Hananya "Bustenai" בוסתנאי ben Haninai (ben Haninai / בן חנינאי), Exilarch & Gaon of Pumbeditha (c.589 - 638) MP

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Nicknames: "Mar R. Huna", "Buṣbuhrā", "Nāsṭūnā", "and Ṣalūbā", "Taḥlifa", "Bostanai", "Bustanai", "Bustenai", "Bostenai"
Birthplace: Pembeditha, Babylon Persia
Death: Died in Baghdad, Baghdād, Iraq
Occupation: 1st Exilarch of the 3rd Dynasty, Exilarch at Bablyon, Guriah = Exilarch, Rosh Golah of Judah
Managed by: Lynn Diane Riemann
Last Updated:

About Hananya "Bustenai" בוסתנאי ben Haninai (ben Haninai / בן חנינאי), Exilarch & Gaon of Pumbeditha

Bustanay (Ḥaninay) ben Kafnay (Kafnai, Chofnai, etc)

Bustanay (Ḥaninay) ben Kafnay (ca. 618–670), frequently cited erroneously in some sources and by later scholars as Bustanay ben Ḥaninay, was the first exilarch (Aram. resh galuta) after the Muslim conquest of the Sassanid empire. Most of the sources about him are legendary and tendentious, and the few historical facts they provide are doubtful. According to an anonymous gaonic responsum from the tenth century, Caliph ʿUmar ibn al-Khaṭṭāb (r. 634–644) confirmed Bustanay in the office of exilarch and gave him Azdadwar, the captive daughter of the Sassanid king (in some sources Khosraw II, in others Yezdigerd III).

The Sassanid princess bore Bustanay three sons:

Guranshah, Mardanshah, and Shahriyar.

After Bustanay’s death, his two older sons by his Jewish first wife argued that their father had not converted the princess, his second wife, to Judaism, and therefore her children were slaves, not entitled to any part of his estate and not princes (Heb. nesi’im) of the Davidic house. The sages of Sura decided in favor of Azdadwar’s sons, citing the talmudic passage “A man will not perform intercourse as an act of harlotry” (BT Giṭṭin 81:2) in support of their ruling that Bustanay could be assumed to have converted her before taking her for a wife.

One of the sages, named Ḥaninay, issued Azdadwar a writ of manumission and even married his daughter to one of her great-grandsons. But the dispute over the legitimacy of the Bustanay dynasty was not settled, and the issue was raised again and again in gaonic responsa. Sherira Gaon (d. 1006), who was proud of his Davidic ancestry, emphasized that his family was not related to the descendants of Bustanay. The story of ʿUmar giving Bustanay the Persian princess is related without comment by Ibn Da’ud in his Sefer ha-Qabbala.

Another legend deals with Bustanay’s origins. It relates that the Persian king abolished the exilarchate and had all the members of the Davidic family killed. One of them had just been married and was murdered on his wedding night, but his widow survived the massacre and turned out to be pregnant. Soon afterward the king had a dream in which he was about to destroy a beautiful orchard but the master of the garden (none other than King David) intervened, threatening to kill him if he uprooted the last young sapling; the king was spared when he promised to make every effort to take care of the sapling.

The next day the king searched for survivors of the massacre, found the young widow, and had her brought to the palace, where she gave birth to a child who was named Bustanay (from Pers. būstān, garden). When the child grew to manhood, he was brought before the king. A fly landed on the youth’s brow, but he did not raise his hand to drive it away. Impressed by the young man’s good manners, the king reestablished the office of exilarchate and appointed Bustanay to the post. And that, says the legend, is why the exilarchic seal was ever after shaped like a fly. This tale, in this version, was printed for the first time in 1577 under the title Ma ʿ ase Bet David (Heb. The Deeds of the House of David), and is not known from elsewhere.

Another Judeo-Arabic version of the legend that differs in essential details was found in the Cairo Geniza. According to this account, the dynasty of the exilarch Kafnay was destroyed, not by a Persian king, but as a divine punishment because the exilarch had mistreated a gaon of the yeshiva who refused to endorse one of his rulings. The gaon then had the same dream as was described above and in consequence took Bustanay, the only surviving son of Kafnay, into his household.

When Bustanay reached the age of sixteen, he claimed the exilarchate but was refused

.

The conflict was brought before Caliph ʿUmar, who ruled in favor of Bustanay because of his fine manners and gave him a captive Persian maiden for a wife. Bustanay married the Persian slave but did not convert her, and one of her descendants turned out to be Anan ben David, the founder of the Karaite sect.

This Judeo-Arabic version of the legend, which has a clearly polemical intent, was used in the conflict between Nathan ben Abraham and Solomon ben Judah for leadership of the Palestinian yeshiva in the eleventh century. The similarity of certain details suggests that it may have originated in the tenth-century dispute between the exilarch David ben Zakkay (I) and Saʿadya Gaon. There is no way of knowing which version of the legend is earlier, and it may be that they were both composed around the same time during one of the many conflicts between the exilarchate and the gaonic academies. A third version of the legend, found in the chronicle Seder ʿOlam Zuṭa, tells the same story about Mar Zuṭra, an exilarch during the Sassanian period, a hundred years before the Arab conquest. It is unclear whether this story was the source for the Bustanay legend, or vice versa.

An attempt has been made to trace certain historical statements about Bustanay to Arabic sources. One of these is that he visited Medina in 623, another that he died in battle in 638, fighting on the Persian side against the Muslims, but both claims are based on uncertain and highly doubtful identifications of names and cognomens. The Arabic historical sources are discussed at length by Gil (1979 and 2004). Grossman (1984) and Gil (2004) have argued most cogently for identifying Bustanay's father as Kafnay with Ḥaninay being Bustanay's actual Aramaic Jewish name (for Hanan or Hananiah).

Roni Shweka

Bibliography

Gil, Moshe. “The Babylonian Encounter,” Tarbiẓ 48 (1979): 35–73 [Hebrew].

——–. Jews in Islamic Countries in the Middle Ages (Leiden: Brill, 2004), pp. 58–104 et passim.

Graetz, Heinrich. Divre Yeme Yisraʾel, ed. and trans. S. P. Rabinowitz (Warsaw, 1894), vol. 3, pp. 125–127, 412–415.

Grossman, Avraham. The Babylonian Exilarchate in the Gaonic Period (Jerusalem: Zalman Shazar Center, 1984), pp. 15–44 [Hebrew].

Tykocinski, H. “Bustanay the Exilarch,” Devir 1 (1923): 145–179 [Hebrew].

Citation Roni Shweka. " Bustanay (Ḥaninay) ben Kafnay." Encyclopedia of Jews in the Islamic World. Executive Editor Norman A. Stillman. Brill Online , 2012. Reference. Jim Harlow. 26 December 2012 <http://referenceworks.brillonline.com/entries/encyclopedia-of-jews-in-the-islamic-world/bustanay-haninay-ben-kafnay-SIM_0004740> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Genealogical chart

http://www.entrybytroops.org/bahaullahs-genealogy.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bostanai

Bostanai was the first exilarch under Arabian rule; he flourished about the middle of the seventh century. The name is Aramaized from the Persian "bustan" or "bostan" (as proper name see Ferdinand Justi, Iranisches Namenbuch, p. 74). Almost the only exilarch of whom anything more than the name is known, he is frequently made the subject of legends.

Bostanai was the son of the exilarch Hananiah. Hai Gaon, in "Sha'are Ẓedeḳ," p. 3a, seems to identify Bostanai with Haninai, and tells that he was given for wife a daughter of the Persian king Chosroes II (died 628), by the calif Omar (died 644). (See Rapoport, in "Bikkure ha-'Ittim," x.83; B. Goldberg, in "Ha-Maggid," xiii.363). Abraham ibn Daud, however, in his "Sefer ha-Ḳabbalah" (Adolphe Neubauer's Medieval Jewish Chronicles, i.64), says that it was the last Sassanid king, Yezdegerd (born 624; died 651-652; see Nöldeke, "Tabari," pp. 397 et seq.), who gave his daughter to Bostanai. But in that case it could have been only Calif Ali (656-661), and not Omar, who thus honored the exilarch (see "Ma'aseh Bet David"). It is known also that Ali gave a friendly reception to the contemporary Gaon Isaac (Sherira II's "Letter," ed. Neubauer, ib. p. 35; Abraham ibn Daud, ib. p. 62); and it is highly probable, therefore, that he honored the exilarch in certain ways as the official representative of the Jews. The office of the exilarch, with its duties and privileges, as it existed for some centuries under the Arabian rule, may be considered to begin with Bostanai.

http://akevoth.org/genealogy/duparc/3702.htm

Bustanai (d. 660/5) was the first Exilarch to be recognized by Arab rule. His birth and much of his life is surrounded by legend. As a token of appreciation, Caliph Ali gave him the daughter of the Persian king Yazdeger (Yazadagird III of Parthia ) for a slave. Eventually Bustanai married her.

His first wife, Adoa, a Davidic Jewish princess (relative), had two sons: Hisdai I & Baradai;

His 2nd wife, Dara or Azdadwar Izdundad or Izdadwar daughter of Zamaspdukht and King Shahrijar III of Persia. The Parthi princess, had three sons: (a) Hisdai II , (b) Nehemiah , and (c) Haninai [Hananiah], who was "exilarch" of Sura 689-694.

http://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/בוסתנאי_בן_חנינאי

בוסתנאי בן חנינאי (618 - 670) ראש הגולה בבבל, אשר קורות חייו עטופים באגדה.

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http://members.aol.com/rdavidh218/davidicdynasty.html

note: the descent-line is called the Nehar-Pekod Line from Bustanai's grandson Haninai [son of Baradai] to Mari [or Meir], who emigrated to Spain in AD 941 and founded the Meiriate ["B"] Line, which is also called the Mariite Line

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issue of (65) Haninai (Hainai), Gaon of Sura (above)

(66A) Hillel, Gaon of Sura 694-712

(66B) Yakob, Gaon of Sura 712-730, the father of (67) Mari, Gaon of Sura 748-756/or 751-756, the father of (68) Hillel, Gaon of Sura 788-797/or 792-798 (below)

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issue of (68) Hillel, Gaon of Sura 788-797/or 792-798 (above) was:

(69A) Ivomai (821) (below)

(69B) Natroi, Gaon of Sura (d853)

(69C) Rivyai, the father of (70) Joseph (841)

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issue of (69A) Ivomai (above) was:

(70) Tzedek Ha-Kohen (d848) (below)

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issue of (70) Tzedek Ha-Kohen (above) was:

(71A) Nahshon, Gaon of Sura 874-882, the father of (72) [K]Hai, Gaon of Sura 889-896 (below)

(71B) Hophni, had issue (below)

(71C) Nehemiah

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descendants of (71B) Hophni (above) were:

(72) Rabba[n] [his son], the father of

(73) Mari [went to Spain 941], ancestor of the Mariite Line , which is also called the Meirite "B" Line, the father of

(74) Samuel, the father of

(75) Hophni (d963), = [name], daughter of Tzadok Kahana (above)

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issue of (75) Hophni (above) was:

(76A) Samuel Ha-Kohen (d1013)

(76B) Joseph Na-Nagid, the father of (77) Samuel, the father of (78) Joseph Ha-Nagid, killed 1062 in a pogrom

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issue of (76A) Samuel Ha-Kohen (above) was:

(77A) Israel (1017)

(77B) Joseph Ibn Nagrela [Al-Nagrila] Ha-Nagid (d1034), had issue

(77C) Asmouna, wife of [K]Hai, Gaon of Pumbedita (d1038) (above)

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issue of (77B) Joseph Ibn Nagrela Ha-Nagid (above) was:

(78) Samuel Ha-Nagid, vizier 1027 (d1056)

Eve [his cousin], daughter of [K]Hai, Gaon of Pumbedita,

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descendants of (78) Samuel Ha-Nagid (d1013) (above), by generation, were:

(79) Joseph Ha-Nagid [his son] (executed 1066)

[name here], daughter of Rabbi Nissim Ben Yaakov, the parents of

(80) Yechiel, the father of

(81) Avraham, the father of

(82) Azariah (Azarya), the father of

(83) Ezekiel (Yekhezkel), the father of

(84) Laemiel, the father of

(85) Azariah, the father of

(86) Elijah (Eliyah), the father of

(87) Joseph (Yosef), the father of

(88) Nachman, the father of

(89) Kalonymos Kalman, the father of

(90) Leibush, the father of

(91) Eleazar, the father of

(92) Yerakmiel, the father of

(93) Arye-Zeev (Arieh-Zeev), the father of

(94) Yaakov, the father of

(95) Belzalel Ha-Zaken, the father of

(96) Isaac, the father of

(97) Yehuda Lev Hazaken (d1439/40), the father of

(98) Betzalel, the father of

(99) Hayyim (d1565), the father of

(100) Bezalel Loew (Lowe), ancestor of the Lowe, Loew, Loeb, & Lieb families, &, the father of three sons, who were:

(1)/(101a) Yehuda Lieb, ancestor of the Schneerson Family

(2)/(101b) Sinai Loeb, ancestor of the Eskeles Family

(3)/(101c) Mendel Lieb, ancestor of the Mendel Family & Menachem Mendel, called "Tzemach Tzeddek", adopted wife's surname, "Schneerson", the father of (a) Shmuel Schneerson, called "Maharash" (d1882) [the father of Sholom Dovber (d1920), the father of Yosef Yitzchak (d1950)] & (b) Boruch Schneur, father of Levi Yitzchak (d1944), father of Menachem Mendel Schneerson, claimant (d1994)(below)

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section 13.2: The Maharel's House

(101) Yehuda Lieb, called "The Maharel of Prague" (above), a rabbi (d1609), who, by wife, Pearl Shmelkes, begot 3 sons & 6 daughters, of whom the sons were:

(102A) Shmuel Zvi, whose descendants end with Jacob Frank (d1791) and his daughter, an heiress, Eve, called "The Divine Lady" (d1826)

(102B) Betzalel Loewe, ancestor of "The Alter Rebbe", ancestor of another modern family, the Schneersons

(102C) Zvi Mendel, or Mendel Lieb, among whose descendants was Israel of Rushin

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section 13.3: senior-line

(102a) Shmuel Zvi, father of

(103) Yanai Loewe, father of

(104) Zalman Lieb, father of

(105) Yosef, father of

(106) Yehuda [Jude] Lieb "of Prossnitz", claimant 1724 (d1730), father of

(107) Jacob Frank [Jacob Ben Judah], claimant (d1791), treated as a "king" by many of Europe's royal courts, he was the father of

(108) Eve (daughter), considered the dynasty's heiress & rightful queen; called "The Divine Lady" among other epithets, titles & styles; resided in a palace and presided over a lavish court; d 1816 without issue

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section 13.4: secondary-line & the Schneerson Family

(102b) Betzalel Loewe, a rabbi (d1600), the father of

(103) Schmuel, a rabbi (d1655), the father of

(104) Yehuda Lieb, a rabbi (d1704), the father of

(105) Moishe, a rabbi (d1736), the father of

(106) Schneur Zalman, a rabbi (d1735), the father of

(107) Boruch Ha-Tzakid Loewe, a rabbi (d1790), the father of

(108) Schneur Zalman Boruchovitch, called "The Alter Rebbe" (d1812/13), who, by wife, Sterna Segal, begot

(1)/(109A) Dover Shneuri Dov Baer, a.k.a. Dor Ber, adopted "Schneerson" as surname (d1826/27)

(2)/(109B) Chayim Avraham Schneur (d1844)

(3)/(109C) Moshe Schneur (d1877), begot (110a&b) 2 daughters, Rivkah & Rachel

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issue of (109A) Dover Shneuri Dov Baer, a.k.a. Dor Ber Schneerson (above), by wife, Sheina, was:

(1)/(110A) Menahem Nakhum (below)

(2)/(110B) Baruch Shmuel, father of (111) Schneur Zalman

(3)/(110C) Moshka (daughter), wife of Menahem Mendel, called "Tzemach" "Tzeddek" (d1866), adopted wife's surname "Schneerson", great-grandfather of Menachem Mendel Schneerson, claimant (d1994)

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issue of (110A) Menahem Nakhum (above), by 1st wife, Frieda Twerski, was:

(1)/(111A) Mordechai Dor Tversky Shneurson (d1920), father of

(112) Moshe Chaim Tversky-Shneursohn, father of

(113) Levi Yitzchak Tversky-Shneursohn, father of

(114) MENAHEM MORDECHAI SHNEURSON TVERSKY, senior heir of "The Maharal of Prague"

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issue of (110A) Menahem Nakhum (above), by 2nd wife, Sheina Rivlin, was:

(2)/(111B) Shneur Schneerson, father of (112A) Baruch & (112B) Yehuda Lieb, father of (113) Zalman (d1939)

(3)/(111C) Levi Yitzchak (below)

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issue of (111C) Levi Yitzchak (above) was/is:

(1)/(112A) Mordechai Zalman (below)

(2)/(112B) Aaron Moshe

(3)/(112C) Hirsch Lieb, father of (113) Adel Lieb

(4)/(112D) Pinchas Ber, father of (113a) Zalman, (113b) Meir, & (113c) Volodia Vladmir (d1954)

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issue of (112A) Mordechai Zalman (above) was/is:

(113) Yakov Yisrael (d1938), who, by wife, Sarah Yoffe, begot (114a) Herzliya (d1989) & (114b) Mordechai, the father of (115) Eliezer Schneerson, the father of (116a) Merav, (116b) Michal, (116c) Efrat, & (116d) Yuval

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issue of (112B) Aaron Moshe (above) was/is:

(1)/(113A) Mordechai Kalman

(2)/(113B) Dov Ber (Dover), father of (114) Dan, father of (115) Guy

(3)/(113C) Shneur Schneerson (below)

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issue of (113C) Shneur Schneerson (above) was/is:

(114) Aaron Schneerson-Yoeli, who, by wife, Miriam Berger, begot (115a) Noga, (115b) Amir, & (115c) Obed, who each took "Yoeli" as their surname

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issue of (109B) Chayim Avraham Schneur (above) was/is:

(1)/(110A) Dover [Bliyadi], father of (111a) Yehuda Avli & (111b) Levi Yitzchak, father of (112) Chaim Moshe

(2)/(110B) Baruch Shmuel, father of (111a) Zalman & (111b) Levi Yitzchak (below)

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issue of (111b) Levi Yitzchak (above), by 1st wife was:

(1)/(112A) Chaim

(2)/(112B) Shmari

(3)/(112C) Shneur Tzvi Hirsh

(4)/(112D) Baruch

(5)/(112E) Lieb

(6)/(112F) Yona[h]

(7)/(112G) Moshe

(8)/(112H) Doobah (daughter)

(9)/(112i) Tzila (daughter)

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issue of (111b) Levi Yitzchak (above), by 2nd wife was:

(1)/(112J) Meshullam Zusel

(2)/(112K) Raphael Mordechai

(3)/(112L) Sarah Freida (daughter)

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section 13.5: another-line

(102c) Mendel Lieb, father of

(103) Haim, father of

(104) Eliezer, general, father of

(105) Ysrael, a.k.a. Baal Shem Tov (d1760), father of

(106) Dov Ber [Dover] (d1772), father of

(107) Schneur, father of

(108) Nachman (d1811), father of

(109) Israel "of Rushin" (d1850)

(110) issue

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article: another miscellaneous descent-line

(101) "The Maharal of Prague" (above)

(102c) Mendel Lieb, whose brothers were Betzalel Loewe, and Shmuel Zvi

(103) Haim

(104) Eliezer, a general

Sarah [his 2nd =]

(105) Yisroel, aka Baal Shem Tov

2 Channah [Anne]

(106b) Adil (dau), sister of (106a) Zvi

Yechiel Ashkenazi

(107c) Feiga (dau), sister of Baruch Medzebog & Moshe Chaim of Sudilkov

Simcha Horodenker, descended from "The Rashi of Troyes"

(108) Rebbe Nachman of Breslev

Sasha, dau of Ephraim Ossatin

(109) Chaya (dau)

Aharon Zaslosky [her 2nd =]

(110) Yechiel Zaslovsky

Shterna Sashya, dau of Nachman Chayeles

(111) [C]Hannah Rabinovitch

(112) Aharon Rabinovitch

Leah Cohen

(113) Rivka Rabinovitch

Zindel Lukashavsky

(114) Frieda

Zeev [William] Lux

(115) Sarah [Lillian] Leah

Pesach Burstein

(116b) Susan [Joy] Roth, sister of (116a) Mike Burstein

Michael Roth

issue:

(117a) David Roth

(117b) Dianne (daughter), wife of Tony Medina

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David Hughes "Davidic Dynasty" http://members.aol.com/rdavidh218/davidicdynasty.html

Arthur J. Zuckerman " "A Jewish Princedom in Feudal France" p. 768 - 900

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http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.loebtree.com/jj/aleph.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.loebtree.com/hophni.html&h=567&w=145&sz=50&tbnid=stforPg7ffneuM:&tbnh=400&tbnw=102&prev=/images%3Fq%3DBustanai%2Bpicture&usg=__-r35anW9yWSbkIJRlcnKpI-Nzso=&sa=X&ei=9r09TN_TJoH88AaWu4WPBw&ved=0CBYQ9QEwAA

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http://books.google.com/books?id=ZABSepHO1FMC&pg=PA631&lpg=PA631&dq=Jewish+Exilarchs+chart&source=bl&ots=GhC5dOhqO8&sig=8lHJuYPmqsq0o6-fRWSMEQ04aKo&hl=en&ei=zq89TKuKGsK88gbrtvmoBg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CCIQ6AEwBDgK#v=onepage&q&f=false

‪The British Chronicles, Volume 2‬ By David Hughes

Yazidgard lll / Bostonai, Exilarch chart

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http://www.bupc.org/genealogy/genealogy-of-christ.html

Genealogy of Baha'u'llah, The HEIR to the THRONE OF DAVID, showing His lineage from Bostanai (the exilarch: exiled Davidic monarch) the son of King David.

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Exilarchs

http://www.dayanofaleppo.org/docs/OtherImages.aspx

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Hanina ben Adoi (exilarch)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exilarch

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http://www.loebtree.com/hophni.html

Bustanai Genealogy

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http://medlibrary.org/medwiki/Bustanai_ben_Haninai

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Genealogical chart

http://www.entrybytroops.org/bahaullahs-genealogy.html

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Appointed as the new Exilarch in 642 when he was 16. He did so by impressing the Arabic Caliph when a bee landed on his head while he was paying his respects and did not flinch. His second wife, Princess Izdundad/Izdadwar Sassanid, was considered to be foreign by the Jews and their children illegitimate. -------------------- His name, Bustenai, is from bustan, which means "orchard." The last Persian King, Khusro II (Chosroes II, also our ancestor), inimical to the Jews, decided to extinguish the royal house of David, no one being left of that house but a young woman whose husband had been killed shortly after his marriage. Then the king dreamed he was in a garden ("bostan"), where he uprooted the trees and broke the branches, and, as he was lifting up his ax against a little root, an old man snatched the ax away from him and gave him a severe blow that almost killed him, saying: "Are you not satisfied with having destroyed all the beautiful trees of my garden, that you now try to destroy also the last root? Truly you deserve that your memory perish from the earth." The King thereupon promised to guard the last plant of the garden very carefully. No one but an old Jewish sage was able to interpret the dream, and he said: "The garden represents the house of David, all of whose descendants you have destroyed except a young woman with her unborn baby. The old man you saw was David, to whom you promised that his house should be renewed by this boy." The Jewish sage, who was the father of the young woman, brought her to the King, and she was assigned rooms fitted up with princely splendor, where she gave birth to a boy, who received the name "Bostanai" from the garden ("bostan"), which the king had seen in his dream.

Exilarch Bustanai ben Haninai beni David was recognized as the head (Exilarch [Hebrew: ראש גלות Rosh Galut, Aramaic: ריש גלותא Reish Galuta lit. "head of the exile", Greek: Æchmalotarcha], referring to the leaders of the Diaspora Jewish community following the deportation of the population of Judah into Babylonian exile after the destruction of the kingdom of Judah) of the two principal academies of Babylonian Jewry, and through him by the Muslim caliphate, as final arbiters of Jewish law and the religious heads of all Jewish communities under Muslim rule circa 640.

See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p299.htm#i12958 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )

Bustanai was our ancestor through two distinct lines of descent: through his son Hananai and his son Hisdai, each of whom was independently our ancestor. -------------------- Lay head of Jewish community 610-670. Blev högst 80 år. -------------------- Bustani , birth CA 589, died CA 660, occupation: Exilarch, son of Hanina(i) and nn Possible ancestor R. Yoseph I may descend via Bustanai from the King David genealogy as follows: Each entry is supposed to be the son of daughter of the previous entry. Zurubbabel Hananiah. Sons: Pelatiah (Phaltial), Jeshaiah (Yesaiah) (Yeshaya) (Isaiah), Exilarch (Contact Don Stone for descendants) Exilarch Isaiah or Jeshaiah (b. Jerusalem about 469 B.C.E.) Exilarch Rephaiah (b. Jerusalem about 424 B.C.E.) Exilarch Amay or Arnan (b. Jerusalem about 400 B.C.E.) Exilarch Obadaiah (b. Jerusalem about 375 B.C.E.) Exilarch Shecanian Exilarch Shemaiah (b. Jerusalem about 325 B.C.E.). Children: Exilarch Neariah, Exilarch Hattush II, Exilarch Shemida, Igeal (Igal), Bariah, Shaphat, Neariah (b. Jerusalem about 297 B.C.E.). Children: Exilarch Hezekaiah (father of Exilarch Nakhum I), Exilarch Azrikam, Exilarch Elioenai. (Another source gives a different descent from here to Huna II) Exilarch Hizkiah Elioenai (lived Jerusalem, b. about 272 B.C.E.). Seven son all of whom were Exilarchs: Anani, Dalaiah, Johanan, Akkub, Pelaiah, Eliashib, Hodaviah (ancestor of some more exilarchs) Akkub (lived Jerusalem, b. about 244 B.C.E.) David Shlomo Shemaiah David Shechaniah Hizkiah Shalom Nathan (possibly Nathan De-Zuzita, an illusive Jewish hero whose story is chronologically out of place and in literature jumps around history.) Hunya Shlomo Yakov Ahija, founded a new dynasty of exilarchs around 135 on the extinction of previous dynasty (none of ancestors between him and Akkub were exilarches). Sons: Nakhum, II, Johanan, Nathan. Nakhum, II (around 145-170) Sons: Huna, I, Mar-Ukba, I. Mar-Ukba, I (around 210-240). Sons: Huna, II, Nathan, I Huna, II, Exilarch 240-259. Sons: Nathan I, and Nosson Nathan I UKBA, Exilarch at Babylon 259-270. Sons: Nehemiah I, Mar-Ukba, II Nehemiah (b. 270, executed 313), Exilarch at Babylon. Sons: Mar-Ukba, II/III, Isaac, Huna, III. Nathan (known as Ukba Mar II before he became Exilarch), Exilarch at Babylon (d. 337, reigned 313-337). Mar Abba Abra, Exilarch at Babylon (b. 300, d. 370, reigned 350-370) Sons: Nathan, II, Kahana, I Mar Kahani, I, Exilarch at Babylon (reigned 400-415). Sons: Nathan, Huna, IV, Mar-Zutra, I Mar Zutra I, Exilarch at Babylon (b. 370, d. 413(???), reigned 441-455). Sons: Kahana II, Huna V, and Nosson. Maremar = Kahana II (reigned 455-465). Haninai = Huna VI (reigned 484-508) Sons: Mar-Zutra II, and Hizkiah (father of David father of Mar-Zutra III) one missing generation? Mar Zutra II (b. 493, d. 520, reigned 508-520). Sons: Ahunai (Huna-Mar II), and Sutra I who went to palestine and founded a new dynansty of the Palestinian Nesi'im. Huna Mar (Ahunai) (520-581) Kafnai Hofnai (Kafnai; Qafnai), exilarch at Babylon (550-581). Sons: Haninai and Hushiel. Haninai (b. 560 Persia, d. 590 executed), exilarch at Babylon (581-589) Bustanai (d. 660/5) was the first Exilarch to be recognized by Arab rule. His birth and much of his life is surrounded by legend. As a token of appreciation, Caliph Ali gave him the daughter of the Persian king Yazdeger (Yazadagird III of Parthia ) for a slave. Eventually Bustanai married her. His first wife, Adoa, a Davidic Jewish princess (relative), had two sons: Hisdai I & Baradai; His 2nd wife, Dara or Azdadwar Izdundad or Izdadwar daughter of Zamaspdukht and King Shahrijar III of Persia. The Parthi princess, had three sons: (a) Hisdai II , (b) Nehemiah , and (c) Haninai [Hananiah], who was "exilarch" of Sura 689-694. Se e family trees descending from Haninai. The descendants of Haninai appear to occupy the gaonate of Sura for several generations and may also be ancestors of the Maharal of Prague <maharal.html>. (However, according to Rinnah Burns, their three son s were Shahrijar, Durdanshah, and Mardanshah. Source: Arthur J. ZUCKERMAN's A Jewish Princedom in Feudal France, 768-900 and David HUGHES's Davidic Dynasty. See article by Moshe SHALTIEL-GRACIAN Prince Haninai Baradai (d. 689). Three sons: Hisdai II (exilarch c. 700-730) (information available), Nehemiah through whom the line of the exilarchs eventually passes, and Hananiah Hannaniah, the gaon of Sura from 689 to 694. Sons: Hilai (Hillel) gaon of Sura from 694 to 712, and Yakob Yakob, Gaon of Sura from 712-730 Mari, Gaon of Sura from 748 or 751 to 756 (d. 756). Hillel, Gaon of Sura 792-798, d. 798. Sons: Ivomai, Natroi gaon of Sura (d. 853) and Rivyai (father of Joseph [d. 841]) Ivomai, Kohen Zedek, Gaon 838-848. Sons: Hophni, Nehemiah and Nahshon (gaon of Sura 874-882, and father of Khai gaon of Sura 889-896). Hophni. Given by another source as Hophni son of Zedek Ha-COHEN son of Ivomai. Rabba or Rabban Mari, Gaon of Sura, went to Spain in 941. Samuel Ha-Gaon, gaon of an academy in Spain around 975. Died 935. Hophni ha-COHEN (from Merida?) (d. 963) married the daughter of Tzadok Kahana son of Mar Joseph Rav, grandson of Matityahu Gaon. (See David HUGHES for ancestry of Matityahu Gaon.) Sons: Samuel Ha-Nagid, Yehoseph Ha-Nagid (father of Samuel, fathe r of Joseph Ha-Nagid who was killed in a pogrom 1062) Samuel Ha-Nagid (b. Spain, d. 1056 Spain or 1034) (Last Gaon of the Sura academy 997-1013). Samuel's daughter Asmouna possibly married Hai Gaon. Samuel's son Israel was Gaon of Sura Academy 1017-1034. (Azariah ha-Kohen [Gaon of Sura Academy 1034-1037] may have been son of Israel.) Samuel's son Isaac was a gaon. (generation skipped in some accounts) Joseph Ibn Nagrela [Al-Nagrila] Ha-Nagid (d. 1034) (generation skipped in some accounts) Samuel Ha-Nagid, vizier 1027 (d. 1056). R. Yoseph I. Gaon. Executed 1066. Married daughter of Rabbi Nissim Ben Yaakov. According to oshe Shaltiel, Yoseph was assassinated in a pogrom in Granada (1062) where he served as a Grand Vizier like his father before him. to: Adoa Davidic Jewish princess 1) Hisdai I 2) Bar Adai

Family Page Bustani to: Princess Izdundad (Dara?), daughter of King Yazdegerd (Yazadagird) and Princess Manyanh of Byzantium Persian princess given by Omar as a slave. Bustenai proceeded to free her and to marry her after she converted to Judaism. 1) Hisdai II 2) Nechemiah 3) Prince Haninai Bar Adai (Hananiah), birth CA 615, died CA 689, occupation: Gaon Sura 689-694 to: nn Main index A-Z

Bustani , birth CA 589, died CA 660, occupation: Exilarch, son of Hanina(i) and nn Possible ancestor R. Yoseph I may descend via Bustanai from the King David genealogy as follows: Each entry is supposed to be the son of daughter of the previous entry. Zurubbabel Hananiah. Sons: Pelatiah (Phaltial), Jeshaiah (Yesaiah) (Yeshaya) (Isaiah), Exilarch (Contact Don Stone for descendants) Exilarch Isaiah or Jeshaiah (b. Jerusalem about 469 B.C.E.) Exilarch Rephaiah (b. Jerusalem about 424 B.C.E.) Exilarch Amay or Arnan (b. Jerusalem about 400 B.C.E.) Exilarch Obadaiah (b. Jerusalem about 375 B.C.E.) Exilarch Shecanian Exilarch Shemaiah (b. Jerusalem about 325 B.C.E.). Children: Exilarch Neariah, Exilarch Hattush II, Exilarch Shemida, Igeal (Igal), Bariah, Shaphat, Neariah (b. Jerusalem about 297 B.C.E.). Children: Exilarch Hezekaiah (father of Exilarch Nakhum I), Exilarch Azrikam, Exilarch Elioenai. (Another source gives a different descent from here to Huna II) Exilarch Hizkiah Elioenai (lived Jerusalem, b. about 272 B.C.E.). Seven son all of whom were Exilarchs: Anani, Dalaiah, Johanan, Akkub, Pelaiah, Eliashib, Hodaviah (ancestor of some more exilarchs) Akkub (lived Jerusalem, b. about 244 B.C.E.) David Shlomo Shemaiah David Shechaniah Hizkiah Shalom Nathan (possibly Nathan De-Zuzita, an illusive Jewish hero whose story is chronologically out of place and in literature jumps around history.) Hunya Shlomo Yakov Ahija, founded a new dynasty of exilarchs around 135 on the extinction of previous dynasty (none of ancestors between him and Akkub were exilarches). Sons: Nakhum, II, Johanan, Nathan. Nakhum, II (around 145-170) Sons: Huna, I, Mar-Ukba, I. Mar-Ukba, I (around 210-240). Sons: Huna, II, Nathan, I Huna, II, Exilarch 240-259. Sons: Nathan I, and Nosson Nathan I UKBA, Exilarch at Babylon 259-270. Sons: Nehemiah I, Mar-Ukba, II Nehemiah (b. 270, executed 313), Exilarch at Babylon. Sons: Mar-Ukba, II/III, Isaac, Huna, III. Nathan (known as Ukba Mar II before he became Exilarch), Exilarch at Babylon (d. 337, reigned 313-337). Mar Abba Abra, Exilarch at Babylon (b. 300, d. 370, reigned 350-370) Sons: Nathan, II, Kahana, I Mar Kahani, I, Exilarch at Babylon (reigned 400-415). Sons: Nathan, Huna, IV, Mar-Zutra, I Mar Zutra I, Exilarch at Babylon (b. 370, d. 413(???), reigned 441-455). Sons: Kahana II, Huna V, and Nosson. Maremar = Kahana II (reigned 455-465). Haninai = Huna VI (reigned 484-508) Sons: Mar-Zutra II, and Hizkiah (father of David father of Mar-Zutra III) one missing generation? Mar Zutra II (b. 493, d. 520, reigned 508-520). Sons: Ahunai (Huna-Mar II), and Sutra I who went to palestine and founded a new dynansty of the Palestinian Nesi'im. Huna Mar (Ahunai) (520-581) Kafnai Hofnai (Kafnai; Qafnai), exilarch at Babylon (550-581). Sons: Haninai and Hushiel. Haninai (b. 560 Persia, d. 590 executed), exilarch at Babylon (581-589) Bustanai (d. 660/5) was the first Exilarch to be recognized by Arab rule. His birth and much of his life is surrounded by legend. As a token of appreciation, Caliph Ali gave him the daughter of the Persian king Yazdeger (Yazadagird III of Parthia ) for a slave. Eventually Bustanai married her. His first wife, Adoa, a Davidic Jewish princess (relative), had two sons: Hisdai I & Baradai; His 2nd wife, Dara or Azdadwar Izdundad or Izdadwar daughter of Zamaspdukht and King Shahrijar III of Persia. The Parthi princess, had three sons: (a) Hisdai II , (b) Nehemiah , and (c) Haninai [Hananiah], who was "exilarch" of Sura 689-694. Se e family trees descending from Haninai. The descendants of Haninai appear to occupy the gaonate of Sura for several generations and may also be ancestors of the Maharal of Prague <maharal.html>. (However, according to Rinnah Burns, their three son s were Shahrijar, Durdanshah, and Mardanshah. Source: Arthur J. ZUCKERMAN's A Jewish Princedom in Feudal France, 768-900 and David HUGHES's Davidic Dynasty. See article by Moshe SHALTIEL-GRACIAN Prince Haninai Baradai (d. 689). Three sons: Hisdai II (exilarch c. 700-730) (information available), Nehemiah through whom the line of the exilarchs eventually passes, and Hananiah Hannaniah, the gaon of Sura from 689 to 694. Sons: Hilai (Hillel) gaon of Sura from 694 to 712, and Yakob Yakob, Gaon of Sura from 712-730 Mari, Gaon of Sura from 748 or 751 to 756 (d. 756). Hillel, Gaon of Sura 792-798, d. 798. Sons: Ivomai, Natroi gaon of Sura (d. 853) and Rivyai (father of Joseph [d. 841]) Ivomai, Kohen Zedek, Gaon 838-848. Sons: Hophni, Nehemiah and Nahshon (gaon of Sura 874-882, and father of Khai gaon of Sura 889-896). Hophni. Given by another source as Hophni son of Zedek Ha-COHEN son of Ivomai. Rabba or Rabban Mari, Gaon of Sura, went to Spain in 941. Samuel Ha-Gaon, gaon of an academy in Spain around 975. Died 935. Hophni ha-COHEN (from Merida?) (d. 963) married the daughter of Tzadok Kahana son of Mar Joseph Rav, grandson of Matityahu Gaon. (See David HUGHES for ancestry of Matityahu Gaon.) Sons: Samuel Ha-Nagid, Yehoseph Ha-Nagid (father of Samuel, fathe r of Joseph Ha-Nagid who was killed in a pogrom 1062) Samuel Ha-Nagid (b. Spain, d. 1056 Spain or 1034) (Last Gaon of the Sura academy 997-1013). Samuel's daughter Asmouna possibly married Hai Gaon. Samuel's son Israel was Gaon of Sura Academy 1017-1034. (Azariah ha-Kohen [Gaon of Sura Academy 1034-1037] may have been son of Israel.) Samuel's son Isaac was a gaon. (generation skipped in some accounts) Joseph Ibn Nagrela [Al-Nagrila] Ha-Nagid (d. 1034) (generation skipped in some accounts) Samuel Ha-Nagid, vizier 1027 (d. 1056). R. Yoseph I. Gaon. Executed 1066. Married daughter of Rabbi Nissim Ben Yaakov. According to oshe Shaltiel, Yoseph was assassinated in a pogrom in Granada (1062) where he served as a Grand Vizier like his father before him. to: Adoa Davidic Jewish princess 1) Hisdai I 2) Bar Adai

Family Page Bustani to: Princess Izdundad (Dara?), daughter of King Yazdegerd (Yazadagird) and Princess Manyanh of Byzantium Persian princess given by Omar as a slave. Bustenai proceeded to free her and to marry her after she converted to Judaism. 1) Hisdai II 2) Nechemiah 3) Prince Haninai Bar Adai (Hananiah), birth CA 615, died CA 689, occupation: Gaon Sura 689-694 to: nn

-------------------- http://www.davidicdynasty.org/dna.php

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exilarch

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bostanai -------------------- He was appointed by the Arabic Caliph "Shah Yazdegerd III" as the new Exilarchy in 642, which began a new [3rd] dynasty of Exilarchs. Bostanai caught the attention of the caliph as a sixteen year old youth, when he did not flinch out of respect for the caliph when a bee (or wasp) landed on the side of his head but remained at attention. The caliph was so moved by the episode that he removed "the Arab Shiekh" who was then Exilarch and gave the Exilarchate office to Bostonai, and also gave him a Parthian princess [Dara-Izdadwar] for his [2nd] wife.

Bostonai married:

1. Princess Adai, an Arabic-Jewish princess, (daughter of Assad Ibn Hashim, a Quraysh sheik, who died 582);

2. Princess Izdundad/Izdadwar Sassanid (daughter of Shah Yazdegerd III), but who was then considered by the Jews to have been a "foreign wife".

According to legend, Dara was the daughter of Charlemagne – a gift to the King of Persia in order to build a diplomatic bridge between the greatest Kings of the Period.

Bostenai could possibly be the son of Hananai but most historians and researchers believe Gurya is the son of Sa'adyah , grandson of Mar Zutra II.

Bostenai was the 1st Exilarch under Arabian rule, flourished in middle of 7th century; he had a son named Hananai [Khaled] (by “Adai”-daughter of Assad Ibn Hashim and sister of Fatima bint Assad-mother of the first Shi’a Imam Ali bin Abi Talib,) who, in turn, had a daughter named “Judit” who married Nehemiah.

Bustenai was the Son-in-Law of the Persian Caliph (Bostenai's father, Haninai, was son of Chofnai - 32nd exilarch from 560-581 CE). Gurya had two (2 ) sons by his Jewish wife (Hisdai and Haninai – Gamliel and Khaled respectively) and three (3) sons by his Persian wife. For the record, Assad Ibn Hashim was the son of Hashim ibn Abd Manaf the great-grandfather of the Prophet Muhammad. Hashim ibn Abd al-Manaf was also was the originator of the Banu Hashim clan of the Banu Quraish tribe in Mecca.

The House of Bostanai thus developed into two branches. Upon the death of Bostenai his sons by his 1st [Jewish] wife insisted that their father's "foreign wife" as well as her three sons were illegitimate, and, as such, had no claim to the succession. The judges were divided in opinion, but finally decided that the marriage with his "foreign wife" was morganatic and that the offspring of that marriage had no claim to the succession. There is no evidence that "the birthright" passed to the offspring of Bostanai and his second wife as the "Bahai' Faith" pretends, when "the birthright" passed to the offspring of first wife.

The son and descendants of Bostanai and his 1st wife were his successors in the Jewish Exilarchy, that is, they were the medieval Jewish Exilarchs; while the three sons of Bostanai and his 2nd wife founded regional-dynasties in three Iranian provinces, which were

(a) Tabaristan [the Buwayhids, that is, the Shaharite Line];

(b) Gilan [the Dabwaihides, that is, the Davidides];

(c) Mazandaran [the Baduspanides].

The following text is an excerpt from the Dayan Family Tree which was provided by Mitch Dayan: In Seder Hadorot it is written in the name of Sefer Yohasin that in the year 4420 the matter of Bustenai and Dudava came to pass, and he was called Mar Zutra. At that time, the Persian king decreed and killed all of the House of David, from the great to the small, and left no remnant, other than one bride. Her husband was killed on the day of their wedding, when she had just become pregnant. The king had a dream in which he was walking through a garden and cutting down all the plants, leaving neither branch nor root, except for one small branch, which he almost destroyed. An old man then came and beat him until he bled, and when he awoke, there was blood spilled on the bed wherein he was sleeping. In the morning, one of the wise men of Israel came and interpreted his dream as referring to his having killed the House of David. He asked that it be ascertained whether there were any branch or root left, and in truth, there was none other than the pregnant bride. The king regretted having decimated the House of David, and he took it upon himself to watch over the child that would be born, and so he did. And it came to pass that when she gave birth to a son, she called his name Bustenai, after the garden the king had seen, which is called bustan in Arabic. The child grew up and the king commanded that he be brought to him, and he came and stood before the king from morning until evening. He stood in fear and awe before the king, and none of his limbs moved. A fly then came and bit him in his face until he bled, but he did not raise his hand to chase away the fly. When the king saw this great thing, he was very pleased, and he appointed him to be a judge. This is the reason that the image of a fly is engraved on their seal, because of the story of Butenai. So it says in Seder Hadorot page 47.

On page 50b there is a somewhat different version: The family of the House of David was destroyed for having pained Rabbi Hanina, the Head of the Yeshiva. Rabbi Hanina went to the synagogue, and cried so much that he filled a vessel with his tears and drank it. This was the reason for the demise of the House of David, and they all died in one night. The only remnant was the daughter of the said Rabbi Hanina, who had been married to someone from the House of David. Rabbi Hanina saw in a dream that he was standing in a garden with an ax in his hand and destroying the garden. An old red-haired man came, beat him until his face turned around backwards, and he said to him, “Why are you destroying my garden?” In the morning he asked the wise men if anyone remained from the House of David, and they replied, “No one remains other than your daughter, who is pregnant.” He went and sat with her until she gave birth, and as he was watching over her, his face retuned to its normal state. Now there was an in-law of the House of David who, when he saw that the descendants of the House of David had all died, bribed the king and was appointed Prince. When Bustenai grew up, he went to the king and the pretender was demoted. A fly then entered into the nose of that in-law of the House of David, and he died. This is the reason that the House of David has the image of a fly on its seal. In The Travels of Benyamin. Page 13b, it is written that the grave of the Prince Rabbi Bustenai, the Head of the Exile, is in Pompadita of Naharda’ah.