Bianca d'Agliano (Lancia), II (c.1176 - 1222)

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Nicknames: "(also called Beatrice and Blanche)"
Birthplace: Piedmont, Italy
Death: Died in Gioia Del Colle, Taranto, Puglia, Italy
Occupation: Contessa di Lancia
Managed by: Ernesto Álvarez Uriondo
Last Updated:

About Bianca d'Agliano (Lancia), II

Bianca Lancia d'Agliano (also called Beatrice and Blanche); was an Italian noblewoman, who was the mistress and later wife of emperor Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, although the marriage, conducted while she was on her deathbed, was considered non-canonical.

Contents [hide]

1 Family

2 Relationship with Frederick II

3 Marriage and Children

4 Death

5 Footnotes

6 References

7 External links


[edit] Family

Born ca. 1200/1210 in Agliano Terme, Bianca was a member of the Lancia (or Lanza) family of Piedmont, so-called since her grandfather Manfred I had been lancifer of emperor Frederick Barbarossa. There is no source which definitively states who her parents were, historians have offered three theories:

1.That she was a granddaughter of Manfred I Lancia, as daughter of his daughter (maybe named Bianca), by a son (name unknown) of Guglielmo di Moncucco and Belda di Agliano.

2.That she was a granddaughter of Manfred I Lancia, as daughter of his son Bonifacio di Agliano by an unknown wife.[1]

3.That she was a granddaughter of Manfred I Lancia, as daughter of his son Manfred II, possible from a marriage to a lady called Bianca, of the Maletta family.

If she was a daughter of Manfred II, she had seven siblings: four brothers (Manfred III, Guglielmo, Galvano and Frederick) and three sisters (Beatrice, Agnes and Isabella). Apparently, Bianca would be the third child and first born daughter.[2][3] But this is only one of three competing theories.

[edit] Relationship with Frederick II

Bianca lived most of her life in the Castle of Boro, the ancestral residence of the Lancia family. She met Frederick II, who was then married to Yolande of Jerusalem, in 1225 at Agliano, near Asti. Thenceforth, it is said, the two maintained a romantic relationship.

According to some historians, Bianca was the only true love of Frederick's life; others consider this a romantic exaggeration. It was certainly beneficial to the interests of the Lancia family, who were favoured by the Emperor with political posts in Italy (Manfredo III was appointed Imperial Vicar of the Holy Roman Empire's northern Italian territories and Podesta of Alessandria, Milan and Chieri; Galvano became Imperial Vicar of Tuscany, Podesta of Padova, Prince of Salerno, Count of Fondi and Grand Marshal of Sicily; and Frederick was appointed Count of Squillace and Viceroy of Apulia). Nonetheless, the relationship of Bianca and Frederick was the longest to all the affairs of the Emperor.

After the death of Queen Isabella of England, Frederick's third wife, in 1241, he endowed Bianca with the castle of Monte Sant'Angelo, located in the cities of Vieste and Siponto. By the terms of the will of William II of Sicily, the castle was the traditional dowry of the Sicilian queens consort.

Bianca died either in the castle of Paternò or the castle of Gioia del Colle.

[edit] Marriage and Children

The Chronicle of Salimbene di Adam, and also Matthew of Paris claimed that a "confirmatio matrimonii in articulo mortis" ("marriage ceremony in the moments of death") took place between Bianca and Frederick when she was dying. Bianca, apparently, desired the marriage for the salvation of her soul and the safety of their children's future.[4][5] This marriage however was not deemed canonical by the Church.

Frederick and Bianca had three children together:

Constance (1230-1307), who married the Emperor of Nicea, John Vatatzes, and thereupon her name changed to Anna.

Manfred (1232-1266), who succeeded his father as ruler of Sicily (initially as regent, before usurping the throne for himself).

Violante (1233-1264), who married Richard Sanseverino, Count of Caserta.

[edit] Death

It is not known exactly when she died. There are several conflicting reports. Although the Medlands database gives 1233/1234, Medlands is not reliable for unsourced claims. This date lingers in various reference works but appears based only on the assumption that she died after the birth of her last child, and before the marriage of her husband to his next wife.

There are credible reports that she married Frederick while she was on her deathbed, and that her son was 12 at this time. Bianca may have died a short while before the wedding of her daughter to Ioannes Batatzes in 1244.[6] One source states that she died 20 years after the start of her relationship with Frederick, however the same source states that she died 20 years before events that were occurring in 1256. All of these cannot be simultaneously true.

[edit] Footnotes

1.^ "The mother of Manfred, King of Sicily, was a noblewoman named Blanche, of the family of the Marquis of Lancia and Loreto, in southern Lombardy. She was the daughter of Boniface, Count of Agliano (near Asti), one of the principal fiefs of Lancia. Even contemporaries were unsure of the exact degree of her relationship with the Marquis of Lancia, who had accompanied Emperor Frederick II to the East. They could not tell if she were his niece or his granddaughter." [Reference: Source: Paul Crawford, The 'Templar of Tyre': Part III of the 'Deeds of the Cypriots' (Crusade Texts in Translation 6) (2003), pg. 18, footnote 4]. Reference provided by Douglas Richardson on soc.genealogy.medieval 22 January 2008

2.^ Monferrato MONFERRATO, SALUZZO, SAVONA

3.^ Genealogy of the Lancia family

4.^ Matthew of Paris, Mon. Germ. Hist. Scriptores XXVIII pp. 360-361

5.^ Cronica Fratris Salimbene di Adam, Ordinis Minorem, MGH SS XXXII p.349

6.^ By this time, Frederick II's longtime enemy, the Duke Frederick of Austria became his most important ally, and, by reforce this new alliance, were make plans to a marriage between the Emperor and the teenager niece of the Duke, Gertrude. She refused the marriage.

[edit] References

Natale Ferro, "Chi fu Bianca Lancia di Agliano", in _Bianca Lancia d'Agliano, fra il Piemonte e il regno di Sicilia: Atti del convegno (Asti-Agliano, 28-29 aprile 1990)_, edited by Renato Bordone, Ricerche di storia locale 4 (Alessandria, 1992) pp 55-80. (in Italian) (Reference provided by Peter Stewart on soc.genealogy.medieval)

"Monumenta Germaniae Historica", using Search Term : "Salimbene, Bianca" will display : "Cronica fratris Salimbene de Adam ordinis Minorum" i.e. "The Chronicle of brother Salimbene de Adam, order of Minors"

[edit] External links

Biography (Italian)

Preceded by

Isabella of England Queen consort of Sicily?

c. 1244 Succeeded by

Elisabeth of Bavaria

Holy Roman Empress?

c. 1244 Succeeded by

Margaret of Hainault

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bianca_Lancia"

Categories: 1200 births | 1233 deaths | German queens consort | Hohenstaufen Dynasty | Italian nobility | Royal consorts of Sicily | Mistresses of German royalty | People from the Province of Asti | Women of medieval Italy

--------------------

Wikipedia:

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bianca_Lancia_die_J%C3%BCngere

Bianca Lancia die Jüngere

aus Wikipedia, der freien Enzyklopädie

Wechseln zu: Navigation, Suche

Bianca Lancia die Jüngere (1200/1210 in Agliano, Provinz Asti; † 1233/1234 in Gioia del Colle, Provinz Bari)[1] war ab 1227 bis zu ihrem Tod die Geliebte Kaiser Friedrichs II. und wurde auf dem Sterbebett seine Ehefrau.

Bianca Lancia die Jüngere war die Tochter von Bianca Lancia der Älteren; wer ihr Vater gewesen ist, ist hingegen unklar. Sie wohnte im Schloss von Brolo.

Friedrich II. heiratete sie kurz vor ihrem Tod (confirmatio matrimonii in articulo mortis), wodurch ihre gemeinsamen Kinder nachträglich legitimiert wurden (legitimatio per matrimonium subsequens)

Ein paar Autoren haben behauptet, dass sie die einzige wahre Liebe von Friedrich war, jedoch ist es auch wahrscheinlich, dass die romantisch wirkende Heirat politischen Zweckes war.

Ihre gemeinsamen Kinder waren:

   * Costanza (Anna) (1230/1232 - 1307)
   * Manfred (1231-1266)
   * Violanta; (vor 1233 - nach Sommer 1264) heiratete um 1245 Ricardo Graf von Caserta

Nach einer örtlichen Überlieferung starb Bianca in Gioia del Colle bei Tarent, in der dortigen Pfarrkirche soll ihr Grab noch im 17. Jahrhundert vorhanden gewesen sein.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

[Anzeigen]

   * 1 Legenden
   * 2 Weblinks
   * 3 Literatur
   * 4 Anmerkung

Legenden [Bearbeiten]

Ein paar Legenden ranken sich um diese mögliche Liebesgeschichte:

   * In Mazzarino (CL) wird erzählt, dass auf dem Schloss Castello di Grassuliato noch heute der Geist Friedrichs spukt, da dort Bianca und Friedrich sich liebten.
   * Der Priester Bonaventura da Lama schrieb, dass Bianca während der Schwangerschaft mit Manfred von Friedrich im Turm von Gioia del Colle (BA) eingesperrt wurde, weil er eifersüchtig war. Als Beweis ihrer Treue überlieferte sie Friedrich nach der Geburt Manfreds, das Kind und ihre abgeschnittenen Brüste auf einem Tablett.

Weblinks [Bearbeiten]

   * Materialsammlung

Literatur [Bearbeiten]

Uwe A. Oster, Die Frauen Kaiser Friedrichs II., Piper Verlag, München 2008.

Anmerkung [Bearbeiten]

  1. ↑ Zeitgenössische Quellen, wie die "Annali Genovesi" gaben für den Tod Biancas die Jahre zwischen 1244 und 1246 an. Ebenso berichtete Matthäus von Paris, dass Bianca 20 Jahre nach dem ersten Zusammentreffen mit Friedrich II. verstarb. Dies wäre 1246 gewesen. aus: Uwe A. Oster; Die Frauen Kaiser Friedrichs II.; Piper Verlag GmbH München, ungekürzte Taschenbuchausgabe 2009, S. 214 - Oster hat jedoch keine neuen Forschungsergebnisse über das Leben Biancas zwischen 1233/34 und 1244/46 vorzuweisen.

-------------------- Bianca Lancia From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bianca Lancia d'Agliano (also called Beatrice and Blanche); was an Italian noblewoman, who was the mistress and later wife of emperor Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, although the marriage, conducted while she was on her deathbed, was considered non-canonical.

Family

Born ca. 1200/1210, Bianca was a member of the Lancia (or Lanza) family of Piedmont, so-called since her grandfather Manfred I had been lancifer of emperor Frederick Barbarossa. There is no source which definitively states who her parents were, historians have offered three theories: That she was a granddaughter of Manfred I Lancia, as daughter of his daughter (maybe named Bianca), by a son (name unknown) of Guglielmo di Moncucco and Belda di Agliano. That she was a granddaughter of Manfred I Lancia, as daughter of his son Bonifacio di Agliano by an unknown wife.[1] That she was a granddaughter of Manfred I Lancia, as daughter of his son Manfred II, possible from a marriage to a lady called Bianca, of the Maletta family. If she was a daughter of Manfred II, she had seven siblings: four brothers (Manfred III, Guglielmo, Galvano and Frederick) and three sisters (Beatrice, Agnes and Isabella). Apparently, Bianca would be the third child and first born daughter[2] [3]. But this is only one of three competing theories. [edit]Relationship with Frederick II

Bianca lived most of her life in the Castle of Boro, the ancestral residence of the Lancia family. She met Frederick II, who was then married to Yolande of Jerusalem, in 1225 at Agliano, near Asti. Thenceforth, it is said, the two maintained a romantic relationship. According to some historians, Bianca was the only true love of Frederick's life; others consider this a romantic exaggeration. It was certainly beneficial to the interests of the Lancia family, who were favoured by the Emperor with political posts in Italy (Manfredo III was appointed Imperial Vicar of the Holy Roman Empire's northern Italian territories and Podesta of Alessandria, Milan and Chieri; Galvano became Imperial Vicar of Tuscany, Podesta of Padova, Prince of Salerno, Count of Fondi and Grand Marshal of Sicily; and Frederick was appointed Count of Squillace and Viceroy of Apulia). Nonetheless, the relationship of Bianca and Frederick was the longest to all the affairs of the Emperor. After the death of Queen Isabella of England, Frederick's third wife, in 1241, he endowed Bianca with the castle of Monte Sant'Angelo, located in the cities of Vieste and Siponto. By the terms of the will of William II of Sicily, the castle was the traditional dowry of the Sicilian Queen consorts. Bianca died either in the castle of Paternò or the castle of Gioia del Colle. [edit]Marriage and Children

The Chronicle of Salimbene di Adam, and also Matthew of Paris claimed that a "confirmatio matrimonii in articulo mortis" ("marriage ceremony in the moments of death") took place between Bianca and Frederick when she was dying. Bianca, apparently, desired the marriage for the salvation of her soul and the safety of their children's future. [4] [5] This marriage however was not deemed canonical by the Church. Frederick and Bianca had three children together: Constance (1230-1307), who married the Emperor of Nicea, John Vatatzes, and thereupon her name changed to Anna. Manfred (1232-1266), who succeeded his father as ruler of Sicily (initially as regent, before usurping the throne for himself). Violante (1233-1264), who married Richard, Count of Caserta. [edit]Death

It is not known exactly when she died. There are several conflicting reports. Although the Medlands database gives 1233/1234, Medlands is not reliable for unsourced claims. This date lingers in various reference works but appears based only on the assumption that she died after the birth of her last child, and before the marriage of her husband to his next wife. There are credible reports that she married Frederick while she was on her deathbed, and that her son was 12 at this time. Bianca may have died a short while before the wedding of her daughter to Ioannes Batatzes in 1244[6]. One source states that she died 20 years after the start of her relationship with Frederick, however the same source states that she died 20 years before events that were occurring in 1256. All of these cannot be simultaneously true.

References

^ "The mother of Manfred, King of Sicily, was a noblewoman named Blanche, of the family of the Marquis of Lancia and Loreto, in southern Lombardy. She was the daughter of Boniface, Count of Agliano (near Asti), one of the principal fiefs of Lancia. Even contemporaries were unsure of the exact degree of her relationship with the Marquis of Lancia, who had accompanied Emperor Frederick II to the East. They could not tell if she were his niece or his granddaughter." [Reference: Source: Paul Crawford, The 'Templar of Tyre': Part III of the 'Deeds of the Cypriots' (Crusade Texts in Translation 6) (2003), pg. 18, footnote 4]. Reference provided by Douglas Richardson on soc.genealogy.medieval Jan 22, 2008 ^ Monferrato ^ Lancia family ^ Matthew of Paris, Mon. Germ. Hist. Scriptores XXVIII pp. 360-361 ^ Cronica Fratris Salimbene di Adam, Ordinis Minorem, MGH SS XXXII p.349 ^ By this time, Frederick II's longtime enemy, the Duke Frederick of Austria became his most important ally, and, by reforce this new alliance, were make plans to a marriage between the Emperor and the teenager niece of the Duke, Gertrude. She refused the marriage.

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Bianca d'Agliano, II's Timeline

1176
1176
Piedmont, Italy
1195
1195
Age 19
Hohenstaufen, Donaukreis, Wuerttemberg, Germany
1222
June 23, 1222
Age 46
Gioia Del Colle, Taranto, Puglia, Italy
1230
1230
Age 46
Of, Valencia, Valencia, Spain
1232
1232
Age 46
1233
1233
Age 46
Italy
????
2ND Mistress ??