John Armstrong, Sr. (1717 - 1795)

public profile

1

Matches

0 1 0
Adds more complete burial place.

View John Armstrong, Sr.'s complete profile:

  • See if you are related to John Armstrong, Sr.
  • Request to view John Armstrong, Sr.'s family tree

Share

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Brookeborough, Fermanagh, Ireland
Death: Died in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, United States
Occupation: Military - Colonel
Managed by: Nathan Dunn
Last Updated:

About John Armstrong, Sr.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Armstrong,_Sr.

John Armstrong (October 13, 1717 – March 9, 1795) was an American civil engineer and soldier who served as a major general in the Revolutionary War. He was a delegate to the Continental Congress for Pennsylvania. Armstrong County in Pennsylvania is named in his honor.

Early life

Armstrong was born on October 13, 1717, in Brookeborough, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland, to James Armstrong and Jane Campbell. John was educated in Ireland and became a civil engineer before emigrating to Pennsylvania. Armstrong came to Pennsylvania as a surveyor for the Penn family, who owned the colony. In 1750 he laid out the first plat or plan for the town of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and was one of its first settlers. He was later appointed surveyor for the newly established Cumberland County.

Seven Years War

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kittanning_Expedition

In 1758, Colonel Armstrong led 2,700 Pennsylvania provincial troops on the Forbes Expedition, the approach of which compelled the French to vacate and blow up Fort Duquesne. Armstrong became a good friend to the other militia commander in this expedition, Colonel George Washington.

American Revolution

In the early stages of the American Revolutionary War, Armstrong was a brigadier general in the Pennsylvania militia. On March 1, 1776, the Continental Congress appointed him to that same rank in the Continental Army. He was sent south to begin preparations for the defense of Charleston, South Carolina. He contributed his engineering talents to the construction of defenses that enabled them to withstand the Siege of Charleston later that year. When General Charles Lee arrived to take command, he returned to his duties with the main army and with the Pennsylvania militia. Pennsylvania named him Major General in charge of the state militia. This ended his service in the Continental Army, but not the war or his cooperation with General Washington.

At the Battle of Brandywine on September 11, 1777, Armstrong's militia held the far left of the American line. They were also to guard the Army's supplies. After a hard day's fighting the Americans were forced to withdraw or face being surrounded. Armstrong brought the supplies and his militia out from Pyle's Ford after dark.

In the Battle of Germantown on October 2, General Armstrong led the American right. His mission was to skirt the British left flank and attack there and in their rear. Despite delays and the troubles some units had in moving, the overall attack was going well, until the center was held up at the Benjamin Chew House. Then it collapsed after a friendly fire incident in the fog in which General Adam Stephen's men fired on Anthony Wayne's troops causing their withdrawal. Armstrong, whose men had advanced nearly to the center of Germantown, but were not greatly involved in the fight later complained that it was "....a glorious victory fought for and eight tenths won, ....mysteriously lost, for to this moment no one man can ....give any good reason for the flight."

After Germantown, Armstrong was granted permission to give up active command. At aged sixty, his health was declining, and old wounds were troubling him. Returning home to Carlisle, he was elected to the Continental Congress by the Pennsylvania Assembly. As a delegate from 1777 to 1780 he was a strong supporter of Washington and the Army. Armstrong was firm in his support for a new United States Constitution, and was returned to the Congress during its final days in 1787 and 1788.

Later life

Throughout his life Armstrong served in a number of local or civic offices. One of these, the Carlisle school board, led him to originally oppose Dr. Benjamin Rush's proposal to start a college in the town. He later relented, and became a member of the first Board of Trustees for Dickinson College. John died at home in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, on March 9, 1795, and is buried in the Old Carlisle Cemetery. In 1800, when Pennsylvania created a new county at Kittanning, it was named Armstrong County, in his honor.

___________________________________________

ID: I827634 Name: John Armstrong Given Name: John Surname: Armstrong Prefix: Brig. Gen. Sex: M Birth: 13 Oct 1717 in Brooksboro, Fermanagh County, Ireland Death: 1795 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania 1 2 3 Event: Fact 2 Note: Armstrong Co., PA Is Named For John Armstrong Event: Military Service Brigadier General Event: Alt Birth 1717 Antrim, Brooksboro County, Ireland 3 Event: Alt Death 1795 Herman, Harrisburg County, Pennsylvania 3 Change Date: 3 Jul 2007 at 15:16 Note: []

John immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1740.Source-Immigrants to America Be fore 1750-Baltimore Genealogical Publishing Co., 1965 by Federick Adams Virkus editor, page 75. John was a Revolutionary War General in the Army in Pa.Sou rce-Mrs. Robert Bergfelder 808 Fort Lane Apt. 238, Arlington, Tx. 76010 Source -Chronicles of the Armstrongs p. 329 & 369Source-Day's Historical Collection p. 465 State Library Harrisburg, Pa. Source-Chart of the Ten Lords of Mangerto n Castle Compiled by W.L.A.(Az.)

Father: James Armstrong b: Abt 1684 in Brooksboro, Fermanagh County, Ulster, Ireland Mother: Mary Campbell b: Abt 1688 in Brookboro, Fermanagh, Ireland

Marriage 1 Rebecca Lyon b: Abt 1720 in Pennsylvania Married: Nov 1746 in Pennsylvania 4 Change Date: 3 Jul 2007 Children John Rokeby Armstrong b: 25 Nov 1758 in Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania James Armstrong b: 29 Aug 1748 in Pennsboro, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

Marriage 2 Rebecca Armstrong b: Abt 2 May 1719 in Enniskillen, Fermanagh, Ulster, Ireland Married: Change Date: 3 Jul 2007 Children Rebecca Armstrong b: 1745 James Armstrong b: 29 Aug 1748 in Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania John Armstrong b: 28 Nov 1758 in Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

Sources: Media: Internet Database (Rootsweb) Abbrev: Owens Family (including Armstrongs) Title: Owens Family online @ Ancestry.com Author: Cal Owens Publication: June 2002 http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=calowen http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:745017&id=I34388531

http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=craigsharrow&id=I827634

JULY 1, 2008 CANNOT SAY THAT I AGREE THAT HE MARRIED TWO REBECCAS. MY OWN OPINION IS THAT THEY ARE ONE AND THE SAME. JSC

Armstrong, John (1717-1795) — also known as "Hero of Kittanny" — of Pennsylvania. Born in Brookeborough, County Fermanagh, Ireland (now Northern Ireland), October 13, 1717. Son of James Armstrong ; married to Rebecca Lyon; father of James Armstrong (1748-1828) and John Armstrong, Jr.. Civil engineer; surveyor; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1778-80. Died in Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pa., March 9, 1795. Interment at Old Carlisle Cemetery, Carlisle, Pa. Armstrong County, Pa. is named for him.

John Armstrong Sr. Memorial Photos Flowers Edit Birth: Oct. 13, 1717, Northern Ireland (Ulster) Death: Mar. 9, 1795 Carlisle Cumberland County Pennsylvania, USA

Revolutionary War Major General. He received his education in Ireland and became a civil engineer. He came to Pennsylvania as a surveyor for the Penn family. He laid out the plans for Carlisle, Pennsylvania in 1750 and became one of its first settlers. He was then appointed as surveyor for the newly established Cumberland County. When the French and Indian Wars began, he was a colonel in charge of militia troops stationed in Cumberland County. When a group of Indians and Frenchmen overtook Fort Granville and captured prisoners that were taken back to their fortified village of Kittanning on the Allegheny River, it was Armstrong that led an expedition that destroyed their village and rescued the prisoners. He led the "Forbes Expedition" of 2,700 Pennsylvania troops that forced the French to evacuate and blow up Fort Duquesne. There was another militia commander on that expedition who became a good friend of Armstrong, Colonel George Washington. Armstrong began the Revolutionary War as a brigadier general in the Pennsylvania militia, but on March 1, 1776, the Congress appointed him to the same rank in the Continental Army. With his engineering skill he was sent to Charleston to contribute to the construction of its defense. Later he returned to his regular army and Pennsylvania militia duties. His Continental Army duties ended when he accepted the position of Major General in the militia, but his war duties and cooperation with General Washington would continue. He would participate valiantly in the battles of Brandywine and Germantown, but with only modest success. At the age of sixty, his health not being what it once was, and old wounds bothering him, he was allowed to leave active command after Germantown. He was elected to the Continental Congress after returning to his home town of Carlisle and served from 1877 to 1878, strongly supporting Washington and the army. He was elected to the Congress again in its final days of 1787 and 1788 and was firm in supporting a new United States Constitution. In 1880, when Pennsylvania formed a new county at Kittanning, where he first became a hero, it was named Armstrong County in his honor. (bio by: Tom Todd)

Search Amazon for John Armstrong Sr.

Burial: Old Graveyard Carlisle Cumberland County Pennsylvania, USA

Maintained by: Find A Grave Record added: Aug 06, 2002 Find A Grave Memorial# 6664788

Added by: George Seitz

Cemetery Photo Added by: Janet Wright

- Mario Added: Jun. 24, 2009

- Jo Anne (Neely) Gomez Added: May. 29, 2009 Continental Congressman from Pennsylvania, 1778-1780. - Garver Graver Added: Apr. 16, 2009

More About COL. JOHN ARMSTRONG: Burial: OLD GRAVEYARD CEMETERY

Children of COL. ARMSTRONG and REBECCA LYON are: i. JAMES6 ARMSTRONG, b. August 29, 1748, PENNSBORO, LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA; m. MARY STEPHENSON, June 17, 1789, CARLISLE, CUMBERLAND COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA. 7. ii. JOHN ROKEBY ARMSTRONG, b. November 25, 1758, CARLISLE, CUMBERLAND COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA; d. April 01, 1843, RED HOOK, DUCHESS COUNTY, NEW YORK. 8. iii. REBECCA ARMSTRONG.

6. MARGARET5 ARMSTRONG (JAMES4, JAMES3, JAMES2, JAMES1) died 1793. She married (1) JAMES TURNER. She married (2) JOHN LYON in IRELAND. He died 1780.

Notes for JOHN LYON:

John Lyon emigrated with his family from Enniskillen, County Fermanagh, Province of Ulster, Ireland, to the Province of Pennsylvania, in the year 1763, and settled in Cumberland county, now Milford township, Juniata county, about two miles west of Mifflintown. The warrant for this tract of land, two hundred and seventy-three acres and sixty-three perches, is dated September 18, 1766. In 1773 the Proprietaries granted to John Lyon, et al., twenty acres of land for the use of the Presbyterian Church of Tus- carora, where he is buried. He died in 1780. He married, in Ireland, Margaret Armstrong, sister of Colonel John Armstrong, one of the prominent and patriotic Pennsylvanians of Provincial and Revolutionary times. She was a woman of bright intellect, remarkable intelligence, and a fine conversationalist. She died about 1793, and is buried in Tuscarora.

William Lyon, son of John and Margaret (Armstrong) Lyon, preceded his father and family to the Province of Pennsylvania, having arrived about 1750, and attained the position of assistant surveyor to his uncle, John Armstrong, who was deputy surveyor and justice of the peace for Cumberland county, a well- educated man who had arrived from Ireland in 1748. Together they laid out the town of Carlisle, by order of the Proprietaries, in 1751, and the seat of justice was then permanently established there. William Lyon entered the Provincial military service for the defense of the frontier against the French and Indians, and as first lieutenant of the Pennsylvania regiment, appointed December 6, J757> participated in Forbes' great expedition against Fort Duquesne, in 1758. He resigned in March, 1759, and was appointed a magistrate in 1764 by Governor John Penn, then in Carlisle, dispatching Colonel Bouquet on his second expedition. On the opening of the Revolution and the suppression of the Pro

vincial authority he was appointed by the Supreme Executive Council a member of the Committee of Safety, October 16, 1776; prothonotary for Cumberland county, March 12, 1777; clerk of the Orphans' Court, February 9, 1779; and register and recorder, February 13, 1779; he was reappointed by Governor Mifflin register of wills, September 4, 1790, and prothonotary, register and recorder, and clerk of the Orphans' Court, August 17, 1791; he was also reappointed by Governor McKean, January 29, 1800, prothonotary and clerk of the courts, and continued prothonotary by proclamation in 1802 and 1805; he was appointed by the Supreme Executive Council to receive subscriptions for Cumberland county for a loan of $20,000,000, authorized by Congress, June 29, 1779. William Lyon, born March 17, 1729, in Ireland, died in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, February 7, 1809; married (first), in 1756, Alice Armstrong, daughter of his uncle, Colonel John Armstrong, of Carlisle, Pennsylvania. He married (second), in 1768, Ann Fleming, of Carlisle, Pennsylvania.

http://books.google.com/books?pg=RA3-PA668&lpg=RA3-PA668&dq=JOHN+armstrong+C ARLISLE+PENNSYLVANIA&sig=5VU7FwypE-YdKVgbcqWElkkNpOM&ei=T6aISvPaK6KJtgfp8Njn DA&ct=result&id=muUsAAAAYAAJ&ie=ISO-8859-1&ots=KRoQVbENMI&output=html_text

Child of MARGARET ARMSTRONG and JOHN LYON is: i. WILLIAM6 LYON.

Generation No. 6

7. JOHN ROKEBY6 ARMSTRONG (COL. JOHN5, JAMES4, JAMES3, JAMES2, JAMES1) was born November 25, 1758 in CARLISLE, CUMBERLAND COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, and died April 01, 1843 in RED HOOK, DUCHESS COUNTY, NEW YORK. He married ALIDA LIVINGSTON January 19, 1789, daughter of ROBERT LIVINGSTON and MARGARET BEEKMAN. She was born December 24, 1761, and died 1822.

Notes for JOHN ROKEBY ARMSTRONG:

ID: I826782 Name: John Rokeby Armstrong Given Name: John Rokeby Surname: Armstrong Prefix: Gen Suffix: Secretary of War, U.S. Senator 1 Sex: M Birth: 25 Nov 1758 in Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania 2 Death: 1 Apr 1843 in Redhook, Dutchess County, N.Y 2 3 4 5 2 Change Date: 3 Jul 2007 at 15:16 Note: John was a General and Secretary of War in 1813-1814 during the War of 1812He served in the American Revolution and was elected to the Continental Congress in 1787, served in the U.S. Senate 1800-1804, and was minister in Paris France 1804-1810.

John assisted in drafting the 'Declaration Of Independence'. He was grandfather of Elizabeth Brown born 1814.John was a Brig. General and was in charge of the defense of New York City.

Father: John Armstrong b: 13 Oct 1717 in Brooksboro, Fermanagh County, Ireland Mother: Rebecca Lyon b: Abt 1720 in Pennsylvania

Marriage 1 Alida Livingston b: 24 Dec 1761 in New York Married: 19 Jan 1789 in Livingston, New York 6

Children Margaret Rebecca Armstrong b: 1800 in Albany, New York Henry Beekman Armstrong Horatio Gates Armstrong b: Abt 1790 in Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania James Kosciuszko Armstrong William Armstrong John Armstrong

http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=craigsharrow&id=I826782

US Military Dictionary: John Armstrong, Jr. Armstrong, John, Jr. (1758-1843) soldier, senator, and secretary of war, born in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Armstrong was the son of John Armstrong, the “hero of Kittanning.” During the Revolutionary War, Armstrong wrote anonymously the controversial “Newburgh Addresses, ” intended to pressure Congress into redressing the army's grievances, especially concerning the lack of pay, which were perceived as challenging George Washington's authority, but he was eventually forgiven. As a brigadier general, he was assigned the defense of New York harbor in 1812. As war secretary during the War of 1812, Armstrong infused new energy into the department, but treated his officers imperiously, was known to interfere in matters belonging to the commanders, failed to coordinate his activities with President James Madison, and was blamed for insufficient defense of Washington, D.C., that led to its burning by British troops after the Battle of Bladensburg in 1814. He resigned that year. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ John Armstrong (1813 - 1814): Secretary of War

John Armstrong was born in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, on November 25, 1758, and attended Princeton University. Armstrong began his political career in the state of Pennsylvania, first serving as secretary of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania (1783-1787) and subsequently as that state's adjutant general. After a term with the Continental Congress (1787-1788), Armstrong moved from Pennsylvania to New York and served for several years as a U.S. senator from that state (1800-1804).

He terminated his senatorial career in 1804 on account of a lack of interest, leaving his legislative duties behind to serve overseas as U.S. minister plenipotentiary to France (1804-1810). In addition, Armstrong filled in for one year as minister to Spain (1806). He returned home in 1810 with the United States embroiled in political conflict with France and Britain. With the onset of the War of 1812, Armstrong received a commission as brigadier general in the U.S. Army, marking his first stay with the Army since his service as aide-de-camp to General Horatio Gates during the Revolutionary War.

Armstrong accepted an appointment from President James Madison to become secretary of war in 1813. However, many observers blamed Armstrong for the Army's early failures in the war, practically forcing him to retire in 1814 after only one year of service. He subsequently did retire, moving to his home in New York and continuing life as a gentleman farmer and a writer. Armstrong died on April 1, 1843 in Red Hook, New York.

More About JOHN ROKEBY ARMSTRONG: Burial: RHINEBECK CEMETERY, RHINEBECK, NEW YORK

Child of JOHN ARMSTRONG and ALIDA LIVINGSTON is: 9. i. DAVID7 ARMSTRONG, b. VIRGINIA.

8. REBECCA6 ARMSTRONG (COL. JOHN5, JAMES4, JAMES3, JAMES2, JAMES1) She married (1) JAMES TURNER. She married (2) GEORGE DUFFIELD March 05, 1759 in LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, son of GEORGE DUFFIELD and MARGARET. He was born October 07, 1732 in LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

Child of REBECCA ARMSTRONG and GEORGE DUFFIELD is: i. GEORGE7 DUFFIELD, b. Abt. 1762.

Generation No. 7

9. DAVID7 ARMSTRONG (JOHN ROKEBY6, COL. JOHN5, JAMES4, JAMES3, JAMES2, JAMES1) was born in VIRGINIA. He married MRS. ARMSTRONG.

Child of DAVID ARMSTRONG and MRS. ARMSTRONG is: 10. i. STEPHEN8 ARMSTRONG, b. Abt. 1850.

Generation No. 8

10. STEPHEN8 ARMSTRONG (DAVID7, JOHN ROKEBY6, COL. JOHN5, JAMES4, JAMES3, JAMES2, JAMES1) was born Abt. 1850. He married MRS. ARMSTRONG.

Child of STEPHEN ARMSTRONG and MRS. ARMSTRONG is: 11. i. WILLIS9 ARMSTRONG, b. Abt. 1880.

Generation No. 9

11. WILLIS9 ARMSTRONG (STEPHEN8, DAVID7, JOHN ROKEBY6, COL. JOHN5, JAMES4, JAMES3, JAMES2, JAMES1) was born Abt. 1880. He married MRS. ARMSTRONG.

Child of WILLIS ARMSTRONG and MRS. ARMSTRONG is: 12. i. STEPHEN10 ARMSTRONG, b. Abt. 1900.

Generation No. 10

12. STEPHEN10 ARMSTRONG (WILLIS9, STEPHEN8, DAVID7, JOHN ROKEBY6, COL. JOHN5, JAMES4, JAMES3, JAMES2, JAMES1) was born Abt. 1900. He married MRS. ARMSTRONG.

Child of STEPHEN ARMSTRONG and MRS. ARMSTRONG is: 13. i. NEIL11 ARMSTRONG, b. August 05, 1930, WAPAKONETA, OHIO.

Generation No. 11

13. NEIL11 ARMSTRONG (STEPHEN10, WILLIS9, STEPHEN8, DAVID7, JOHN ROKEBY6, COL. JOHN5, JAMES4, JAMES3, JAMES2, JAMES1) was born August 05, 1930 in WAPAKONETA, OHIO. He married JANET SHEARON. She was born Abt. 1930.

Children of NEIL ARMSTRONG and JANET SHEARON are: i. ERIC12 ARMSTRONG, b. Abt. 1960. ii. MARK ARMSTRONG, b. Abt. 1962.

-------------------- Colonel John Armstrong - one of the prominent and patriotic Pennsylvanians of Provincial and Revolutionary Times - From Pennsylvania: Genealogies chiefly Scotch-Irish and German by William Henry Egle

view all

Brig. General John Armstrong, Sr. (Continental Army)'s Timeline

1717
October 13, 1717
Brookeborough, Fermanagh, Ireland
1748
August 29, 1748
Age 30
1758
November 25, 1758
Age 41
Carlisle, Cumberland, Pennsylvania, United States
1795
March 9, 1795
Age 77
Carlisle, Pennsylvania, United States
????
????
Carlisle, Pennsylvania, United States