Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Baron

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Bartholomew 1st Baron de Badlesmere

Also Known As: "1st Baron Badlesmere", "Knight"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Chilham Castle, Kent, England
Death: Died in Leeds Castle, Canterbury, Kent, England-Hanged, Drawn & Quartered
Cause of death: Hanged
Place of Burial: Badlesmere Church Badlesmere Swale Borough Kent, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Guncelin de Badlesmere, 1244 and Joan de Badlesmere
Husband of Margaret de Clare, Baroness of Badlesmere
Father of Margery de Badlesmere, Baroness de Ros; Ralph Badlesmere; Maud de Badlesmere, Countess of Oxford; Elizabeth de Badlesmere, Countess of Northampton; Baron Giles de Badlesmere and 1 other
Brother of Maud de Badlesmere, Countess of Oxford; Miss Badlesmere; Giles Badlesmere and James Bohun, [Earl]

Occupation: Lord Badlesmere, was hanged, Baron, 1st Baron of Badlesmere, Baron of Badlesmere, 1st Sheriff Of Glamorganshire
Managed by: Patricia Norton Chong
Last Updated:

About Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Baron

Bartholomew Badlesmere (1275 – 14 April 1322), English nobleman, was the son and heir of Gunselm de Badlesmere (died 1301), and fought in the English army both in France and Scotland during the later years of the reign of Edward I of England. [edit]Life

In 1307 he became governor of Bristol Castle. Edward II appointed him steward of his household. Badlesmere made a compact with some other noblemen to gain supreme influence in the royal council. Although very hostile to Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, Badlesmere helped to make peace between the king and the earl in 1318, and was a member of the middle party which detested alike Edward's minions, like the Despensers, and his violent enemies like Lancaster. The king's conduct, however, drew him to the side of the earl, and he had already joined Edward's enemies when, in October 1321, his wife, Margaret de Clare, Lady Badlesmere refused to admit Queen Isabella to her husband's castle at Leeds in Kent. The king assaulted and captured the castle, seized and imprisoned Lady Badlesmere, and civil war began. After the defeat of the Earl of Lancaster at the Battle of Boroughbridge, Badlesmere was captured, attainted, and hanged at Blean near Canterbury on April 14, 1322. His head was displayed on the Burgh Gate at Canterbury. His son and heir, Giles, died in 1338 leaving four daughters, but no sons. [edit]Family

His son and heir, Giles, died in 1338 leaving four daughters, but no sons. His daughter Elizabeth de Badlesmere (1313-8 June 1356), was married firstly (27 June 1316) to the Hon. Edmund Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer (1302-17 December 1331), Lord Mortimer, eldest son of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville. Both were the parents of Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March. See also the history of Chilham Castle, which was held from time to time by his descendants until the reign of King Henry VIII.

-------------------- ID: I188060 Name: Lord Bartholomew [IV @<^v] de Badlesmere Sex: M Birth: ABT 1275 in Chilham, Kent, England Death: 14 APR 1322 in hanged--Canterbury, Kent, England

Father: Guncelin [<^v] de Badlesmere b: ABT 1240 in Of Castle, Badlesmere, Kent, England Mother: Joan [@ <^v] Fitz-Bernard b: ABT 1234 in Kingsdown, Kent, England

Marriage 1 Countess Margaret [@ <^v] de Clare b: BET 1280 AND 1287 in Thomond, Connaught, County Clare, Ireland Married: 1305 in Castle, Badlesmere, Kent, England Children

Margaret "Margary" [@ <^v] de Badlesmere b: 1306 in Castle, Badlesmere, Kent, England
Maud [@ <^] de Badlesmere b: ABT 1310 in Badlesmere Castle, England
Countess Elizabeth [@ <^v] de Badlesmere b: 1313 in Hereford, England
Margaret [@] de Badlesmere b: ABT 1315

source: http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=gilead07&id=I253485 -------------------- Bartolomew de BADLESMERE 1st Lord Badlesmere (1275-1322) [Pedigree] Son of Sir Guncelin de BADLESMERE (1232-1301) and Joan FitzBernard

      REF FarisPA. Of Magna Charta Surety descent and
      descendant of Charlemagne.
   b. 1275
   d. 14 Apr 1322, Canterbury, Kent, Eng.

Married Margaret de CLARE (1280-1333)

Children:

Margery de BADLESMERE (1306-1363) m. William de ROS Baron Ros of Helmsley (-1342) Maud de BADLESMERE (1310-1366) m. John de VERE 7th Earl of Oxford (1311-1359) Elizabeth de BADLESMERE (1313-1356) m(1) Sir William de BOHUN K.G. Earl of Northampton (1310-1360) Giles de BADLESMERE (1314-1338) Margaret de BADLESMERE (1315-1344) m. Sir John de TIPTOFT 2nd Lord Tybotot (1313-1367) References:

-------------------- mediaeval castle was demolished long ago. It was once home to the great family of Badlesmere whose head, Bartholomew de Badlesmere, was one of the most powerful men in England during the reign of King Edward II -------------------- Bartholomew Badlesmere (1275 – 14 April 1322), English nobleman, was the son and heir of Gunselm de Badlesmere (died 1301), and fought in the English army both in France and Scotland during the later years of the reign of Edward I of England.

[edit] Life In 1307 he became governor of Bristol Castle. Edward II appointed him steward of his household. Badlesmere made a compact with some other noblemen to gain supreme influence in the royal council. Although very hostile to Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, Badlesmere helped to make peace between the king and the earl in 1318, and was a member of the middle party which detested alike Edward's minions, like the Despensers, and his violent enemies like Lancaster.

The king's conduct, however, drew him to the side of the earl, and he had already joined Edward's enemies when, in October 1321, his wife, Margaret de Clare, Lady Badlesmere refused to admit Queen Isabella to her husband's castle at Leeds in Kent. The king assaulted and captured the castle, seized and imprisoned Lady Badlesmere, and civil war began.

After the defeat of the Earl of Lancaster at the Battle of Boroughbridge, Badlesmere was captured, attainted, and hanged at Blean near Canterbury on April 14, 1322. His head was displayed on the Burgh Gate at Canterbury.

[edit] Family His only son Giles, died in 1338, and then the Badlesmere estates were divided among Giles' four sisters, the daughters of Bartholomew and Margaret.

His daughter Elizabeth de Badlesmere (1313-8 June 1356), was married firstly (27 June 1316) to Sir Edmund Mortimer (1302-17 December 1331), eldest son of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville. Both were the parents of Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March.

See also the history of Chilham Castle, which was held from time to time by his descendants until the reign of King Henry VIII.

Preceded by The Lord Cobham Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports 1320 Succeeded by The Lord le Despencer Preceded by New Creation Baron Badlesmere 1309–1322 Succeeded by Giles de Badlesmere

[edit] References

"Badlesmere, Bartholomew, Baron". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). 1911. 

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bartholomew_de_Badlesmere,_1st_Baron_Badlesmere" Categories: 1275 births | 1322 deaths | Barons in the Peerage of England | People executed by hanging | People executed under the Plantagenets | Executed English people -------------------- Hanged by Edward II as a result on l\not allowing the Queen to enter Leeds Castle...and arrows being shot at her! -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bartholomew_de_Badlesmere,_1st_Lord_Badlesmere --------------------

  1. Prefix: Sir
  2. Suffix: 1st Baron
  3. Sex: M
  4. Birth: 1275 in Chilham, Kent, England
  5. Death: 14 Apr 1322 in Canterbury, Kent, England 1 1
  6. Change Date: 21 Sep 2005 at 15:22
  7. Note:
   Presidents George Washington and Grover Cleveland, actresses Olivia deHavilland and Joan Fontaine, and Gen. Douglas MacArthur and U.S. President Theodore "Teddy Rough Rider" Roosevelt are descendants of Bartholomew
   Sir Bartholomew Badlesmere rose from provincial obscurity to nationa lprominence and then abruptly fell; a graphic illustration of the uncertainty of Edward II's England. He was born about 1275 into a gentry family from Badlesmere in Kent. His father rose to be Justice of Chester in the service of Prince Edward and died in 1301, by when Bartholomew had also made his mark. He served in Gascony in 1294, in Flanders in 1297, when he became one of Edward I's household knights, and in Scotland in1303-4. Almost alone among Edward's household knights, he was elected toparliament, sitting at the Carlisle Parliament of 1307: perhaps evidenceof unusual political ambitions. Badlesmere was appointed constable of Bristol in 1307, was granted Chilham castle -- henceforth his principalseat -- in 1309, and from then on he attended parliament as a baron. One factor here may be his wife's lands as widowed Countess of Angus and heiress in her own right; another may be the patronage of the Earl of Gloucester, whose principal retainer he was, and whom he assisted as keeper of the realm in 1311.
   Certainly on Gloucester's death at Bannockburn in 1314 Badlesmere becamemore prominent in royal service. He was closely associated with the Earlof Pembroke. Thus in 1315 he accompanied Pembroke on his defence of thenorth; in 1316 Pembroke helped him bring the recalcitrant citizens ofBristol to heel; and in 1317 both went on embassy to Avignon. Late in1317 it was with Badlesmere that Pembroke strove to restrain theirresponsibility of Roger Damory and with whose assistance in councilPembroke hoped to guide the king more sensibly. The royal grantsaccompanying Badlesmere's rise culminated in his appointment in 1318 assteward of the royal household, an office of first-rate politicalimportance offering intimate contact with the king. In 1316 the kingretained him for life for Ð400 in peace and 5,000 marks (Ð3,333) in war,when he was to serve with 100 men-at-arms, and in 1317 added 1,000 marksfor his counsel: high valuations indeed for his service. Another sign ofhis rise are the marriage of his daughter to the heir of the marcher lordRoger Mortimer of Wigmore, for which he paid Ð2,000.
   It was therefore entirely logical that in 1321 Edward II should sendBadlesmere to persuade the northerners not to join the marcher lordsagainst the Despensers, but Badlesmere deserted and demonstrated hishatred of the Despensers by concocting the false charge of treasonagainst them. His reasons for rebelling are not clear. Certainly the riseof the Despensers to favour with the king deprived Badlesmere of much ofhis influence and his marriage ties with the Mortimers may have made himsympathetic towards the marchers. However that may be, the desertion ofthe steward of his household, bound to him by intimate personal ties,made Edward II into his most vengeful enemy. That Badlesmere's Kentishlands were isolated from those of the other rebels offered Edward themeans of revenge. It was probably a deliberate ploy to provoke a crisisthat provoked him to send Queen Isabella to Badlesmere's Leeds castleand, when Lady Badlesmere predictably refused admission, Edward reacted to the affront by besieging the castle.Badlesmere's only hope was support from the marchers and northerners, butthis Lancaster denied him. The reasons for Lancaster's hostility are notknown. Opposed by the king and earl, Badlesmere was doomed and was dulyexecuted on 14 April 1322. [Who's Who in Late Medieval England, MichaelHicks, Shepheard-Walwyn, London, 1991]
   Bartholomew de Badlesmere, who in the lifetime of his father (22nd EdwardI) [1294], received command to attend the king at Portsmouth, upon the1st day of September, with horse and arms, to embark with him forGascony, and, in the year that he succeeded to his paternal property, wasin the wars of Scotland. He was afterwards in the retinue of Robert deClifford in the Welsh wars, and in the 1st year of Edward I [1272], wasappointed governor of the castle of Bristol. In two years afterwards, hewas summoned to parliament as Badlesmere, and had a grant from the king,through the especial influence of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucesterand Hertford, and Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, of the castle and manorof Chilham, in Kent, for his own and his wife's life, which castle hadbeen possessed by Alexander de Baliol in right of his wife Isabel, andought to have escheated to the crown upon the decease of the saidAlexander by reason of the felony that John de Strabolgi, Earl of Atholl(Isabel's son and heir), who was hanged in the 5th of Edward II [1312],Lord Badlesmere was constituted governor of the castle of Leeds andobtained, at the same time, grants of divers extensive manors. In thenext year but one, his lordship was deputed with Otto de Grandison andothers, ambassador to the court of Rome, and the next year, upon thedeath of Robert de Clifford, he obtained a grant of the custody of thecastle of Skipton in Yorkshire, whereof the said Robert died possessed,to hold during the minority of Roger de Clifford, his son and heir.
   His lordship was further indebted to the crown for numerous charters forfairs and marts throughout his extensive manors; and he held the highoffice of steward of the household for a great number of years; butnotwithstanding his thus basking in the sunshine of royal favour, hisallegiance was not trustworthy, for joining the banner of Thomas, Earl ofLancaster, and other discontented nobles of that period, he went intoKent without the king's permission; where, being well received, he puthimself at the head of some soldiers from his castle at Leeds and thenproceeded to Canterbury with 19 knights, having linen jackets under theirsurcoats, all his esquires being in plate armour, and thus repaired tothe shrine of St. Thomas, to the great amazement of the good citizens.While Lord Badlesmere remained at Canterbury, John de Crumwell and hiswife sought his lordship's aid, and, pledging himself to afford it, hehastened to Oxford where the barons of his party had been then assembled.In the meantime the king being apprised of the baron's proceedings,despatched the queen to Leeds and, upon admission being denied to her,the castle was regularly invested by Adomere de Valence, Earl ofPembroke, and John de Britannia, Earl of Richmond, to who it eventuallysurrendered, when Lord Badlesmere's wife, young son, and daughters, allfalling into the hands of the besiegers, were sent prisoners to the Towerof London. The baron and his accomplices afterwards were pursued byEdmund, Earl of Kent, and John de Warren, Earl of Surrey, and beingdefeated and taken prisoners at the battle of Borough-Bridge, hislordship was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Canterbury, and his head set upon a pole at Burgate. At the time of the baron's execution, upwards ofninety lords, knights, and others concerned in the same insurrection suffered a similar fate in various parts of the kingdom. Margaret, his lordship's widow (one of the daus. and co-heiresses of Thomas, 3rd son ofThomas, 2nd son of Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester), continued prisoner in the Tower until, through the influence of William Lord Roos,of Hamlake, and others, she obtained her freedom, whereupon taking herself to the nunnery of Minoresses, without Aldgate, in the suburbs of London, she had 2 s. a day for her maintenance to be paid by the sheriff of Essex; she subsequently, however, obtained a large proportion of the deceased lord's manors for her dowry. By this lady, Lord Badlesmere left issue. His lordship had been summoned to parliament from 26 October,1309, to 5 August, 1320. His unhappy fate occurred in 1322. [Sir BernardBurke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 19, Badlesmere, Barons Badlesmere]
   Sir Bartholomew became one of Edward I's household knights, serving that monarch in the wars of Gascony, France and Scotland. In 1309, Bartholomew was granted Chilham Castle This became the family's principal residence. Bartholomew hated the meddling Despensers in the reign of Edward II. He took the side of Thomas of Lancaster and there belling barons, was captured and executed.

-------------------- Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere1 M, #23603, b. circa 1275, d. 14 April 1322

Last Edited=21 Mar 2007

    Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere was born circa 1275. He was the son of Guncelin de Badlesmere and Joan FitzBernard.2,3 He married Margaret de Clare, daughter of Sir Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzMaurice, before 30 June 1308.4 He died on 14 April 1322, hanged as a traitor.4,5
    In 1294 he was excused from the war in Gascony.5 He fought in the Scottish Wars from 1303 to 1304.5 He held the office of Governor of Bristol Castle in 1307.5 In 1309 he had a grant of the Castle and Manor of Chilham, Kent.5 He was created 1st Lord Badlesmere [England by writ] on 26 October 1309.5 He obtained a grant of the Castle of Leeds, Kent.5 He held the office of Steward of the King's Household.5 He held the office of Governor of Skipton Castle in 1314/15, and of all the castles in Yorkshire and Westmorland.5 He joined the Earl of Lancaster's rebellion.5 He lived at Badlesmere, Kent, England.2 He lived at Chilham Castle, Kent, England.2 He fought in the Battle of Boroughbridge on 16 March 1322, where the rebellion was defeated.5 At Stow Park he was captured, tried and attainted.5 He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.6
    

Children of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare Margery de Badlesmere+ b. c 13067 Maud de Badlesmere+ b. c 1310, d. 13667 Elizabeth de Badlesmere+ b. c 1313, d. 8 Jun 13561 Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Lord Badlesmere b. 18 Oct 1314, d. 7 Jun 13385 Margaret de Badlesmere+ b. c 13157 Citations [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 84. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 371. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage. [S1916] Tim Boyle, "re: Boyle Family," e-mail message from <e-mail address> (unknown address) to Darryl Roger Lundy, 16 September 2006. Hereinafter cited as "re: Boyle Family". [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 149. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 372. [S18] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995). Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 373.

-------------------- 1st Baron Badlesmere Fought in France and Scotland 1307 Governor of Bristol Castle Steward of Edward II's household Negotiated peace between Edward II and Earl Lancaster Fought with Lancaster at Boroughbridge, captured and hanged His head displayed on Burge Gate, Canterbury

-------------------- Steward of the King's Household. Ambassador, to France, Savoy, and the Vatican. Bartholomew, 1st Lord Badlesmere was son and heir of Guncelin of Badlesmere, Justice of Chester, by Joan, daughter of Ralph Fitz Bernard. He was of Badlesmere and Chilham Castle at Kent, England. Arms: Argent, a fesse between two bars gemelles gules. He was born in 1275 at Chilham Castle, Kent, England. He was the son of Sir Guncelin de Badlesmere and Joan FitzBernard. Bartholomew, 1st Lord Badlesmere attended the war in Gascony in 1294 at 22 Edward I, France.1 Arms: D'argent, à la fasce de gueules, accompagnée de deux jumelles du même, au lambel d'azur, brochant sur-le-tout. He succeeded his father in 1301.1 He was in the Scottish Wars between 1303 and 1304. Governor of Bristol Castle in 1307. He married Margaret de Clare of Thomond, daughter of Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana fitz Maurice, before 30 June 1308 at Kent, England; Her 2nd (widow). Bartholomew, 1st Lord Badlesmere was a witness where Edward II, King of England called a Parliament and summoned his Barons in 1309. Bartholomew, 1st Lord Badlesmere was summoned to Parliament as 1st Lord Badlesmere by Edward II in 1309. 1st Lord Badlesmere in 1309. He had a grant of the Castle and Manor of Chilham in 1309 at Kent, England. He was summoned to Parliament by writs directed to Bartholmew de Badlesmere, whereby he may be held to have become Lord Badlesmere, between 26 October 1309 and 15 May 1321. He obtained a grant of the Castle of Leeds before 1314/15 at Kent. He was made Governor of Skipton Castle, and of all the castles in Yorkshire and Westmorland, whereof Robert de Clifford had d. seized in 1314/15. Governor of Skipton Castle in 1314/15. He joined the Earl of Lancaster in his rebellion, notwithstanding the many favours he had received, and was defeated with him at Boroughbridge on 16 March 1322. He was captured at Stow Park, and attained after 16 March 1322. He died on 14 April 1322 at Canterbury, Kent, England, at age 47 years. He was hanged, drawn & quartered, and had his head impaled on the then Burgate Wall for his part in the rebellion. -------------------- http://homepage.mac.com/philipdavis/English%20sites/1674.html

Excavations of the moated habitation known as "Tonge Castle" were carried out in 1963-4 by the Sittingbourne and Swale Archaeological Group. The rectangular earthwork, previously thought to be a possible motte and bailey castle, is largely destroyed by footpath embankments, hillslipping associated with cultivation, and flooding by a large pond. Work to date has been concerned with an area on top of the middle mound where stone foundations were found in 1932. Deep sections were cut on this habitation area and in parts of the dry moat. It seems that the "castle" consisted of two enlarged hills, partly encircled by a deep moat. Only one mound was used for habitation - three building sites have now been revealed. Evidence of a Norman wooden building was found, which had been replaced by a substantial hall and associated buildings. The habitation is a manor house and not a true castle. Occupation ceased during the late C13. The moat appears to belong to the late C13 or early C14. In August-September 1965 excavations continued on the middle mound of Tonge Medieval Manor. One small building has been completely excavated, and a large building with a complex system of floors. Burnt clay daub was recovered from a third building excavated previously. Traces of a wooden structure on the highest mound were recorded. The excavations also included the dry moat and the area between the habitation mound and the highest point of the earthworks, where deep transects, up to 9ft., were made. Building mortar from the primary fill of the ditch indicated that the earthworks and manor building were contemporary in date. Evidence for re-excavation of a silting moat, possibly circa 1448, was noted; Presumable this was in relation to the licence to crenellate granted to Thomas Brown at this date for the manor. There was no indication of occupation before 1100 A.D. The village of Tonge has disappeared leaving the castle isolated.

---------------------------------------- Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Bartholomew de Badlesmere Born circa 1275 Died 14 April 1322 Blean near Canterbury Title 1st Baron Badlesmere Tenure 1309-1322 Nationality English Residence Leeds Castle Offices Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports Successor Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere Spouse(s) Margaret de Clare Parents Gunselm de Badlesmere Joan FitzBernard

Arms of Badlesmere: Argent, a fess between two bars gemeles gules. As blazoned for Guncelin de Badlesmere, on the Herald's Roll of Arms also on The Camden Roll & St George's Roll[1] Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere (circa 1275 - 14 April 1322), English soldier, Member of Parliament, landowner and nobleman, was the son and heir of Gunselm de Badlesmere (died circa 1301) and Joan FitzBernard. He fought in the English army both in France and Scotland during the later years of the reign of Edward I of England[2] and the earlier part of the reign of Edward II of England.

Contents [hide] 1 Life 2 Death 3 Family 4 References Life[edit] In October 1300, Bartholomew de Badlesmere, as one of the household of Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, was permitted by the King to accompany the Earl when he set out for Rome during the following month in order to complain to Pope Boniface VIII of injury done by the Scots.[3][4]

A writ issued on 13 April 1301, presumably soon after the death of Jocelin (Guncelinis, Goscelinus) de Badlesmere, initiated inquests into the identity of the next heir of lands that he held direct from the King. This led to a hearing on 30 April of that year in relation to property in Kent at Badlesmere and Donewelleshethe, where it was confirmed that the heir was his son Bartholomew, then aged 26.[5]

Bartholomew de Badlesmere and Fulk Payfrer were the knights who represented the county of Kent at the Parliament that sat at Carlisle from January 1306/7 until 27 March 1307.[6]

In 1307 Bartholomew became governor of Bristol Castle, and afterwards Edward II appointed him steward of his household.[2]

In the Scottish campaign of 1310-11, Bartholomew undertook the role of lieutenant to Robert de Clifford, who was his wife's brother-in-law. Bartholomew had already served in the royal armies in Gascony in 1294, Flanders in about 1297 and Scotland in 1298, 1300, 1301, 1303-4, 1306, 1397 and 1308.[7]

On 1 November 1317, the King appointed Bartholomew as custodian of Leeds Castle in Kent [8] This was followed by a transaction on 20 March 1317/18 by which the King granted the castle and manor of Leeds along with the advowson of the priory of Leeds to Bartholomew and his heirs in exchange for the manor and advowson of Adderley, Shropshire, which Bartholomew surrendered to the King [9]

On 1 October 1318, Bartholomew was with the King at York, setting out to repel an invasion by the Scots.[10]

Bartholomew made a compact with some other noblemen to gain supreme influence in the royal council. Although very hostile to Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, Bartholomew helped to make peace between the king and the earl in 1318, and was a member of the middle party which detested alike Edward's minions, like the Despensers, and his violent enemies like Lancaster.[2]

In 1319, he obtained the king's licence to found a Priory on his manor of Badlesmere. But nothing came to this licence. Then in 1320, he was constituted governor of Tunbridge castle.[11]

The king's conduct drew Bartholomew to the side of Lancaster. Bartholomew had already joined Edward's enemies when, in October 1321, his wife, Margaret de Clare refused to admit Queen Isabella to her husband's castle at Leeds.[2] The king made an assault on the castle; eventually capturing it. After he seized and imprisoned Baroness Badlesmere and their five children, civil war broke out.

On 26 December 1321, the King ordered the sheriff of Gloucester to arrest Bartholomew.[12] Later arrest warrants refer to the progress of Bartholomew and his companions across England. By 15 January 1321/2, they had occupied and burned the town of Bridgnorth and sacked the castles at Elmley and Hanley.[13] By 23 February, the rebels had been sighted in Northamptonshire.[14] On 1 March, Bartholomew was reported as one of a number of prominent rebels who had reached Pontefract.[15] On 11 March the sheriff of Nottingham and Derby was ordered to arrest the same group, who had taken Burton upon Trent but departed from that town when the royal army arrived there.[16]

On 16 March 1321/2, the Earl of Lancaster and his allies were defeated at the Battle of Boroughbridge.

Death[edit] Bartholomew fled south from Boroughbridge and, according to the "Livere de Reis", was captured in a small wood near Brickden and taken by the Earl of Mar to Canterbury.[17] John Leland's "Collectanea" states that "Syr Barptolemew Badelesmere was taken at Stow Parke yn the Manoyr of the Bishop of Lincoln that was his nephew."[18] Stow Park is about 10 miles north-west of the centre of Lincoln, where the current bishop was Henry Burghersh. Stow Park was one of the principal residences of the Bishop in that era but none of the medieval buildings still survive above ground.[19]

Bartholomew was tried and sentenced to death at Canterbury.[20] He was then drawn behind a horse to Blean where he was hanged on the gallows of his own manor and beheaded on 14 April 1322.[21] His head was displayed on the Burgh Gate at Canterbury.

Family[edit] A comprehensive overview of Bartholomew's children can be seen in the records of numerous inquisitions post mortem that were held after the death of his son Giles on 7 June 1338.[22] The evidence given at each hearing rested on local knowledge and there were some inconsistencies about the names of Giles' sisters and their precise ages. However, taken as a whole, it is clear from the inquisition records that the names of Bartholomew's children were as follows, listed in descending order of age:

Margery de Badlesmere, married William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros, then Thomas de Arundel Maud de Badlesmere, married Robert FitzPayn, then John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford Elizabeth de Badlesmere, married Sir Edmund Mortimer, then William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere, married Elizabeth Montagu, and died without issue[23] Margaret de Badlesmere, married John Tiptoft, 2nd Baron Tibetot See also the history of Chilham Castle, which was held from time to time by his descendants until the reign of King Henry VIII.

Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere Born: 1275 Died: 14 April 1322 Peerage of England Preceded by New Creation Baron Badlesmere 1309–1322 Succeeded by Giles de Badlesmere Political offices Preceded by The Lord Cobham Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports 1320 Succeeded by The Lord le Despencer References[edit] Jump up ^ The Heralds' Roll, Part 5 ^ Jump up to: a b c d One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Badlesmere, Bartholomew, Baron". Encyclopædia Britannica 3 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. Jump up ^ Calendar of Close Rolls, 1296-1302, p. 370. Jump up ^ J. S. Hamilton, ‘Lacy, Henry de, fifth earl of Lincoln (1249–1311)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 accessed 13 May 2013 Jump up ^ Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem, 1st series, Vol. 4, No. 38. Jump up ^ Calendar of Close Rolls, 1302-1307, pp. 524-5. Jump up ^ David Simpkin, The English Aristocracy at War: From the Welsh Wars of Edward I to the Battle of Bannockburn, Woodbridge, 2008, p. 54. Jump up ^ Calendar of Patent Rolls, Edward II, Vol. 3 (1317-1321), p. 46. Jump up ^ Calendar of Patent Rolls, Edward II, Vol. 3 (1317-1321), p. 128. Jump up ^ Calendar of Close Rolls, 1318-1323, p. 14. Jump up ^ Hasted, Edward (1800). "Parishes". The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent (Institute of Historical Research) 6: 467–481. Retrieved 8 February 2014. Jump up ^ Calendar of Close Rolls, 1318-1323, p. 413. Jump up ^ Calendar of Close Rolls, 1318-1323, pp. 511-512. Jump up ^ Calendar of Close Rolls, 1318-1323, p. 519. Jump up ^ Calendar of Close Rolls, 1318-1323, p. 526. Jump up ^ Calendar of Close Rolls, 1318-1323, p. 522. Jump up ^ Glover, John (1865). Le Livere de Reis de Britannie E Le Livere de Reis de Engletere (edited). London. pp. 342–3. Jump up ^ Leland, John (1770). Collectanea, Vol. 1, Part 2. London. p. 465. Jump up ^ "Stow Bishops Palace". Retrieved 2014-03-04. Jump up ^ Calendar of Close Rolls, 1318-1323, p. 673. Jump up ^ 'Parishes: Bleane', The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 8 (1799), pp. 524-536. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63525&strquery=badlesmere Date accessed: 04 March 2014. Jump up ^ Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem, 1st series, Vol. 8, No. 185. Jump up ^ Chisholm 1911.

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Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Baron's Timeline

1255
1255
Badlesmere, Kent, England
1275
1275
Chilham Castle, Kent, England
1303
1303
Age 28
Of, Castle, Badlesmere, Kent, England
1304
December 3, 1304
Age 29
Kent, England
1310
1310
Age 35
Castle Badlesmere, Kent, England, (Present UK)
1313
1313
Age 38
Chilham Castle, Badlesmere, Kent, England
1314
October 1, 1314
Age 39
Hambleton, Rutlandshire, England
1315
December 3, 1315
Age 40
Castle, Badlesmere, Kent, England
1322
April 14, 1322
- 1322
Age 47
Badlesmere Church Badlesmere Swale Borough Kent, England

Birth: 1275
Badlesmere
Kent, England
Death: Apr. 14, 1322
Blean
Kent, England

This memorial is dedicated to my ancestor Bartholomew Badlesmere. He was the son and heir of Gunselm de Badlesmere (died 1301), and fought in the English army both in France and Scotland during the later years of the reign of Edward I of England.
In 1307 he became governor of Bristol Castle. Edward II appointed him steward of his household. Badlesmere made a compact with some other noblemen to gain supreme influence in the royal council. Although very hostile to Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, Badlesmere helped to make peace between the king and the earl in 1318, and was a member of the middle party which detested alike Edward's minions, like the Despensers, and his violent enemies like Lancaster.
The king's conduct, however, drew him to the side of the earl, and he had already joined Edward's enemies when, in October 1321, his wife, Margaret de Clare, who refused to admit Queen Isabella to her husband's castle at Leeds in Kent. The king assaulted and captured the castle, seized and imprisoned Lady Badlesmere, and civil war began.
After the defeat of the Earl of Lancaster at the Battle of Boroughbridge, Badlesmere was captured and hanged at Blean on April 14, 1322. His head was displayed on the Burgh Gate at Canterbury. His son and heir, Giles, died in 1338 leaving four daughters, but no sons.
His daughter Elizabeth de Badlesmere (1313-8 June 1356), was married firstly (27 June 1316) to the Edmund Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer (1302-17 December 1331), Lord Mortimer, eldest son of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville. Both were the parents of Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March.
See also the history of Chilham Castle, which was held from time to time by his descendants until the reign of King Henry VIII.


Family links:
Parents:
Guncelin de Badlesmere (1232 - 1301)
Joan FitzBernard (1244 - 1310)

Spouse:
Margaret de Clare (1287 - 1333)

Children:
Maud De Badlesmere DeVere (1310 - 1366)*
Elizabeth Badlesmere de Bohun (1313 - 1356)*
Giles Badlesmere (1314 - 1338)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Badlesmere Church
Badlesmere
Swale Borough
Kent, England

Created by: Mad
Record added: Aug 26, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 57716474

April 14, 1322
Age 47
Leeds Castle, Canterbury, Kent, England-Hanged, Drawn & Quartered

Bartholomew Badlesmere (1275 – 14 April 1322), English nobleman, was the son and heir of Gunselm de Badlesmere (died 1301), and fought in the English army both in France and Scotland during the later years of the reign of Edward I of England.

In 1307 he became governor of Bristol Castle. Edward II appointed him steward of his household. Badlesmere made a compact with some other noblemen to gain supreme influence in the royal council. Although very hostile to Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, Badlesmere helped to make peace between the king and the earl in 1318, and was a member of the middle party which detested alike Edward's minions, like the Despensers, and his violent enemies like Lancaster.

The king's conduct, however, drew him to the side of the earl, and he had already joined Edward's enemies when, in October 1321, his wife, Margaret de Clare, Lady Badlesmere refused to admit Queen Isabella to her husband's castle at Leeds in Kent. The king assaulted and captured the castle, seized and imprisoned Lady Badlesmere, and civil war began.

After the defeat of the Earl of Lancaster at the Battle of Boroughbridge, Badlesmere was captured and hanged at Blean near Canterbury on April 14, 1322. His head was displayed on the Burgh Gate at Canterbury. His son and heir, Giles, died without children in 1338.

His daughter Elizabeth Badlesmere, 3rd Baroness Badlesmere (1313-8 June 1356), was married (27 June 1316) to the Hon. Edmund Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer (1302-17 December 1331), Lord Mortimer, eldest son of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville. Both were the parents of Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March.