Bleddyn ap Cynfyn, Brenin of Gwynedd and Powys

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Bleddyn ap Cynfyn, Brenin of Gwynedd and Powys

Nicknames: "King of Gwynedd and Powys and Deheubarth", "Bleddyn ap Kynvyn", "Bleddn ab Cynvn"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Montgomeryshire,Wales
Death: Died in Powys,Wales
Immediate Family:

Son of Cynfyn ap Gwerstan, King of Powys and Angharad
Husband of (No Name); unknown (Family 1) ferch Gruffydd; Haer verch Cyllyn and Unknown (family 3)
Father of Cadwgawn ou Powis; Iorwoerth ou Powis; Madog Ap Bleddyn; Maredudd ou ap Bleddyn, Brenin of Powys; Rhiryd Ap Bleddyn and 10 others
Brother of Gwenwyn verch Cynfyn; Rhiwallon ap Cynfyn, Prince of Powys; Angharad verch Cynfyn and Llewelyn ap Cynfyn
Half brother of Iwerydd verch Cynfyn; Rhiwallon ap Cynfyn, Prince of Powys and Gruffydd ap Llewellyn, King of the Britons

Occupation: Prince of Deheubarth, MURDERED, King of Gwynedd and of Powys, aka Bledyn ap KYNUYN; Prince (Tywysog) of Deheubarth (of Powys); usurped throne of Wales; founded the Third Royal Tribe of Wales. Murdered., Founder of the III Royal Tibe of Wales
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Bleddyn ap Cynfyn, Brenin of Gwynedd and Powys

slain in battle with Rhys ab Tewdwr

"A wise and gentle ruler" {re: "Royal Ancestors of Magna Charta Barons," Carr P. Collins, Jr., Dallas, 1959, p. 94}. {Bleddyn's wife, Haer, is dau. of Cilin (son of the Lord of Gest).}

-------------------- Bleddyn ap Cynfyn From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search

Bleddyn ap Cynfyn (died 1075) was a Prince of the Welsh Kingdoms of Gwynedd and of Powys.

Lineage

Bleddyn was the son of Princess Angharad ferch Maredudd (of the Dinefwr dynasty of Deheubarth) with her second husband Cynfyn ap Gwerstan, a Powys Lord, about whom little is now known. He may have been son of an English Saxon - the name has been postulated as being derived from Werestan.

His mother Angharad was previously widow of Llywelyn ap Seisyll and also mother of Gruffudd ap Llywelyn.

Marriage

Bleddyn was married to Hear of Powys.

Submission to Harold Godwinson & Reward

When Gruffydd ap Llywelyn was killed by his own men after being defeated by the Saxon Harold Godwinson in 1063, his realm was divided among several Welsh Princes. Bleddyn and his brother Rhiwallon ap Cynfyn, as half brothers to Gruffudd succeeded to his lands but first as vassals and allies of the Saxon King of England, Edward the Confessor and then submitted to Harold and from him received Gwynedd and Powys.[1]

Anti-Norman Welsh & Saxon Alliance

They continued Gruffudd's policy of allying to the Mercian Saxons to resist the threat from William the Conqueror.

In 1067 Bleddyn and Rhiwallon joined with the Mercian Eadric the Wild in an attack on the Normans at Hereford, ravaged thelands as far as the River Lugg then in 1068 allied with Earl Edwin of Mercia and Earl Morcar of Northumbria in another attack on the Normans.

Challenges at Home

Bleddyn was challenged by the two sons of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, but defeated them at the battle of Mechain in 1070, one being killed and the other dying of exposure after the battle. Bleddyn's brother Rhiwallon was also killed in this battle, Bleddyn emerging as the only one of the four to survive the bloody encounter and he ruled Gwynedd and Powys alone until his death.

In 1073 Robert of Rhuddlan stealthily established his forces on the banks of the River Clwyd and attempted to ambush and capture Bleddyn, narrowly failing but seizing valuable booty from the raids further south.

Killed By Deheubarth

He was killed in 1075 by Rhys ab Owain of Deheubarth and the nobility of Ystrad Tywi in South Wales, a killing which caused much shock throughout Wales.

When Rhys ab Owain was defeated in arms at the Battle of Goodwick and forced to become a fugitive by Bleddyn's cousin and successor as King of Gwynedd, Trahaearn ap Caradog in 1078 and killed by Caradog ap Gruffydd of Gwent shortly afterwards, this was hailed as "vengeance for the blood of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn".

Bleddyn is said in the Brut y Tywysogion to have been a benevolent ruler:

   "the most lovable and the most merciful of all kings ... he was civil to his relatives, generous to the poor, merciful to pilgrims and orphans and widows and a defender of the weak ...".

and

   "the mildest and most clement of kings" and he "did injury to none, save when insulted.... openhanded to all, terrible in war, but in peace beloved." 

Legacy

He was responsible for a revision of Welsh law in the version used in Gwynedd. After his death Gwynedd was seized by Trahaearn ap Caradog and later recovered for the line of Rhodri the Great by Gruffydd ap Cynan, but in Powys Bleddyn was the founder of a dynasty which lasted until the end of the 13th century.

Notes

  1. ^ K. L. Maund is of the opinion that Bleddyn ruled Gwynedd and Rhiwallon Powys.

References

   * R.R. Davies (1991). The age of conquest: Wales 1063-1415. O.U.P. ISBN 0-19-820198-2. 
   * Thomas Jones (ed) (1952) Brut y Tywysogyon: Peniarth MS. 20 version (University of Wales Press)

-------------------- Bleddyn ap Cynfyn (died 1075) was a King of the Welsh Kingdoms of Gwynedd and of Powys. He was the son of Queen Angharad ferch Maredudd (of the Dinefwr dynasty of Deheubarth) with her second husband Cynfyn ap Gwerstan, a Powys lord (about whom little is now known; he may have been the son of an English Saxon.) The name has been postulated as being derived from Werestan.

King Bleddyn's mother Angharad was the widow of Llywelyn ap Seisyll (and she was also the mother of Gruffudd ap Llywelyn.) Bleddyn was married to Hear of Powys.

When Gruffydd ap Llywelyn was killed by his own men after being defeated by the Saxon Harold Godwinson in 1063, his realm was divided among several Welsh Princes. Bleddyn and his brother Rhiwallon ap Cynfyn, as half brothers to Gruffudd succeeded to his lands but first as vassals and allies of the Saxon King of England, Edward the Confessor and then submitted to Harold and from him received Gwynedd and Powys. They continued Gruffudd's policy of allying to the Mercian Saxons to resist the threat from William the Conqueror.

In 1067 Bleddyn and Rhiwallon joined with the Mercian Eadric the Wild in an attack on the Normans at Hereford and ravaged the lands as far as the River Lugg. Then, in 1068, they allied with Earl Edwin of Mercia and Earl Morcar of Northumbria in another attack on the Normans.

Bleddyn's rule was challenged by the two sons of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn. The challenge culminated in the Battle of Mechain, which was fought in 1070 in Montgomeryshire, Wales, for rule of the Welsh kingdoms of Gwynedd and Powys. At this battle, both of Gruffyd's sons were defeated, one being killed and the other dying of exposure after the battle. Bleddyn's brother Rhiwallon was also killed in this battle, leaving Bleddyn to rule Gwynedd and Powys alone.

In 1073 Robert of Rhuddlan stealthily established his forces on the banks of the River Clwyd and attempted to ambush and capture Bleddyn, narrowly failing but seizing valuable booty from the raids further south.

King Bleddyn was killed in 1075 by Rhys ab Owain of Deheubarth and the nobility of Ystrad Tywi in South Wales, a killing which caused much shock throughout Wales.

Bleddyn's cousin - Trahaearn ap Caradog - succeeded as King of Gwynedd. He engaged and defeated Bleddyn's killer at the Battle of Goodwick in 1078. Rhys ab Owain was forced to become a fugitive and he was killed by Caradog ap Gruffydd of Gwent shortly afterwards. The killing was hailed as "vengeance for the blood of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn".

Bleddyn is said in the Brut y Tywysogion to have been a benevolent ruler. He was "the most lovable and the most merciful of all kings ... he was civil to his relatives, generous to the poor, merciful to pilgrims and orphans and widows and a defender of the weak . . .." He was "the mildest and most clement of kings" who "did injury to none, save when insulted.... [he was] open-handed to all, terrible in war, but in peace beloved."

King Bleddyn was responsible for a revision of the Welsh law implemented in Gwynedd. After his death, Gwynedd was seized by Trahaearn ap Caradog and later recovered for the line of Rhodri the Great by Gruffydd ap Cynan. However, in Powys, Bleddyn was the founder of a dynasty which lasted until the end of the 13th century.

R.R. Davies (1991). The age of conquest: Wales 1063-1415. O.U.P. ISBN 0-19-820198-2.

Thomas Jones (ed) (1952) Brut y Tywysogyon: Peniarth MS. 20 version (University of Wales Press)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bleddyn_ap_Cynfyn http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Mechain -------------------- By 1063, Blethyn (Bleddyn) rules a mostly united Wales, and Powys is detached from Gwynedd & Deheubarth for, or by, his son.

Bleddyn and his brother Rhiwallon were half-brothers of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn. Their mother, Angharad, married Cynfyn ap Gwerstan o the death of Llywelyn ap Seisyll. Cynfyn ap Bwerstan may have been a Powys nobleman; there is also some suggestion that he may have been half Saxon. Bleddyn remained a strong supporter of the Mercians in their battles against the Normans.

Bleddyn and Rhiwallon also had to contend with internal revolution. The sons of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, Maredudd and Idwal, attempted to reestablish their claim to the throne. However, they were also killed in the Battle of Mechain in 1070; Bleddyn now ruled without internal challenge.

He is reported to having been a generous king, giving to church and populous. He was the first king in over 100 years to revise the laws developed under Hywel Dda.

Unfortunately, in 1073, the Normans began their advance through north Wales, and defeated Bleddyn in a surprise attack. Weakened, he became vurnerable to his southern neighbor, Rhys ab Owain of Deheubarth. In 1075, Rhys betrayed Bleddyn, leading to his murder. However, Bleddyn's descendents became the main ruling family of Powys. [The Welsh Kings] -------------------- Bleddyn ap Cynfyn From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bleddyn ap Cynfyn (died 1075) was a Prince of the Welsh Kingdoms of Gwynedd and of Powys.

Lineage

Bleddyn was the son of Princess Angharad ferch Maredudd (of the Dinefwr dynasty of Deheubarth) with her second husband Cynfyn ap Gwerstan, a Powys Lord, about whom little is now known. He may have been son of an English Saxon - the name has been postulated as being derived from Werestan. His mother Angharad was previously widow of Llywelyn ap Seisyll and also mother of Gruffudd ap Llywelyn. [edit]Marriage

Bleddyn was married to Hear of Powys. [edit]Submission to Harold Godwinson & Reward

When Gruffydd ap Llywelyn was killed by his own men after being defeated by the Saxon Harold Godwinson in 1063, his realm was divided among several Welsh Princes. Bleddyn and his brother Rhiwallon ap Cynfyn, as half brothers to Gruffudd succeeded to his lands but first as vassals and allies of the Saxon King of England, Edward the Confessor and then submitted to Harold and from him received Gwynedd and Powys.[2] [edit]Anti-Norman Welsh & Saxon Alliance

They continued Gruffudd's policy of allying to the Mercian Saxons to resist the threat from William the Conqueror. In 1067 Bleddyn and Rhiwallon joined with the Mercian Eadric the Wild in an attack on the Normans at Hereford, ravaged the lands as far as the River Lugg then in 1068 allied with Earl Edwin of Mercia and Earl Morcar of Northumbria in another attack on the Normans. [edit]Challenges at Home

Bleddyn was challenged by the two sons of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, but defeated them at the battle of Mechain in 1070, one being killed and the other dying of exposure after the battle. Bleddyn's brother Rhiwallon was also killed in this battle, Bleddyn emerging as the only one of the four to survive the bloody encounter and he ruled Gwynedd and Powys alone until his death. In 1073 Robert of Rhuddlan stealthily established his forces on the banks of the River Clwyd and attempted to ambush and capture Bleddyn, narrowly failing but seizing valuable booty from the raids further south. [edit]Killed By Deheubarth

He was killed in 1075 by Rhys ab Owain of Deheubarth and the nobility of Ystrad Tywi in South Wales, a killing which caused much shock throughout Wales. When Rhys ab Owain was defeated in arms at the Battle of Goodwick and forced to become a fugitive by Bleddyn's cousin and successor as King of Gwynedd, Trahaearn ap Caradog in 1078 and killed by Caradog ap Gruffydd of Gwent shortly afterwards, this was hailed as "vengeance for the blood of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn". Bleddyn is said in the Brut y Tywysogion to have been a benevolent ruler: "the most lovable and the most merciful of all kings ... he was civil to his relatives, generous to the poor, merciful to pilgrims and orphans and widows and a defender of the weak ...". and "the mildest and most clement of kings" and he "did injury to none, save when insulted.... openhanded to all, terrible in war, but in peace beloved." [edit]Legacy

He was responsible for a revision of Welsh law in the version used in Gwynedd. After his death Gwynedd was seized by Trahaearn ap Caradog and later recovered for the line of Rhodri the Great by Gruffydd ap Cynan, but in Powys Bleddyn was the founder of a dynasty which lasted until the end of the 13th century. [edit]Notes

^ Williams, Richard (1887). The royal tribes of Wales; To which is added an account of The fifteen tribes of north Wales. With numerous additions and notes, preface and index. Liverpool I. Foulkes. ISBN AFV-0947. ^ K. L. Maund is of the opinion that Bleddyn ruled Gwynedd and Rhiwallon Powys. [edit]References

R. R. Davies (1991). The age of conquest: Wales 1063-1415. O.U.P. ISBN 0-19-820198-2. Thomas Jones (ed) (1952) Brut y Tywysogyon: Peniarth MS. 20 version (University of Wales Press)

  • Bleddyn ap Cynfyn

born about 1025 Montgomeryshire, Wales died 1075

father:

  • Cynfyn ap Gwerystan King of Powys

born about 1002 Powys, Wales

mother:

  • Angharad verch Maredydd

born about 0982 Deheubarth, Wales married 1023

siblings:

  • Miss verch Cynfyn born about 1024 Powys, Wales
  • Rhiwallon ap Cynfyn born about 1025 Powys, Wales

died 1070 (slain) Battle Mechain, Montgomeryshire, Wales

  • Iwerydd verch Cynfyn born about 1024 Powys, Wales
  • Nest verch Cynfyn born about 1027 Powys, Wales

Gwerydd verch Cynfyn

spouse (1st):

  • Haer verch Cillin

born about 1025 Gest, Dolbenmaen, Caernarvonshire, Wales married about 1044 Wales

children:

  • Maredudd ap Bleddyn born about 1047 Montgomeryshire, Wales died 1124/29
  • Efa verch Bleddyn born about 1058 Montgomeryshire,Wales

spouse (2nd or 3rd): unknown

children (from that marriage):

  • Denis verch Bleddyn born about 1062 Montgomeryshire, Wales
  • Cadwgon ap Bleddyn born about 1070 Montgomeryshire, Wales died 1111 (slain)

biographical and/or anecdotal:

notes or source: LDS

-------------------- Bleddyn ap Cynfyn was a Prince of the Welsh Kingdoms of Gwynedd and of Powys, which is most of Wales.

When Gruffydd ap Llywelyn was killed by his own men after being defeated by the Saxon Harold Godwinson in 1063, his realm was divided among several Welsh Princes. Bleddyn and his brother Rhiwallon ap Cynfyn, as half brothers to Gruffudd succeeded to his lands but first as vassals and allies of the Saxon King of England, Edward the Confessor and then submitted to Harold and from him received Gwynedd and Powys.

They continued Gruffudd's policy of allying to the Mercian Saxons to resist the threat from William the Conqueror.

In 1067 Bleddyn and Rhiwallon joined with the Mercian Eadric the Wild in an attack on the Normans at Hereford, ravaged the lands as far as the River Lugg then in 1068 allied with Earl Edwin of Mercia and Earl Morcar of Northumbria in another attack on the Normans.

Bleddyn was challenged by the two sons of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, but defeated them at the battle of Mechain in 1070, one being killed and the other dying of exposure after the battle. Bleddyn's brother Rhiwallon was also killed in this battle, Bleddyn emerging as the only one of the four to survive the bloody encounter and he ruled Gwynedd and Powys alone until his death.

In 1073 Robert of Rhuddlan stealthily established his forces on the banks of the River Clwyd and attempted to ambush and capture Bleddyn, narrowly failing but seizing valuable booty from the raids further south.

Bleddyn was killed in 1075 by Rhys ab Owain of Deheubarth and the nobility of Ystrad Tywi in South Wales, a killing which caused much shock throughout Wales.

When Rhys ab Owain was defeated in arms at the Battle of Goodwick and forced to become a fugitive by Bleddyn's cousin and successor as King of Gwynedd, Trahaearn ap Caradog in 1078 and killed by Caradog ap Gruffydd of Gwent shortly afterwards, this was hailed as "vengeance for the blood of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn."

Bleddyn is said in the Brut y Tywysogion to have been a benevolent ruler:

   "the most lovable and the most merciful of all kings ... he was civil to his relatives, generous to the poor, merciful to pilgrims and orphans and widows and a defender of the weak ..."

and

"the mildest and most clement of kings" and he "did injury to none, save when insulted.... openhanded to all, terrible in war, but in peace beloved." -------------------- Died in 1075, assasinated at Powys Castle

Bleddyn was Prince of Powys and Gwynedd from 1063 to 1075; he acknowledged the overlordship of King Edward the Confessor and later resisted William the Conqueror. He married to Haer, daughter and heiress of Cilin ap y Blaidd Rhydd, Lord of Gestyn-Efionydd.

From: http://www.robertsewell.ca/powys.html --------------------

  1. 11222-Welsh Medieval Database

MILITARY-Wars & Battles 1068-Maredudd & Idwel, the Rightful Heirs of Brochwel, King of Powys, led an army against Bleddyn & Rhiwallon, to regain Gwynedd. Bleddyn & Rhiwallon met them at Mechain with a host of Saxons, for the Saxons had fled from the intrusion of the Normans into Gwynedd , for protection. Rhiwallon was slain, also Idwal ap Gruffydd. Source: Lloyd, History of the Princes, The Lords Marcher and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, vol 1-page 71.

1072-Rhys ab Owain ab Edwin ab Einion came against Bleddyn and fought a battle and killed him Source: Lloyd, History of the Princes etc, Vol 1-page 72.

TITLES: Accession-Appears to have ruled Gwynedd (after his half-brother Gruffydd ap Llywelyn) as well as Powys from 1063-1075 Source: Fryde, Handbook of British Chronology, Page 54. Prince of Powys Source, Lloyd, History of the Princes etc. vol 1-page 109. Brenin of Powys Source 1062-1072 Source, Lloyd, History of the Princes etc, vol1-page 109

--------------------

Family Links Spouses/Children: 1. Haer FERCH CYNILLIN Maredudd AP BLEDDYN+ Cadwgon AP BLEDDYN of Nannau, King of Powys+ Gwenllian FERCH BLEDDYN 2. Miss FERCH BROCHWEL Efa FERCH BLEDDYN+ Hunydd FERCH BLEDDYN Bleddyn "Sais" AP CYNFYN Prince of Powys 4850,8457

Born: Abt 1025, Powys, Montgomeryshire, Wales Married (1): 1044 Married (2): Before 1058, 2nd wife Died: 1075

  Another name for Bleddyn was Bleddyn ÀP MORIEN.
  General Notes:

All of the following information came from Jane Williams Flank, World Connect db=jwflank, rootsweb.com:

Bleddyn Cynfyn ruled Powys 1063-1075

_____________________ From http://homepages.tesco.net/~plk33/plk33/History/KingListBritain:

By 1063, Blethyn (Bleddyn) rules a mostly united Wales, and Powys is detached from Gwynedd & Deheubarth for, or by, his son.

_____________________

Bleddyn and his brother Rhiwallon were half-brothers of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn. Their mother, Angharad, married Cynfyn ap Gwerstan o the death of Llywelyn ap Seisyll. Cynfyn ap Bwerstan may have been a Powys nobleman; there is also some suggestion that he may have been half Saxon. Bleddyn remained a strong supporter of the Mercians in their battles against the Normans.

Bleddyn and Rhiwallon also had to contend with internal revolution. The sons of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, Maredudd and Idwal, attempted to reestablish their claim to the throne. However, they were also killed in the Battle of Mechain in 1070; Bleddyn now ruled without internal challenge.

He is reported to having been a generous king, giving to church and populous. He was the first king in over 100 years to revise the laws developed under Hywel Dda.

Unfortunately, in 1073, the Normans began their advance through north Wales, and defeated Bleddyn in a surprise attack. Weakened, he became vurnerable to his southern neighbor, Rhys ab Owain of Deheubarth. In 1075, Rhys betrayed Bleddyn, leading to his murder. However, Bleddyn's descendents became the main ruling family of Powys. [The Welsh Kings]

_______________________

During the later years of the reign of his half-brother, Gruffyd, the English had brought Wales into at least nominal subjection. Gruffyd was killed by the English 5 Aug 1063. Bleddyn and his brother Rhiwallon, having submitted to King Edward, were made rules of Gwynedd and Powys. The Normans who came with William the Conqueror soon encroached upon the Welsh who resisted them and Rhiwallon was slain in battle in 1070. Bleddyn was then the sole Ruler. [The Weaver Genealogy]

___________________________

In 1075, Bleddyn was killed by Rhys, the brother of Maredudd ab Owain, and Rhys in turn was likeed in 1078 by Caradog ap Gruffudd. Bleddyn's kingdom passed to his cousin, Trahaearn ap Caradog, but Trahaearn was killed, along with Caradog ap Gruffudd, in the battle of Mynydd Carn in 1081. [A History of Wales; John Davies]

  Marriage Information:

Bleddyn married Haer FERCH CYNILLIN, daughter of Cynillin AP Y BLAIDD RYDD and Unknown, in 1044. (Haer FERCH CYNILLIN was born about 1025 in Gest near Penmorfa, Caernarvonshire, Wales and died after 1050.)

   Marriage Information:

Bleddyn also married Miss FERCH BROCHWEL, daughter of Brochwel AP BLEDRUS and Unknown, before 1058 in 2nd wife. (Miss FERCH BROCHWEL was born about 1040 in Anglesey, Wales.)

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Bleddyn ap Cynfyn, Brenin of Gwynedd and Powys's Timeline

1025
1025
Montgomeryshire,Wales
1044
1044
Age 19
Wales
1045
1045
Age 20
Montgomeryshire, Wales
1047
1047
Age 22
Montgomeryshire, Wales
1049
1049
Age 24
Montgomeryshire, Wales
1051
1051
Age 26
Montgomeryshire, Wales
1053
1053
Age 28
Powys, Wales
1056
1056
Age 31
Montgomeryshire, Wales
1058
1058
Age 33
Wales
1060
1060
Age 35
Montgomeryshire, , Wales