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Baeldaeg Of North Germany (Mythical Ancestor of King Cerdic of Wessex)

Nicknames: "Baldr", "Balder", "Baldur of Asgard", "243"
Birthdate:
Death: Died in Vest Saksland, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
Immediate Family:

Son of Óðinn / Woden / Woutan
Husband of Nanna Nepsdotter
Father of Forsete; Brand and Bernic
Half brother of Balder Odinsson,King of The West Saxons; Hiemdal Odinsson; Skjold Odinsson,King of Denmark; Víðarr Odinsson, of Asgard; Saemingr Odinsson, King in Hålogaland and 20 others

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About Baeldaeg Of North Germany (Mythical Ancestor of King Cerdic of Wessex)

Balder

by Micha F. Lindemans

The god of light, joy, purity, beauty, innocence, and reconciliation. Son of Odin and Frigg, he was loved by both gods and men and was considered to be the best of the gods. He had a good character, was friendly, wise and eloquent, although he had little power. His wife was Nanna daughter of Nep, and their son was Forseti, the god of justice. Balder's hall was Breidablik ("broad splendor").

Most of the stories about Balder concern his death. He had been dreaming about his death, so Frigg extracted an oath from every creature, object and force in nature (snakes, metals, diseases, poisons, fire, etc.) that they would never harm Balder. All agreed that none of their kind would ever hurt or assist in hurting Balder. Thinking him invincible, the gods enjoyed themselves thereafter by using Balder as a target for knife-throwing and archery.

The malicious trickster, Loki, was jealous of Balder. He changed his appearance and asked Frigg if there was absolutely nothing that could harm the god of light. Frigg, suspecting nothing, answered that there was just one thing: a small tree in the west that was called mistletoe. She had thought it was too small to ask for an oath. Loki immediately left for the west and returned with the mistletoe. He tricked Balder's blind twin brother Hod into throwing a mistletoe fig (dart) at Balder. Not knowing what he did, Hod threw the fig, guided by Loki's aim. Pierced through the heart, Balder fell dead.

While the gods were lamenting Balder's death, Odin sent his other son Hermod to Hel, the goddess of death, to plead for Balder's return. Hel agreed to send Balder back to the land of the living on one condition: everything in the world, dead or alive, must weep for him. And everything wept, except for Loki, who had disguised himself as the witch Thokk. And so Balder had to remain in the underworld.

The others took the dead god, dressed him in crimson cloth, and placed him on a funeral pyre aboard his ship Ringhorn, which passed for the largest in the world. Beside him they lay the body of his wife Nanna, who had died of a broken heart. Balder's horse and his treasures were also placed on the ship. The pyre was set on fire and the ship was sent to sea by the giantess Hyrrokin.

Loki did not escape punishment for his crime and Hod was put to death by Vali, son of Odin and Rind. Vali had been born for just that purpose. After the final conflict (Ragnarok), when a new world arises from its ashes, both Balder and Hod will be reborn.

In some versions it was his mother who had these disturbing dreams about his death.

Old Norse: Baldr

--------------------

«Balder» har flere betydninger.


Den norrøne guden Balder blir drept av Hod og Loke. Illustrasjon fra et islandsk manuskript fra 1666 som gjengir Snorres Den yngre EddaBalder, på norrønt Baldr, er en gud i norrøn mytologi. Balder er sønn av Odin og Frigg og gift med Nanna, som han har sønnen Forsete sammen med. Balder er rettferdighetens og lysets gud, og den peneste av alle æsene. Balder bor i Breidablik.

I Snorres gude- og skaldeverk Den yngre edda, beskrives Balder slik:

«Balder er Odins sønn, og ham er det mye godt å si om; han er den beste og ham roser alle. Han er så fager av utseende og så lys at det lyser av ham; ja, en blomst er så hvit at den sammenlignes med øyenvippene (brå) til Balder (Balder-brå). Den er den hviteste av alle urter, og herav kan du skjønne hvor fager han er på både hår og kropp.»

[rediger] Se også

Balders død

Commons: Baldr – bilder, video eller lyd 

--------------------

Beldig of Scandinavia

Male, #35157, (about 243 - )

Beldig of Scandinavia|b. a 243|p35157.htm|Odin of Asgard|b. a 215|p35160.htm|Frigg||p35161.htm|Frithuwald|b. a 190|p35162.htm|Beltsea o. A. unknown|b. a 194|p35163.htm|||||||

    Beldig of Scandinavia was born about 243.1 He was the son of Odin of Asgard and Frigg.1 Beldig married Nanna of Scandinavia, daughter of Gewar King of Norway.1

Child of Beldig of Scandinavia and Nanna of Scandinavia

   * Brand of Scandinavia+ (a 271 - )1

Citations

  1. Stuart, Roderick W. Royalty for Commoners, The Complete Known Lineage of John of Gaunt, Son of Edward III, King of England, and Queen Philippa. Fourth Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2002.
http://www.genealogy.theroyfamily.com/p35157.htm

547. This year Ida began to reign, from whom arose

the royal race of North-humbria ; and he reigned twelve

years, and built Bambrough, which was at iSirst enclosed by

a hedge, and afterwards by a wall. Ida was the son of

Eoppa, Eoppa of Esa, Esa of Ingwi, Ingwi of Angenwit,

Angenwit of Aloe, Aloe ot Benoc, Benoc of Brond, Brond

of Beldeg, Beldeg of Woden, Woden of Frithowald, Fritho-

wald of Frithuwulf, Frithuwulf of Finn, Finn of Godwulf,

Godwulf of Geat.

http://www.archive.org/stream/anglosaxonchroni00gile/anglosaxonchroni00gile_djvu.txt -------------------- Balder is a god in Norse Mythology associated with light and beauty.

In the 12th century, Danish accounts by Saxo Grammaticus and other Danish Latin chroniclers recorded a euhemerized account of his story. Compiled in Iceland in the 13th century, but based on much older Old Norse poetry, the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda contain numerous references to the death of Baldr as both a great tragedy to the Æsir and a harbinger of Ragnarök.

According to Gylfaginning, a book of Snorri Sturluson's Prose Edda, Baldr's wife is Nanna and their son is Forseti. In Gylfaginning, Snorri relates that Baldr had the greatest ship ever built, named Hringhorni, and that there is no place more beautiful than his hall, Breidablik.

Apart from this description Baldr is known primarily for the story of his death. His death is seen as the first in the chain of events which will ultimately lead to the destruction of the gods at Ragnarok. Baldr will be reborn in the new world, according to Völuspá.

He had a dream of his own death and his mother had the same dreams. Since dreams were usually prophetic, this depressed him, so his mother Frigg made every object on earth vow never to hurt Baldr. All objects made this vow except mistletoe. Frigg had thought it too unimportant and nonthreatening to bother asking it to make the vow (alternatively, it seemed too young to swear).

When Loki, the mischief-maker, heard of this, he made a magical spear from this plant (in some later versions, an arrow). He hurried to the place where the gods were indulging in their new pastime of hurling objects at Baldr, which would bounce off without harming him. Loki gave the spear to Baldr's brother, the blind god Höðr, who then inadvertently killed his brother with it (other versions suggest that Loki guided the arrow himself). For this act, Odin and the giantess Rindr gave birth to Váli who grew to adulthood within a day and slew Höðr.

Baldr was ceremonially burnt upon his ship, Hringhorni, the largest of all ships. As he was carried to the ship, Odin whispered in his ear. This was to be a key riddle asked by Odin (in disguise) of the giant Vafthrudnir (and which was, of course, unanswerable) in the poem Vafthrudnismal. The riddle also appears in the riddles of Gestumblindi in Hervarar saga.

The dwarf Litr was kicked by Thor into the funeral fire and burnt alive. Nanna, Baldr's wife, also threw herself on the funeral fire to await Ragnarok when she would be reunited with her husband (alternatively, she died of grief). Baldr's horse with all its trappings was also burned on the pyre. The ship was set to sea by Hyrrokin, a giantess, who came riding on a wolf and gave the ship such a push that fire flashed from the rollers and all the earth shook.

Upon Frigg's entreaties, delivered through the messenger Hermod, Hel promised to release Baldr from the underworld if all objects alive and dead would weep for him. And all did, except a giantess, Þökk, who refused to mourn the slain god. And thus Baldr had to remain in the underworld, not to emerge until after Ragnarok, when he and his brother Höðr would be reconciled and rule the new earth together with Thor's sons.

When the gods discovered that the giantess Þökk had been Loki in disguise, they hunted him down and bound him to three rocks. Then they tied a serpent above him, the venom of which dripped onto his face. His wife Sigyn gathered the venom in a bowl, but from time to time she had to turn away to empty it, at which point the poison would drip onto Loki, who writhed in pain, thus causing earthquakes. He would free himself, however, in time to attack the gods at Ragnarok.

Writing at about the end of the 12th century, the Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus tells the story of Baldr (recorded as Balderus) in a form which professes to be historical. According to him, Balderus and Høtherus were rival suitors for the hand of Nanna, daughter of Gewar, King of Norway. Now Balderus was a demigod and common steel could not wound his sacred body. The two rivals encountered each other in a terrific battle. Though Odin and Thor and the rest of the gods fought for Balderus, he was defeated and fled away, and Høtherus married the princess.

Nevertheless Balderus took heart of grace and again met Høtherus in a stricken field. But he fared even worse than before. Høtherus dealt him a deadly wound with a magic sword, named Mistletoe[7], which he had received from Miming, the satyr of the woods; after lingering three days in pain Balderus died of his injury and was buried with royal honours in a barrow.

The god of light, joy, purity, beauty, innocence, and reconciliation. Son of Odin and Frigg, he was loved by both gods and men and was considered to be the best of the gods. He had a good character, was friendly, wise and eloquent, although he had little power. His wife was Nanna daughter of Nep, and their son was Forseti, the god of justice. Balder's hall was Breidablik ("broad splendor").

Most of the stories about Balder concern his death. He had been dreaming about his death, so Frigg extracted an oath from every creature, object and force in nature (snakes, metals, diseases, poisons, fire, etc.) that they would never harm Balder. All agreed that none of their kind would ever hurt or assist in hurting Balder. Thinking him invincible, the gods enjoyed themselves thereafter by using Balder as a target for knife-throwing and archery.

The malicious trickster, Loki, was jealous of Balder. He changed his appearance and asked Frigg if there was absolutely nothing that could harm the god of light. Frigg, suspecting nothing, answered that there was just one thing: a small tree in the west that was called mistletoe. She had thought it was too small to ask for an oath. Loki immediately left for the west and returned with the mistletoe. He tricked Balder's blind twin brother Hod into throwing a mistletoe fig (dart) at Balder. Not knowing what he did, Hod threw the fig, guided by Loki's aim. Pierced through the heart, Balder fell dead.

While the gods were lamenting Balder's death, Odin sent his other son Hermod to Hel, the goddess of death, to plead for Balder's return. Hel agreed to send Balder back to the land of the living on one condition: everything in the world, dead or alive, must weep for him. And everything wept, except for Loki, who had disguised himself as the witch Thokk. And so Balder had to remain in the underworld.

The others took the dead god, dressed him in crimson cloth, and placed him on a funeral pyre aboard his ship Ringhorn, which passed for the largest in the world. Beside him they lay the body of his wife Nanna, who had died of a broken heart. Balder's horse and his treasures were also placed on the ship. The pyre was set on fire and the ship was sent to sea by the giantess Hyrrokin.

Loki did not escape punishment for his crime and Hod was put to death by Vali, son of Odin and Rind. Vali had been born for just that purpose. After the final conflict (Ragnarok), when a new world arises from its ashes, both Balder and Hod will be reborn.

In some versions it was his mother who had these disturbing dreams about his death.

Old Norse: Baldr

-------------------- Also known as Balder. -------------------- Baeldaeg's father was Odin or Woden and his mother was Friege, Frigg, Frea de Siluria.

See these individuals in another part of this tree.

His paternal grandparents were Frithuwald or Bor and Beltsa; his maternal grandparents were Cadwalladr ap Lewfer Mawr and <Unknown>. He had eight brothers named Njord, Winta, Skjold, Wecta With I, Casere, Seaxneat, Waegdagg and Wihtlaeg. He was the fourth oldest of the nine children. He had a half-brother named Saeming. -------------------- BIOGRAPHY: Old Norse Baldr, in Norse mythology, the son of the chief god Odin and his wife Frigg. Beautiful and just, he was the favourite of the gods. Most legends about him concern his death. Icelandic stories tell how the gods amused themselves by throwing objects at him, knowing that he was immune from harm. The blind god Höd, deceived by the evil Loki, killed Balder by hurling mistletoe, the only thing that could hurt him. After Balder's funeral, the giantess Thökk, probably Loki in disguise, refused to weep the tears that would release Balder from death.

Some scholars believe that the passive, suffering figure of Balder was influenced by that of Christ. The Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus (c. 1200), however, depicts him as a warrior engaged in a feud over the hand of a woman.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. --------------------

   WIKIPEDIA:
   Balder (Old Norse Baldr, modern Icelandic and Faroese Baldur, Balder is the name in modern Norwegian, Swedish and Danish and an anglicized form) is, in Norse Mythology, the god of innocence, beauty, joy, purity, and peace, and is Odin's second son. His wife is called Nanna and his son Forseti. Balder had a ship, the largest ever built, named Hringhorni, and a hall, called Breidablik. Phol may have been a German name for Balder, based on the second Merseburg charm, where the same person seems to be referred to as Phol and Balder.
   The Prose Edda
   Balder's brow.
   In the Gylfaginning section of Snorri Sturluson's Prose Edda Balder is described as follows.
   The second son of Odin is Baldr, and good things are to be said of him. He is best, and all praise him; he is so fair of feature, and so bright, that light shines from him. A certain herb is so white that it is likened to Baldr's brow; of all grasses it is whitest, and by it thou mayest judge his fairness, both in hair and in body. He is the wisest of the Æsir, and the fairest-spoken and most gracious; and that quality attends him, that none may gainsay his judgments. He dwells in the place called Breidablik, which is in heaven; in that place may nothing unclean be[.] - Brodeur's translation
   Apart from this gushing description Balder is known primarily for the myth surrounding his death. His death is seen as the first in the chain of events which will ultimately lead to the destruction of the gods at Ragnarok. Balder will be reborn in the new world, however, as foretold in the Völuspá.
   Due to perceived similarities, Balder is sometimes associated with Christ in art, as is clearly emphasized in this illustration of Baldrs draumar (1893).
   He had a dream of his own death (or his mother had the same dreams). Since dreams were usually prophetic, this depressed him, and his mother Frigg made every object on earth vow never to hurt Balder. All but one, an insignificant weed called the mistletoe, made this vow. Frigg had thought it too unimportant and nonthreatening to bother asking it to make the vow (alternatively, it seemed too young to swear). When Loki, the mischief-maker, heard of this, he made a magical spear from this plant (in some later versions, an arrow). He hurried to the place where the gods were indulging in their new pastime of hurling objects at Balder, which would bounce off without harming him. Loki gave the spear to Balder's brother, the blind god Hö?r, who then inadvertently killed his brother with it. For this act, Odin and Rind had a child named Váli, who was born solely to punish Hö?r, who was slain.
   Balder was ceremonially burnt upon his ship, Hringhorni, the largest of all ships. As he was carried to the ship, Odin whispered in his ear. This was to be a key riddle asked by Odin (in disguise) of the giant Vafthruthnir (and which was, of course, unanswerable) in the Vafthruthnismal (the riddle also appears in the riddles of Gestumblindi in Hervarar saga). The dwarf Lit was kicked by Thor into the funeral fire and burnt alive. Nanna, Balder's wife, also threw herself on the funeral fire to await the end of Ragnarok when she would be reunited with her husband (alternatively, she died of grief). Balder's horse with all its trappings was also burned on the pyre. The ship was set to sea by Hyrrokin, a giantess, who came riding on a wolf and gave the ship such a push that fire flashed from the rollers and all the earth shook.
   Upon Frigg's entreaties, delivered through the messenger Hermod, Hel promised to release Balder from the underworld if all objects alive and dead would weep for him. And all did, except a giantess, Thokk, who refused to mourn the slain god. And thus Balder had to remain in the underworld, not to emerge until after Ragnarok, when he and his brother Hö?r would be reconciled and rule the new earth together with Thor's sons.
   When the gods discovered that the giantess had been Loki in disguise, they hunted him down and bound him to three rocks. Then they tied a serpent above him, the venom of which dripped onto his face. His wife Sigyn gathered the venom in a bowl, but from time to time she had to turn away to empty it, at which point the poison would drip onto Loki, who writhed in pain, thus causing earthquakes. He would free himself, however, in time to attack the gods at Ragnarok.
   The Poetic Edda
   Loki tricks Hö?r to shoot Balder.
   In the Elder Edda the tragic tale of Balder is hinted at rather than told at length. Among the visions which the Norse Sibyl sees and describes in the weird prophecy known as the Völuspá is one of the fatal mistletoe. "I behold," says she, "Fate looming for Balder, Woden's son, the bloody victim. There stands the Mistletoe slender and delicate, blooming high above the ground. Out of this shoot, so slender to look on, there shall grow a harmful fateful shaft. Hod shall shoot it, but Frigga in Fen-hall shall weep over the woe of Wal-hall." Yet looking far into the future the Sibyl sees a brighter vision of a new heaven and a new earth, where the fields unsown shall yield their increase and all sorrows shall be healed; then Balder will come back to dwell in Odin's mansions of bliss, in a hall brighter than the sun, shingled with gold, where the righteous shall live in joy for ever more.
   Gesta Danorum
   Writing about the end of the 12th century, the old Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus tells the story of Balder in a form which professes to be historical. According to him, Balderus and Høtherus were rival suitors for the hand of Nanna, daughter of Gewar, King of Norway. Now Balderus was a demigod and common steel could not wound his sacred body. The two rivals encountered each other in a terrific battle. Though Odin and Thor and the rest of the gods fought for Balderus, he was defeated and fled away, and Høtherus married the princess. Nevertheless Balderus took heart of grace and again met Høtherus in a stricken field. But he fared even worse than before. Høtherus dealt him a deadly wound with a magic sword, which he had received from Miming, the satyr of the woods; and after lingering three days in pain Balderus died of his injury and was buried with royal honours in a barrow.
   Chronicon Lethrense and Annales Lundenses
   There are also two less known Danish Latin chronicles, the Chronicon Lethrense and the Annales Lundenses of which the latter is included in the former. These two sources provide a second euhemerized account of Hö?r's slaying of Balder.
   It relates that Hother was the king of the Saxons and son of Hothbrod and the daughter of Hadding. Hother first slew Othen's (i.e. Odin) son Balder in battle and then chased Othen and Thor. Finally, Othen's son Both killed Hother. Hother, Balder, Othen and Thor were incorrectly considered to be gods.
   Beowulf
   In Beowulf Balder appears as the geatish prince Herebeald, who is killed by his brother Hæ?cyn (Hö?r). The king Hre?el replaces Odin as the grieving father.
   Balder in place names
   There are few place names in Scandinavia that contains the name Balder. The most certain and notable one is the (former) parishname Baldishol in Hedmark county, Norway: "a Balldrshole" 1356 (where the last element is hóll m "mound; small hill"). Others may be (in Norse forms) Baldrsberg in Vestfold county, Baldrsheimr in Hordaland county and Baldrsnes in Sør-Trøndelag county.
   Analogues
   The legendary death of Balder resembles the legendary death of the Persian hero Esfandyar in the epic Shahnameh. In Finnish mythology, Lemminkäinen shares just the same kind of fate as Balder: to be killed by a blind one at the feast of gods. Balder has also been likened to Jesus, as C. S. Lewis did when he said he "loved Balder before Christ."
   Balder's brows
   In Scandinavian, the Scentless Mayweed (Matricaria perforata) is named Balder's brows because of its whiteness.
   Modern popular culture
   Main article: Balder in popular culture
   Balder has been the basis of various works of art and appears irregularly in modern popular culture.
   References
   • Brodeur, Arthur Gilchrist (transl.) (1916). The Prose Edda by Snorri Sturluson. New York: The American-Scandinavian Foundation. Available online at http://www.northvegr.org/lore/prose/index.php.
   • Eysteinn Björnsson (ed.). Snorra-Edda: Formáli & Gylfaginning : Textar fjögurra meginhandrita. 2005. http://www.hi.is/~eybjorn/gg/
   External Links
   • Viktor Rydberg's "Teutonic Mythology: Gods and Goddesses of the Northland" e-book
   • W. Wagner's "Asgard and the Home of the Gods" e-book
   • H. A. Guerber's "Myths of Northern Lands" e-book
 # • Peter Andreas Munch's "Norse Mythology: Legends of Gods and Heroes" e-book Date: 2 Apr 2007
  1. OBJE:
  2. FORM: jpeg
  3. Title: Balder
  4. FILE: Pics/Baldr.jpg
  5. Note:
   WIKIPEDIA:
   The Anglo-Saxon kings claimed descent from Woden. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and the Historia Britonum, Woden had the sons Wecta, Baeldaeg, Casere and Wihtlaeg.
   • Wecta's line is continued by Witta, Wihtgils, Hengest and Horsa, and the Kings of Kent.
   • Baeldaeg's line is continued by Brona, Frithugar, Freawine, Wig, Gewis, Esla, Elesa, Cerdic and the Kings of Wessex.
   • Casere's line is continued by Tytmon, Trygils, Hrothmund, Hryp, Wilhelm, Wehha, Wuffa and the Kings of East Anglia.
   • Wihtlaeg's line is continued by Wermund king of Angel, Offa Wermundson, Angeltheow, Eomer, Icel and the Kings of Mercia.
   Anglo-Saxon literature starts at about the time of the conversion from the old religion. Though whatever stories recording his part in the lives of men and the gods are lost, Woden's name survived in the names of many settlements and geographical features. 
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Baeldaeg Of North Germany's Timeline

243
243
270
270
Age 27
Alt Sachsen (Ancient Saxony), Germany
????
????
????
Saxony, Northern Germany
????
Vest Saksland, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
????