Benjamin Huger (1746 - 1779) MP

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Birthplace: St. Philip's, Charleston, South Carolina
Death: Died in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina, United States
Cause of death: Killed in battle (friendly-fire situation)
Occupation: American patriot
Managed by: Elizabeth
Last Updated:

About Benjamin Huger

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Huger_(American_Revolution)

Benjamin Huger (1746 – 11 May 1779) was one of five Huger brothers from South Carolina who served in the American Revolutionary War. Huger became a close friend of La Fayette, having met him upon his arrival near Georgetown in 1777, and his son Francis Kinloch Huger had a role in getting La Fayette temporarily released from prison at Olomouc in the 1790s.

Benjamin began his military career as a Lieutenant in the Charleston Artillery Company in 1774 and by 1776 had advanced to the rank of Major in the Fifth Regiment of the South Carolina Line. As a military commander, Benjamin Huger was esteemed as one of the most promising officers in the Continental forces. He had whipped his soldiers into shape, bringing “his Regiment into a high state of efficiency,” and as a result earned a reputation as an excellent disciplinarian. However, this talented young officer would not live to reach his full potential. While conducting reconnaissance during a British attack on Charles Town in May of 1779, Benjamin was tragically shot and killed by American forces who had mistaken his party for the approaching enemy.

His grandson was the Confederate General Benjamin Huger.

Benjamin Huger has been recognized by the Daughters of the American Revolution as an American patriot, for service with 5TH Regiment, South Carolina Line, and for being a member of Congress and the 1ST,2ND and 3RD General Assembly. His DAR number is A059029.

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Benjamin Huger

Birth: Dec. 30, 1746, Death: May 11, 1779,

Benjamin was born at Limerick Plantation, S.C., fourth son of Daniel and Mary (Cordes) Huger. One of the celebrated patriot Huger brothers, grandsons of Daniel Huger, the refugee from France. Benjamin was educated in Europe with his brothers; was a representative in the commons house of the assembly of South Carolina, and with his brothers Isaac and John, was a delegate to the provincial congress in 1775. He joined his brothers in encouraging Revolutionary movement in South Carolina and was commissioned major of the 1st regiment of riflemen, afterward the 5th South Carolina regiment in the continental establishment. While engaged in reconnoitering the position of the British under Prevost before Charleston, he was shot and killed, May 11, 1779. (From The twentieth century biographical dictionary of notable Americans)

He was married first, July 19, 1767, to Mary, daughter and co-heiress of Culcheth Golightly; children were Benjamin 1768- 1823 (Find A Grave Memorial #7188520 and Mary Golightly 1771-1835.

Married second, Dec. 10, 1772, to Mary Esther, daughter of Francis Kinloch and Ann Isabella (Cleland); of the four children born to Benjamin and Mary Esther only Francis Kinloch Huger (1773-1855) survived.

Benjamin Huger was buried in St. Philip's Church cemetery and a monument was placed by his widow in 1786, but was destroyed by fire when the church burned in 1835.

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Benjamin Huger's Timeline

1746
December 30, 1746
St. Philip's, Charleston, South Carolina
1768
1768
Age 21
South Carolina
1769
July 26, 1769
Age 22
Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina
1771
1771
Age 24
Charleston Charleston County South Carolina, USA
1772
December 10, 1772
Age 25
1773
September 17, 1773
Age 26
Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina
1779
May 11, 1779
Age 32
Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina, United States
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Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina, United States