Arthur Middleton, Signer of the "Declaration of Independence"

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Arthur Middleton, (Signer)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Middleton Place, St. Andrew's Parish, Charleston, South Carolina
Death: Died in age 44, Fever, Goose Creek, St. James Parish, South Carolina
Place of Burial: Middleton Place Gardens and Tomb, Charleston, SC
Immediate Family:

Son of Henry Middleton, 2nd Pres. of the Cont. Congress and Mary Baker Middleton
Husband of Mary "Polly" Izard
Father of Henry Middleton, US Congress; Emma Philadelphia Izard; Isabella Johannes Huger; Septima Sexta Rutledge; Maria Henrietta Middleton and 4 others
Brother of William Middleton; Henrietta Rutledge; Col. Thomas Middleton; Hester Drayton; Sarah Middleton Pinckney and 4 others

Occupation: signer of the United States Declaration of Independence, English, Planter, Pres. of 1st Continental Congress
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Arthur Middleton, Signer of the "Declaration of Independence"

Arthur Middleton (June 26, 1742–January 1, 1787), of Charleston, South Carolina, was a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Parents:

Henry Middleton (1717 - 1784) President of the Continental Congress

Mary Baker Williams Middleton (1721 - 1761)

Mary Izard (1747-1814) married Arthur Middleton

Children of Mary Izard and Arthur Middleton are:

i. Henry A. Middleton , Gov was born 28 Sep 1770 in London, England. see "Hist of Beaufort Co" p378, and died 14 Jun 1846 in Charleston, SC - lived at Middleton Place.

ii. Maria Henrietta Middleton was born 13 Aug 1772 in dau of Dec Signer, 1st wife, and died 14 Jan 1791 in SC - effects of second miscarriage. She married Joseph Manigault ,Barrister,Planter 25 Nov 1788 in Middleton Place, Ashley River, SC- no issue, son of Peter Manigault , The Speaker and Elizabeth Wragg. He was born 19 Oct 1763 in Charleston, SC -memb. Middle Temple, London, and died 5 Jun 1843 in 350 Meeting St, Charleston, SC see No. 91, p 109.

iii. Eliza Carolina Middleton was born 6 Oct 1774, and died 7 Feb 1792 in unmarried.

iv. Emma Philadelphia Middleton was born 22 Oct 1776 in "South Carolina Genealogies" Vol 3, p148, and died 1 May 1813.

v. Anna Louisa Middleton was born 1778, and died 1819 in Grosvenor Square, London, England.

vi. Isabella Johannes Middleton was born 25 Nov 1780 in dau of Dec Signer, and died 25 Aug 1865 in Athens, GA.

vii.	Septima Sexta Middleton was born 25 Oct 1783, and died 1865 in Nashville, TN. She married Henry Middleton Rutledge? 1800. He was born ABT. 1775.

viii. John Izard Middleton was born 13 Aug 1785 in Middleton Place, near Charleston, SC, and died 5 Oct 1849 in Paris, France. He married Eliza Augusta Falconet 11 Jun 1810 in had issue, daughter of Theodore de Palazieu Falconet.

Weblinks:

http://awt.ancestrylibrary.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=fletcht2001&id=I01288&ti=5542

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Middleton

http://www.middletonplace.org/

http://www.colonialhall.com/middleton/middleton.php

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=2810

http://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=16281

Middleton-Pinckney-Rutledge-Laurens family of South Carolina

Note: This is just one of 686 family groupings listed on The Political Graveyard web site. These families each have three or more politician members, all linked together by blood, marriage or adoption.

http://politicalgraveyard.com/families/10677.html

Note 5 October 2010:

Middleton Family Archives (primary source material) have been donated to the Genealogy Room, Charleston, SC County Library, link here:

http://www.ccpl.org/content.asp?catID=10364&parentID=5402

Biographical Information:

Arthur Middleton was educated in Britain, at Westminster School, London, and St John's College, Cambridge. He studied law at the Middle Temple and traveled extensively in Europe where his taste in literature, music, and art was developed and refined. In 1764 Arthur and his bride Mary Izard settled at Middleton Place. (His wife was a cousin of South Carolina Congressman Ralph Izard; likewise a son of Congressman Izard was married to a niece of Arthur Middleton, and another son married Arthur's daughter Emma). Keenly interested in Carolina politics, Arthur Middleton was a more radical thinker than his father, Henry Middleton. He was a leader of the American Party in Carolina and one of the boldest members of the Council of Safety and its Secret Committee. In 1776, Arthur was elected to succeed his father in the Continental Congress and subsequently was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Also in 1776 he and William Henry Drayton designed the Great Seal Of South Carolina. Despite the time he spent in England, his attitude toward Loyalists was said to be ruthless.

During the American Revolutionary War, Arthur served in the defense of Charleston. After the city's fall to the British in 1780, he was sent as a prisoner of war to St. Augustine, Florida (along with Edward Rutledge), until exchanged in July the following year.

Arthur died on January 1, 1787 at the age of 44. He was buried in the family tomb in the Gardens at Middleton Place. The plantation then passed to Henry, his eldest son, who went on to a career in politics. He was elected Governor of South Carolina (1810–1812), U.S. Representative (1815–1819), and held the post of Minister to Russia (1820–1830).

--------------------

Arthur Middleton (June 26, 1742–January 1, 1787), of Charleston, South Carolina, was a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

His parents were Henry Middleton and Mary Baker Williams.[1] He was educated in Britain, at Westminster School, Hackney, and Trinity Hall, Cambridge. He studied law at the Middle Temple and traveled extensively in Europe where his taste in literature, music, and art was developed and refined. In 1764 Arthur and his bride Mary Izard settled at Middleton Place. (His wife was a cousin of South Carolina Congressman Ralph Izard; likewise a son of Congressman Izard was married to a niece of Arthur Middleton, and another son married Arthurs daughter Emma). Keenly interested in Carolina politics, Arthur Middleton was a more radical thinker than his father, Henry Middleton. He was a leader of the American Party in Carolina and one of the boldest members of the Council of Safety and its Secret Committee. In 1776, Arthur was elected to succeed his father in the Continental Congress and subsequently was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Also in 1776 he and William Henry Drayton designed the Great Seal Of South Carolina. Despite the time he spent in England, his attitude toward Loyalists was said to be ruthless.

During the American Revolutionary War, Arthur served in the defense of Charleston. After the city's fall to the British in 1780, he was sent as a prisoner of war to St. Augustine, Florida (along with Edward Rutledge), until exchanged in July the following year.

Arthur died on January 1, 1787 at the age of 44. He was buried in the family tomb in the Gardens at Middleton Place. The plantation then passed to Henry, his eldest son, who went on to a career in politics. He was elected Governor of South Carolina (1810-1812), U.S. Representative (1815-1819), and held the post of Minister to Russia (1820-1830).

The United States Navy ship, USS Arthur Middleton (AP-55/APA-25), was named for him.

He was related to three Confederate Generals:

   * A son-in-law Daniel Elliot Huger Jr was an uncle of Confederate General Benjamin Huger;
   * A granddaughter of Daniel Elliott Huger Jr {1779-1854} named Mary Procter Huger {1833-1893) was the wife of South Carolina Confederate General Arthur Middleton Manigault (1824-1886)-a grandson of Arthur Middleton's sister Hester Middleton and South Carolina Lt. Gov. Charles Drayton. Note Charles Drayton was a brother of S.C. Congressman William Henry Drayton.
   * A cousin twice removed, Alica Middleton, was married to Confederate General Roswell Sabine Ripley. {Note Alica Middleton's grandmother Anne Manigault was a wife of Thomas Middleton-a brother of Arthur Middleton. Anne Manigault was a sister of Joseph Manigault the father of Confederate General Arthur Middleton Manigault.}

He was an ancestor of Baldur von Schirach, one time leader of the Hitler Youth and later Governor ("Gauleiter" or "Reichsstatthalter") of the Reichsgau Vienna who was convicted of "crimes against humanity" at the Nuremberg Trials, through Baldur Von Schirach's mother Emma Middleton Lynah Tillou (1872 - 1944).

==============================================================================Arthur Middleton

1742-1787

Arthur Middleton was the son of Henry Middleton, and was born in the year 1742, at the seat of his father, at Middleton Place, near the banks of the Ashley.

  At the early age of twelve years, he was sent to the celebrated school of Hackney, in the neighborhood of London; whence, after spending two years, he was removed to the school of Westminster. The advantages which he here enjoyed resulted in a thorough acquaintance with the Greek and Roman classics, especially in a knowledge of the former, In which he is said to have greatly excelled. The taste which he acquired for classical literature he preserved through life, and from the indulgence of it derived an exalted pleasure, lost to minds of a heavier mold. 
  At the age of eighteen or nineteen, young Middleton became a member of one of the colleges of the university of Cambridge. Having for his companions young men frequently of dissipated habits, he was often powerfully tempted to enter into their youthful follies; but fortunately he escaped the contagion of their pernicious examples, and devoted that leisure to the improvement of his mind, which the less reflecting devoted to amusements and vicious indulgence. In his twenty-second year, he was graduated bachelor of arts, and left the university with the reputation of an accomplished scholar, and a moral man. 
  By means of his father's liberality, he was now enabled to travel. After visiting several parts of England, he proceeded to the continent, where he spent two years, chiefly in the southern parts of Europe. At Rome, he passed several months in viewing the various objects of taste afforded by that ancient and splendid spot. He here greatly improved his taste for music and painting; and even became well versed in the principles of sculpture and architecture. 
  Soon after his return to South Carolina, he was connected in marriage with the daughter of Walter Izard, Esq. Having still a fondness for traveling, he, soon after his marriage, again embarked on a visit to Europe, accompanied by his wife. In this tour he visited many places in England, whence proceeding to the continent, they passed through several of the principal cities of France and Spain. In 1773, Mr. Middleton once more returned to America, and now settled down on the delightful banks of the Ashley. 
  The father of Mr. Middleton was, at this time, a man of great wealth, and both by himself and family the approaching controversy between Great Britain and her American colonies might have been viewed with great concern, had not the patriotism with which they were imbued much preferred the welfare of their country, to their private interests. A rupture with the mother country would necessarily put to hazard the wealth which had long been enjoyed by the family, and might abridge that influence, and diminish those comforts, which that wealth naturally gave them. But what were these in comparison with the rights and liberties of a country, destined to embrace millions within its bosom? Between the alternatives presented, there was no room to hesitate. Both father and son, in the spirit which had long characterized the family, stood forth in the defense of the rights of America, and, "left not a hook to hang a doubt on," that they were patriots of the noblest stamp. 
  In the spring of 1775, Mr. Arthur Middleton was chosen on a secret committee, who were invested with authority to place the colony in a state of defense. In the exercise of the trust with which they were charged, they immediately took possession of the public magazine of arms and ammunition, and removed its contents to a place of safety. 
  In the following June, the provincial congress of South Carolina proceeded to appoint a council of safety, consisting of thirteen persons. This council, of which Mr. Middleton was a member, took measures to organize a military force, the officers of which received commissions at their hands, and under their signatures. Among the members of this committee, no one exhibited more activity, or manifested a greater degree of resolution and firmness, than did Arthur Middleton. 
  In February, 1776, the provincial legislature of South Carolina appointed a committee to prepare and report a constitution, which "should most effectually secure peace and good order in the colony, during the continuance of the dispute with Great Britain." This duty was assigned to Mr. Middleton and ten others. 
  Having discharged the duty to the satisfaction of the assembly, Mr. Middleton was soon after elected by that body a representative of South Carolina in the congress of the United States, assembled at Philadelphia. Here he had an opportunity of inscribing his name on the great charter of American liberties. At the close of the year 1777, Mr. Middleton relinquished his seat in Congress, and returned to South Carolina, leaving behind him, in the estimation of those who had been associated with him in the important measures of congress, during the time he had been with them, the character of a man of the purest patriotism, of sound judgment, and unwavering resolution. 
  In the spring of 1778, the assembly of South Carolina proceeded to the formation of a new constitution, differing, in many important points, from that of 1776. On presenting it to the governor, John Rutledge, for his approbation, that gentleman refused to assent to it. But, as he would not embarrass the assembly in any measures which they might deem it expedient to adopt, he resigned the executive chair, upon which the assembly proceeded by a secret ballot again to fill it. On counting the votes, it was found that Mr. Middleton was elected to the office by a considerable majoritv. But, entertaining similar views in respect to the constitution, expressed by the distinguished gentleman who had vacated the chair of state, he frankly avowed to the assembly, that he could not conscientiously accept the appointment, under the constitution which they had adopted. The candor with which he had avowed his sentiments, and the sterling integrity of the man, exhibited in refusing an honor from conscientious scruples, instead of diminishing their respect for him, contributed to raise him still higher in the confidence of his fellow-citizens. The assembly proceeded to another choice, and elected Mr. Rawlins Lowndes to fill the vacancv, who gave his sanction to the new constitution. 
  During the year 1779, the southern states became the principal theater of the war. Many of the plantations were wantonly plundered, and the families and property of the principal inhabitants were exposed to the insults and ravages of the invaders. During these scenes of depredation, Middleton Place did not escape. Although the buildings were spared , they were rifled of every thing valuable. Such articles as could not easily be transported were either wantonly destroyed, or greatly injured. Among those which were injured, was a valuable collection of paintings belonging to Mr. Middleton. Fortunately, at the time the marauders visited Middleton Place, the family had made their escape a day's journey to the north of Charleston. 
  On the investment of the latter place, in the following year, Mr. Middleton was present, and actively engaged in the defense of the city. With several others on the surrender of this place, he was taken prison, and was sent by sea to St. Augustine, in East Florida, where he was kept in confinement for nearly a year. At length, in July, 1781, he was exchanged, and proceeded in a cartel to Philadelphia. On his arrival at the latter place, Governor Rutledge, in the exercise of authority conferred upon him by general assembly of South Carolina, appointed him a representative in congress. To this office he was again elected in 1782; but in the month of November of that year, he returned to South Carolina on a visit to his family, from whom he had been separated during a long and anxious period. 
  On the signing the preliminaries of peace, Mr. Middleton declined accepting a seat in congress, preferring the pleasures of retirement with his family, to any honor which could be conferred upon him. He occasionally, however, accepted of a seat in the state legislature, in which he was greatly instrumental in promoting the tranquillity and happiness of his fellow-citizens. 
  The life of Mr. Middleton was terminated on the 1st of January, 1787. His death was occasioned by an intermittent fever, which he took in the preceding month of November, by an injudicious exposure to the unsettled weather of the autumnal season. 
  In his person, Mr. Middleton was of ordinary size, symmetrically proportioned, with fine features, and countenance expressive of firmness and decision.

Source: Rev. Charles A. Goodrich Lives of the Signers to the Declaration of Independence. New York: William Reed & Co., 1856. Pages 447-451. (Some minor spelling changes may have been made.) http://colonialhall.com/middleton/middleton.php

================================================================

Birth: Jun. 26, 1742 Charleston County South Carolina, USA Death: Jan. 1, 1787 Charleston County South Carolina, USA

Signer of the Declaration of Independence from South Carolina. Born at Middleton Place, a plantation near Charleston, South Carolina to a wealthy family. His father, Henry Middleton, owned more than twenty plantations covering 50,000 acres (about 8 square miles) with more than 800 slaves. At age 12, he was sent to England, where he attended school and studied law. He returned home just before Christmas 1763, and the next year, married Mary Izard, with whom he would have nine children. In 1765, he was elected to the South Carolina legislature. A patriot leader early in the cause, he became a founding member of the South Carolina Council of Safety, and a vocal opponent of the Tories, those who supported Great Britain. In 1774, his father, Henry Middleton, was sent to the First Continental Congress, briefly serving as its president. Citing health reasons, Henry turned down a reappointment, and his son, Arthur, was elected to replace him. An ardent patriot, he had no problem with voting for independence and readily signed the Declaration. After a year with the Congress, he returned home to continue to help manage his parent’s estates. He was elected as a delegate to the Congress in 1778, 1779, and 1780, but refused to take a seat, remaining at home. When the British attacked Charleston, SC, in 1780, Arthur Middleton joined the Army to defend the city. When the British captured the city, Middleton was taken prisoner, along with Edward Rutledge and Thomas Heyward, Jr, two other signers of the Declaration of Independence. Middleton was imprisoned in Florida, while the British Army plundered his family estates and carried off over 200 slaves, which they sold in the British West Indies. During her husband’s imprisonment, Mary Izard Middleton had to beg help from the British to care for her children. In 1781, Arthur returned to his home and repaired the damage to the plantation. He was selected as a delegate to the Congress of the Confederation in 1781. On New Year’s Day, 1787, he died at the age of 44. (bio by: Kit and Morgan Benson)


Family links:

Parents:
 Henry Middleton (1717 - 1784)
 Mary Baker Williams Middleton (1721 - 1761)

Spouse:
 Mary Izard Middleton (1747 - 1814)*

Children:
 Henry Middleton (1770 - 1846)*
 Emma Philadelphia Middleton Izard (1776 - 1813)*
 Isabella Johannes Middleton Huger (1780 - 1865)*
 Septima S Middleton Rutledge (1783 - 1865)*
 John Izard Middleton (1785 - 1849)*

Siblings:
 Arthur Middleton (1742 - 1787)
 Henrietta Middleton Rutledge (1750 - 1792)*
 Thomas Middleton (1753 - 1797)*
 Hester Middleton Drayton (1754 - 1789)*
 Sarah Middleton Pinckney (1756 - 1784)**
 Susannah Middleton Parker (1760 - 1834)**
  • Calculated relationship
    • Half-sibling

Burial: Middleton Place Gardens and Tomb Charleston Dorchester County South Carolina, USA


Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]


Maintained by: Find A Grave Record added: Apr 28, 1998 Find A Grave Memorial# 2810

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=2810

-------------------- The youngest signer of the Declaration of Independence from Great Britain.

view all 17

Arthur Middleton, Signer of the "Declaration of Independence"'s Timeline

1705
1705
- 2014
Middleton Place Plantation, Charleston, S.C.

This place is beautiful I remember touring it with my late husband and his Aunt and Uncle when they came to visit us while we were stationed and the Navy base back in the 1970's. The pictures really don't tell how beautiful it really is. You miss the smells of flowers. They also are not showing the whole story either of like the slave quarters. It is my understanding that the plantation was used to film Gone with the Wind. (At least that is what our guide told us.) I see the tree is still there that my late husband climbed in order to get pictures of him sitting in the tree.
There are a lot more pictures on the below sight

http://www.bellewood-gardens.com/2009/Charleston_2009-03_Middleton

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=82-PhKin1B4

http://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g54171-d144683-Reviews...

http://south-carolina-plantations.com/dorchester/middleton-place.html

http://www.laduenews.com/living/design/design-rediscovered-middleto...

https://middletonplace.org/

1742
June 26, 1742
Middleton Place, St. Andrew's Parish, Charleston, South Carolina
1764
1764
Age 21
1770
September 28, 1770
Age 28
London, England
1772
August 13, 1772
Age 30
1774
October 6, 1774
Age 32
Charleston, Charleston County, Province of South Carolina
1776
July 4, 1776
- 1776
Age 34
Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, United States

Descent Only 15 of the 56 signers have male descendants today. These Signers have no descendants: William Whipple, John Hancock, Samuel Huntington, James Smith, James Wilson, Caesar Rodney, George Wythe, Francis Lightfoot Lee, Joseph Hewes, Thomas Lynch, Jr. Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, and George Walton. These Signers have no same surname (male) descendants: Josiah Bartlett, Matthew Thornton, Samuel Adams, Elbridge Gerry, William Williams, William Floyd, Francis Lewis, Robert Morris, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin Franklin, George Clymer, George Taylor, George Ross, Thomas McKean, Samuel Chase, Thomas Stone, Thomas Jefferson, William Hooper and John Penn. These Signers have very doubtful same surname (male) descendants: Stephen Hopkins, William Ellery, Oliver Wolcott, John Witherspoon, Abraham Clark, John Morton, Carter Braxton, Edward Rutledge. The remainder of the Signers is known to have same surname (male) descendants. (Talk about being blown away when you find out almost all of the signers are part of your family's history. You sit back shake your head and wonder am I dreaming. Then you double check in disbelief wondering how that could be. What does that mean for you and your.) =================================================================== Did Your Ancestor Sign the Declaration of Independence? By James Pylant And can you prove it? Kathy M. Cornwell's "Disspelling a Myth and Finding An Ancestor," in Seventeen Seventy-Six, Vol. 2, No. 2 (pp. 69-73), tells of a family tradition that her husband's ancestor, Jane Wilson Cornwell, was the daughter of James Wilson, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. "Admittedly, there was plausibility for the claim, for descendants of all of Jane's children whom we could locate had heard the story, and firmly believed it. One relative knew it was true because his grandmother told him, and she was Jane's daughter." Her research did reveal her husband's ancestor was the daughter of James Wilson — only that he and the signer were not one and the same. Signer James Wilson, according to one source Cornwell found, had no living descendants. "Our search to prove or disprove it spanned several years," wrote Cornwell, "but at the end of the genealogical journey we found the real ancestor, another James Wilson, who turned out to be just as colorful and fascinating as the celebrated Wilson." Yet, some legends prove to be true. “I too had a family story that the Rev. Dr. John Witherspoon was an ancestor," says librarian Beatrice M. Beck. "It took three years to document this story. But it was one hundred percent correct.”* The Rev. Frederick W. Pyne’s Descendants of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence, a nine-volume series, was published by Picton Press. The author’s work incorporates data from the application files of the Society of the Descendants of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence, the Frank W. Leach manuscript, and many other published references. In 1987, the LDS Reference Unit at the Family History Library, in Salt Lake City, compiled the "Founding Fathers Project." The project encompasses genealogical data on signers of the Declaration of Independence, signers of the Articles of Confederation (1778), and members of the American Constitutional Convention (1787). The Reference Unit's objective was to identify names of wives, children, and parents. This reference is available on microfilm loan at the various Family History Centers. The film number is 1592751, item 3. However, for more complete data on descendants (up to 1900 in some cases), refer to the following microfilms: 001751: John Adams, Samuel Adams, Josiah Bartlett, William Ellery, Elbridge Gerry,John Hancock, Stephen Hopkins, Samuel Huntington, Robert Treat Paine, Roger Sherman, Matthew Thornton, William Whipple, William Williams, and Oliver Wolcott. 001752: Abraham Clark, William Floyd, John Hart, Francis Lewis, Phillip Livingston, and Lewis Morris. 001753: George Clymer, Benjamin Francis Hopkinson, Robert Morris, John Morton, and John Witherspoon. 001754: Charles Carroll, Samuel Chase, Thomas McKean, William Paca, George Read, Caesar Rodney, George Ross, Benjamin Rush, Thomas Stone, George Taylor, and James Wilson. 001755: Carter Braxton, Benjamin Harrison, Thomas Jefferson, Francis Lightfoot Lee, Richard Henry Lee, Thomas Nelson Jr., and George Wythe. 001756: Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, Joseph Hewes, Thomas Heyward Jr., William Hooper, Thomas Lynch Jr., Arthur Middleton, John Penn, Edward Rutledge, and George Walton * Beatrice M. Beck to James Pylant, 4 June 2001. http://www.genealogymagazine.com/didyouransig.html
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http://history.org/foundation/journal/Winter11/painting_magnify/

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http://research.history.org/pf/publishing/goddardsPrinting.cfm

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http://research.history.org/pf/publishing/dunlap.cfm

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http://research.history.org/pf/signers/

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William Woodruff's Facsimile

An upsurge in public interest in the Declaration of Independence occurred in the early nineteenth century. Among the various editions printed was one by Philadelphian William Woodruff, a journeyman engraver. Allegorical symbols of the new nation surround the text and signatures. The cursive signatures on the printing at the right indicate that it was one produced after Woodruff's initial 1819 printing.

http://research.history.org/pf/viewer.cfm?image=lg_woodruff.jpg&amp...

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July 4th, 2012 at the National Archives: Dramatic Reading of the Declaration of Independence

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drIdEZ_om9w
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Declaration of Independence

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9ovu0a6pL8
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John and Abigail (Adams)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k9ddILn141w
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Correspondence between John and Abigail Adams

http://www.masshist.org/digitaladams/archive/letter/
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Letter from Abigail Adams to John Adams, 31 March - 5 April 1776

http://www.masshist.org/digitaladams/archive/doc?id=L17760331aa
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October 22, 1776
Age 34
Middleton Place, South Carolina
1778
1778
Age 35
Charleston County, South Carolina, United States
1780
November 25, 1780
Age 38
Ashley River, South Carolina