Cairpre Lithfeachair, 117th High King of Ireland

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Cairpre Lithfeachair mac Cormaic, 117th Ard Rí na h'Éireann

Nicknames: "Liffey", "Liffy Lover", "Caibre Lifeachain", "Carbre Liffeachair", "Corpre Liffechar", "Coirpre Liffeachaire", "Cairpre Lifechar", "Coirpre", "Cairbre Liffeachaire of Ireland"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ireland
Death: Died in Battle of Gabhra Aichle
Place of Burial: Tara, Ireland
Immediate Family:

Son of Cormac Ulfheda, 115th High King of Ireland and Eithne Ollamda ingen Dúnlaing
Husband of Aine nic Finn
Father of Eochaidh Dubhlen mac Cairbre Ó Cuinn; Fiacha Srabhteine, 128th High King of Ireland and Sgiam Sholais ingen Cairpre
Brother of Dáire mac Cormac; Cellach mac Cormac; Gráinne ingen Cormac and Aillbe ingen Cormac

Occupation: 127th High King of Ireland
Managed by: Jocelynn Elaine Oakes
Last Updated:

About Cairpre Lithfeachair mac Cormaic, 117th Ard Rí na h'Éireann

Based on merged profiles,

Birth Date circa 210, 220

-SPF

--------------------

Cairbre Lifechair ("lover of the Liffey"), son of Cormac mac Airt, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland. He came to the throne after the death of Eochaid Gonnat. During his time Bresal Belach was king of Leinster, and refused to pay the bórama or cow-tribute to the High King, but Cairbre defeated him in the Battle of Dubchomar, and from then on exacted the bórama without a battle.

According to Cath Gabhra (The Battle of Gabhra), a narrative of the Fenian Cycle of Irish mythology, Cairbre married Aine, daughter of Fionn mac Cumhaill. During his reign, his sons Fiacha Sraibhtine and Eochaid Doimlen, killed Óengus Gaíbúaibthech, leader of the Déisi. But when his daughter, Sgiam Sholais, was to be married, the fianna demanded a tribute of twenty gold bars, which they claimed was customarily paid on such occasions. Cairbre decided the fianna were too powerful, and raised a huge army from Ulster, Connacht and Leinster against them. They were joined by Goll mac Morna and his followers, who had turned against their comrades in the fianna, but Munster sided with the fianna. Cairbre's army won in the Battle of Gabhra, but Cairbre himself fell in single combat against Fionn's grandson Oscar, who died of his wounds shortly afterwards. Fionn himself either died in the battle, or had been killed on the River Boyne the previous year. The only survivors of the fianna were Caílte mac Rónáin and Fionn's son Oisín.

Cairbre had ruled for seventeen, twenty-six or twenty-seven years. He was succeeded by Fothad Cairpthech and Fothad Airgthech, sons of Lugaid mac Con, ruling jointly. The chronology of Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éirinn dates his reign to 245-272, the Annals of the Four Masters to 267-284.[1][2][3][4][5]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cairbre_Lifechair

--------------------

"Lover of the Liffey"

--------------------

Nickname 'Lover of the Liffey' ~ a river in Ireland, which flows thru the center of Dublin. -------------------- Name: Cairbre Liffeachair King of Ireland

Birth bef 257

Death 284, Battle of Gabhra Aichle, Ireland

Father Cormac "Ulfhada" mac Art King of Ireland (<195-267)

Mother: Eithne Ollamhdha

117th Monarch of Ireland; son of King Cormac Mac Art: was so called from his having been nursed by the side of the Liffey, the river on which Dublin is built. His mother was Eithne, daughter of Dunlong, King of Leinster. He had three sons— 1. Eochaidh Dubhlen; 2. Eocho; and 3. Fiacha Srabhteine, who was the 120th Monarch of Ireland, and the ancestor of O'Neill, Princes of Tyrone. Fiacha Srabhteine was so called, from his having been fostered at Dunsrabhteine, in Connaught, of which province he was King, before his elevation to the Monarchy. After seventeen years' reign, the Monarch Cairbre Lifeachar was slain at the battle of Gabhra [Gaura], A.D. 284, by Simeon, the son of Ceirb, who came from the south of Leinster to this battle, fought by the Militia of Ireland, who were called the Fiana Erionn (or Fenians), and arising from a quarrel which happened between them; in which the Monarch, taking part with one side against the other, lost his life.

Monarchy: Under the laws of "Tanistry," the Crown in Ireland and Scotland was hereditary in the Family, but not exclusively in Primogeniture— (See the Paper "Election of Kings, Princes, and Chiefs," in the Appendix). On this subject Sir Water [sic] Scott, in his History of Scotland, observes:—

"The blood of the original founder of the family was held to flow in the veins of his successive representatives, and to perpetuate to each chief the right of supreme authority over the descendants of his own line; who formed his children and subjects, as he became by right of birth their sovereign, ruler, and lawgiver. With the family and blood of this chief of chiefs most of the inferior chieftains claimed a connection more or less remote. This supreme chiefdom or right of sovereignty, was hereditary, in so far as the person possessing it was chosen from the blood royal of the King deceased; but it was so far elective that any of his kinsmen might be chosen by the nation to succeed him; and, as the office of sovereign could not be exercised by a child, the choice generally fell upon a full-grown man, the brother or nephew of the deceased, instead of his son or grandson. This uncertainty of succession which prevailed in respect to the crown itself, proved a constant source of rebellion and bloodshed: the postponed heir, when he arose in years, was frequently desirous to attain his father's power; and many a murder was committed for the purpose of rendering straight an oblique line of succession, which such preference of an adult had thrown out of a direct course."

Part III, Chapter IV of Irish Pedigrees, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 351-9, 664-8 and 708-9.

Spouses

1Aine ingen Finn

-------------------- From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps11/ps11_009.htm

117th Monarch of Ireland; son of King Cormac Mac Art: was so called from his having been nursed by the side of the Liffey, the river on which Dublin is built. His mother was Eithne, daughter of Dunlong, King of Leinster. He had three sons— 1. Eochaidh Dubhlen; 2. Eocho; and 3. Fiacha Srabhteine, who was the 120th Monarch of Ireland, and the ancestor of O'Neill, Princes of Tyrone. Fiacha Srabhteine was so called, from his having been fostered at Dunsrabhteine, in Connaught, of which province he was King, before his elevation to the Monarchy. After seventeen years' reign, the Monarch Cairbre Lifeachar was slain at the battle of Gabhra [Gaura], A.D. 284, by Simeon, the son of Ceirb, who came from the south of Leinster to this battle, fought by the Militia of Ireland, who were called the Fiana Erionn (or Fenians), and arising from a quarrel which happened between them; in which the Monarch, taking part with one side against the other, lost his life.

Monarchy: Under the laws of "Tanistry," the Crown in Ireland and Scotland was hereditary in the Family, but not exclusively in Primogeniture— (See the Paper "Election of Kings, Princes, and Chiefs," in the Appendix). On this subject Sir Water [sic] Scott, in his History of Scotland, observes:—

"The blood of the original founder of the family was held to flow in the veins of his successive representatives, and to perpetuate to each chief the right of supreme authority over the descendants of his own line; who formed his children and subjects, as he became by right of birth their sovereign, ruler, and lawgiver. With the family and blood of this chief of chiefs most of the inferior chieftains claimed a connection more or less remote. This supreme chiefdom or right of sovereignty, was hereditary, in so far as the person possessing it was chosen from the blood royal of the King deceased; but it was so far elective that any of his kinsmen might be chosen by the nation to succeed him; and, as the office of sovereign could not be exercised by a child, the choice generally fell upon a full-grown man, the brother or nephew of the deceased, instead of his son or grandson. This uncertainty of succession which prevailed in respect to the crown itself, proved a constant source of rebellion and bloodshed: the postponed heir, when he arose in years, was frequently desirous to attain his father's power; and many a murder was committed for the purpose of rendering straight an oblique line of succession, which such preference of an adult had thrown out of a direct course."

Part III, Chapter IV of Irish Pedigrees, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 351-9, 664-8 and 708-9. -------------------- Title: King of Ireland -------------------- Carbre Leiffechar King of Ireland

born 0211

died 0284 at Battle of Gabhra

father:

  • Cormac "Longbeard" macArt King of Ireland

died 0266

mother:

  • Eithene Ollamhdha

(end of information)

siblings:

unknown

spouse:

  • Aine NicFinn

(continued ad infinitum)

children:

  • Fiacha Trabhteine

Eochaidh Dubhlinn MacCairbre

-------------------- Cairbre Lifechair ("lover of the Liffey"), son of Cormac mac Airt, was a legendary High King of Ireland of the 3rd century. Cairbre was married to Aine Ingen Finn.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cairbre_Lifechair -------------------- Cairbre Lifechair ("lover of the Liffey"), son of Cormac mac Airt, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland. He came to the throne after the death of Eochaid Gonnat. During his time Bresal Belach was king of Leinster, and refused to pay the bórama or cow-tribute to the High King, but Cairbre defeated him in the Battle of Dubchomar, and from then on exacted the bórama without a battle.

[edit]Reign

According to the 8th-century text known as The Expulsion of the Déisi, Cairbre takes the throne when his father Cormac is blinded by Óengus Gaíbúaibthech of the Déisi, it being against the law for the king to have any physical blemish. The chronicles indicate that Eochaid Gonnat succeeded Cormac, but was soon succeeded by Cairbre following his death in battle.

According to Cath Gabhra (The Battle of Gabhra), a narrative of the Fenian Cycle of Irish mythology, Cairbre married Aine, daughter of Fionn mac Cumhaill. During his reign, his sons Fiacha Sraibhtine and Eochaid Doimlen killed Óengus Gaíbúaibthech. To make peace, Cairpre betroths his daughter, Sgiam Sholais, to a Déisi prince. However, the fianna demand a tribute of twenty gold bars, which they claimed was customarily paid on such occasions. Cairbre decides the fianna have become too powerful, and raises a huge army from Ulster, Connacht and Leinster against them. They are joined by Goll mac Morna and his followers, who turn against their comrades in the fianna, but Munster and the Déisi side with the fianna. Cairbre's army wins in the Battle of Gabhra, but Cairbre himself falls in single combat against Fionn's grandson Oscar, who dies of his wounds shortly afterwards. Fionn himself either dies in the battle, or had been killed on the River Boyne the previous year. The only survivors of the fianna are Caílte mac Rónáin and Fionn's son Oisín.

Cairbre had ruled for seventeen, twenty-six or twenty-seven years. He was succeeded by Fothad Cairpthech and Fothad Airgthech, sons of Lugaid mac Con, ruling jointly. The chronology of Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éirinn dates his reign to 245-272, the Annals of the Four Masters to 267-284.[1][2][3][4]

[edit] -------------------- Celtic Royal Genealogy

Entries: 82118 Updated: 2008-06-04 17:09:36 UTC (Wed)

mac Cormac, Cairbre Lithfeachair 117th High King Ireland b: ABT 0240 in Tara, Midi (Meath), Iwerddon d: 0284 in Battle Gabhra Aichle, County Meath, Iwerddon

117 E Cairbre Liffeachair

107.

(Carbri Lificar; Cairbre Lifiochair (Lifechar) MacCormaic. Cairbre Lifiochair (Lifechar) MacCormaic aka Cairbrelifefeachaire)

268–284 Joyce: 279 Cairbre Liffechar, Cairpre Liphechair m. Cormaic, Caibre-Lifeachar, Cairbre Lifiochair, Cairbre II Aiffeachair, Cairpre, Corpre, Carbery Liffechair (of the Liffey)
Second son of Cormac, #115. Fiacha Srabhteine #120 was Cairbre's son. Another son was Eochaidh Doimhlen (Dublein) (Eochaid Domplen (Dubhlen) MacCairpre Liphecair) father of the three Collas, one of whom was Colla Uais #121, who became High King in 322. Cairbre Liffeachair was also King of Connaught. In 271, he fought three battles against the men of Munster in defense of the right of Leinster. He fell in the battle of Gabhra Aichle, by the hand of Semeon, son of Cearb, one of the Fotharta (Fortuatha of Leinster 
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Cairpre Lithfeachair, 117th High King of Ireland's Timeline

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Ireland
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270
Age 35
Ireland
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275
Age 40
Tara, Midi, Eireann, Ireland
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285
Age 50
Battle of Gabhra Aichle
285
Age 50
Tara, Ireland
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Britain?
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117th, King of Scotland
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117th, King of Scotland
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117th, King of Scotland