Elizabeth Ann "Betty" Kinzer (Sipes) (1826 - 1936) MP

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Nicknames: "Betty Ann Kinzer"
Birthplace: farm five miles northeast of, Heltonville, Monroe, Indiana, USA
Death: Died in Heltonville, Monroe, Indiana, USA
Managed by: Eldon Clark (C)
Last Updated:

About Elizabeth Ann "Betty" Kinzer (Sipes)

Find a Grave

Birth: Nov. 9, 1826

Death: Feb. 8, 1936

Bloomington (Monroe County, Indiana) Telephone, February 10, 1936, p. 1.

BETTY ANN KINSER, AGE 109, SUCCUMBS ON FARM ON WHICH SHE WAS BORN Had Only Scant Contact with Outside World--She Had Never Seen a Train or Radio Five Children Survive

Taking with her invaluable memories of the past-of the days when Indians roamed at will over the hills of Polk Township-of the primitive years of the county's settlement-Betty Ann Kinser, Monroe County's oldest resident, whom it is thought was born on November 9, 1826, died Saturday afternoon on the same farm on which she was born, five miles northeast of Heltonville in the southeast corner of Monroe County, at the age of 109 years, two months and 30 days.

She was the widow of Austin Kinser who died so many years ago that no one is sure just when it was. She had had scant contact with the outside world and had never seen a train or radio. Except for rare and almost half-forgotten trips to Bloomington some 30 or 40 years ago, however, she had seldom been off the farm. Until only a few years ago, however, she was hale and hearty and did all of the cooking and housekeeping for her sons, George and Bill, who made their homes with her. Only close neighbors and friends had seen her for a number of years, so close did she remain at home.

Her father was George Sipes, a pioneer in the county. Four of her sons, William and George at home, David of Harrodsburg and Thomas of Smithville, and one daughter, Mrs. Ben Deckard of Heltonville, survive her. There are also 19 grandchildren.

In an interview last summer, the first and only time, perhaps, that she ever talked "for the press," the aged woman said, "My health has always been tol'able good and I've had plenty to eat," and seemed to think that these were the only requisites for a long and happy life. During the interview, however, she let fall the fact that she never worried and slept long hours, suggesting that these might have been the formula for longevity.

She also admitted that she had ceased to chew tobacco about a year ago because "it went agin me and I quit." Only a few drinks of hard liquor ever passed between her lips, she said, and of course she never had an operation or became addicted to the use of medicine of any kind.

When asked what she enjoyed most in life, the answer was fairly simple for the centenarian, "Eating," she said. "I like to eat, and I used to like to cook." Her son went on to explain how she had told them she used to cook when she was young. A skillet was placed on the fire after the food was inserted, a lid was closed. Over the lid were heaped fiery embers. The food was cooked until the lid started to rise. Deer meat was plentiful at the time, she said.

"Complications of old age" will read the death certificate for Mrs. Kinser, perhaps. But according to her sons, she was seldom ill. Her strength just gradually left her, little by little, forcing her to give up all activity. Last summer, however, she was able to go on the porch with the help of her sons and pose for her photograph.

A desire of Mrs. Kinser for many many years was to receive a $5.00 a month pension from the government. Her application was always refused, however, because her status was that of a dependent living with her two sons. Last fall the wish was fulfilled, and she received the pension until her death.

Funeral services were held this afternoon at two o'clock at the Chapel Hill Church of which she was a member. Burial was in the adjoining cemetery.


Family links:

Spouse:
  • Austin Kinser (1836 - 1911)
Children:
  • Mary Polly Ann Kinser Deckard (1858 - 1948)*
  • Sarilda Jane Kinser Arthur (1860 - 1934)*
  • David F. Kinser (1870 - 1948)*
  • George Kinser (1876 - 1950)*
  • Richard Kinser (1879 - 1931)*
  • William O. Kinser (1881 - 1962)*

  • Calculated relationship

Burial: Chapel Hill Cemetery Chapel Hill (Monroe County) Monroe County Indiana, USA

Created by: Cindy Schrieber Record added: Oct 21, 2011 Find A Grave Memorial# 78878837 -------------------- Bloomington (Monroe County, Indiana) Telephone, February 10, 1936, p. 1.

BETTY ANN KINSER, AGE 109, SUCCUMBS ON FARM ON WHICH SHE WAS BORN Had Only Scant Contact with Outside World--She Had Never Seen a Train or Radio Five Children Survive

Taking with her invaluable memories of the past-of the days when Indians roamed at will over the hills of Polk Township-of the primitive years of the county's settlement-Betty Ann Kinser, Monroe County's oldest resident, whom it is thought was born on November 9, 1826, died Saturday afternoon on the same farm on which she was born, five miles northeast of Heltonville in the southeast corner of Monroe County, at the age of 109 years, two months and 30 days.

She was the widow of Austin Kinser who died so many years ago that no one is sure just when it was. She had had scant contact with the outside world and had never seen a train or radio. Except for rare and almost half-forgotten trips to Bloomington some 30 or 40 years ago, however, she had seldom been off the farm. Until only a few years ago, however, she was hale and hearty and did all of the cooking and housekeeping for her sons, George and Bill, who made their homes with her. Only close neighbors and friends had seen her for a number of years, so close did she remain at home.

Her father was George Sipes, a pioneer in the county. Four of her sons, William and George at home, David of Harrodsburg and Thomas of Smithville, and one daughter, Mrs. Ben Deckard of Heltonville, survive her. There are also 19 grandchildren.

In an interview last summer, the first and only time, perhaps, that she ever talked "for the press," the aged woman said, "My health has always been tol'able good and I've had plenty to eat," and seemed to think that these were the only requisites for a long and happy life. During the interview, however, she let fall the fact that she never worried and slept long hours, suggesting that these might have been the formula for longevity.

She also admitted that she had ceased to chew tobacco about a year ago because "it went agin me and I quit." Only a few drinks of hard liquor ever passed between her lips, she said, and of course she never had an operation or became addicted to the use of medicine of any kind.

When asked what she enjoyed most in life, the answer was fairly simple for the centenarian, "Eating," she said. "I like to eat, and I used to like to cook." Her son went on to explain how she had told them she used to cook when she was young. A skillet was placed on the fire after the food was inserted, a lid was closed. Over the lid were heaped fiery embers. The food was cooked until the lid started to rise. Deer meat was plentiful at the time, she said.

"Complications of old age" will read the death certificate for Mrs. Kinser, perhaps. But according to her sons, she was seldom ill. Her strength just gradually left her, little by little, forcing her to give up all activity. Last summer, however, she was able to go on the porch with the help of her sons and pose for her photograph.

A desire of Mrs. Kinser for many many years was to receive a $5.00 a month pension from the government. Her application was always refused, however, because her status was that of a dependent living with her two sons. Last fall the wish was fulfilled, and she received the pension until her death.

Funeral services were held this afternoon at two o'clock at the Chapel Hill Church of which she was a member. Burial was in the adjoining cemetery.



      
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Betty Ann Kinzer's Timeline

1826
November 9, 1826
Heltonville, Monroe, Indiana, USA
1858
July 1858
Age 31
1860
1860
Age 33
1870
April 12, 1870
Age 43
1876
March 4, 1876
Age 49
1879
March 31, 1879
Age 52
1881
July 5, 1881
Age 54
1936
February 8, 1936
Age 109
Heltonville, Monroe, Indiana, USA
????
????
Chapel Hill, Monroe, Indiana, USA