Art Eanfhear "the Solitary", 112th High King of Ireland

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Art Eanfhear "the Solitary" mac Cuinn, 112th Ard Rí na h'Éireann

Also Known As: "Art Óenfer", "Art Aonfhir", "Art Aonshir", "Art Aoinfhear"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Tara Seat of Kings Tuath Amrois near Teamhair or Tara Castle, Meath, Leinster, Ireland
Death: Died in Battle of Magh Mucruimhe, Gallway, Ireland
Place of Burial: Tara, Ireland
Immediate Family:

Son of Conn of the Hundred Battles, 110th High King of Ireland; Conn Cétchathach; Maedhb Leathdearg ingen Cathaír Mór and Eithne Táebfada
Husband of Dubgilla of Ireland; Cithne Ollamhda; Medb Lethderg; Eachtach; Medb Lehtderg, Queen of Leinster and 1 other
Father of Caibre Leffachaire; Cormac Ulfheda, 115th High King of Ireland; Saruit; Artghen Mac Art of Leinster; Boindia Mac Art of Leinster and 1 other
Brother of Saruit; Saraid ingen Conn; Conaire Caem mac Modh Lamha, Ard-rí na h'Éireann; Maoin ingen Cuinn Ceadcatha Ó Hailill; Crionna and 1 other
Half brother of Conaire Caem mac Modh Lamha, Ard-rí na h'Éireann; Sadhbh . ingen Cuinn and Conla Ruadh

Occupation: 112th (or 122nd) High King of Ireland, High King
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Art Eanfhear "the Solitary", 112th High King of Ireland

Art mac Cuinn ("son of Conn"), also known as Art Óenfer (literally "one man", used in the sense of "lone", "solitary", or "only son"),[1] was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

According to legend, he was not Conn's only son: he had a brother called Connla, who fell in love with a fairy woman, and went with her to Mag Mell, never to be seen again. After that, Art was alone and gained his nickname[2] (Geoffrey Keating says he had two brothers, Connla and Crionna, who were killed by their uncle Eochaid Finn).[3] Another fairy woman, Bé Chuille, who had been banished to Ireland by the Tuatha Dé Danann, fell in love with Art, but, when she learned his father Conn was still alive and a widower, agreed to marry him instead, on the condition that Art be banished from Tara for a year. The injustice caused famine in Ireland, until Art forced by Bé Chuille to leave as a forfeit in a game of fidchell.[4]

Art succeeded to the High Kingship after his brother-in-law Conaire Cóem, was killed by Nemed, son of Sroibcenn, in the battle of Gruitine. He ruled for twenty or thirty years. During his reign Conaire's sons took revenge against Nemed and his allies, the sons of Ailill Aulom, in the Battle of Cennfebrat in Munster. Ailill's foster-son Lugaid mac Con was wounded in the thigh in the battle, and was exiled from Ireland. He made an alliance with Benne Brit, son of the king of Britain, raised an army of foreigners, and returned to Ireland. He defeated and killed Art in the Battle of Maigh Mucruimhe in Connacht.[5] According to legend, Art was given hospitality by Olc Acha, a local smith, the night before the battle. It had been prophesied that a great dignity would come from Olc's line, and he gave Art his daughter Achtan to sleep with. Art's son Cormac was conceived that night.[6] However, according to Keating, Achtan was Art's official mistress, to whom he paid a dowry of cattle; his wife, and the mother of his other children, was Medb Lethderg.[7]

The Lebor Gabála Érenn synchronises Art's reign with that of the Roman emperor Commodus (180-192).[8] The chronology of Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éirinn dates his reign to 143-173, that of the Annals of the Four Masters to 165-195.

References

  1. ^ Dictionary of the Irish Language, Compact Edition, Royal Irish Academy, 1990, pp. 299-300, 485
  2. ^ "The Adventures of Connla the Fair", Cross & Slover 1936, pp. 488-490
  3. ^ Geoffrey Keating, Foras Feasa ar Éirinn 1.41
  4. ^ "The Adventures of Art son of Conn", Cross & Slover 1936, pp. 491-502
  5. ^ Annals of the Four Masters M165-195
  6. ^ "The Battle of Mag Mucrama" (translator unknown)
  7. ^ Geoffrey Keating, Foras Feasa ar Éirinn 1.43
  8. ^ R. A. Stewart Macalister (ed. & trans.), Lebor Gabála Érenn: The Book of the Taking of Ireland Part V, Irish Texts Society, 1956, p. 335

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_mac_Cuinn -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_mac_Cuinn -------------------- Aka Art Oenfer (literally 'one man', 'lone', 'solitary', or 'only son'. -------------------- Art mac Cuinn ("son of Conn"), also known as Art Óenfer (literally "one man", used in the sense of "lone", "solitary", or "only son"),[1] was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

According to legend, he was not Conn's only son: he had a brother called Connla, who fell in love with a fairy woman, and went with her to Mag Mell, never to be seen again. After that, Art was alone and gained his nickname[2] (Geoffrey Keating says he had two brothers, Connla and Crionna, who were killed by their uncle Eochaid Finn).[3] Another fairy woman, Bé Chuille, who had been banished to Ireland by the Tuatha Dé Danann, fell in love with Art, but, when she learned his father Conn was still alive and a widower, agreed to marry him instead, on the condition that Art be banished from Tara for a year. The injustice caused famine in Ireland, until Art forced by Bé Chuille to leave as a forfeit in a game of fidchell.[4]

Art succeeded to the High Kingship after his brother-in-law Conaire Cóem, was killed by Nemed, son of Sroibcenn, in the battle of Gruitine. He ruled for twenty or thirty years. During his reign Conaire's sons took revenge against Nemed and his allies, the sons of Ailill Aulom, in the Battle of Cennfebrat in Munster. Ailill's foster-son Lugaid mac Con was wounded in the thigh in the battle, and was exiled from Ireland. He made an alliance with Benne Brit, son of the king of Britain, raised an army of foreigners, and returned to Ireland. He defeated and killed Art in the Battle of Maigh Mucruimhe in Connacht.[5] According to legend, Art was given hospitality by Olc Acha, a local smith, the night before the battle. It had been prophesied that a great dignity would come from Olc's line, and he gave Art his daughter Achtan to sleep with. Art's son Cormac was conceived that night.[6] However, according to Keating, Achtan was Art's official mistress, to whom he paid a dowry of cattle; his wife, and the mother of his other children, was Medb Lethderg.[7]

The Lebor Gabála Érenn synchronises Art's reign with that of the Roman emperor Commodus (180-192).[8] The chronology of Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éirinn dates his reign to 143-173, that of the Annals of the Four Masters to 165-195. -------------------- Art Eaufhear "the Solitary" King in Ireland

died 0195 (or 0250) in battle

father:

  • Conn "of a hundred battles" Ceadcatha King in Ireland

died 0157

mother:

  • Mendhbh Lithdnearg

siblings:

  • Saraid

spouse:

  • Eachtach wife of Art Eaufhear

(end of information)

children:

  • Cormac macArt King of Ireland

died 0266

-------------------- 112

E Art

102 Art Aenfir

(Airt the Solitary' Aoinfhear MacConn, aka Art (III) Aonthir; aka Art-Ean-Fhear Eanfhear Aenfher)

166–195 Joyce: 220 Art Eanfhear , Art Ean-Fhear, Artt Óenfer, Art Aoinfhear, Art Aenfer (the Solitary), Art Aeinfer
Son of Conn of the Hundred Battles #110. Married Maedhbh Leathdearg (Meadbh Leithderg), the daughter of Conann Cualann; from this Queen, Rath Maedhbhe, near Tara, obtained its name [Descendants of Milesius]. Ancestor of O'Hart. Fell in the battle of Magh Mucruimhe, by Maccon [Lughaidh #113] and his foreigners. Seven sons of Art's sister, Sadhbh, daughter of Conn, whose father was Oilioll Olum, fell in the same battle—against their half brother, Lughadh Maccon. It was Beinne Brit, King of Britain, who laid violent hands upon them. Beinne was slain by Lughaidh Lagha in revenge of his relatives. Father of Cormac #115 

-------------------- Art Ean Fhear King of Ireland

Birth: bef 155, Ireland

Death: 195, Battle of Magh Mucroimbe, County Galway

Father: Conn Ceadeathach King of Ireland (<113-157)

Mother: Landabaria

Misc. Notes

This Art, who was the 112th Monarch of Ireland, had three sisters — one of whom Sarad was the wife of Conaire Mac Mogha Laine, the 111 Monarch, by whom she had three sons called the "Three Cairbres," viz.— 1. Cairbre (alias Eochaidh) Riada —a quo "Dalriada," in Ireland, and in Scotland; 2. Cairbre Bascaon; 3. Cairbre Musc, who was the ancestor of O'Falvey, lords of Corcaguiney, etc. Sabina (or Sadhbh), another sister, was teh wife of MacNiadh [nia], half King of Munster (of the Sept of Lughaidh, son of Ithe), by whom she had a sonnamed Maccon; and by her second husband Olioll Olum she had nine sons, seven whereof were slain by their half brother Maccon, in the famous battle of Magh Mucroimhe [muccrove], in the county of Galway, where also the Monarch Art himself fell, siding with his brother-in-law Olioll Olum against the said Maccon, after a reigh of thirty years, A.D. 195. This Art was married to Maedhbh, Leathdearg, the dau. of Conann Cualann; from this Queen, Rath Maedhbhe, near Tara, obtained its name.

Art; In Old High-German, the word "hart" (which is evidently derived from the Celtic art) means inexorable.

According to Keating's History of Ireland, the epithet Eanfhear applied to this Art means "The Solitary;" because he was the only one of his father's sons that survived: his two brothers Conla Ruadh and Crionna, having been slain by their uncles, as above mentioned. His grief on account of that fact was so intense, that, in old writings, he is often called "Art, the Melancholy."

This Art's descendants gave Kings to Connaught, Meath, and Orgiall; Kings or Princes to Clanaboy, Tirconnell, and Tirowen; and with only two or three exceptions, Monarchs to Ireland, up to the Anglo-Norman Invasion. From this Art also descended the Kings of Scotland, from Fergus Mór Mac Earca, in the fifth century, down to the Stuarts: See No. 81 on "The Lineal Descent of the Royal Family of England," ante.

Part III, Chapter IV of Irish Pedigrees, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 351-9, 664-8 and 708-9.

Spouses

1: Medb Lehtderg Queen of Leinster

-------------------- From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps11/ps11_011.htm

This Art, who was the 112th Monarch of Ireland, had three sisters — one of whom Sarad was the wife of Conaire Mac Mogha Laine, the 111 Monarch, by whom she had three sons called the "Three Cairbres," viz.— 1. Cairbre (alias Eochaidh) Riada —a quo "Dalriada," in Ireland, and in Scotland; 2. Cairbre Bascaon; 3. Cairbre Musc, who was the ancestor of O'Falvey, lords of Corcaguiney, etc. Sabina (or Sadhbh), another sister, was teh wife of MacNiadh [nia], half King of Munster (of the Sept of Lughaidh, son of Ithe), by whom she had a sonnamed Maccon; and by her second husband Olioll Olum she had nine sons, seven whereof were slain by their half brother Maccon, in the famous battle of Magh Mucroimhe [muccrove], in the county of Galway, where also the Monarch Art himself fell, siding with his brother-in-law Olioll Olum against the said Maccon, after a reigh of thirty years, A.D. 195. This Art was married to Maedhbh, Leathdearg, the dau. of Conann Cualann; from this Queen, Rath Maedhbhe, near Tara, obtained its name.

Art; In Old High-German, the word "hart" (which is evidently derived from the Celtic art) means inexorable.

According to Keating's History of Ireland, the epithet Eanfhear applied to this Art means "The Solitary;" because he was the only one of his father's sons that survived: his two brothers Conla Ruadh and Crionna, having been slain by their uncles, as above mentioned. His grief on account of that fact was so intense, that, in old writings, he is often called "Art, the Melancholy."

This Art's descendants gave Kings to Connaught, Meath, and Orgiall; Kings or Princes to Clanaboy, Tirconnell, and Tirowen; and with only two or three exceptions, Monarchs to Ireland, up to the Anglo-Norman Invasion. From this Art also descended the Kings of Scotland, from Fergus Mór Mac Earca, in the fifth century, down to the Stuarts: See No. 81 on "The Lineal Descent of the Royal Family of England," ante.

Part III, Chapter IV of Irish Pedigrees, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 351-9, 664-8 and 708-9. -------------------- Title: King of Ireland -------------------- The Loner

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Art Eanfhear "the Solitary", 112th High King of Ireland's Timeline

157
157
Tara Seat of Kings Tuath Amrois near Teamhair or Tara Castle, Meath, Leinster, Ireland
190
190
Age 32
Leinster, Dublin, Ireland
195
195
Age 37
Battle of Magh Mucruimhe, Gallway, Ireland
195
Age 37
Tara, Ireland
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