Boson d'Autun, Comte de Vienne, Dux de Provence

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Boson d'Autun, Comte de Vienne, Dux de Provence

Nicknames: "/Boso I of Provence/", "boso de provence carolingian"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Metz, Moselle, Lorraine, France
Death: Died in Vienne, Isere, Rhone-Alpes, France
Place of Burial: Cathédrale de Saint-Maurice, Vienne, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Bivin, count & lay abbot of Gorze and Richilde d'Arles
Husband of Unknown Wife of Boso and Ermengardis d'Italie, Queen of Provence
Father of William; Rudolph II Graf von Vienne; Richardis de Metz; Folmar von Metzgau; Willa, Queen of Upper Burgundy and 4 others
Brother of Buvinus de Metz; Richildis d'Ardennes, de Provence; Richard II le Justicier, duc de Bourgogne and N.N. de Metz
Half brother of Richard d'Autunois

Occupation: Roi de Bourgogne-Provence 879, duc de Lombardie, King of Provence, King of Kingdom of Provence, Count of Lyon and Vienne, Lay Abbot of St. Maurice d'Agaune, Unknown GEDCOM info: Konge af Nedre Burgund 879 - 87 Unknown GEDCOM info: 0, Konge, Italian Count
Managed by: Noel Clark Bush
Last Updated:

About Boson d'Autun, Comte de Vienne, Dux de Provence

Boso, son of Bivin (Bouvinus), died 11 Jan 887. Comte de Vienne, King of Provence.

1st wife unknown. Child Willa (m. Rudolf d'Auxerre and Hugues d'Arles).

2nd wife Ermengarde (dau of Louis II King of Italy); children --Engelberga, --Louis, and --unnamed daughter (wife of Manasses Comte de Vergy).

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm


BOSON, son of comte BUVINUS [Bouvin] & his wife --- d'Arles (-Vienne, Isère 11 Jan 887, bur Vienne, cathédrale de Saint-Maurice).

The Annals of Hincmar name "Bosone filio Buvini quondam comitis" in 869[12]. An agreement between Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks and his brother Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks dated Jun 860 names "nobilis ac fidelibus laicis…Chuonradus, Evrardus, Adalardus, Arnustus, Warnarius, Liutfridus, Hruodolfus, Erkingarius, Gislebertus, Ratbodus, Arnulfus, Hugo, item Chuonradus, Liutharius, Berengarius, Matfridus, Boso, Sigeri, Hartmannus, Liuthardus, Richuinus, Wigricus, Hunfridus, Bernoldus, Hatto, Adalbertus, Burchardus, Christianus, Leutulfus, Hessi, Herimannus, item Hruodulfus, Sigehardus"[13], although it is not known whether "…Boso…" refers to the same person.

His brother-in-law Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks gave him the abbey of Saint-Maurice d'Agaune. "Boso comes simulque Bernardus comes ad vicem" donated Nogent "in pago Otmense" for the soul of "quondam amici nostri Odonis comitis…uxoris suæ Guendilmodis" to Saint-Martin-des-Tours by charter dated 871 after 21 Jun[14].

He was invested as Comte de Vienne in 870 by King Charles II after the latter conquered the kingdom of Provence.

He was installed as Comte de Berry in [872] after the deposition of Gérard comte en Aquitaine.

He accompanied King Charles II to Italy in 875. An agreement dated Feb 876 of Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks names "Bosonis…ducis et sacri palatii archiministri atque imperiali missi" among those present in Italy with the king[15].

He was invested as dux regni Italici at Pavia in Feb 876, fulfilling the role of viceroy in the absence of the king.

Recalled by Emperor Charles in early 877, Boson left his brother Richard in his place in Italy and became Governor and Comte de Provence [877].

He took part in the general rebellion of 877, refusing to swear allegiance to Louis II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks on his accession[16]. After the death of King Louis II, "Hugo abbas et Boso et alii" sent "Walterum Episcopum Aurelianensem et Goiranum et Anscherum comites" to Ludwig III King of the East Franks to offer him part of the kingdom in 879[17].

He was named King BOSON[18] at Mantaille, near Vienne 15 Oct 879 by the archbishops of Vienne, Besançon, Lyon, Tarentaise, Aix and Arles, and crowned at Lyon a few days later. He installed his capital at Vienne.

The reigning Carolingian monarchs formed a league against him, captured Lyon, and besieged Vienne which fell in 882, although Boson refused to capitulate[19]. The Annales Fuldenses record that the sons of Ludwig II " der Deutsche" King of the East Franks fought "Buosonem in Galliam" in 880 and expelled him from "Madasconam urbem", accepting homage from "Bernhardum qui in ea principatum tenebat"[20].

The Annales Fuldenses record the death in 887 of "Buosone", leaving a young son by "filia Hludowici Italici regis"[21]. The epitaph of "Bosonis Regis" records his death "III Id Jan VIII anno regni sui"[22].

[m firstly ---. The name of the supposed first wife of King Boson is not known. The only reference to her existence so far identified is in the Annales Fuldenses which record that "Buosone comite" abducted "filiam Hludowicis imperatoris de Italiam" by force in 878, having poisoned his wife[23]. If this is correct, it is surprising that it is not reported in any other contemporary source. However, as shown below, the chronology is favourable for one of the possible daughters attributed to King Boson to have been born from a first marriage, although as the existence of this daughter is not certain this represents a circular argument for proving the fact of the king´s supposed first marriage.]

m [secondly] ([Mar/Jun] 876) ERMENGARDIS, daughter of Emperor LOUIS II King of Italy & his wife Engelberga --- ([852/55]-896 before 2 Jun, bur Vienne, Isère, cathédrale de Saint-Maurice). "Hludowicus…imperator augustus" granted the abbey of San Salvatore to "nostra coniux…Angilberga ante filiam…nostrum Hermengardem" by charter dated at Venosa 28 Apr 868[24]. Regino records the marriage of "Hirmingardem filiam Hludowici imperatoris" and "Bosoni germano Richildis reginæ"[25]. "Ludowicus…rex" granted "nepta nostra Hirmingarda" property at Morcula and Almenno in the county of Bergamo by a charter dated 26 Feb 875[26]. Abbess of San Salvatore at Brescia 878. The Annales Fuldenses record that "Buosone comite" abducted "filiam Hludowicis imperatoris de Italiam" by force in 878, having poisoned his wife[27]. "Boso…et coniunx mea Hirmingardi proles imperiales" donated property "in pago Laticense…in villa Lantinus" to the abbey of Montiérender by charter dated 25 Jul 879, subscribed by "Richardi comitis, Teutbaldi comitis, Bernardi comitis"[28]. The Annales Bertiniani name "Richardus frater Bosonis" when recording that, after the capture of Vienne by the forces of King Carloman, he took “uxorem Bosonis et filiam eius” back to “comitatum suum Augustudensem” in 882[29]. She was regent for her son King Louis from 890.

King Boson & his [first] wife had [one child]:

1. [WILLA [Guille] (-before 924). Chaume[30] and Hlawitschka[31] suggest that Willa, wife of Rudolf I King of Burgundy, was the daughter of King Boson, the former considering that she was the daughter of King Boson's second marriage while the latter prefers his first wife as her mother. If Willa was the daughter of King Boson, it is more probable that she was the daughter of his first marriage as her husband is recorded as already having children in 888[32]. Alternatively, she may have been King Rudolf's second wife (which Chaume assumes), the king's children having been born from an unrecorded earlier marriage. This would fit better with Willa's second marriage in 912, when her second husband would have been about 30 years old, while Willa would have been over 50 if her first children had been born in the early 880s. m firstly ([880/85][33]) RUDOLF, son of CONRAD II [Welf] Comte d'Auxerre & his wife Waldrada --- (-25 Oct 911). He was proclaimed RUDOLF I King of Upper Burgundy in 888. m secondly (912) as his first wife, HUGUES d'Arles, son of THEOTBALD Comte d'Arles & his wife Berta of Lotharingia [Carolingian] ([880]-10 Apr 947). He succeeded as UGO King of Italy in 926.]

King Boson & his second wife had three children:

2. ENGELBERGA ([877]-after Jan 917). Her origin is deduced from her donation to Cluny with her husband dated Jan 917, in which her brother "Ludovico" is named[34]. The Annales Bertiniani record the betrothal in 878 of "filiam Bosonis" and "Karlomanno filio suo [=Hlodowici rex]"[35]. It is assumed that this daughter was Engelberga, who was an infant at the time, but no proof has been found which confirms that this is the case. "Bosonis" could refer either to the future King Boson or to Count Boson, husband of the adulterous Engiltrudis (see below). While Boson of Provence had refused to swear allegiance to Louis II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks ("Hlodowici rex") on the latter's accession, it is not known whether he was still in rebellion the following year. Assuming that some reconciliation had taken place, a marriage alliance between the two parties would have been a likely possibility. The other Count Boson was presumably of less political importance and, in addition, his problems with his adulterous wife may have rendered his daughters unmarriageable at the time. If she was the daughter of the future King Boson, it is probable that she was the child of his first marriage, although it is not impossible that she was newly born at the time of the betrothal given the age of her proposed husband. Engelberga is named as co-founder with her husband of the monastery of Cluny in a charter dated 11 Sep 910[36]. She became a nun at San Sisto, Piacenza. Betrothed (11 Sep 878) to CARLOMAN, son of LOUIS II "le Bègue" King of the Franks & his first wife Ansgardis --- (867-killed accidentally Bézu-la-Forêt, near Andelys, Eure 6 Dec 884, bur église de l'abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). He succeeded his brother in 882 as CARLOMAN King of the West Franks. m (before 898[37]) GUILLAUME I "le Pieux" Duke of Aquitaine, son of BERNARD "Plantevelue" Comte d'Auvergne & his wife Ermengarde [d'Auvergne] (-6 Jul 918, bur Abbaye de Brioude, Haute-Loire).

3. LOUIS (late 882 or after-Arles 5 Jun 928). Herimannus names "puer Ludowicus" son of Boson "ex filia Ludowici Italiæ imperatoris" when recording that he was adopted by Emperor Karl III after his father's death[38]. The Annales Bertiniani name "Richardus frater Bosonis" when recording that, after the capture of Vienne by the forces of King Carloman, he took “uxorem Bosonis et filiam eius” back to “comitatum suum Augustudensem” in 882[39], which suggests that Louis was born after the siege of Vienne. The Annales Fuldenses record the death in 887 of "Buosone", leaving a young son by "filia Hludowici Italici regis" but does not name him[40]. His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 6 Jun 903 under which "Hludovicus…imperator augustus" confirmed privileges which Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks had ceded to "fideles nostri Liutfridus, Hugo atque Teutbertus comites" at the request of "Adalelmo comite et eius coniugi Rotlindi", the charter naming "rex genitor nostri Boso"[41]. "Ludovico" is named as brother of Engelberga in the latter's donation to Cluny dated Jan 917[42]. He was adopted by his maternal great uncle Emperor Karl III "der Dicke/le Gros" at Kirchen-am-Rhein end May 887, at the request of his mother, rendering him eligible to be elected king according to the rules of Carolingian succession[43]. He was elected LOUIS King [of Provence] at Valence in 890 by the Archbishops of Lyon, Arles, Vienne and Embrun, ruling over Provence and Viennois under the regency of his mother[44]. He was called to Italy in 896 by opponents of Berengario King of Italy, captured Pavia, expelled Berengario, and was elected LOUIS III King of Italy at Pavia 12 Oct 900, crowned the same day. He claimed the imperial crown from Pope Benedict IV, and was crowned Emperor LUDWIG III in Rome 15 or 22 Feb 901, although this was only recognised in Lombardy and Tuscany. He was expelled from Pavia by King Berengario in Jul 902, whereupon he returned to Vienne, continuing to call himself emperor. He was recalled to Italy in 905 by Adalbero II Marchese of Tuscany and reconquered the kingdom, but was captured by King Berengario at Verona and blinded 21 Jul 905. Regino records that "Hludowicus filius Bosonis" expelled "Berengarium" from Italy in 905[45]. He was freed and returned to Provence, where he continued to reign at Vienne, but in name only as Hugues Comte d'Arles was appointed governor[46]. "Ludowicus imperator augustus" restored property to the church of Avignon at the request of "comes nosterque propinquus Boso" by charter dated to [907/10][47]. Betrothed ([Jun/Jul] 900]) ANNA, daughter of Emperor LEON VI & his second wife Zoe Zautsina ([886/88]-[901/early 904], bur Constantinople Church of the Holy Apostles). The basis for this betrothal is a letter written by Nikolaos Mystikos, which Settipani quotes in French translation, recalling the writer's admonishing Emperor Leon VI for his unsuitable third marriage (dated to Spring 900), excused because of "l'accord…conclu avec le Franc…tu lui destinais comme épouse ta fille unique…[au] cousin de Berta auquel il est arrivé l'infortune que l'on sait"[48]. The date, the relationship with "Berta" (assuming, as Settipani proposes, that this is Berta daughter of Lothaire II King of Lotharingia who married Adalbert Marchese of Tuscany), and "l'infortune" (his blinding) are consistent with "le Franc" being identified with Louis III King of Italy (his title in 900). Settipani assumes that the marriage actually took place. However, the translation only refers to a proposed marriage ("…tu lui destinais…") and provides no proof that the marriage ever happened or, if it did occur, that the bride ever left Byzantium for Provence. Anna is not named in any of the surviving charters of Emperor Louis, nor has any mention of her been found in any of the primary sources so far consulted. This would have been the first marriage between the families of the eastern and western emperors as no previous betrothal resulted in a marriage. This absence from contemporary western documentation is therefore striking. It also contrasts sharply with the extensive records which relate the Byzantine origin of Theophano, wife of Emperor Otto II, even though Theophano's precise ancestry is still a mystery[49]. Traditional genealogies[50] show Emperor Louis III's son, Charles Constantin, as the child of this alleged first marriage of Emperor Louis, presumably because of his grandiose name. However, another possible explanation is that the name was a symbol of the emperor's hope that his son would one day unite the two successor parts of the ancient Roman empire, in the name of his illustrious predecessors Emperors Charlemagne and Constantine I "the Great", completely independent of his mother's maternal ancestry. Tougher suggests that Anna was legitimate, born after her parents' marriage, and that the marriage to King Louis did not take place[51]. If he is correct about her legitimacy at birth, this excludes her from being the mother of King Louis's son Charles Constantin, if the latter's birth date is correctly estimated below. Anna was crowned Augusta in Constantinople in [899/900], after the death of her mother and before the third marriage of her father[52]. Emperor Konstantinos VII's De Ceremoniis Aulæ records that "Anna et Eudocia, filiæ beati eiusdem Leonis ex [secunda uxore] Zoe", the Greek text specifying "Aννα και Aννα" although the editor suggests that "Ευδοκία" be substituted for the second Anna (without giving his reasons: this may result from confusion with Anna's older half-sister of that name), were buried in the church of the Holy Apostles[53]. It is not known whether this is an error, but in any case both daughters named Anna (assuming that there were two) must have died young, and presumably the second daughter must have been the one betrothed to Louis [de Provence] (assuming the betrothal took place). Her burial in Constantinople suggests that Anna never left her father's court. m ([Jun 902/905]) ADELAIS, daughter of ---. "Hludowicus…imperator augustus" granted property at Tressin, Viennois to "fideli nostro Girardo" at the request of "coniux nostra Adalaida" by charter dated 18 Jan 915[54]. Her origin is not known. According to Poupardin[55], she was Adelais, relative [maybe niece] of Rudolf I King of Upper Burgundy [Welf]. Presumably this is based on the two charters dated 28 Mar 943 and 18 May 943 under which "Carolus comes" is named "consanguineus noster" by Conrad I King of Burgundy[56]. The potential problem with this is the apparently impossible marriage of King Louis with his own niece. The solution would be either that Adelais was the daughter of King Rudolf by an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage, or that King Rudolf's known wife Willa was not the daughter of Boson King [of Provence]. The problem is discussed fully by Settipani[57]. The discussion proceeds on the basis that Adelais was in some way related to King Rudolf, but the precise basis for this speculation does not appear to be clearly stated. The estimated date for this relatively obscure marriage is based on its having taking place during the ex-emperor's period of exile in Vienne, before his recall to Italy, at a time when he would not have been considered a great marriage prospect by more prominent prospective fathers-in-law. The problem also is that “consanguineus” in the 943 charters could indicate a much more remote relationship than second cousin.

4. daughter ([after 882]-after 11 Aug 887). The existence of more than one daughter of King Boson & his second wife is confirmed by the charter dated 11 Aug 887 under which Emperor Karl III confirms a donation by "neptam nostram Hermingardim…filioque suo Hludouuico nepoti nostro et sororibus eius"[72]. It is not known how many other daughters there may have been. The Annales Bertiniani name "Richardus frater Bosonis" when recording that, after the capture of Vienne by the forces of King Carloman, he took “uxorem Bosonis et filiam eius” back to “comitatum suum Augustudensem” in 882[73], which suggests that any other children were born after the siege of Vienne. same person as…? [ERMENGARDE (-after Jun 924). One version of the Series abbatum Flaviniacensium, as reproduced only in a 17th century secondary source, records that "Richardus dux et Ingelbertus" installed "Vualonem, fratrem Manasserii comitis qui gener erat B fratris Richardi ducis" as abbot of Flavigny[74] which, if correct, means that the wife of Manassès was the daughter of King Boson. If this is right, her name suggests that she was the daughter of his second wife, although Chaume proposed that she was the daughter of his first marriage[75]. m MANASSES Comte [de Vergy], son of MANASSES & his wife --- (-925 or after).]


-------------------- Boso was a Frankish nobleman from the Bosonid-family, who was related to the Carolingian dynasty,[1] who rose to become King of Provence (879 – 887).

Boso was the son of Bivin of Gorze, a count in Lotharingia. His aunt Theutberga was the wife of king Lothair II of Lotharingia. Boso was also a nephew of the Italian count Boso, for whom he was named, and of Hucbert, lay abbot of Saint Maurice d’Agaune, to which he succeeded as lay abbot in 869.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boso_of_Provence -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boso_of_Provence -------------------- Boso of Provence From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Boso was a Frankish nobleman from the Bosonid-family, who was related to the Carolingian dynasty,[1] who rose to become King of Provence (879 – 887). Boso was the son of Bivin of Gorze, a count in Lotharingia. His aunt Theutberga was the wife of king Lothair II of Lotharingia. Boso was also a nephew of the Italian count Boso, for whom he was named, and of Hucbert, lay abbot of Saint Maurice d’Agaune, to which he succeeded as lay abbot in 869.

Service of Charles the Bald

In 870, Charles the Bald, King of West Francia, married Boso's sister Richilde. This marriage paved the way for Boso's career in the service of his royal brother-in-law. In the same year, Boso was appointed Count of Lyon and Vienne, replacing Gerard of Roussillon. In 872, Charles appointed him chamberlain and magister ostiariorum (master of porters) to his heir Louis the Stammerer. Boso likewise received investiture as Count of Bourges. Louis was reigning as a subordinate king of Aquitaine, but because of his youth, it was Boso who looked after the administration of that realm. In the autumn of 875, Boso accompanied Charles on his first Italian campaign and at the diet of Pavia in February 876 he was appointed arch-minister and missus dominicus for Italy and elevated to the rank of duke. He was probably also charged with the administration of Provence. He acted as a viceroy and increased his prestige even more by marrying Ermengard, the only daughter of the Emperor Louis II. [edit]Out of favour

However, he disapproved of Charles' second Italian campaign in 877 and conspired with other like-minded nobles against his king. After Charles's death in October, these nobles forced Charles's son to confirm their rights and privileges. Boso also formed close relations to the Papacy and accompanied Pope John VIII in September 878 to Troyes, where the Pope asked King Louis for his support in Italy. The Pope adopted Boso as his son and probably offered to crown Louis emperor. It is said that he wanted to crown Boso emperor.[2] [edit]Independent rule

In April 879, Louis died, leaving behind two adult sons, Louis and Carloman. Boso joined with other western Frankish nobles and advocated making Louis III of France the sole heir of the western kingdom, but eventually both brothers were elected kings. Boso, however, renounced allegiance to both brothers and in July claimed independence by using the style Dei gratia id quod sum: by the Grace of God, that is what I am. He also claimed that his imperial father-in-law had named him as his heir. On 15 October 879, the bishops and nobles of the region around the rivers Rhône and Saône assembled in the Synod of Mantaille elected Boso king as successor to Louis the Stammerer, the first non-Carolingian king in Western Europe in more than a century.[3]. This event marks the first occurrence of a "free election" among the Franks, without regard to royal descent, inspired by a canonical principle (but not constant practice) of ecclesiastical elections. Boso's realm, usually called the Kingdom of Provence, comprised the ecclesiastical provinces of the archbishops of Arles, Aix, Vienne, Lyon (without Langres), and probably Besançon, as well as the dioceses of Tarentaise, Uzès, and Viviers. After Louis and Carloman had divided their father's realm at Amiens in March 880, the two brothers joined to march against Boso. They took Mâcon and the northern parts of Boso's realm. Then uniting their forces with those of Charles the Fat, they unsuccessfully besieged Vienne from August to November. In August 882, Boso was again besieged at Vienne by his relative, Richard, Count of Autun, who took the city in September. After this, Boso could not regain most of his realm and was restricted to the vicinity of Vienne. He died in 887 and was succeeded by his son Louis the Blind. Boso was the progenitor of three successful lineages, called the "Bosonids" by modern historians. Through his marriage to Ermengard he also had two daughters: Ermengard (c.877-917), who married Manasses, Count of Chalon, and Ethelberga, who married first Carloman and then William the Pious, Count of Auvergne.[4] It is possible (though not certain) that the famous Guilla of Provence, queen of Upper Burgundy, was his daughter, then presumably by an earlier wife than Ermengarde.

-------------------- Boso was a Frankish nobleman from the Bosonid-family, who was related to the Carolingian dynasty,[1] who rose to become King of Provence (879 – 887). Boso was the son of Bivin of Gorze, a count in Lotharingia. His aunt Theutberga was the wife of king Lothair II of Lotharingia. Boso was also a nephew of the Italian count Boso, for whom he was named, and of Hucbert, lay abbot of Saint Maurice d’Agaune, to which he succeeded as lay abbot in 869. Contents [hide] 1 Service of Charles the Bald 2 Out of favour 3 Independent rule 4 Notes [edit]Service of Charles the Bald

In 870, Charles the Bald, King of West Francia, married Boso's sister Richilde. This marriage paved the way for Boso's career in the service of his royal brother-in-law. In the same year, Boso was appointed Count of Lyon and Vienne, replacing Gerard of Roussillon. In 872, Charles appointed him chamberlain and magister ostiariorum (master of porters) to his heir Louis the Stammerer. Boso likewise received investiture as Count of Bourges. Louis was reigning as a subordinate king of Aquitaine, but because of his youth, it was Boso who looked after the administration of that realm. In the autumn of 875, Boso accompanied Charles on his first Italian campaign and at the diet of Pavia in February 876 he was appointed arch-minister and missus dominicus for Italy and elevated to the rank of duke. He was probably also charged with the administration of Provence. He acted as a viceroy and increased his prestige even more by marrying Ermengard, the only daughter of the Emperor Louis II. [edit]Out of favour

Boso disapproved of Charles' second Italian campaign in 877 and conspired with other like-minded nobles against his king. After Charles's death in October, these nobles forced Charles's son to confirm their rights and privileges. Boso also formed close relations to the Papacy and accompanied Pope John VIII in September 878 to Troyes, where the Pope asked King Louis for his support in Italy. The Pope adopted Boso as his son and probably offered to crown Louis emperor. It is said that he wanted to crown Boso emperor.[2] [edit]Independent rule

In April 879, Louis died, leaving behind two adult sons, Louis and Carloman. Boso joined with other western Frankish nobles and advocated making Louis III of France the sole heir of the western kingdom, but eventually both brothers were elected kings. Boso, however, renounced allegiance to both brothers and in July claimed independence by using the style Dei gratia id quod sum: by the Grace of God, that is what I am. He also claimed that his imperial father-in-law had named him as his heir. On 15 October 879, the bishops and nobles of the region around the rivers Rhône and Saône assembled in the Synod of Mantaille elected Boso king as successor to Louis the Stammerer, the first non-Carolingian king in Western Europe in more than a century.[3]. This event marks the first occurrence of a "free election" among the Franks, without regard to royal descent, inspired by a canonical principle (but not constant practice) of ecclesiastical elections. Boso's realm, usually called the Kingdom of Provence, comprised the ecclesiastical provinces of the archbishops of Arles, Aix, Vienne, Lyon (without Langres), and probably Besançon, as well as the dioceses of Tarentaise, Uzès, and Viviers. After Louis and Carloman had divided their father's realm at Amiens in March 880, the two brothers joined to march against Boso. They took Mâcon and the northern parts of Boso's realm. Then uniting their forces with those of Charles the Fat, they unsuccessfully besieged Vienne from August to November. In August 882, Boso was again besieged at Vienne by his relative, Richard, Count of Autun, who took the city in September. After this, Boso could not regain most of his realm and was restricted to the vicinity of Vienne. He died in 887 and was succeeded by his son Louis the Blind. Boso was the progenitor of three successful lineages, called the "Bosonids" by modern historians. Through his marriage to Ermengard of Italy he also had two daughters: Ermengard (c.877-917), who married Manasses, Count of Chalon, and Ethelberga, who married first Carloman and then William the Pious, Count of Auvergne.[4] It is possible (though not certain) that the famous Guilla of Provence, queen of Upper Burgundy, was his daughter, then presumably by an earlier wife than Ermengarde. [edit]Notes

^ His mother's father, Boso, provided a daughter, Tetburgis/Teutberga, Boso's aunt, to be wife of Lothair II. (Constance B. Bouchard, "The Bosonids or Rising to Power in the Late Carolingian Age" French Historical Studies 15.3 (Spring 1988, pp. 407-431) genealogical table, p.409.. ^ Caravale, Mario (ed). Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani: LXI Guglielmo Gonzaga – Jacobini. Rome, 2003. ^ Constance B. Bouchard, "The Bosonids or Rising to Power in the Late Carolingian Age" French Historical Studies 15.3 (Spring 1988), pp. 407-431. ^ Riché, Les Carolingiens: Une famille qui fit l'Europe, genealogical table XII (Bosonides). Preceded by Louis the Stammerer King of Lower Burgundy 879–887 Succeeded by Louis the Blind

-------------------- Boso was a Frankish nobleman from the Bosonid-family, who was related to the Carolingian dynasty,[1] who rose to become King of Provence (879 – 887).

Boso was the son of Bivin of Gorze, a count in Lotharingia. His aunt Theutberga was the wife of king Lothair II of Lotharingia. Boso was also a nephew of the Italian count Boso, for whom he was named, and of Hucbert, lay abbot of Saint Maurice d’Agaune, to which he succeeded as lay abbot in 869.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boso_of_Provence -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boso_of_Provence -------------------- Boso of Provence From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Boso was a Frankish nobleman from the Bosonid-family, who was related to the Carolingian dynasty,[1] who rose to become King of Provence (879 – 887). Boso was the son of Bivin of Gorze, a count in Lotharingia. His aunt Theutberga was the wife of king Lothair II of Lotharingia. Boso was also a nephew of the Italian count Boso, for whom he was named, and of Hucbert, lay abbot of Saint Maurice d’Agaune, to which he succeeded as lay abbot in 869.

Service of Charles the Bald

In 870, Charles the Bald, King of West Francia, married Boso's sister Richilde. This marriage paved the way for Boso's career in the service of his royal brother-in-law. In the same year, Boso was appointed Count of Lyon and Vienne, replacing Gerard of Roussillon. In 872, Charles appointed him chamberlain and magister ostiariorum (master of porters) to his heir Louis the Stammerer. Boso likewise received investiture as Count of Bourges. Louis was reigning as a subordinate king of Aquitaine, but because of his youth, it was Boso who looked after the administration of that realm. In the autumn of 875, Boso accompanied Charles on his first Italian campaign and at the diet of Pavia in February 876 he was appointed arch-minister and missus dominicus for Italy and elevated to the rank of duke. He was probably also charged with the administration of Provence. He acted as a viceroy and increased his prestige even more by marrying Ermengard, the only daughter of the Emperor Louis II. [edit]Out of favour

However, he disapproved of Charles' second Italian campaign in 877 and conspired with other like-minded nobles against his king. After Charles's death in October, these nobles forced Charles's son to confirm their rights and privileges. Boso also formed close relations to the Papacy and accompanied Pope John VIII in September 878 to Troyes, where the Pope asked King Louis for his support in Italy. The Pope adopted Boso as his son and probably offered to crown Louis emperor. It is said that he wanted to crown Boso emperor.[2] [edit]Independent rule

In April 879, Louis died, leaving behind two adult sons, Louis and Carloman. Boso joined with other western Frankish nobles and advocated making Louis III of France the sole heir of the western kingdom, but eventually both brothers were elected kings. Boso, however, renounced allegiance to both brothers and in July claimed independence by using the style Dei gratia id quod sum: by the Grace of God, that is what I am. He also claimed that his imperial father-in-law had named him as his heir. On 15 October 879, the bishops and nobles of the region around the rivers Rhône and Saône assembled in the Synod of Mantaille elected Boso king as successor to Louis the Stammerer, the first non-Carolingian king in Western Europe in more than a century.[3]. This event marks the first occurrence of a "free election" among the Franks, without regard to royal descent, inspired by a canonical principle (but not constant practice) of ecclesiastical elections. Boso's realm, usually called the Kingdom of Provence, comprised the ecclesiastical provinces of the archbishops of Arles, Aix, Vienne, Lyon (without Langres), and probably Besançon, as well as the dioceses of Tarentaise, Uzès, and Viviers. After Louis and Carloman had divided their father's realm at Amiens in March 880, the two brothers joined to march against Boso. They took Mâcon and the northern parts of Boso's realm. Then uniting their forces with those of Charles the Fat, they unsuccessfully besieged Vienne from August to November. In August 882, Boso was again besieged at Vienne by his relative, Richard, Count of Autun, who took the city in September. After this, Boso could not regain most of his realm and was restricted to the vicinity of Vienne. He died in 887 and was succeeded by his son Louis the Blind. Boso was the progenitor of three successful lineages, called the "Bosonids" by modern historians. Through his marriage to Ermengard he also had two daughters: Ermengard (c.877-917), who married Manasses, Count of Chalon, and Ethelberga, who married first Carloman and then William the Pious, Count of Auvergne.[4] It is possible (though not certain) that the famous Guilla of Provence, queen of Upper Burgundy, was his daughter, then presumably by an earlier wife than Ermengarde.

-------------------- Boso was a Frankish nobleman from the Bosonid-family, who was related to the Carolingian dynasty,[1] who rose to become King of Provence (879 – 887). Boso was the son of Bivin of Gorze, a count in Lotharingia. His aunt Theutberga was the wife of king Lothair II of Lotharingia. Boso was also a nephew of the Italian count Boso, for whom he was named, and of Hucbert, lay abbot of Saint Maurice d’Agaune, to which he succeeded as lay abbot in 869. Contents [hide] 1 Service of Charles the Bald 2 Out of favour 3 Independent rule 4 Notes [edit]Service of Charles the Bald

In 870, Charles the Bald, King of West Francia, married Boso's sister Richilde. This marriage paved the way for Boso's career in the service of his royal brother-in-law. In the same year, Boso was appointed Count of Lyon and Vienne, replacing Gerard of Roussillon. In 872, Charles appointed him chamberlain and magister ostiariorum (master of porters) to his heir Louis the Stammerer. Boso likewise received investiture as Count of Bourges. Louis was reigning as a subordinate king of Aquitaine, but because of his youth, it was Boso who looked after the administration of that realm. In the autumn of 875, Boso accompanied Charles on his first Italian campaign and at the diet of Pavia in February 876 he was appointed arch-minister and missus dominicus for Italy and elevated to the rank of duke. He was probably also charged with the administration of Provence. He acted as a viceroy and increased his prestige even more by marrying Ermengard, the only daughter of the Emperor Louis II. [edit]Out of favour

Boso disapproved of Charles' second Italian campaign in 877 and conspired with other like-minded nobles against his king. After Charles's death in October, these nobles forced Charles's son to confirm their rights and privileges. Boso also formed close relations to the Papacy and accompanied Pope John VIII in September 878 to Troyes, where the Pope asked King Louis for his support in Italy. The Pope adopted Boso as his son and probably offered to crown Louis emperor. It is said that he wanted to crown Boso emperor.[2] [edit]Independent rule

In April 879, Louis died, leaving behind two adult sons, Louis and Carloman. Boso joined with other western Frankish nobles and advocated making Louis III of France the sole heir of the western kingdom, but eventually both brothers were elected kings. Boso, however, renounced allegiance to both brothers and in July claimed independence by using the style Dei gratia id quod sum: by the Grace of God, that is what I am. He also claimed that his imperial father-in-law had named him as his heir. On 15 October 879, the bishops and nobles of the region around the rivers Rhône and Saône assembled in the Synod of Mantaille elected Boso king as successor to Louis the Stammerer, the first non-Carolingian king in Western Europe in more than a century.[3]. This event marks the first occurrence of a "free election" among the Franks, without regard to royal descent, inspired by a canonical principle (but not constant practice) of ecclesiastical elections. Boso's realm, usually called the Kingdom of Provence, comprised the ecclesiastical provinces of the archbishops of Arles, Aix, Vienne, Lyon (without Langres), and probably Besançon, as well as the dioceses of Tarentaise, Uzès, and Viviers. After Louis and Carloman had divided their father's realm at Amiens in March 880, the two brothers joined to march against Boso. They took Mâcon and the northern parts of Boso's realm. Then uniting their forces with those of Charles the Fat, they unsuccessfully besieged Vienne from August to November. In August 882, Boso was again besieged at Vienne by his relative, Richard, Count of Autun, who took the city in September. After this, Boso could not regain most of his realm and was restricted to the vicinity of Vienne. He died in 887 and was succeeded by his son Louis the Blind. Boso was the progenitor of three successful lineages, called the "Bosonids" by modern historians. Through his marriage to Ermengard of Italy he also had two daughters: Ermengard (c.877-917), who married Manasses, Count of Chalon, and Ethelberga, who married first Carloman and then William the Pious, Count of Auvergne.[4] It is possible (though not certain) that the famous Guilla of Provence, queen of Upper Burgundy, was his daughter, then presumably by an earlier wife than Ermengarde. [edit]Notes

^ His mother's father, Boso, provided a daughter, Tetburgis/Teutberga, Boso's aunt, to be wife of Lothair II. (Constance B. Bouchard, "The Bosonids or Rising to Power in the Late Carolingian Age" French Historical Studies 15.3 (Spring 1988, pp. 407-431) genealogical table, p.409.. ^ Caravale, Mario (ed). Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani: LXI Guglielmo Gonzaga – Jacobini. Rome, 2003. ^ Constance B. Bouchard, "The Bosonids or Rising to Power in the Late Carolingian Age" French Historical Studies 15.3 (Spring 1988), pp. 407-431. ^ Riché, Les Carolingiens: Une famille qui fit l'Europe, genealogical table XII (Bosonides). Preceded by Louis the Stammerer King of Lower Burgundy 879–887 Succeeded by Louis the Blind

-------------------- From Wikipedia:

Boso was a Frankish nobleman from the Bosonid-family, who was related to the Carolingian dynasty, who rose to become King of Provence (879 – 887).

Boso was the son of Bivin of Gorze, a count in Lotharingia. His aunt Theutberga was the wife of king Lothair II of Lotharingia. Boso was also a nephew of the Italian count Boso, for whom he was named, and of Hucbert, lay abbot of Saint Maurice d’Agaune, to which he succeeded as lay abbot in 869.

In 870, Charles the Bald, King of West Francia, married Boso's sister Richilde. This marriage paved the way for Boso's career in the service of his royal brother-in-law. In the same year, Boso was appointed Count of Lyon and Vienne, replacing Gerard of Roussillon.

In 872, Charles appointed him chamberlain and magister ostiariorum (master of porters) to his heir Louis the Stammerer. Boso likewise received investiture as Count of Bourges. Louis was reigning as a subordinate king of Aquitaine, but because of his youth, it was Boso who looked after the administration of that realm.

In the autumn of 875, Boso accompanied Charles on his first Italian campaign and at the diet of Pavia in February 876 he was appointed arch-minister and missus dominicus for Italy and elevated to the rank of duke. He was probably also charged with the administration of Provence. He acted as a viceroy and increased his prestige even more by marrying Ermengard, the only daughter of the Emperor Louis II.

Boso also formed close relations to the Papacy and accompanied Pope John VIII in September 878 to Troyes, where the Pope asked King Louis for his support in Italy. The Pope adopted Boso as his son and probably offered to crown Louis emperor. It is said that he wanted to crown Boso emperor.

In April 879, Louis died, leaving behind two adult sons, Louis and Carloman. Boso joined with other western Frankish nobles and advocated making Louis III of France the sole heir of the western kingdom, but eventually both brothers were elected kings. Boso, however, renounced allegiance to both brothers and in July claimed independence by using the style Dei gratia id quod sum: by the Grace of God, that is what I am. He also claimed that his imperial father-in-law had named him as his heir. On 15 October 879, the bishops and nobles of the region around the rivers Rhône and Saône assembled in the Synod of Mantaille elected Boso king as successor to Louis the Stammerer, the first non-Carolingian king in Western Europe in more than a century. This event marks the first occurrence of a "free election" among the Franks, without regard to royal descent, inspired by a canonical principle (but not constant practice) of ecclesiastical elections.

Boso's realm, usually called the Kingdom of Provence, comprised the ecclesiastical provinces of the archbishops of Arles, Aix, Vienne, Lyon (without Langres), and probably Besançon, as well as the dioceses of Tarentaise, Uzès, and Viviers.

After Louis and Carloman had divided their father's realm at Amiens in March 880, the two brothers joined to march against Boso. They took Mâcon and the northern parts of Boso's realm. Then uniting their forces with those of Charles the Fat, they unsuccessfully besieged Vienne from August to November.

In August 882, Boso was again besieged at Vienne by his relative, Richard, Count of Autun, who took the city in September. After this, Boso could not regain most of his realm and was restricted to the vicinity of Vienne.

He died in 887 and was succeeded by his son Louis the Blind.

Boso was the progenitor of three successful lineages, called the "Bosonids" by modern historians. Through his marriage to Ermengard of Italy he also had two daughters: Ermengard (c.877-917), who married Manasses, Count of Chalon, and Ethelberga, who married first Carloman and then William the Pious, Count of Auvergne.[4]

It is possible (though not certain) that the famous Guilla of Provence, queen of Upper Burgundy, was his daughter, then presumably by an earlier wife than Ermengarde.

-------------------- Boso was a Frankish nobleman from the Bosonid-family, who was related to the Carolingian dynasty,[1] who rose to become King of Provence (879 – 887).

Boso was the son of Bivin of Gorze, a count in Lotharingia. His aunt Theutberga was the wife of king Lothair II of Lotharingia. Boso was also a nephew of the Italian count Boso, for whom he was named, and of Hucbert, lay abbot of Saint Maurice d’Agaune, to which he succeeded as lay abbot in 869.

Contents

[hide]

   * 1 Service of Charles the Bald
   * 2 Out of favour
   * 3 Independent rule
   * 4 Notes

[edit] Service of Charles the Bald

In 870, Charles the Bald, King of West Francia, married Boso's sister Richilde. This marriage paved the way for Boso's career in the service of his royal brother-in-law. In the same year, Boso was appointed Count of Lyon and Vienne, replacing Gerard of Roussillon.

In 872, Charles appointed him chamberlain and magister ostiariorum (master of porters) to his heir Louis the Stammerer. Boso likewise received investiture as Count of Bourges. Louis was reigning as a subordinate king of Aquitaine, but because of his youth, it was Boso who looked after the administration of that realm.

In the autumn of 875, Boso accompanied Charles on his first Italian campaign and at the diet of Pavia in February 876 he was appointed arch-minister and missus dominicus for Italy and elevated to the rank of duke. He was probably also charged with the administration of Provence. He acted as a viceroy and increased his prestige even more by marrying Ermengard, the only daughter of the Emperor Louis II.

[edit] Out of favour

Boso disapproved of Charles' second Italian campaign in 877 and conspired with other like-minded nobles against his king. After Charles's death in October, these nobles forced Charles's son to confirm their rights and privileges.

Boso also formed close relations to the Papacy and accompanied Pope John VIII in September 878 to Troyes, where the Pope asked King Louis for his support in Italy. The Pope adopted Boso as his son and probably offered to crown Louis emperor. It is said that he wanted to crown Boso emperor.[2]

[edit] Independent rule

In April 879, Louis died, leaving behind two adult sons, Louis and Carloman. Boso joined with other western Frankish nobles and advocated making Louis III of France the sole heir of the western kingdom, but eventually both brothers were elected kings. Boso, however, renounced allegiance to both brothers and in July claimed independence by using the style Dei gratia id quod sum: by the Grace of God, that is what I am. He also claimed that his imperial father-in-law had named him as his heir. On 15 October 879, the bishops and nobles of the region around the rivers Rhône and Saône assembled in the Synod of Mantaille elected Boso king as successor to Louis the Stammerer, the first non-Carolingian king in Western Europe in more than a century.[3]. This event marks the first occurrence of a "free election" among the Franks, without regard to royal descent, inspired by a canonical principle (but not constant practice) of ecclesiastical elections.

Boso's realm, usually called the Kingdom of Provence, comprised the ecclesiastical provinces of the archbishops of Arles, Aix, Vienne, Lyon (without Langres), and probably Besançon, as well as the dioceses of Tarentaise, Uzès, and Viviers.

After Louis and Carloman had divided their father's realm at Amiens in March 880, the two brothers joined to march against Boso. They took Mâcon and the northern parts of Boso's realm. Then uniting their forces with those of Charles the Fat, they unsuccessfully besieged Vienne from August to November.

In August 882, Boso was again besieged at Vienne by his relative, Richard, Count of Autun, who took the city in September. After this, Boso could not regain most of his realm and was restricted to the vicinity of Vienne.

He died in 887 and was succeeded by his son Louis the Blind.

Boso was the progenitor of three successful lineages, called the "Bosonids" by modern historians. Through his marriage to Ermengard of Italy he also had two daughters: Ermengard (c.877-917), who married Manasses, Count of Chalon, and Ethelberga, who married first Carloman and then William the Pious, Count of Auvergne.[4]

It is possible (though not certain) that the famous Guilla of Provence, queen of Upper Burgundy, was his daughter, then presumably by an earlier wife than Ermengarde.

[edit] Notes

  1. ^ His mother's father, Boso, provided a daughter, Tetburgis/Teutberga, Boso's aunt, to be wife of Lothair II. (Constance B. Bouchard, "The Bosonids or Rising to Power in the Late Carolingian Age" French Historical Studies 15.3 (Spring 1988, pp. 407-431) genealogical table, p.409..
  2. ^ Caravale, Mario (ed). Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani: LXI Guglielmo Gonzaga – Jacobini. Rome, 2003.
  3. ^ Constance B. Bouchard, "The Bosonids or Rising to Power in the Late Carolingian Age" French Historical Studies 15.3 (Spring 1988), pp. 407-431.
  4. ^ Riché, Les Carolingiens: Une famille qui fit l'Europe, genealogical table XII (Bosonides).

Preceded by

Louis the Stammerer King of Lower Burgundy

879–887 Succeeded by

Louis the Blind -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boso_of_Provence

Boso of Provence

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to:navigation, search

Fragment of a fresco at Charlieu Abbey, depicting Boso and the Protomartyr Stephen

Boso was a Frankish nobleman from the Bosonid-family, who was related to the Carolingian dynasty,[1] who rose to become King of Provence (879 – 887).

Boso was the son of Bivin of Gorze, a count in Lotharingia. His aunt Theutberga was the wife of king Lothair II of Lotharingia. Boso was also a nephew of the Italian count Boso, for whom he was named, and of Hucbert, lay abbot of Saint Maurice d’Agaune, to which he succeeded as lay abbot in 869.

Contents

[hide]

   * 1 Service of Charles the Bald
   * 2 Out of favour
   * 3 Independent rule
   * 4 Notes

[edit] Service of Charles the Bald

In 870, Charles the Bald, King of West Francia, married Boso's sister Richilde. This marriage paved the way for Boso's career in the service of his royal brother-in-law. In the same year, Boso was appointed Count of Lyon and Vienne, replacing Gerard of Roussillon.

In 872, Charles appointed him chamberlain and magister ostiariorum (master of porters) to his heir Louis the Stammerer. Boso likewise received investiture as Count of Bourges. Louis was reigning as a subordinate king of Aquitaine, but because of his youth, it was Boso who looked after the administration of that realm.

In the autumn of 875, Boso accompanied Charles on his first Italian campaign and at the diet of Pavia in February 876 he was appointed arch-minister and missus dominicus for Italy and elevated to the rank of duke. He was probably also charged with the administration of Provence. He acted as a viceroy and increased his prestige even more by marrying Ermengard, the only daughter of the Emperor Louis II.

[edit] Out of favour

Boso disapproved of Charles' second Italian campaign in 877 and conspired with other like-minded nobles against his king. After Charles's death in October, these nobles forced Charles's son to confirm their rights and privileges.

Boso also formed close relations to the Papacy and accompanied Pope John VIII in September 878 to Troyes, where the Pope asked King Louis for his support in Italy. The Pope adopted Boso as his son and probably offered to crown Louis emperor. It is said that he wanted to crown Boso emperor.[2]

[edit] Independent rule

In April 879, Louis died, leaving behind two adult sons, Louis and Carloman. Boso joined with other western Frankish nobles and advocated making Louis III of France the sole heir of the western kingdom, but eventually both brothers were elected kings. Boso, however, renounced allegiance to both brothers and in July claimed independence by using the style Dei gratia id quod sum: by the Grace of God, that is what I am. He also claimed that his imperial father-in-law had named him as his heir. On 15 October 879, the bishops and nobles of the region around the rivers Rhône and Saône assembled in the Synod of Mantaille elected Boso king as successor to Louis the Stammerer, the first non-Carolingian king in Western Europe in more than a century.[3]. This event marks the first occurrence of a "free election" among the Franks, without regard to royal descent, inspired by a canonical principle (but not constant practice) of ecclesiastical elections.

Boso's realm, usually called the Kingdom of Provence, comprised the ecclesiastical provinces of the archbishops of Arles, Aix, Vienne, Lyon (without Langres), and probably Besançon, as well as the dioceses of Tarentaise, Uzès, and Viviers.

After Louis and Carloman had divided their father's realm at Amiens in March 880, the two brothers joined to march against Boso. They took Mâcon and the northern parts of Boso's realm. Then uniting their forces with those of Charles the Fat, they unsuccessfully besieged Vienne from August to November.

In August 882, Boso was again besieged at Vienne by his relative, Richard, Count of Autun, who took the city in September. After this, Boso could not regain most of his realm and was restricted to the vicinity of Vienne.

He died in 887 and was succeeded by his son Louis the Blind.

Boso was the progenitor of three successful lineages, called the "Bosonids" by modern historians. Through his marriage to Ermengard of Italy he also had two daughters: Ermengard (c.877-917), who married Manasses, Count of Chalon, and Ethelberga, who married first Carloman and then William the Pious, Count of Auvergne.[4]

It is possible (though not certain) that the famous Guilla of Provence, queen of Upper Burgundy, was his daughter, then presumably by an earlier wife than Ermengarde.

[edit] Notes

  1. ^ His mother's father, Boso, provided a daughter, Tetburgis/Teutberga, Boso's aunt, to be wife of Lothair II. (Constance B. Bouchard, "The Bosonids or Rising to Power in the Late Carolingian Age" French Historical Studies 15.3 (Spring 1988, pp. 407-431) genealogical table, p.409..
  2. ^ Caravale, Mario (ed). Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani: LXI Guglielmo Gonzaga – Jacobini. Rome, 2003.
  3. ^ Constance B. Bouchard, "The Bosonids or Rising to Power in the Late Carolingian Age" French Historical Studies 15.3 (Spring 1988), pp. 407-431.
  4. ^ Riché, Les Carolingiens: Une famille qui fit l'Europe, genealogical table XII (Bosonides).

Preceded by

Louis the Stammerer King of Lower Burgundy

879–887 Succeeded by

Louis the Blind

This page was last modified on 14 April 2010 at 18:26 -------------------- Occupation: King of Burgundy -------------------- BIOGRAPHY: d. Jan. 11, 887, Vienne [France]

French BOSON, king of lower Burgundy, or Provence, from 877.

The son of Buvin (or Beuves), Count of Ardennes, Boso was given the governance of Lombardy (876) by his brother-in-law Charles II the Bald, king of the West Franks (France), and received the title of duke. During the minorities of the West Frankish kings Louis III and Carloman, he convoked the bishops of Provence and had them proclaim him their king (Oct. 15, 879). Boso thereafter proceeded to expand his domains. The territory over which he usurped royal authority included not only Provence but many lands to the north, as far as Autun--an enlarged Burgundy.

In succeeding years, especially 880-882, Boso lost many of the marginal northern lands to the French and German Carolingians, who were reestablishing their authority. He was succeeded by his son, Louis, who in 901 became the Frankish emperor Louis III.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica

-------------------- Boso was a Frankish nobleman from the Bosonid-family, who was related to the Carolingian dynasty, who rose to become King of Provence (879 – 887).

Service of Charles the Bald

In 870, Charles the Bald, King of West Francia, married Boso's sister Richilde. This marriage paved the way for Boso's career in the service of his royal brother-in-law. In the same year, Boso was appointed Count of Lyon and Vienne, replacing Gerard of Roussillon.

In 872, Charles appointed him chamberlain and magister ostiariorum (master of porters) to his heir Louis the Stammerer. Boso likewise received investiture as Count of Bourges. Louis was reigning as a subordinate king of Aquitaine, but because of his youth, it was Boso who looked after the administration of that realm.

In the autumn of 875, Boso accompanied Charles on his first Italian campaign and at the diet of Pavia in February 876 he was appointed arch-minister and missus dominicus for Italy and elevated to the rank of duke. He was probably also charged with the administration of Provence. He acted as a viceroy and increased his prestige even more by marrying Ermengard, the only daughter of the Emperor Louis II.

Out of favour

Boso disapproved of Charles' second Italian campaign in 877 and conspired with other like-minded nobles against his king. After Charles's death in October, these nobles forced Charles's son to confirm their rights and privileges.

Boso also formed close relations to the Papacy and accompanied Pope John VIII in September 878 to Troyes, where the Pope asked King Louis for his support in Italy. The Pope adopted Boso as his son and probably offered to crown Louis emperor. It is said that he wanted to crown Boso emperor.

Independent rule

In April 879, Louis died, leaving behind two adult sons, Louis and Carloman. Boso joined with other western Frankish nobles and advocated making Louis III of France the sole heir of the western kingdom, but eventually both brothers were elected kings. Boso, however, renounced allegiance to both brothers and in July claimed independence by using the style Dei gratia id quod sum: by the Grace of God, that is what I am. He also claimed that his imperial father-in-law had named him as his heir. On 15 October 879, the bishops and nobles of the region around the rivers Rhône and Saône assembled in the Synod of Mantaille elected Boso king as successor to Louis the Stammerer, the first non-Carolingian king in Western Europe in more than a century. This event marks the first occurrence of a "free election" among the Franks, without regard to royal descent, inspired by a canonical principle (but not constant practice) of ecclesiastical elections.

Boso's realm, usually called the Kingdom of Provence, comprised the ecclesiastical provinces of the archbishops of Arles, Aix, Vienne, Lyon (without Langres), and probably Besançon, as well as the dioceses of Tarentaise, Uzès, and Viviers.

After Louis and Carloman had divided their father's realm at Amiens in March 880, the two brothers joined to march against Boso. They took Mâcon and the northern parts of Boso's realm. Then uniting their forces with those of Charles the Fat, they unsuccessfully besieged Vienne from August to November.

In August 882, Boso was again besieged at Vienne by his relative, Richard, Count of Autun, who took the city in September. After this, Boso could not regain most of his realm and was restricted to the vicinity of Vienne.

He died in 887 and was succeeded by his son Louis the Blind.

Boso was the progenitor of three successful lineages, called the "Bosonids" by modern historians. Through his marriage to Ermengard of Italy he also had two daughters: Ermengard (c.877-917), who married Manasses, Count of Chalon, and Ethelberga, who married first Carloman and then William the Pious, Count of Auvergne.

It is possible (though not certain) that the famous Guilla of Provence, queen of Upper Burgundy, was his daughter, then presumably by an earlier wife than Ermengarde.

view all 19

Boson d'Autun, Comte de Vienne, Dux de Provence's Timeline

844
844
849
849
850
850
Metz, Moselle, Lorraine, France
855
855
Age 5
855
Age 5
Burgundy, France
873
December 873
Age 23
Provence, France
876
876
Age 26
Châlons-en-Champagne, Champagne-Ardenne, France
876
Age 26
(Present Italy)
877
877
Age 27
Autun, Saone-et-Loire, Bourgogne, France
883
883
Age 33
Arles, (Present department Bouches de Rhone), Royaume Provence, (Present France)