Benjamin Mazyck (1715 - 1800) MP

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About Benjamin Mazyck

Benjamin Mazyck was born on September 17, 1715 in South Carolina and died there in 1800. He was the son of Isaac Mazyck and wife Marianne le Serurier, Hugenot emigres. He married Damaris Elizabeth Ravenel and had six children.

Benjamin Mazyck was a patriot who helped supply the Continental troops and state militia during the Revolutionary War. In April 1780, Daniel Horry's Regiment of LIght Dragoons camped at the plantation and requisitioned "12,000 weight corn blades" or fodder. In addition, Benjamin sent sheep and other provisions to Charleston to feed Continental troops. After the war, he sent in a claim for payment of more than 428 pounds. His bill included firewood, rice, fodder, beef and musket balls. He put in a separate claim for 30 pounds for labor, as seven of his plantation slaves had been sent to Charleston for public works. Three of the slaves never returned.

One young slave was put to work on an American galley ship. The British Navy captured the ship and the slave became part of the prize. Another, trained as a shoemaker, was captured by the British when Charleston fell. [No DAR record found for him]

When Benjamin Mazyck died in 1800, his estate was inventoried and valued at 5,078 pounds, with the largest portion (4,660 pounds) representing his ownership of 74 slaves. By 1834, all his sons and grandsons had died. His plantation was sold at auction for $7,800.

Mazyck's Plantation

Benjamin inherited a 900 acre plantation from his father, on the northeast side of Foster's Creek and established his home there. He followed in his father's business as a merchant in Charleston and kept a home there, as well. He continued to add to his plantation holdings for the remainder of his life, where he produced bricks, lumber, rice and livestock.

After his death, his son Stephen held the property. Stephen was unable to make the property successful and fell into debt. The land changed hands a few times until it was purchased by Charles Desel at auction in 1834.

Desel was a wealthy Charleston physician who constructed a 10-building settlement near a landing on the creek and kept his home as a working farmhouse rather than an elegant plantation. He did not work the plantation year-round, preferring to spend much of his time in Charleston. Noted naturalist John James Audubon visited Liberty Hall during this time period with Dr. John Bachman, a Charleston naturalist and good friend of Charles Desel.

The land was referred to as “Liberty Hall” for the first recorded time in 1859 during one of many sales. In 1912, a group of Charleston men leased the right to use the land as a hunting preserve. The “Liberty Hall Hunt Club” was incorporated for the following 30 years. After that, the land was used by timber companies before being developed for residential use.

Children of Benjamin Mazyck and wife Damaris Elizabeth Ravenel:

  • Daniel Mazyck (died 1800)
  • Isaac Mazyck
  • Marianne Mazyck (1740-1743)
  • John Mazyck
  • Charlotte Mazyck (1745 - 1777), married John Beamor Waring and had 4 children.
  • Stephen Mazyck ((1755 - 1800)), married Mary Young and had 6 children.

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