Capt. Augustine Washington, Sr.

Is your surname Washington?

Research the Washington family

Capt. Augustine Washington, Sr.'s Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Augustine Washington, Sr.

Also Known As: "Gus"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Bridges Creek, Westmoreland, Virginia
Death: Died in Fredericksburg, Stafford, Virginia
Immediate Family:

Son of Capt. Lawrence Washington; Capt. Lawrence Washington; Mildred Warner and Mildred Warner
Husband of Jane Washington and Mary Washington
Father of Butler Washington; Lawrence Washington; Col. Augustine Washington, Jr.; Jane Washington; George Washington, 1st President of the USA and 10 others
Brother of John Washington; Mildred Willis / Gregory and Mildred Washington

Occupation: iron mining, Sheriff, Captain
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Capt. Augustine Washington, Sr.

Augustine Washington (November 12, 1694 – April 12, 1743) was the father of the first U.S. President George Washington. He belonged to the Colony of Virginia's landed gentry and was a planter and slaveholder.

Augustine Washington

  • Born: November 12, 1694 Westmoreland, Virginia, British America
  • Died: April 12, 1743 (aged 48) Ferry Farm, Stafford County, Virginia.
  • Parents: Lawrence Washington, Mildred Warner
  • Spouse(s): Jane Butler (1715-1730; her death), Mary Ball (1731-1743; his death)
  • Ethnicity: English
  • Occupation: Planter
  • Religion: Anglican Church

Children:

  1. Lawrence Washington (1718 - 1752)*
  2. Augustine Washington (1720 - 1762)*
  3. George Washington (1732 - 1799)*
  4. Betty Washington Lewis (1733 - 1797)*
  5. Samuel Washington (1734 - 1781)*
  6. John Augustine Washington (1736 - 1787)*
  7. Charles Washington (1738 - 1799

From Wikipedia

The British were well established in America with thirteen colonies prior to the American Revolution led by George Washington culminating in independence from England and the formation of a united county. Cities, seaports, schools, churches and thriving industry doted the landscape. In the south, large plantations sprang up, constructed and operated by cheap labor in the form of slaves imported from Africa. By the time of the birth of George Washington to Jane Butler and Augustine Washington Sr., three family generations had past since George's Great Grandfather John Washington had immigrated to the Colonies during the British Civil War in 1631. The extensive family became prosperous and thriving when Augustine Washington was born in 1694 in Westmoreland County, Virginia on his father's plantation. He was only four when his father died and his inheritance consisted of 1,000 acres on Bridges Creek (Popes Creek).

When Augustine came of age, he married Jane Butler, an orphan with considerable wealth of her own. The couple settled on his inherited property and quickly constructed a new house called "Wakefield." He developed the land known as Popes Creek Plantation into a modest but successful farming venture. In addition to cultivating tobacco, he was active in the church, local politics and served at various times as justice of the peace and county sheriff. The marriage would produce two sons, Lawrence and Augustine Jr.

Jane would pass away in 1728 and three years later Augustine would marry a second time to Mary Ball.

Their first born would be George destined to be the first President of the United States. Although born in the "Wakefield Mansion," he would only spend the first three years of his life as the family moved many times, living at various plantations owned by Augustine Sr. The family lastly settled at Ferry Farm Plantation near Frederiksburg where Augustine owned and operated Accokeek Iron Furnace located nearby. Five other children followed...Samuel, Elizabeth, John Augustine, Charles, and Mildred (died in infancy).

When Augustine Washington Sr. died in 1743 at Ferry Farm, he left his wife Mary Ball with many small children but well provided. George the oldest was but eleven. He along with other family members conveyed their father's remains by land and river 35 miles back to Popes Creek where they buried him beside his first wife and near his father and grandfather at the Washington family burial ground (Popes Creek Cemetery.) Mary would continue to live with her children and operate Ferry Farm with enslaved labor until selling the farm and moving into the town of Fredericksburg in 1774.

Soon after the death of his father, George would live with his half brother Augustine Washington Jr. (Austin) in order to pursue an education at the Henry Williams School in Westmoreland County. At age fifteen he was a land surveyor. His first assignment was a land survey of 22 acres at Popes Creek.

Legacy

In 1779, William, the son of Augustine Washington Jr., accidently burned down "Wakefield" after building a large fire in the mansion fire place then leaving to attend Episcopal church services on Christmas day. A spark from the chimney ignited a fire that destroyed the dwelling. A replica plantation house was constructed on the plantation land in Westmoreland County to approximate the original birth house in 1932 and is today known as the "Memorial House." The historical area today consists of 538 acres with the house, the Washington family burial ground, a working demonstration farm and 18th century period garden.

Also interred in the burial ground are 28 other early members of the Washington family.

President George Washington was buried at Mt. Vernon in 1799 and his mother Mary Ball Washington in Frederiksburg. The original foundations of what is believed to be the birth house were discovered by preservationist and is outlined. The site is now known as the George Washington Birthplace National Monument. An unmarked slave graveyard discovered at the Washington birthplace is an infamous legacy of Augustine Washington Sr. It contains 156 bodies of slaves owned by George Washington's father. Trivia note: Washington's birthplace eventually was sold and passed from the holdings of the Washington family. It was allow to disintegrate until preservationists realized the historical significance of the site. However, it was to late, nothing remained but finally a concerted effort with private and government assistance began to restore the plantation in the early 30's in a style of how it may have looked. Even the burial grounds was a vain attempt at restoration and creation. The finished project today resulted after disinterring of family parts, and a few vandalized markers from around the plantation and area with reinterring on the site.

====================

Augustine Washington (Lawrence , John , Lawrence ) was born in 1694 in Wakefield, Westmoreland Co., VA. He died on 12 Apr 1743 in Ferry Farm, King George Co., VA. At age 21, Augustine married Jane Butler, the daughter of Caleb Butler Esq. of Westmoreland Co, VA.. Jane brought 1,300 acres of land to their marriage, which she inherited from her father. At this time in his life, he was richer than his father had been. His home was called Lisson Estate. Jane had 4 children, but only Lawrence & Augustine survived into adulthood.

Augustine married (1) Jane Butler on 20 Apr 1715. Jane was born in 1699. She died on 24 Nov 1729.

They had the following children:

  1. Butler Washington was born in 1716 in Bridge Creek, Westmoreland Co., VA. He died before 1729.
  2. Lawrence Washington (1718-1752)
  3. Augustine Washington , Jr. - (1720-1762)
  4. Jane Washington was born about 1722 in Bridge's Creek, VA. She died on 17 Jan 1735.

Augustine married (2) Mary Ball daughter of Joseph Ball and Mary Bennett on 6 Mar 1731. Mary was born in 1708 in Lancaster Co., VA. She died on 25 Aug 1789 in Fredericksburg, VA.

They had the following children:

  1. President George Washington was born on 11 Feb 1732 in Pope's Creek, Westmoreland Co., VA. He died on 14 Dec 1799 in Mount Vernon, Fairfax Co., VA. George married Martha Dandridge. Martha was born on 21 Jun 1731 in New Kent Co., VA. She died on 22 May 1802 in Mount Vernon, Fairfax Co., VA.
  2. Elizabeth Washington was born on 20 Jun 1733 in Pope's Creek, Wakefield, Westmoreland Co., VA. She died on 31 Mar 1797 in Western View, Culpeper Co., VA. Elizabeth married Colonel Fielding Lewis on 7 May 1750. Fielding was born in 1725. He died in 1781.
  3. Samuel Washington (1734-1781)
  4. John Augustine Washington (1736-1787)
  5. Charles Washington (1738-1799)
  6. Mildred Washington was born in 1739 in Pope's Creek, Wakefield, Westmoreland Co., VA. She died on 23 Oct 1740 in Pope's Creek, Wakefield, Westmoreland Co., VA.
======================

Augustine was born at Bridges Creek in Westmoreland County, Virginia. Augustine died in the city of Fredericksburg when young George Washington was only 11. He was a male line descendant from the Scottish 2nd Earls of Dunbar, who in turn were male line descendants of the House of Macduff, second Royal House of Scotland. He also descended eight times from King Jean de Brienne of Jerusalem, once from King Louis VIII of France, once from King Henry III of England, three times from King Edward I of England and three times from King Edward III of England.

Augustine was the father of George Washington and son of Lawrence Washington and Mildred Gale. His father was a militia captain in the Colony of Virginia and a member of the House of Burgesses. His paternal grandparents were John Washington and Anne Pope. Born in 1694, Augustine was only four years old when his father died. He inherited about 1,000 acres (4.0 km²) on Bridges Creek in Westmoreland from his father (the Little Hunting Creek property went to his sister Mildred). When Augustine came of age (and into his inheritance) in 1715, he married Jane Butler, an orphan, who had inherited about 640 acres (2.6 km²) from her father. The young couple settled on the Bridges Creek property. In 1718, Augustine purchased land on Popes Creek, abridging his property on Bridges Creek and about 1726, built a new house there (later called Wakefield). In the same year, he purchased the Little Hunting Creek property from his sister, Mildred. In addition to planting, Augustine was active in the church and in local politics, serving at various times as justice of the peace and as county sheriff. Augustine and Jane had four children, only two of whom (Lawrence and Augustine, Jr.) lived to adulthood. After Jane's early death in 1729, Augustine married 23-year-old Mary Ball of Lancaster County in 1731. Three children were born to Augustine and Mary at Popes Creek - George (1732), Betty (1733), and Samuel (1734).

In 1735, the family moved to the Little Hunting Creek property. The exact reason for the move is unclear, but it may have had to do with Augustine's other occupation - iron mining. In 1725, Augustine entered into an agreement with the Principio Company of England to start an iron works on Accokeek Creek in Stafford County. In 1728, Augustine made an agreement with the company to bear one sixth of the cost of running Accokeek Furnace. Little Hunting Creek was a bit closer to the iron mine than Pope's Creek, so that may have been among the reasons for the move.

In 1738, a 150-acre (0.6 km²) property just across the Rappahannock River from the fledgling town of Fredericksburg, became available. Formerly owned by William Strother, the property was sold by his executors to Augustine who moved the family there at the end of that same year. The new property offered easier access to Accokeek Furnace and was within a day's ride of both Little Hunting Creek and Popes Creek. Augustine also leased a 450-acre (1.8 km²) parcel adjacent to the property that he later purchased outright. Although there was a ferry road and landing on the property, the farm was not called Ferry Farm during the time of the Washington's occupation.

By the time the family had moved to the Rappahannock River farm, two more children were born; John Augustine, 1736 and Charles, 1738. A sixth child, Mildred, was born on the new farm in 1739 but she died in infancy in 1740.

Legacy: After Augustine's death in 1743, the Fredericksburg property went to George, but since he was only 11 years old, his mother, Mary, managed the property for him. She remained on the property until 1772, when George finally moved her to a house across the river in Fredericksburg. The Little Hunting Creek property went to Lawrence, and the Popes Creek property went to Augustine, Jr. Lawrence renamed his property Mount Vernon, in honor of an Admiral Vernon he had served with in the British Navy during the Battle of Cartagena.

According to the terms of Augustine's will, if Lawrence died without children, the Little Hunting Creek property would be given to Augustine, Jr. who would then have to give Popes Creek to George. If Augustine, Jr. did not want the Little Hunting Creek property, it would then go to George. Lawrence had no living children when he died and Augustine, Jr. was apparently not interested in giving up Popes Creek. Lawrence's widow, Ann, had a life interest in the property but, because she remarried and was not living at Mount Vernon, leased the property to George beginning in 1754. Upon her death in 1761, George inherited the property outright.

Augustine's paternal grandparents were John Washington and Anne Pope. Augustine was only four years old when his father died. He inherited about 1,000 acres (4.0 km²) on Bridges Creek in Westmoreland from his father (the Little Hunting Creek property went to his sister Mildred). When Augustine came of age (and into his inheritance) in 1715, he married Jane Butler, an orphan, who had inherited about 640 acres (2.6 km²) from her father. The young couple settled on the Bridges Creek property.

In 1718, Augustine purchased land on Popes Creek, abridging his property on Bridges Creek and about 1726, built a new house there (later called Wakefield). In the same year, he purchased the Little Hunting Creek property from his sister, Mildred. In addition to planting, Augustine was active in the church and in local politics, serving at various times as justice of the peace and as county sheriff.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Augustine_Washington

http://fredericksburg.com/News/FLS/2005/032005/03262005/1710627/printer_friendly

Augustine Washington had many holdings--farms, businesses, mines, and land. He was a man of great energy. He added to theWestmoreland plantation until it included the whole peninsula between Popes Creek and Bridges Creek, small streams emptying into the Potomac. He purchased the estate in Fairfax County later known as "Mount Vernon". SOURCE: Colonial Familiesof the Southern States of America, page 520.

Augustine Washington's Will: "I Augustine Washington of the County of King George--Gentlemanbeing sick and weak but of perfect disposing sence (sic) andmemory. Do make my last will and testament in manner herebyrevoking all former will or wills whatsoever by me heretoforemade.

Imprimis: I give unto my Son Lawrence Washington and his heirs forever all that plantation and tract of Land at Hunting Creek in the County of Prince William containing by estimate, two hundred and five hundred acres with the Water Mill adjoining thereto or lying near the same and all the Slaves, Cattle and Stocks of all Kinds whatsoever and all the Household Furnature(sic) whatsoever now in and upon or which have been commonly possessed by my said son, together with said plantation track of Land and Mill.

Item: I give unto my son Augustine Washington and his heirs forever all my lands in the County of Westmoreland except suchonly as are hereinafter otherwise disposed of together with twenty five head of neat Cattle forty hogs and twenty sheep and a negro man named Frank besides those negros formerly given him by his mother.

Item: I give to my son George Washington and his heirs the land I now live on which I purchased of the Executors of Mr. Wm Strther deceased. And one, one moiety of my land lying on Deeps Run and ten negro Slaves.

Item: I give unto my son Samuel Washington and his heirs my land at Chotank in the County of Stafford containing about six hundred acres and also the other moity (sic) of my land lying on Deeps Run.

Item: I give unto my son John Washington and his heirs my land at the head of Mattox in the County of Westmoreland containing about seven hundred acres.

Item: I give unto my son Charles Washington and his heirs the land I purchased of my son Lawrence Washington whereon Thomas Lewis now lives, adjoining to my said son Lawrence's land above devised. I also give unto my said son Charles and his heirs the land I purchased of Gabriel Adams in the County of Prince William containg about seven hundred acres.

Item: It is my will and desire that all the rest of my negroes not herein particularly devised may be equally divided between my wife and my three sons Samuel, John and Charles, and that Ned, Jack, Bob, Sue, and Lucy may be included in my wife's part, which part of my said wife's, after her decease I desire may be equally divided between my sons George, Samuel, John and Charles, and part of my said negroes so devised to my wife I mean and intend to be in full satisfaction and in lieu of her dower in my negroes. But if she should insist notwithstanding on her right of Dower in my negroes I will and desire that so many as may be wanting to make up her share may be taken out of the negroes given hereby to my sons George, Samuel, John and Charles.

Item: I give and bequeath unto my said wife and four sons George, Samuel, John and Charles, all the rest of my Personal Estate to be equally divided between them which is not particularly bequeathed by this will to my wife and it is my will and desire that my said four sons Estates may be kept in my wife's hands until they respectively attain the age of twenty one years, in case my said wife continues so long unmarried but in case she Should happen to marry before that time I desire it may be in the power of my Executors to oblige her husband from time to time as they shall think proper to give security for the performance of this last will in paying and delivering my said four sons their Estates respectively as they come of age, or on failure to give such security to take my said sons and their estates out of the custody an tuition of my said wife and her husband.

Item: I give and bequeath to my said wife the crops made at Bridge Creek, Chotank, and Rappahanock (sic) quarters at the time of my decase (sic) for the support of herself and her children and I desire my wife may have the liberty of working my land at Bridge Creek Quarters for the time of Five years after my decease, during which time she may fix a quarters on Deep Run.

Item: I give my son Lawrence Washington and the heirs of his body lawfully begotten forever that tract of Land I purchased of Mr. James Hooe adjoining to the Said Lawrence Washinton's land on Maddox in the County of Westmoreland which I gave him in lieu of the land my said son bought for me in Prince William County of Spencer and Harrison and for want of such heirs then I give and devise the same to my son Augustine and his heirs forever.

Item: I give to my son Lawrence all the right title and interest I have to in or out of the Iron Works in which I am concerned in Virginia and Maryland provided that he do and shall, out of the profits raised thereby purchaes for my son Augustine three young working slaves as I have herein before directed and also pay my daughter Betty when she arrives at the age Eighteen years the sum of four hundred pounds which right title and interest on the condition aforesaid I give to my said son Lawrence and his heirsforever.

Item: I give to my said daughter Betty a negro child named Mary daughter of Sue and an other named Betty daughter of Judy.

Item: It is my will and desire that my sons Lawrence and Augustine do pay out of their respective Estates devised to themo ne half or moity (sic) of the debts I justly owe and for that purpose I give and bequeath unto my said two sons one half of the debts owing to me.

Item: For as much as my several children in this will metioned being of several venters cannot inherit from one another in order to make a proper provision against their dying without issue. It is my will and desire that in case my son Lawrence should die without heirs of his body lawfully begotten that then the land and Mill given him by this my will lying in the county of Prince William shall go and remain to my son George and his heirs but in case my son Augustine should choose to have the said lands rather than the lands he holds in Maddox either by this will or any Settlement. Then I give and devise said lands in Prince William to my said son Augustine and his heirs on conveying the said lands in maddox to my son George and his heirs. And in case my said son Augustine shall happen to die without issue of his body lawfully begotten, then I give and bequeath all the lands by him held in Maddox to my son George and his heirs and if both sons Lawrence and Augustine should happen to die without issue of their several bodies begotten then my will and desire is that my son George and his heirs may have his and their choice either to have the lands of my son Lawrence or the lands of my son Augustine to hold to him and his heirs and the land of such of my said sons Lawrence and Augustine as shall not be so chosen by my son George or his heirs shall go to and be equally divided by my sons Samuel, John and Charles and their heirs share and share alike and in case my son George by the death of both or either of my sons Lawrence and Augustine should according to this my intention come to be possessed of either their lands then my will and desire is that said lands hereby devised to my said son George and his heirs should go over and be equally divided between my sons Samuel, John and Charles and their heirs share and share alike and in case all my children by my present wife should happen to die without issue of their bodies. Then my will and desire is that all the lands by this my will devised to any of my said children should go to my sons Augustine and Lawrence if living and to their heirs or if one of them should be dead without issue then to the survivor and his heirs. But my true Intent and meaning is that each of my children by my present wife may have their lands in fee simple upon the contingency of their arriving at full age or leaving heirs of their bodies lawfully begotten or on their dying under age and without lawful issue their several parts to descend from one to another according to their course of descent and the remainder of their or any of their land in this clause mentioned to my sons Lawrence and Augustine or the survivors of them in only upon the contingency of all my said children by my present wife dying under age and without issue living, my sons Lawrence and Augustine or either of them. Lastly; I constitute and appoint my son Lawrence Washington and my good friends Daniel McLarity and Nathaniel Chapman --Gentlemen Executors of this my last will and Testament. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and Seal theEleventh day of April 1743.

AUGUSTINE WASHINGTON (L.S.)

Signed sealed and published in the presence of us.

Robert Jackson

Anthony Strother

Jas Thompson

Provided further that if my lands at Chotank devised to my son Samuel should by course of law be taken away then I give to the said Samuel in lieu thereof a tract of Land in Westmoreland County where Benjamin Wicks and Thomas Finch now live by estimation seven hundred acres.

Item: I bequeath to my son George one lot of land in the town of Fredericksburg which I purchased of Col. John Walton also two other lots in the said town which I purchased of the Executors of Colo. Henry Willis with all the houses and appurtenances thereunto belonging. And whereas some proposals have been made by Mr. Anthony Strother for purchasing a piece of land where Matthew Tiffy lately lived now if my Executors shall think it for the benefit of my said son George then I hereby empower them to make conveyance of the said land and premices (sic) to the said Strother. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and Seal theEleventh day of April 1743.

AUGUSTINE WASHINGTON (L.S.)

Signed sealed and published in the presence of us.

Robert Jackson

Anthony Strother

Jas Thompson

At a court held for King George County the 6th day of May 1743 The last will and testament of Augustine Washington Gent'n deceased was presented into Court by Lawrence Washington Gent'n one of the Executors who made oath thereunto and the same was provided by the oath of Anthony Strother and James Thompson admitted to Record.

Augustine Washington and Mary Ball were married at Sandy Point, Westmoreland Co.,VA on March 17, 1731 (N.S.), The Rev. Walter Jones of Cople Parish officiating.

!DEATH - ANCESTORS OF AMERICAN PRESIDENTS by Gary Boyd Roberts, p. 1

He died at Ferry Farm, King George Co., VA. 12 April 1743.

BURIAL - THE WASHINGTONS AND THEIR HOMES by John W. Wayland, p. 14

Tombstone reads: CAPTAIN AUGUSTINNE WASHINGTON 1694 - 1743

LANDMARKS OF OLD PRINCE WILLIAM, VOL I & II by Fairfax Harrison, p. 107.

It was not until 1734 that Capt. Augustine Washington, seeking a healthier residence for the young children of his second wife, moved from his grandfather's house, Wakefield, on Pope's Creek in Westmo reland, to the high land of the plantation on Little Hunting Creek, which likewise he had inherited from his grandfather, but he too was only a temporary resident of old Prince William; for, in 1739 , when his modest home was destroyed by fire, he moved again to the house where he died, on the north bank of the Rappahannock, opposite Fredericksburg.

LAND RECORDS OF KING GEORGE CO., VA 1721-1743 by Sue Ann Damron, p. 188

2;22 - deed of release - 3 November 1738 - John Grant of the County of Stafford, Gent., and Margaret his wife Executors of the Last Wiull and Testament of William Strother late of the county of King G eorge, Gent., deceased to Augustin Washington of the county of Prince William, Gent. 317 pounds for 280A described in lease. Whereas the said William Strother in his last will and testament dated 2 0 Nov. 1732 did declare that his lands in Prince William and King George Cos. be sold to the highest bidder by his executor his loving wife Margaret, if she should think convenient, John Grant and Mar garet his wife Excutrix have exposed to sale the premises and the said Augustin Washington was the highest bidder. Signed John Grant, Margt. Grant Delivered in presence of William Thornton, junr., An tho. Hayne - Recorded 3 November 1738 T. Turner

DEED OF RELEASE - Deed was released to Augustin Washington of the Co. of King George, Gent, 317 pounds for 280A described in lease. - Ibid

SURVEYS made by John Savage in King George Co - on April 1726 for Capt. Augustn. Washington 4,560A on the branches of Deep Run. - Ibid

SOME WILLS FROM THE BURNED COUNTIES OF VIRGINIA AND NOTHER WILLS NOT LISTED IN VIRGINIA WILLS AND ADMINISTRATIONS 1632-1800 by William Lindsay Hopkins, p. 71

AUGUSTINE WASHINGTON King Geo. Co 11 Apr 1743/6 May 1743

Son Lawrence Washington. Son Augustine Washington. Son George Washington land bought from the executors of Mr. William Strother, decd. Son Samuel Washington. Son John Washington. Son Charles Wash ington land whereon Thomas Lewis not lives and the land purchased of Gabriel Adams in Prince William Co. Land purchased of Mr. James Hooe. Daughter Betty Washington (under 18). Present wife (not na med). Exors: Son Lawrence Washington, Daniel McCarty and Nathaniel Chapman. Wit: Robert Jackson, Anthony Strother, James Thompson. Also land in Westmoreland Co. where Benjamin Wicks and Thomas Fi nch now live, lots in fredericksburg purchased of the Executors of Col. Henry Willis and a piece of land where Matthew Tiffy late lived.

Tyler V.9, pp. 35-38 New England Hist. & Gen. Register V. 45 (1891) pp. 209-213 and King George Co. W III Book A-1, 1721-1752

Colonel Augustine Washington, Jr. (1720 – May 1762) was the second son of Augustine Washington and Jane Butler, and George Washington's half-brother. Augustine married Anne (or Ann) Aylett who was born in 1726 at "Nominy Plantation." According to the will of Augustine Washington Sr., the land now known as Mount Vernon first was willed to Lawrence Washington (brother of Augustine Jr.). However, the will instructed that in the case Lawrence should die without an heir the property would go to Augustine Jr. if he would be willing to give the Pope's Creek property to George Washington. Augustine decided instead to keep the Pope's Creek property and so George got the property now known as Mount Vernon.

(1) "Burke's Presidential Families of the United States of America" (Burke's Peerage Ltd., London, 1st ed.) p.48. Half-Brothers and Sister of President Washington.

(2) "Virginia Vital Records from the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, the William and Mary College Quarterly, and Tyler's Quarterly" (Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1984), "Inscriptions on Old Tombstones in Westmoreland and Northumberland Counties," p.548.

(1) Of Wakefield, Westmoreland Co., VA.

(1) Colonel of Virginia Militia.

(1) Member of Virginia Assembly.

Will: 18 Sep. 1758 Westmoreland Co., VA.

Probate: 25 May 1762 Westmoreland Co., VA.

Burial: 1762 Bridges Memorial Washington Family cemetery, VA.

Father of George Washington, America's first President. The British were well established in America with thirteen colonies prior to the American Revolution led by George Washington culminating in independence from England and the formation of a united county. Cities, seaports, schools, churches and thriving industry doted the landscape. In the south, large plantations sprang up, constructed and operated by cheap labor in the form of slaves imported from Africa. By the time of the birth of George Washington to Jane Butler and Augustine Washington Sr., three family generations had past since George's Great Grandfather John Washington had immigrated to the Colonies during the British Civil War in 1631. The extensive family became prosperous and thriving when Augustine Washington was born in 1694 in Westmoreland County, Virginia on his father's plantation. He was only four when his father died and his inheritance consisted of 1,000 acres on Bridges Creek (Popes Creek). When Augustine came of age, he married Jane Butler, an orphan with considerable wealth of her own. The couple settled on his inherited property and quickly constructed a new house called "Wakefield." He developed the land known as Popes Creek Plantation into a modest but successful farming venture. In addition to cultivating tobacco, he was active in the church, local politics and served at various times as justice of the peace and county sheriff. The marriage would produce two sons, Lawrence and Augustine Jr. Jane would pass away in 1728 and three years later Augustine would marry a second time to Mary Ball. Their first born would be George destined to be the first President of the United States. Although born in the "Wakefield Mansion," he would only spend the first three years of his life as the family moved many times, living at various plantations owned by Augustine Sr. The family lastly settled at Ferry Farm Plantation near Frederiksburg where Augustine owned and operated Accokeek Iron Furnace located nearby. Five other children followed...Samuel, Elizabeth, John Augustine, Charles, and Mildred (died in infancy). When Augustine Washington Sr. died in 1743 at Ferry Farm, he left his wife Mary Ball with many small children but well provided. George the oldest was but eleven. He along with other family members conveyed their father's remains by land and river 35 miles back to Popes Creek where they buried him beside his first wife and near his father and grandfather at the Washington family burial ground (Popes Creek Cemetery.) Mary would continue to live with her children and operate Ferry Farm with enslaved labor until selling the farm and moving into the town of Fredericksburg in 1774. Soon after the death of his father, George would live with his half brother Augustine Washington Jr. (Austin) in order to pursue an education at the Henry Williams School in Westmoreland County. At age fifteen he was a land surveyor. His first assignment was a land survey of 22 acres at Popes Creek. Legacy...In 1779, William, the son of Augustine Washington Jr., accidently burned down "Wakefield" after building a large fire in the mansion fire place then leaving to attend Episcopal church services on Christmas day. A spark from the chimney ignited a fire that destroyed the dwelling. A replica plantation house was constructed on the plantation land in Westmoreland County to approximate the original birth house in 1932 and is today known as the "Memorial House." The historical area today consists of 538 acres with the house, the Washington family burial ground, a working demonstration farm and 18th century period garden. Also interred in the burial ground are 28 other early members of the Washington family. President George Washington was buried at Mt. Vernon in 1799 and his mother Mary Ball Washington in Frederiksburg. The original foundations of what is believed to be the birth house were discovered by preservationist and is outlined. The site is now known as the George Washington Birthplace National Monument. An unmarked slave graveyard discovered at the Washington birthplace is an infamous legacy of Augustine Washington Sr. It contains 156 bodies of slaves owned by George Washington's father. Trivia note: Washington's birthplace eventually was sold and passed from the holdings of the Washington family. It was allow to disintegrate until preservationists realized the historical significance of the site. However, it was to late, nothing remained but finally a concerted effort with private and government assistance began to restore the plantation in the early 30's in a style of how it may have looked. Even the burial grounds was a vain attempt at restoration and creation. The finished project today resulted after disinterring of family parts, and a few vandalized markers from around the plantation and area with reinterring on the site.

____________________________

Birth: 1694 Death: Apr. 12, 1743


Family links:

Parents:
 Lawrence Washington (1659 - 1697)
 Mildred Warner Washington (1671 - 1701)

Spouses:
 Jane Butler Washington (1699 - 1728)
 Mary Ball Washington (1708 - 1789)
 

Burial: George Washington Birthplace National Monument Colonial Beach Westmoreland County Virginia, USA Plot: Popes Creek Plantation


Maintained by: Find A Grave Record added: Apr 17, 2001 Find A Grave Memorial# 21506


-------------------- Birth: 1694 Death: Apr. 12, 1743

Father of George Washington, America's first President. The British were well established in America with thirteen colonies prior to the American Revolution led by George Washington culminating in independence from England and the formation of a united county. Cities, seaports, schools, churches and thriving industry doted the landscape. In the south, large plantations sprang up, constructed and operated by cheap labor in the form of slaves imported from Africa. By the time of the birth of George Washington to Jane Butler and Augustine Washington Sr., three family generations had past since George's Great Grandfather John Washington had immigrated to the Colonies during the British Civil War in 1631. The extensive family became prosperous and thriving when Augustine Washington was born in 1694 in Westmoreland County, Virginia on his father's plantation. He was only four when his father died and his inheritance consisted of 1,000 acres on Bridges Creek (Popes Creek). When Augustine came of age, he married Jane Butler, an orphan with considerable wealth of her own. The couple settled on his inherited property and quickly constructed a new house called "Wakefield." He developed the land known as Popes Creek Plantation into a modest but successful farming venture. In addition to cultivating tobacco, he was active in the church, local politics and served at various times as justice of the peace and county sheriff. The marriage would produce two sons, Lawrence and Augustine Jr. Jane would pass away in 1728 and three years later Augustine would marry a second time to Mary Ball. Their first born would be George destined to be the first President of the United States. Although born in the "Wakefield Mansion," he would only spend the first three years of his life as the family moved many times, living at various plantations owned by Augustine Sr. The family lastly settled at Ferry Farm Plantation near Frederiksburg where Augustine owned and operated Accokeek Iron Furnace located nearby. Five other children followed...Samuel, Elizabeth, John Augustine, Charles, and Mildred (died in infancy). When Augustine Washington Sr. died in 1743 at Ferry Farm, he left his wife Mary Ball with many small children but well provided. George the oldest was but eleven. He along with other family members conveyed their father's remains by land and river 35 miles back to Popes Creek where they buried him beside his first wife and near his father and grandfather at the Washington family burial ground (Popes Creek Cemetery.) Mary would continue to live with her children and operate Ferry Farm with enslaved labor until selling the farm and moving into the town of Fredericksburg in 1774. Soon after the death of his father, George would live with his half brother Augustine Washington Jr. (Austin) in order to pursue an education at the Henry Williams School in Westmoreland County. At age fifteen he was a land surveyor. His first assignment was a land survey of 22 acres at Popes Creek. Legacy...In 1779, William, the son of Augustine Washington Jr., accidently burned down "Wakefield" after building a large fire in the mansion fire place then leaving to attend Episcopal church services on Christmas day. A spark from the chimney ignited a fire that destroyed the dwelling. A replica plantation house was constructed on the plantation land in Westmoreland County to approximate the original birth house in 1932 and is today known as the "Memorial House." The historical area today consists of 538 acres with the house, the Washington family burial ground, a working demonstration farm and 18th century period garden. Also interred in the burial ground are 28 other early members of the Washington family. President George Washington was buried at Mt. Vernon in 1799 and his mother Mary Ball Washington in Frederiksburg. The original foundations of what is believed to be the birth house were discovered by preservationist and is outlined. The site is now known as the George Washington Birthplace National Monument. An unmarked slave graveyard discovered at the Washington birthplace is an infamous legacy of Augustine Washington Sr. It contains 156 bodies of slaves owned by George Washington's father. Trivia note: Washington's birthplace eventually was sold and passed from the holdings of the Washington family. It was allow to disintegrate until preservationists realized the historical significance of the site. However, it was to late, nothing remained but finally a concerted effort with private and government assistance began to restore the plantation in the early 30's in a style of how it may have looked. Even the burial grounds was a vain attempt at restoration and creation. The finished project today resulted after disinterring of family parts, and a few vandalized markers from around the plantation and area with reinterring on the site. -------------------- Father of George Washington, America's first President. The British were well established in America with thirteen colonies prior to the American Revolution led by George Washington culminating in independence from England and the formation of a united county. Cities, seaports, schools, churches and thriving industry doted the landscape. In the south, large plantations sprang up, constructed and operated by cheap labor in the form of slaves imported from Africa. By the time of the birth of George Washington to Jane Butler and Augustine Washington Sr., three family generations had past since George's Great Grandfather John Washington had immigrated to the Colonies during the British Civil War in 1631. The extensive family became prosperous and thriving when Augustine Washington was born in 1694 in Westmoreland County, Virginia on his father's plantation. He was only four when his father died and his inheritance consisted of 1,000 acres on Bridges Creek (Popes Creek). When Augustine came of age, he married Jane Butler, an orphan with considerable wealth of her own. The couple settled on his inherited property and quickly constructed a new house called "Wakefield." He developed the land known as Popes Creek Plantation into a modest but successful farming venture. In addition to cultivating tobacco, he was active in the church, local politics and served at various times as justice of the peace and county sheriff. The marriage would produce two sons, Lawrence and Augustine Jr. Jane would pass away in 1728 and three years later Augustine would marry a second time to Mary Ball. Their first born would be George destined to be the first President of the United States. Although born in the "Wakefield Mansion," he would only spend the first three years of his life as the family moved many times, living at various plantations owned by Augustine Sr. The family lastly settled at Ferry Farm Plantation near Frederiksburg where Augustine owned and operated Accokeek Iron Furnace located nearby. Five other children followed...Samuel, Elizabeth, John Augustine, Charles, and Mildred (died in infancy). When Augustine Washington Sr. died in 1743 at Ferry Farm, he left his wife Mary Ball with many small children but well provided. George the oldest was but eleven. He along with other family members conveyed their father's remains by land and river 35 miles back to Popes Creek where they buried him beside his first wife and near his father and grandfather at the Washington family burial ground (Popes Creek Cemetery.) Mary would continue to live with her children and operate Ferry Farm with enslaved labor until selling the farm and moving into the town of Fredericksburg in 1774. Soon after the death of his father, George would live with his half brother Augustine Washington Jr. (Austin) in order to pursue an education at the Henry Williams School in Westmoreland County. At age fifteen he was a land surveyor. His first assignment was a land survey of 22 acres at Popes Creek. Legacy...In 1779, William, the son of Augustine Washington Jr., accidently burned down "Wakefield" after building a large fire in the mansion fire place then leaving to attend Episcopal church services on Christmas day. A spark from the chimney ignited a fire that destroyed the dwelling. A replica plantation house was constructed on the plantation land in Westmoreland County to approximate the original birth house in 1932 and is today known as the "Memorial House." The historical area today consists of 538 acres with the house, the Washington family burial ground, a working demonstration farm and 18th century period garden. Also interred in the burial ground are 28 other early members of the Washington family. President George Washington was buried at Mt. Vernon in 1799 and his mother Mary Ball Washington in Frederiksburg. The original foundations of what is believed to be the birth house were discovered by preservationist and is outlined. The site is now known as the George Washington Birthplace National Monument. An unmarked slave graveyard discovered at the Washington birthplace is an infamous legacy of Augustine Washington Sr. It contains 156 bodies of slaves owned by George Washington's father. Trivia note: Washington's birthplace eventually was sold and passed from the holdings of the Washington family. It was allow to disintegrate until preservationists realized the historical significance of the site. However, it was to late, nothing remained but finally a concerted effort with private and government assistance began to restore the plantation in the early 30's in a style of how it may have looked. Even the burial grounds was a vain attempt at restoration and creation. The finished project today resulted after disinterring of family parts, and a few vandalized markers from around the plantation and area with reinterring on the site.



            
view all 22

Capt. Augustine Washington, Sr.'s Timeline

1694
November 12, 1694
Westmoreland, Virginia
1715
April 20, 1715
Age 20
Westmoreland, Virginia, United States
1716
1716
Age 21
Bridge's Creek, Westmoreland Co., Virginia
1718
1718
Age 23
Virginia, United States
1720
1720
Age 25
Bridge's Creek, Westmoreland, Virginia
1722
1722
Age 27
Popes Creek, Westmoreland, Virginia
1731
March 6, 1731
Age 36
Epping Forest, Lancaster, Virginia
1732
February 22, 1732
Age 37
Westmoreland, Virginia
1733
June 20, 1733
Age 38
Westmoreland, Virginia
1734
November 16, 1734
Age 40
Wakefield, Stafford Co, VA