Baldwin V, count of Flanders

Is your surname van Vlaanderen?

Research the van Vlaanderen family

Baldwin V, count of Flanders's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Baldwin "Insulanus" Graaf van Vlaanderen, V

Also Known As: "Baldwin V Count of Flanders", "Boudewijn V van Vlaanderen", "van Rijsel", "Baudouin le Pieux", "de Lille", "the Pious", "Comte de Flandres", "7th Count of /Flanders", "von Flandern", "Baldwin V", "Count of Flanders", ""King" of Flanders", "Den Fromme", "Balduin von Lille"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Flandres, Bihorel, Haute-Normandie, France
Death: Died in Lille, Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
Place of Burial: St. Pierre, Lille, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Baldwin IV Fairbeard, Count of Flanders and Ogive of Luxemburg, Countess of Flanders
Husband of Adèle Capet Princess of France and Adèle de France
Father of Robert I Fleming Count of Flanders; Baldwin VI, Count of Flanders and Hainault; Adelheid van Vlaanderen; Robert I "de Fries", count of Flanders; Matilda of Flanders, Queen Consort of England and 2 others
Brother of Hermengarde van Vlaanderen
Half brother of Judith 'Fausta' de Flandre

Occupation: Count of Flandres, DEBONNAIRE', Greve, Duke of Normandy, Duc de Normandie, 5áe Duc de Normandie (vv.1026-1027), 5th Duke of Normandy, Duke Of Normandy (1026- ), Greve av Flandern, Comte de Flandre, @occu00125@
Managed by: Sally Gene Cole
Last Updated:

About Baldwin V, count of Flanders

http://genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004011&tree=LEO

Baudouin V, 'le Pieux' de Flandre, Boudewyn V den Grôotn van Vloandern - DO NOT CHANGE HIS NAME, he was NOT English.

Son of Baudouin 'le Barbu' and Ogive

Married to Adèle (Robert de France's daughter)

Children:

  • Baudouin
  • Matilde
  • Robert

LINKS

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#Judithdied1094

http://vls.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boudewyn_V_van_Vloandern

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baldwin_V,_Count_of_Flanders

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baudouin_V_de_Flandre

MEDIEVAL LANDS

BAUDOUIN, son of BAUDOUIN IV "le Barbu/Pulchrae Barbae" Count of Flanders & his first wife Ogive de Luxembourg ([1012/13]-Lille 1 Sep 1067, bur Lille St Pierre[217]). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "Balduinum Insulanum" as son of "Balduinum Barbatum [et] Odgivam"[218]. After 1028, he led a rebellion against his father who was forced to take refuge in Normandy. After his father returned with reinforcements, Baudouin submitted but was allowed to rule jointly[219]. He succeeded his father in 1035 as BAUDOUIN V "le Pieux/Insulanus" Count of Flanders. He acquired overlordship of the county of Lens from the counts of Boulogne[220]. He was installed as count in the march of Antwerp, presumably after the death of Gozelon in 1044. The Liber traditionum of Gant Saint-Pierre commemorates the donations of "Baldwinus junior marchysus filius Baldwini marchysi et Odgevæ comitissæ cum conjuge sua Adala", undated[221]. He took part in the Lotharingian rebellion against Emperor Heinrich III and sacked the imperial palace at Nijmegen. Emperor Heinrich gathered a large army to wreak revenge in 1049[222], but in practical terms the only loss to Flanders was the march of Antwerp[223]. Count Baudouin returned Valenciennes to Hainaut, and thus indirectly to German suzerainty[224]. He maintained close relations with Godwin Earl of Wessex, first sheltering the latter´s son Svein after he was outlawed in 1049, then Earl Godwin himself when he was exiled from England in 1051. Emperor Heinrich III invaded Flanders again in 1054 but had to retreat[225]. On the death of Henri I King of France in 1060, Count Baudouin became regent of France for his nephew King Philippe I. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 1067 of "Baldwinus potentissimus marchisus"[226].

m (Amiens 1028) ADELA de France, daughter of ROBERT II King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles (1009-Messines 8 Jan 1079, bur Messines, Benedictine monastery). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Rodberti regis Francorum Adelam" wife of "Balduinum Insulanum"[227]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Alam comitissam Flandrensem" the daughter of King Robert[228]. Corbie was her dowry[229]. The Liber traditionum of Gant Saint-Pierre commemorates the donations of "Baldwinus junior marchysus filius Baldwini marchysi et Odgevæ comitissæ cum conjuge sua Adala", undated[230]. She founded the Benedictine monastery at Messines near Ypres. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "VI Id Jan" of "Adelaidis comitissa"[231].

Count Baudouin V & his wife had three children:

1. BAUDOUIN de Flandre ([1030]-Hasnon Abbey 17 Jul 1070). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Balduinum Haanoniensem, et Robdbertum cognomento postea Iherosolimitanum, et Matilde uxorem Guillelmi regis Anglorum" as the children of "Balduinum Insulanum [et] Adelam"[232].

The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Balduinum sextum, Robertum cognomento Fresonem, Philippum patrem Guilelmi de Ypra et filias duas Iudith, quam duxit Tostinus comes Nortdanimbronum in Anglia et Mathilda…Normannorum ducissa"[233], which confuses three generations of the family of the counts of Flanders. Baudouin's father sent him to be educated at the court of Emperor Heinrich III, who installed him as Markgraaf van Antwerpen in 1045, although this was taken away in [1050] after his father opposed the emperor[234]. He succeeded in 1055 as BAUDOUIN I Comte de Hainaut, by right of his wife. He succeeded his father in 1067 as BAUDOUIN VI Count of Flanders. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 1070 of "Baldwinus marchisus, qui Hasnoni sepultus est"[235]. The Annales Elnonenses Maiores record Baudouin's death "XVI Kal Aug" and his burial "Hasnonie"[236].

m (1051) as her second husband, RICHILDE, widow of HERMAN Comte de Hainaut, daughter of --- (-Messines 15 Mar 1087, bur Abbaye de Hasnon). The difficult question of the parentage of Richilde is discussed fully in the document HAINAUT which sets out her first husband's family. Richilde married thirdly (1070) as his second wife, Guillaume FitzOsbern Earl of Hereford. The Annals of Winchester record the marriage in 1070 of “comitissam Flandriæ” and “rex…nepoti suo Willelmo filio Osberni”[237]. William of Malmesbury records that Baudouin I comte de Hainaut entrusted the guardianship of his two sons to "Philip king of France…and to William Fitz-Osberne", adding that the latter "readily undertook the office that he might increase his dignity by a union with Richilda"[238]. The Complete Peerage, citing Annales Flandriæ, states that Richilde was taken in battle where her new husband FitzOsbern was killed[239], but the precise reference has not yet been found to this primary source. The necrology of Liège Saint-Lambert records the death "XVII Kal Apr" of "Richildis comitisse"[240].

Count Baudouin VI & his wife had three children:

a) ARNOUL de Flandre ([1055]-killed in battle Cassel 22 Feb 1071, bur Saint-Bertin). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Arnulfum et Balduinem" as sons of "Balduinum Haanoniensem [et] Richelde"[241]. "Arnulfum nepotem suum [Robertus filius Balduini comitis Insulani] occiso" is named in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[242]. He succeeded his father in 1070 as ARNOUL III Count of Flanders, Comte de Hainaut. His uncle Robert rebelled against Count Arnoul, defeated him at the battle of Cassel where Arnoul was killed, and seized control of Flanders[243]. Arnoul's younger brother Baudouin was left only with the county of Hainaut.

b) BAUDOUIN de Flandre ([1056]-on Crusade 1098, after 8 Jun). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Arnulfum et Balduinem" as sons of "Balduinum Haanoniensem [et] Richelde"[244]. Guibert describes him as "Balduinus comes de Montibus, Roberti Flandrensis comitis iunioris patrui, filius"[245]. "Balduino frater eius [Arnulphum occiso]" is named in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[246]. He succeeded his brother in 1071 as BAUDOUIN II Comte de Hainaut.

c) [AGNES (-[1071] or after). Comte Arnoul III names his sister Agnes in a charter dated to [1071][247]. It is possible that Agnes was the same person as the unnamed daughter of "Hermannus filius ducis Thuringie ex Richilde" referred to in the Annales Hanoniæ, which specify in a later passage that she became a nun[248]. If this is correct, she was Arnoul's uterine half-sister.]

2. MATHILDE de Flandre ([1032]-Caen 2 Nov 1083, bur Caen, Abbey of Holy Trinity). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Balduinum Haanoniensem, et Robdbertum cognomento postea Iherosolimitanum, et Matilde uxorem Guillelmi regis Anglorum" as the children of "Balduinum Insulanum [et] Adelam"[249]. Her parentage is also stated by Orderic Vitalis[250]. Florence of Worcester records that "comitissa Mahtilda de Normannia" came to England 23 Mar [1068] and was crowned "die Pentecostes [11 May]" by Aldred Archbishop of York[251]. Orderic Vitalis also records that she was crowned queen of England 11 May 1068[252], presumably at Westminster Abbey or Winchester Cathedral although this appears to be unrecorded. Queen Matilda acted as regent in Normandy during her husband's absences in England. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "IV Non Nov" of "Matildis Anglorum regina"[253]. Guillaume de Jumièges records the burial of Queen Mathilde on 3 Nov 1081 at Holy Trinity, Caen[254]. Florence of Worcester records the death "IV Non Nov" in [1083] of "regina Mahtilda" in Normandy and her burial at Caen[255].

m (Eu, Cathedral of Notre Dame [1050/52]) GUILLAUME II Duke of Normandy, illegitimate son of ROBERT “le Diable” Duke of Normandy & his mistress Arlette --- (Château de Falaise, Normandy [1027/8]-Rouen, Priory of St Gervais 9 Sep 1087, bur Caen, Abbey of St Etienne). He succeeded in 1066 as WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England. King William I & his wife had ten children:

a) ROBERT “Curthose” (Normandy [1052/4]-Cardiff Castle 3/10/15 Feb 1135, bur Gloucester Cathedral). William of Malmesbury names Robert as eldest son of King William I[256]. He succeeded his father in 1087 as ROBERT III Duke of Normandy. One child:

i) GUILLAUME de Normandie (Rouen 1101-St Omer, Abbey of St Bertin 27 Jul 1128, bur St Omer, Abbey of St Bertin). His parentage is stated by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that he was born in Rouen in the third year after his parents' marriage[257]. Following the assassination of Count Charles, Louis VI King of France convened a meeting of Flemish barons at Arras where they elected Guillaume 21 Mar 1127 as GUILLAUME I "Clito" Count of Flanders, although he lacked any hereditary right. He was opposed by his uncle Henry I King of England who bribed his supporters in Gent and eastern Flanders. Lille rebelled 1 Aug 1127, and Saint-Omer 8 Feb 1128[258]. Guillaume´s rival Thierry d'Alsace captured Lille, Furnes and Gent[259] and was recognised as Count at Bruges 30 Mar 1128[260]. Guillaume besieged Aalst in Jul 1128, helped by Godefroi Duke of Lower Lotharingia, but was injured and died from his wounds[261].

b) other children - see KINGS of ENGLAND.

3. ROBERT ([1035]-13 Oct 1093). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Balduinum Haanoniensem, et Robdbertum cognomento postea Iherosolimitanum, et Matilde uxorem Guillelmi regis Anglorum" as the children of "Balduinum Insulanum [et] Adelam"[262]. He was regent of the county of Holland 1062-1071, during the minority of his stepson. He succeeded his nephew in 1071 as ROBERT I "le Frison" Count of Flanders.

--------------------

WIKIPEDIA (Eng)

Baldwin V of Flanders (died 1 September 1067) was Count of Flanders from 1035 until his death.

He was the son of Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders, who died in 1035.

History

In 1028 Baldwin married Adèle of France in Amiens, daughter of King Robert II of France; at her instigation he rebelled against his father but in 1030 peace was sworn and the old count continued to rule until his death.

During a long war (1046–1056) as an ally of Godfrey the Bearded, Duke of Lorraine, against the Holy Roman Emperor Henry III, he initially lost Valenciennes to Hermann of Hainaut. However, when the latter died in 1051 Baldwin married his son Baldwin VI to Herman's widow Richildis and arranged that the sons of her first marriage were disinherited, thus de facto uniting the County of Hainaut with Flanders. Upon the death of Henry III this marriage was acknowledged by treaty by Agnes de Poitou, mother and regent of Henry IV.

From 1060 to 1067 Baldwin was the co-Regent with Anne of Kiev for his nephew-by-marriage Philip I of France, indicating the importance he had acquired in international politics.

Family

Baldwin and Adèle had five children:

   * Baldwin VI, 1030-1070
   * Matilda, c.1031-1083 who married William the Conqueror
   * Robert I of Flanders, c.1033–1093
   * Henry of Flanders c.1035
   * Sir Richard of Flanders c. 1050-1105

References

   * Tanner, Heather J, Families, Friends and Allies: Boulogne and Politics in Northern France and England, C.879-1160

------------------

DISAMBIGUATION

As for anyone coming across these lines: there are MANY different Baudouin de Flandre (Baldwin of Flanders):

  • Baldwin I Iron Arm (r. 860s-879), married Judith and was granted lands and honours, which would evolve into the County of Flanders.
  • Baldwin II the Bald (r. 879-918), son of Baldwin I and Judith
  • Arnulf I the Great (r. 918-964), son of Baldwin II, joinly with:

o Baldwin III (r. 958-962), son of Arnulf I

  • Arnulf II (r. 964-988), son of Baldwin III
  • Baldwin IV the Bearded (r. 988-1037), son of Arnulf II, father of Judith who married Tostig Godwinsson
  • Baldwin V of Lille (r. 1037-1067), son of Baldwin IV, father of Mathilda (Maud) married to William Conqueror
  • Baldwin VI (r. 1067-1070), son of Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut
  • Arnulf III (r. 1070-1071), son of Baldwin VI, Count of Hainaut
  • Robert I the Frisian (r. 1071-1093), son of Baldwin VI
  • Robert II (r. 1093-1111), son of Robert I
  • Baldwin VII Hapkin (r. 1111-1119), son of Robert II

----------------------------

FURTHER LINKS

http://www.royalist.info/execute/biog?person=128

--------------------

Baldwin was the son of Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders and Ogive of Luxembourg. In 1028 Baldwin married Adèle of France in Amiens, daughter of King Robert II of France; at her instigation he rebelled against his father but in 1030 peace was sworn and the old count continued to rule until his death. During a long war (1046–1056) as an ally of Godfrey the Bearded, Duke of Lorraine, against the Holy Roman Emperor Henry III, he initially lost Valenciennes to Hermann of Hainaut. However, when the latter died in 1051, Baldwin married his son Baldwin VI to Herman's widow Richildis and arranged that the sons of her first marriage were disinherited, thus de facto uniting the County of Hainaut with Flanders. Upon the death of Henry III this marriage was acknowledged by treaty by Agnes de Poitou, mother and regent of Henry IV. Baldwin V played host to a grateful dowager queen Emma of England, during her enforced exile, at Bruges. He supplied armed security guards, entertainment, comprising a band of minstrels. Bruges was a bustling commercial centre, and Emma fittingly grateful to the citizens. She dispensed generously to the poor, making contact with the monastery of Saint Bertin at St Omer, and received her son, King Harthacnut of England at Bruges in 1039.

From 1060 to 1067 Baldwin was the co-Regent with Anne of Kiev for his nephew-by-marriage Philip I of France, indicating the importance he had acquired in international politics. As Count of Maine, Baldwin supported the King of France in most affairs. But he was also father-in-law to William of Normandy, who had married his daughter Matilda. Flanders played a pivotal role in Edward the Confessor's foreign policy. As the King of England was struggling to find an heir: historians have argued that he may have sent Harold Godwinsson to negotiate the return of Edward the Atheling from Hungary, and passed through Flanders, on his way to Germany. Baldwin's half-sister had married scheming Earl Godwin's third son, Tostig. The half-Viking Godwinsons had spent their exile in Dublin, at a time William of Normandy was fiercely defending his duchy. It is unlikely however that Baldwin intervened to prevent the duke's invasion plans of England, after the Count had lost the conquered province of Ponthieu. By 1066, Baldwin was an old man, and died the following year.

--------------------

Baldwin V of Flanders (c. 1012 – 1 September 1067) was Count of Flanders from 1035 until his death.

He was the son of Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders, who died in 1035.

History

In 1028 Baldwin married Adèle of France in Amiens, daughter of King Robert II of France; at her instigation he rebelled against his father but in 1030 peace was sworn and the old count continued to rule until his death.

During a long war (1046–1056) as an ally of Godfrey the Bearded, Duke of Lorraine, against the Holy Roman Emperor Henry III, he initially lost Valenciennes to Hermann of Hainaut. However, when the latter died in 1051 Baldwin married his son Baldwin VI to Herman's widow Richildis and arranged that the sons of her first marriage were disinherited, thus de facto uniting the County of Hainaut with Flanders. Upon the death of Henry III this marriage was acknowledged by treaty by Agnes de Poitou, mother and regent of Henry IV. Baldwin V played host to a grateful dowager queen Emma of England, during her enforced exile, at Bruges. He supplied armed security guards, entertainment, comprising a band of minstrels. Bruges was a bustling commercial centre, and Emma fittingly grateful to the citizens. She dispensed generously to the poor, making contact with the monastery of Saint Bertin at St Omer, and received her son, King Harthacnut of England at Bruges in 1039.

From 1060 to 1067 Baldwin was the co-Regent with Anne of Kiev for his nephew-by-marriage Philip I of France, indicating the importance he had acquired in international politics. As Count of Maine, Baldwin supported the King of France in most affairs. But he was also father-in-law to William of Normandy, who had married his daughter Matilda. Flanders played a pivotal role in Edward the Confessor's foreign policy. As the King of England was struggling to find an heir: historians have argued that he may have sent Harold Godwinsson to negotiate the return of Edward the Atheling from Hungary, and passed through Flanders, on his way to Germany.[2] Baldwin's half-sister had married scheming Earl Godwin's third son, Tostig. The half-Viking Godwinsons had spent their exile in Dublin, at a time William of Normandy was fiercely defending his duchy. It is unlikely however that Baldwin intervened to prevent the duke's invasion plans of England, after the Count had lost the conquered province of Ponthieu.[3] By 1066, Baldwin was an old man, and died the following year.

Family

Baldwin and Adèle had five children:

   * Baldwin VI, 1030-1070
   * Matilda, c.1031-1083 who married William the Conqueror
   * Robert I of Flanders, c.1033–1093
   * Henry of Flanders c.1035
   * poss. Sir Richard of Flanders c. 1050-1105

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baldwin_V_of_Flanders -------------------- Baldwin V of Flanders (died 1067) was Count of Flanders from 1035 until his death.

He was the son of Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders, who died in 1035.

History

In 1028 Baldwin married Adèle of France in Amiens, daughter of King Robert II of France; at her instigation he rebelled against his father but in 1030 peace was sworn and the old count continued to rule until his death.

During a long war (1046–1056) as an ally of Godfrey the Bearded, Duke of Lorraine, against the Holy Roman Emperor Henry III, he initially lost Valenciennes to Hermann of Hainaut. However, when the latter died in 1051 Baldwin married his son Baldwin VI to Herman's widow Richildis and arranged that the sons of her first marriage were disinherited, thus de facto uniting the County of Hainaut with Flanders. Upon the death of Henry III this marriage was acknowledged by treaty by Agnes de Poitou, mother and regent of Henry IV.

From 1060 to 1067 Baldwin was the co-Regent with Anne of Kiev for his nephew-by-marriage Philip I of France, indicating the importance he had acquired in international politics.

Family

Baldwin and Adèle had five children:

Baldwin VI, 1030-1070

Matilda, c.1031-1083 who married William the Conqueror

Robert I of Flanders, c.1033–1093

Henry of Flanders c.1035

Sir Richard of Flanders c. 1050-1105

--------------------

Balduin V. von Flandern, (der Fromme oder Balduin von Lille ; * um 1012 in Arras; † 1. September 1067 in Lille) war Graf von Flandern von 1036 bis 1067. Als Ehemann von Adela von Frankreich (1009/1014–1079), der Tochter des Königs Robert II. war er der Onkel Königs Philipps I. von Frankreich. Seine Eltern waren Balduin IV. und Otgiva von Luxemburg.

Inhaltsverzeichnis [Verbergen]

1 Das Wichtigste

2 Biographie

3 Quellen und Bibliographie

4 Weblinks


Das Wichtigste  [Bearbeiten]Im 11. Jahrhundert hielten die Grafen von Flandern den größten Teil ihres Territoriums als Vasallen der französischen Könige, einen kleineren Teil als Vasall des deutschen Kaisers. Während der Herrschaft des Grafen Balduin V. wurden die Gebiete zwischen den Flüssen Escaut und Dendre und der Markgrafschaft Antwerpen mit Flandern vereinigt. In der Mitte des 11. Jahrhunderts entsprach die Macht des Grafen von Flandern der eines Königs, was ihnen in der Politik Westeuropas einen erheblichen Einfluss sicherte.

Balduin war von 1060 bis 1067 Regent Frankreichs für seinen minderjährigen Neffen Heinrich I..

Balduin und Adela hatten vier Kinder:

Balduin VI. (1030–1070)

Mathilde (* um 1032; † 2. November 1083 in Caen), Ehefrau von Wilhelm dem Eroberer

Robert I. (1033–1093)

Heinrich von Flandern

Biographie  [Bearbeiten]Balduin war ein aufsässiger Sohn, der gegen seinen Vater rebellierte. Nach seiner prestigeträchtigen Heirat mit Adele von Frankreich zögerte er nicht, sich an die Spitze der aufständischen flämischen Barone zu stellen und seinen Vater zu verjagen, wurde dann aber durch das Eingreifen des Herzogs Robert I. der Normandie zur Unterwerfung gezwungen. Nach dem Tod seines Vaters wurde er einer der mächtigsten Vasallen Frankreichs.

Er begann einen Krieg gegen Graf Dietrich IV. von Holland, der ihm den Besitz Seelands bestritt, das seinem (Dietrichs) Vater von Kaiser Heinrich II. anvertraut worden sein sollte. Balduin bezwang die Friesen und ging aus dem Konflikt um Seeland siegreich hervor. Seeland blieb Lehen Flanderns.

1045 stellte sich Balduin auf die Seite Gottfrieds des Bärtigen bei dessen Kampf gegen Kaiser Heinrich III., der Oberlothringen Gerhard von Elsass und seinem Bruder Albrecht von Elsass gegeben hatte. Wegen seiner Rebellion verlor Balduin gleich die Mark Valenciennes. Im Bündnis mit Graf Dietrich IV. von Holland griff er die Mark Ename an und eroberte auch Antwerpen. Gemeinsam mit Gottfried nahm er sogar der Pfalz zu Nimwegen, wo Albrecht von Elsass bei einem Scharmützel den Tod fand. Der Graf von Flandern unterwarf sich 1056 und nach die Friedesbesprächungen von Andernach (1056 und 1059) bekam er die Mark Ename als Reichslehen (Reichsflandern).

1051 wurde Richilde Witwe. Von der Aussicht angelockt, den Hennegau dem Besitz seiner Familie hinzuzufügen, entführte Balduin die Witwe, um sie und die Grafschaft seinem ältesten Sohn Balduin zu geben. Lietbert, der Bischof von Cambrai, drohte mit Exkommunikation wegen zu enger Blutsverwandtschaft, doch Papst Leo IX. sprach einen Dispens aus und hob einige Jahre später die Sanktion auf. Der älteste Sohn des Grafen von Flandern wurde nun als Balduin I. Graf von Hennegau, wodurch die Vereinigung der beiden Grafschaften in Aussicht stand.

Der Krieg gegen den Kaiser lebte nun wieder auf. Gottfried III., der seinen Sohn Gottfried IV. mit der reichen Erbin der Toskana, Mathilde von Tuszien, verheiratet hatte, rief seinen treuen Verbündeten um Hilfe. Sie eroberten Lüttich, zerstörten Thuin und stießen bis Huy vor. Heinrich III. erwiderte die Angriffe, indem er in Flandern einfiel. Balduin trieb den Widerstand in Arques an, wo er – der Überlieferung nach in drei Nächten – einen Graben ausheben ließ, der bis nach La Bassée reichte. Dieser Graben blieb jedoch nutzlos, da Heinrich III. ihn mit Hilfe des früheren Kastellans von Cambrai, Jean de Béthune, überquerte, das Land dahinter plünderte und Tournai eroberte, während Gottfried und Balduin einen Entlastungsangriff gegen Antwerpen versuchten, das von Friedrich von Luxemburg verteidigt wurde (1055).

Der Tod Heinrichs III. im folgenden Jahr beendete die Auseinandersetzung. Während des Treffens in Köln (1057) der verwitweten Kaiserin Agnes, des Papstes Viktor II. und des französischen Königs Heinrich I., wurde die Abtretung von Eenam (mit Aalst), der Burg von Gent, das Landes von Waes und der Quatre-Métiers ebenso wie die der fünf seeländischen Inseln an Balduin V. beschlossen. Darüber hinaus wurde die Heirat zwischen Richilde von Hennegau und Balduins ältestem Sohn abgesegnet und die Stadt Tournai seiner Herrschaft unterstellt.

Im Jahr 1060 - nach dem Tod seines Schwagers Heinrich I. – wurde Balduin der Vormund des neuen Königs Philipp I. und regierte nach der Wiederverheiratung der Königinmutter Anna von Kiew Frankreich dann allein. Als Regent untersagte er Frankreich, Wilhelm den Eroberer – den Herzog der Normandie – bei dessen Plänen, England zu besetzten, zu unterstützen – er sagte aber die Hilfe Flanderns zu, zumal der zukünftige englische König seine Tochter Mathilde von Flandern geheiratet hatte.

1063 hatte er ein weiteres seiner fünf Kinder, Robert, mit Gertrud von Holland verheiratet, wobei er ihm den deutschen Teil Flanderns überließ.

Der mächtigste Graf Flanderns wurde im Zentrum des Chors der Kirche Saint-Pierre in Lille begraben – der Stadt, die er zu seiner Hauptstadt gemacht hatte und deren ältestes schriftliches Dokument eine Schenkungsurkunde der Grafen zugunsten jener Kirche ist, durch die er einen Bauernhof bei Flers und zwei Drittel der Einkünfte der Kirche in Annapes übereignet (1066).

Quellen und Bibliographie  [Bearbeiten]Egon Boshof: Lothringen, Frankreich und das Reich in der Regierungszeit Heinrichs III. In: Rheinische Vierteljahrsblätter 42, Bonn 1978, S. 63–127. 

Edward Le Glay: Histoire des comtes de Flandern jusqu’à l’avènement de la Maison de Bourgogne. Comptoir des Imprimeurs-unis, Paris MDCCCXLIII (1843).

Henri Platelle, Denis Clauzel: Histoire des provinces françaises du Nord. 2. Des principautés à l’empire de Charles Quint (900–1519). Westhoek-Editions / Éditions des Beffrois, 1989, ISBN 2-87789-004-X.

Cécile et José Douxchamps: Nos dynastes médiévaux (éditeur José Douxchamps). Wepion-Namur 1996, ISBN 29600078-1-6.

Georges-Henri Dumont: Histoire de la Belgique. Histoire/le cri, Bruxelles 1977, ISBN 2-87106-182-3. --------------------

  1. Name: Baudouin V 1 2
  2. Sex: M
  3. Title: Count of Flanders
  4. Birth: ABT 1012 in Flanders, France 1
  5. Death: 1 SEP 1067 in Lille, Nord, France 1

Father: Baudouin IV b: ABT 980 in Flanders, France Mother: Otgiva De Luxemburg b: BET 984 AND 995 in Luxemburg

Marriage 1 Adele De France b: 1009 in France

   * Married: 1028 in Seine, France 3 4

Children

  1. Has Children Baudouin VI b: 1030 in Flanders, Belgium
  2. Has Children Matilda b: ABT 1031 in Flanders, France
  3. Has Children Robert I b: 1033 in Flanders, Belgium
  4. Has No Children Henry b: ABT 1035 in Flanders, France
  5. Has Children Judith Fausta b: ABT 1037 in Flanders, France

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=monicap&id=I05213&style=TABLE -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baldwin_V,_Count_of_Flanders

Baldwin V of Flanders (c. 1012 – 1 September 1067) was Count of Flanders from 1035 until his death.

He was the son of Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders, who died in 1035.

In 1028 Baldwin married Adèle of France in Amiens, daughter of King Robert II of France; at her instigation he rebelled against his father but in 1030 peace was sworn and the old count continued to rule until his death.

During a long war (1046–1056) as an ally of Godfrey the Bearded, Duke of Lorraine, against the Holy Roman Emperor Henry III, he initially lost Valenciennes to Hermann of Hainaut. However, when the latter died in 1051 Baldwin married his son Baldwin VI to Herman's widow Richildis and arranged that the sons of her first marriage were disinherited, thus de facto uniting the County of Hainaut with Flanders. Upon the death of Henry III this marriage was acknowledged by treaty by Agnes de Poitou, mother and regent of Henry IV. Baldwin V played host to a grateful dowager queen Emma of England, during her enforced exile, at Bruges. He supplied armed security guards, entertainment, comprising a band of minstrels. Bruges was a bustling commercial centre, and Emma fittingly grateful to the citizens. She dispensed generously to the poor, making contact with the monastery of Saint Bertin at St Omer, and received her son, King Harthacnut of England at Bruges in 1039.[1]

From 1060 to 1067 Baldwin was the co-Regent with Anne of Kiev for his nephew-by-marriage Philip I of France, indicating the importance he had acquired in international politics. As Count of Maine, Baldwin supported the King of France in most affairs. But he was also father-in-law to William of Normandy, who had married his daughter Matilda. Flanders played a pivotal role in Edward the Confessor's foreign policy. As the King of England was struggling to find an heir: historians have argued that he may have sent Harold Godwinsson to negotiate the return of Edward the Atheling from Hungary, and passed through Flanders, on his way to Germany.[2] Baldwin's half-sister had married scheming Earl Godwin's third son, Tostig. The half-Viking Godwinsons had spent their exile in Dublin, at a time William of Normandy was fiercely defending his duchy. It is unlikely however that Baldwin intervened to prevent the duke's invasion plans of England, after the Count had lost the conquered province of Ponthieu.[3] By 1066, Baldwin was an old man, and died the following year. -------------------- Baldwin V, Count of Flanders From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 (Redirected from Baldwin V of Flanders)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baldwin_V_of_Flanders

Balduin5Flandry.jpg

Baldwin V of Flanders (c. 1012 – 1 September 1067) was Count of Flanders from 1035 until his death.

He was the son of Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders, who died in 1035. Contents [hide]

   1 History
   2 Family
   3 References
   4 Bibliography

History

In 1028 Baldwin married Adèle of France in Amiens, daughter of King Robert II of France; at her instigation he rebelled against his father but in 1030 peace was sworn and the old count continued to rule until his death.

During a long war (1046–1056) as an ally of Godfrey the Bearded, Duke of Lorraine, against the Holy Roman Emperor Henry III, he initially lost Valenciennes to Hermann of Hainaut. However, when the latter died in 1051 Baldwin married his son Baldwin VI to Herman's widow Richildis and arranged that the sons of her first marriage were disinherited, thus de facto uniting the County of Hainaut with Flanders. Upon the death of Henry III this marriage was acknowledged by treaty by Agnes de Poitou, mother and regent of Henry IV. Baldwin V played host to a grateful dowager queen Emma of England, during her enforced exile, at Bruges. He supplied armed security guards, entertainment, comprising a band of minstrels. Bruges was a bustling commercial centre, and Emma fittingly grateful to the citizens. She dispensed generously to the poor, making contact with the monastery of Saint Bertin at St Omer, and received her son, King Harthacnut of England at Bruges in 1039.[1]

From 1060 to 1067 Baldwin was the co-Regent with Anne of Kiev for his nephew-by-marriage Philip I of France, indicating the importance he had acquired in international politics. As Count of Maine, Baldwin supported the King of France in most affairs. But he was also father-in-law to William of Normandy, who had married his daughter Matilda. Flanders played a pivotal role in Edward the Confessor's foreign policy. As the King of England was struggling to find an heir: historians have argued that he may have sent Harold Godwinsson to negotiate the return of Edward the Atheling from Hungary, and passed through Flanders, on his way to Germany.[2] Baldwin's half-sister had married scheming Earl Godwin's third son, Tostig. The half-Viking Godwinsons had spent their exile in Dublin, at a time William of Normandy was fiercely defending his duchy. It is unlikely however that Baldwin intervened to prevent the duke's invasion plans of England, after the Count had lost the conquered province of Ponthieu.[3] By 1066, Baldwin was an old man, and died the following year. Family

Baldwin and Adèle had five children:

   Baldwin VI, 1030-1070
   Matilda, c.1031-1083 who married William the Conqueror
   Robert I of Flanders, c.1033–1093
   Henry of Flanders c.1035
   poss. Sir Richard of Flanders c. 1050-1105

References -------------------- Baldwin V of Flanders (19 August 1012 – 1 September 1067) was Count of Flanders from 1035 until his death. He was the son of Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders, who died in 1035. In 1028 Baldwin married Adèle of France in Amiens, daughter of King Robert II of France; at her instigation he rebelled against his father but in 1030 peace was sworn and the old count continued to rule until his death. During a long war (1046–1056) as an ally of Godfrey the Bearded, Duke of Lorraine, against the Holy Roman Emperor Henry III, he initially lost Valenciennes to Hermann of Hainaut. However, when the latter died in 1051 Baldwin married his son Baldwin VI to Herman's widow Richildis and arranged that the sons of her first marriage were disinherited, thus de facto uniting the County of Hainaut with Flanders. Upon the death of Henry III this marriage was acknowledged by treaty by Agnes de Poitou, mother and regent of Henry IV. Baldwin V played host to a grateful dowager queen Emma of England, during her enforced exile, at Bruges. He supplied armed security guards, entertainment, comprising a band of minstrels. Bruges was a bustling commercial centre, and Emma fittingly grateful to the citizens. She dispensed generously to the poor, making contact with the monastery of Saint Bertin at St Omer, and received her son, King Harthacnut of England at Bruges in 1039. From 1060 to 1067 Baldwin was the co-Regent with Anne of Kiev for his nephew-by-marriage Philip I of France, indicating the importance he had acquired in international politics. As Count of Maine, Baldwin supported the King of France in most affairs. But he was also father-in-law to William of Normandy, who had married his daughter Matilda. Flanders played a pivotal role in Edward the Confessor's foreign policy. As the King of England was struggling to find an heir: historians have argued that he may have sent Harold Godwinsson to negotiate the return of Edward the Atheling from Hungary, and passed through Flanders, on his way to Germany. Baldwin's half-sister had married scheming Earl Godwin's third son, Tostig. The half-Viking Godwinsons had spent their exile in Dublin, at a time William of Normandy was fiercely defending his duchy. It is unlikely however that Baldwin intervened to prevent the duke's invasion plans of England, after the Count had lost the conquered province of Ponthieu. By 1066, Baldwin was an old man, and died the following year.

-------------------- From http://bedblast.com/Our-Kin/CrawfordRootsVII.html

"fifth in descent from Ethelwida, daughter of Alfred the great, and 10th in descent from Charlemagne." -------------------- Leo: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von, Reference: page 9. -------------------- http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/getperson.php?personID=I3611&tree=00

view all 108

Baldwin V, count of Flanders's Timeline

1012
August 19, 1012
Bihorel, Haute-Normandie, France
1025
January 1025
Age 12
Not Married
1026
1026
- August 6, 1927
Age 13
Normandie
1026
- 1028
Age 13
Duke of Normandy
1028
1028
Age 15
Amiens, Picardy, France
1030
1030
Age 17
Hainaut, Walloon Region, Belgium
1031
1031
Age 18
Wijnendale, West Vlaanderen, Vlaams Gewest, Belgium
1031
Age 18
Lille, Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
1032
1032
Age 19
Gent, Vlaanderen
1035
1035
Age 22