6, 2003
Age 56
March 15, 2003
Age 56