Francis Eppes, Sr. (c.1597 - 1668) MP

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Nicknames: "Epes"
Birthplace: Ashford, Kent, England
Death: Died in Charles City, Virginia
Occupation: Colonel
Managed by: Maria Edmonds-Zediker, Volunteer Curator
Last Updated:

About Francis Eppes, Sr.

FRANCIS Eppes (EPES)) was born May 15, 1597 in Kent, England, and died 1674 in Charles City, Virginia. He married MARIE PAULETTE.


Francis Epes, son of John Epes of Ashford, Co. Kent, Eng, and his wife Thomazine Bankes, was baptized, 15 May 1597, according to the register of the Parish Church of Ashford; though his birth date is not given, it must have been shortly before his baptism. He came to Virginia before 1625, in which year he represented Charles City Co. in the General Assembly. He was at first an Ensign, then Captain, and later Lieutenant-Col. o f Militia of that county. In 1635 he was granted 1700 acres of land (with renewal in 1638) in that part of Charles City Co. which then lay south of the James River, later Prince George , and in 1653 he received a further grant of 280 acres adjoining the larger grant , these grants being given for the transportation of a number of individuals into the Colony, including his three sons. In 1637, under Harvey's second administration, he was named one of four person's resident in Virginia and fit to be called to the Council there." He was probably soon after made a member of the Council and continued to be until he death about 1658. It does not appear in extant Virginia records that Col. Epes returned to England at any time, except that the large number of head rights transported by him to Virginia would seem to have been sent from England under his personal direction. News of his father's death late in 1627 would have reached him a few weeks later. Though he was still in Virginia in March, 1628, when he was appointed to the "Commission for a monthly Court in the Upper Parts," it seems probable that he went to England some time in that year, partly for the purpose of collecting his inheritance under his father's will and partly for the purpose of gathering the company or immigrant s who came to Virginia shortly after as his head rights. There is an entry in the register of the Church of St. Olave, in Hart Street, London, which says that, on 8 Sept 1630, Thomas son of Francis Eps and wife Marie, was born. This Francis Eps may have been a different person from the one under consideration , but the entry is significant from the fact that in a deposition of 1665 Thomas Epes of Virginia, son of Col. Francis Epes gives his age as 35 years , making his birth-year 1630, the same as Thomas Epes registered at St. Olave's. In the land patent granted Cap. Francis Epes (as he then was), for the transportation of sundry persons, including his sons John, Francis and Thomas. It is stated that all of them came over in a Spanish frigate in 1629. This is a date which conflicts with the fact that Thomas, born in 1630, was brought to Virginia as one of his father's head rights. He must have come from England in order to qualify. His brothers may have been born in Virginia, and probably were, but could be counted as head rights by going to England and returning to Virginia. Since the deposition of Francis says he was born in 1628, it must have been in Virginia where his father was then living. It is a surmise, but seems logical, that the broad statement that "all of them came over in a Spanish frigate in 1629," means that Captain Francis Epes and his immediat e family, who followed a year or so later. There is no reference to Captain Epes in Virginia records so far discovered from March 1628, when he was appointed a Commissioner of Justice in "the Upper Parts," until 1631, when he was appointed a Commissioner for the counties

of Charles City and Henrico, giving an interval of two years or more which he could have spent profitably in England in organizing his expedition of immigrants. If it was essential for him to accompany this group, he could have left his wife and small children in England and returned to them after seeing his head rights safely landed in Virginia. Besides the work entailed by the organization of the expedition, we can imagine that Cap. Epes found other work to do in London. As a person familiar with conditions in Virginia, so recently taken over by the Regal Government from the London Company, under which he had first served, his knowledge of conditions in the newly settled country would have been useful to Colonial officials living in London and would have found himself frequently in consultation with them. From the will of Cap. Thomas Pawlett, dated 12 Jan 1643/44, we know that Francis Epes' wife accompanied him to Virginia. Capt. Pawlett bequeather his lands to his brother, the second Lord Pawlett; to Captain Epes, one of the overseers of his will, he gave his drum; to Mrs. Epes, he gave his Bible and twenty shillings for a ring; and to their son Francis, who was his godson, he gave some silver plate. The virile characteristics of energetic, courageous Kentish man, were transmitted to his two older sons, who in their generation, filled places in their communities similar to the position he had hewed out for himself in the primitive colonial life of early Virginia with its sparse population, the difficulties of obtaining food and other necessaries of life, and constant danger from unfriendly Indians. The third son, Thomas, was living in 1665, as we know by his deposition, but we have no later information about him. Of Francis Epes' wife, we Francis Epes, know no more than we learn in the will of Captain Thomas Pawlett, unless we conclude that she was Marie, wife of Francis Eps, whose son Thomas’s birth was registered in 1630 in the Church of St . Olave, London. Even that gives little additional information. There is no evidence that there were other children of this marriage than those named at head rights, since individuals of whom we have knowledge in the third generation can easily be accounted for as children of the two eldest sons of Francis Epes. There may have been daughters (whose family name would have been lost in marriage) of whom we can learn nothing about without records. The mortality rate was high in those early days of Virginia, as it was elsewhere, even in England, and it seems reasonable to conclude that only two of the children of Francis Epes left children to continue the name. The Church of St. Olave, in Harts Street on the east side of Mark Lane and near the Tower of London, is interesting as having survived the Great Fire of 1666. The picturesque interior contains a number of curious old tombs, including those of Samuel Pepys (died 1703) and his wife. The skulls over the gate of the churchyard in Seething Lane are said to commemorate the fact that many persons who died of the plague in 1665 are buried here, but this tradition is not supported by the burials-register of the church. Tradition says Francis Epes came to Virginia in the ship Hopewell, which name he gave to his plantation on the south bank of the James River. Hotten gives sailings of the Hopewell in 1622, 1623 and 1624, but does not list Francis Epes among the passengers. However, Hotten's Lists are admittedly incomplete. Maude Pirtle Taylor No tes: Lt. Col. Francis Eppes, died 1656. Said to have been of an armorial family; from England to Prince George Co., VA 1625; patented 1700 acres in Charles City Co., 1635; received head rights for transportation of himself, 3 sons and 30 servants; settled on lands at junction of James and Appomattox Rivers still held by family; commr., 1632; burgess, 4 terms; justice for Charles City Co., VA., 1639-1645; Capt and Lt. Col Virginia troops; member Royal Council, 1652; m. in England. (Ref : Compendium of Am. Genealogy, Vol VII p. 849). Ref. Compendium of American Genealogy, VOL VII p. 101 Francis Eppes see above John (d. 1680) of Charles City, Co., VA m. Mary Daniel (probably son of John) Daniel (1672-1753, of Surry Co., V A, m. Mary 1676-1755 Edward d. 1780, of Sussex Co., VA.; m. ca 1738 Mary Anderson b. ca 172 1; James 8, m Mary, dau of Geo. Jordan of Surry Co. VA Anne b. 1743 m Thomas Gibbons 1734 -1809 or Charles Parish, York Co. , VA and Hawkins Co., TN see Vol. VI Elizabeth b 1774, Maj James Chisholm 1774- 1835 Capt Elijah) Mary Ann 1795-1853, m 1810 John Johnson 1790-185 2 Lavinia Johnson, m. John D. Thomas; Paris, Lamar Co. TX Mattie Thomas, m. Travis C. Henderson Fanny Henderson, m. Geo. A. Russ, Jan 8 1903 at Austin TX The above is copy of records of Mrs. Fanny Henderson Russ, of Eureka Springs, AR These notes were copied from the work of Patrick Anderson, via internet: Notes for Francis Eppes: Francis came to Virginia a with two brothers, William and Peter before 1625. He was a burgess from Charles City Count y in the assembly of 05/10/1625. Member of the Virginia Council in 1637. His original paten t was at City Point, Virginia called Appomattox Manor. Is now a National Park, the ranger can be reached as RangerTB@aol.com. Francis Eppes 08/26/1635 1700 acres Charles City County on the Appomattox River. Bibliography "Francis Eppes, His Ancestors and Descendants" , Eva Turner Clark "Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia 1607-1625", Annie Lash Jester and Martha Woodroof Hiden, Order of the First Families of Virginia, 1607-1620, 1956.

"Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia", Volume One, Edited by, John Frederic k Dorman, Society of the Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, 1992. http://www.2fools .net/book-0001/0009-0005.html#CHILD5

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Francis Epes (or Eppes, in later spellings) was born c. 1597 in Ashford, Kent, England. He was the son of John Epes (b.1650) of Ashford, and Thomasine Fisher. He was baptized 14 May, 1597. His lineage can be traced back to the thirteenth century in Kent.

William, Francis, and Peter, the 5th, 6th, & 8th sons (10th, 11th, & 14th children) of John Eppes, Jr. Captain William Eppes, older brother of Francis, and Peter Eppes, his younger brother were in Virginia by 1623, but neither left descendants of record in the colony. William whose wife was Margaret, was living on the Eastern Shore, 1628, but had moved to St. Christopher's in the West Indies by 1630. Peter Eppes, mentioned in court records for Feb 1626, appears to have left the colony thereafter, for there is no further mention of him.

Frances Eppes married Mary (?) in 1620. She was born c. 1602. It is not clear if they were married in England or Virginia. It is generally accepted (but not proven) that Mary's maiden name was Pawlett. Francis knew the Pawlett family well, being neighbors at Shirley Hundred and having served in the militia with Thomas Pawlett. Thomas Pawlett left Mary his bible and money for a ring in his will.

Francis resided on Shirley Hundred Island, since known as Epes Island, in Virginia. He returned to England c.1629, taking Mary and two small sons with him, to tend to the affairs of his father John Eppes, recently deceased. His son Thomas was born and baptized in London. The Eppes returned to Virginia by 1632.

We know Francis Eppes was in Virginia by April 1625 when he was elected from Shirley Hundred to sit in the Assembly of James City in May of that year, when he began a career of public service.

  • He was an active officer (in grades Ensign through Colonel), Colonial Militia of Virginia.
  • He testified 9 Jan. 1625/26 in the controversy between Mr. Thomas Pawlett and Rev. Greville Pooley.
  • He was appointed commissioner for the Upper Parts, 8 Aug. 1626, and commander of forces with Capt. Thomas Pawlett to attack the Weyanoke, and Appomattox Indians, 4 July 1627.
  • In 26 Aug 1635, as Capt. Francis Epes, he was granted 1700 acres in Charles City County on Appomattox River, a portion of which tract remained in the family until 1978.
  • He served in the House of Burgesses for Charles City, 1639/40 and 1645-46, and after being recommended June 1637, was a member of the Council in 1652.
  • He also held land on Shirley Hundred Island, now Eppes Island.

He was dead by 30 Sept. 1674.

Children of Francis Epes or Eppes and wife Mary (?Pawlette):

  • John Epes (1626-Sept. 30, 1674)
  • Thomas Epes, b. England, Sept. 8, 1630
  • Francis Epes II (Lt-Col) b: 19 NOV 1627 in Virginia

-------------------- Links to additional materials

PLEASE NOTE - The book by Merrow Egerton Sorley has many items that have since been disproved. It does give an idea of life in Virginia Colony during the time of Francis Eppes, and it is interesting to read, so it is listed as a source for additional material.

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"Hundreds" in Early Colonial VirginiaIn the early days of the Virginia colony, it was hard to recruit settlers to leave England and travel to Virginia. Life in the New World was hard. Most immigrants were dying in the new colony - about 90% over the "Starving Time" winter of 1609-1610. The Spaniards had experienced a New World with easy-to-steal gold and silver, but by 1614 it was clear that tobacco was the most-profitable export to come from Virginia's earth... and tobacco farming was hard, hard work.


The Virginia colony was a private venture, managed by the Virginia Company with the blessing of King James I. After the initial promises to make the investors rich did not pan out, the company was unable to sell new shares of stock to raise capital for shipping more people/equipment to Virginia. The labor of indentured servants was essential to tobacco production - and if most settlers died, it just meant the colony had to work even harder to recruit more people.

The Virginia Company shifted gears, recognizing that one item was the most effective inducement to attract new settlers. It began to offer land, a commodity which the company had in abundance, as the incentive to recruit new laborers. Anyone paying their own expenses to Virginia, or the expenses of someone else, would receive a warrant authorizing them to survey and "patent" 50 acres of land free.

In an even better offer, new investors could assemble a whole group of new settlers and start a "particular plantation" away from Jamestown. These plantations were allowed more self-government, an added inducement for a new investor to risk ("venture") their capital. (References in the early 1600's to "adventurers" are comparable to references today to "venture capitalists.") The company's chief manager in Jamestown (the governor) had control over the company's settlements. The new plantations had some autonomy, even before the formation of the first General Assembly in 1619.

The new plantations were called Hundreds, reflecting an old Norman term used to divide England into administrative units after their conquest of the island. The districts (in Norman Conquest time) were sized so each could provide 100 soldiers upon command, but by the time of James I the settlements in Virginia were closer to 100 people - including women and children. Each immigrant brought to Virginia, no matter what their age or sex, entitled the investor paying their way to 100 acres of land.


Bermuda Hundred was started in 1613, after the English settlers made peace with the Virginia natives - in part with Pocahontas' help. It was named after the traumatic shipwreck of the "Third Supply" bringing reinforcements to Virginia in 1609. The leaders of that expedition were shipwrecked in Bermuda and had to take their wrecked ship apart and build two smaller ships to finally get to Virginia. Shakespeare incorporated the tale into a play, The Tempest.

Bermuda Hundred was initially intended to include several "hundreds" upstream and downstream of the Appomattox River. Just north of the mouth of the Appomattox, Bermuda City was founded. It was renamed Charles City to honor the king in England (hey, flattery matters...). City Point is the last remnant of that name south of the James River.

The Bermuda settlements were attacked severely in 1622, when the natives abandoned their efforts at peaceful coexistence. Bermuda Hundred never gained prominence again until 1864 when a Union Army occupied it. The Federal troops came very close to capturing Petersburg and ending the Civil War, before being bottled up on the peninsula.

Source: http://www.virginiaplaces.org/vacities/hundreds.html

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FRANCIS EPES resided on Shirley Hundred Island, since known as EPES Islan d; he was an active officer (in grades Ensign through Colonel), Colonial Militia of Virginia, Member, House of Burgesses; grantee of several large patents for land, some of which remained in the tenure of his descendants for three and a half centuries.

The following from "Adventures of Purse and Person", Ed. Annie Lash Jest er in collaboration with Martha Woodruff (Sponsored by Order of 1st Families of VA 1607-24) 1964

"FRANCIS EPES, one of three brothers who came to Virginia before 1625, was the son of JOHN EPES and his wife THOMASINE BANKES of Ashford, Kent, England. In April 1625, FRANCIS EPES was elected from Charles City to set in the Assembly at James City 'on the next ensuing 10th of May'. At this session often referred to as the 'convention,' he signed a petiti on to be sent to England expressing 'extreme discouragement of the colonis ts over the change in government."

Captain WILLIAM EPES, older brother of FRANCIS, and PETER EPES, his younger brother were in Virginia by 1623, but neither left descendants of record in the colony.

Captain William whose wife was Margaret, was living on the Eastern Shore, 1628, but had removed to St. Christopher's in the West Indies by 1630.

PETER EPES, mentioned in court, Feb 5, 1626, appears to have departed fr om the colony thereafter, for there is no further mention of him.

FRANCIS EPES, appointed to Commissioner for the Upper Parts, August 8, 1626, Commander of forces with Captain THOMAS PAWLETT to attack the Weyano ke and Appomattox Indians.

1627, member of the House of Burgesses for Shirley Hundred, Mr. Farrar's and Chaplaine's, 1631-32, and for Charles City, 1639, as one of four perso,ns 'resident in Virginia and fit to be called to the Council there.'

On August 26, 1635, Captain FRANCIS EPES was granted 17000 acres of the Appomattox River, a portion of which tract has remained continuously in the family since that date. Headrights named in the patent were himself, his three sons, JOHN, FRANCIS, and THOMAS and 30 servants.

The only mention of his wife occurs in the will of Captain THOMAS PAWL TT of Westover, Jan 12, 1643/44, bequeathing to 'Mrs. Epps, 20 sh. for a ring and my Bible.'"

The following taken from "Autographs of 65 gentlemen justices, militia officers and member of the grand jury from Charles City/Prince George and Surry counties who signed an oath of loyalty to protestant King William,I II of England in March 1701/2" by Elizabeth Lawrence-Dow, 1976; "The first Captain FRANCIS EPES patented 1700 acres the 26th of August, 1635 on the upper Appomattox river in what would become Bristol parish. Fi ty acres was for his own importation, and 50 acres each for his three sons, plus 30 servants".

There are six autographs of the immigrant grandsons or great-grandsons, living in Charles City and Henrico counties, and of the three JOHN EPES living in Charles City/Prince George Co. in 1701/2, we have the autographs of two..

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FRANCIS Eppes (EPES)) was born May 15, 1597 in Kent, England, and died 1674 in Charles City, Virginia. He married MARIE PAULETTE. .

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Francis Epes, son of John Epes of Ashford, Co. Kent, Eng, and his wife Thomazine Bankes, was baptized, 15 May 1597, according to the register of the Parish Church of Ashford; though his birth date is not given, it must have been shortly before his baptism. He came to Virginia before 1625, in which year he represented Charles City Co. in the General Assembly. He was at first an Ensign, then Captain, and later Lieutenant-Col. o f Militia of that county. In 1635 he was granted 1700 acres of land (with renewal in 1638) in that part of Charles City Co. which then lay south of the James River, later Prince George , and in 1653 he received a further grant of 280 acres adjoining the larger grant , these grants being given for the transportation of a number of individuals into the Colony, including his three sons. In 1637, under Harvey's second administration, he was named one of four person's resident in Virginia and fit to be called to the Council there." He was probably soon after made a member of the Council and continued to be until he death about 1658. It does not appear in extant Virginia records that Col. Epes returned to England at any time, except that the large number of head rights transported by him to Virginia would seem to have been sent from England under his personal direction. News of his father's death late in 1627 would have reached him a few weeks later. Though he was still in Virginia in March, 1628, when he was appointed to the "Commission for a monthly Court in the Upper Parts," it seems probable that he went to England some time in that year, partly for the purpose of collecting his inheritance under his father's will and partly for the purpose of gathering the company or immigrant s who came to Virginia shortly after as his head rights. There is an entry in the register of the Church of St. Olave, in Hart Street, London, which says that, on 8 Sept 1630, Thomas son of Francis Eps and wife Marie, was born. This Francis Eps may have been a different person from the one under consideration , but the entry is significant from the fact that in a deposition of 1665 Thomas Epes of Virginia, son of Col. Francis Epes gives his age as 35 years , making his birth-year 1630, the same as Thomas Epes registered at St. Olave's. In the land patent granted Cap. Francis Epes (as he then was), for the transportation of sundry persons, including his sons John, Francis and Thomas. It is stated that all of them came over in a Spanish frigate in 1629. This is a date which conflicts with the fact that Thomas, born in 1630, was brought to Virginia as one of his father's head rights. He must have come from England in order to qualify. His brothers may have been born in Virginia, and probably were, but could be counted as head rights by going to England and returning to Virginia. Since the deposition of Francis says he was born in 1628, it must have been in Virginia where his father was then living. It is a surmise, but seems logical, that the broad statement that "all of them came over in a Spanish frigate in 1629," means that Captain Francis Epes and his immediat e family, who followed a year or so later. There is no reference to Captain Epes in Virginia records so far discovered from March 1628, when he was appointed a Commissioner of Justice in "the Upper Parts," until 1631, when he was appointed a Commissioner for the counties .

of Charles City and Henrico, giving an interval of two years or more which he could have spent profitably in England in organizing his expedition of immigrants. If it was essential for him to accompany this group, he could have left his wife and small children in England and returned to them after seeing his head rights safely landed in Virginia. Besides the work entailed by the organization of the expedition, we can imagine that Cap. Epes found other work to do in London. As a person familiar with conditions in Virginia, so recently taken over by the Regal Government from the London Company, under which he had first served, his knowledge of conditions in the newly settled country would have been useful to Colonial officials living in London and would have found himself frequently in consultation with them. From the will of Cap. Thomas Pawlett, dated 12 Jan 1643/44, we know that Francis Epes' wife accompanied him to Virginia. Capt. Pawlett bequeather his lands to his brother, the second Lord Pawlett; to Captain Epes, one of the overseers of his will, he gave his drum; to Mrs. Epes, he gave his Bible and twenty shillings for a ring; and to their son Francis, who was his godson, he gave some silver plate. The virile characteristics of energetic, courageous Kentish man, were transmitted to his two older sons, who in their generation, filled places in their communities similar to the position he had hewed out for himself in the primitive colonial life of early Virginia with its sparse population, the difficulties of obtaining food and other necessaries of life, and constant danger from unfriendly Indians. The third son, Thomas, was living in 1665, as we know by his deposition, but we have no later information about him. Of Francis Epes' wife, we Francis Epes, know no more than we learn in the will of Captain Thomas Pawlett, unless we conclude that she was Marie, wife of Francis Eps, whose son Thomas’s birth was registered in 1630 in the Church of St . Olave, London. Even that gives little additional information. There is no evidence that there were other children of this marriage than those named at head rights, since individuals of whom we have knowledge in the third generation can easily be accounted for as children of the two eldest sons of Francis Epes. There may have been daughters (whose family name would have been lost in marriage) of whom we can learn nothing about without records. The mortality rate was high in those early days of Virginia, as it was elsewhere, even in England, and it seems reasonable to conclude that only two of the children of Francis Epes left children to continue the name. The Church of St. Olave, in Harts Street on the east side of Mark Lane and near the Tower of London, is interesting as having survived the Great Fire of 1666. The picturesque interior contains a number of curious old tombs, including those of Samuel Pepys (died 1703) and his wife. The skulls over the gate of the churchyard in Seething Lane are said to commemorate the fact that many persons who died of the plague in 1665 are buried here, but this tradition is not supported by the burials-register of the church. Tradition says Francis Epes came to Virginia in the ship Hopewell, which name he gave to his plantation on the south bank of the James River. Hotten gives sailings of the Hopewell in 1622, 1623 and 1624, but does not list Francis Epes among the passengers. However, Hotten's Lists are admittedly incomplete. Maude Pirtle Taylor No tes: Lt. Col. Francis Eppes, died 1656. Said to have been of an armorial family; from England to Prince George Co., VA 1625; patented 1700 acres in Charles City Co., 1635; received head rights for transportation of himself, 3 sons and 30 servants; settled on lands at junction of James and Appomattox Rivers still held by family; commr., 1632; burgess, 4 terms; justice for Charles City Co., VA., 1639-1645; Capt and Lt. Col Virginia troops; member Royal Council, 1652; m. in England. (Ref : Compendium of Am. Genealogy, Vol VII p. 849). Ref. Compendium of American Genealogy, VOL VII p. 101 Francis Eppes see above John (d. 1680) of Charles City, Co., VA m. Mary Daniel (probably son of John) Daniel (1672-1753, of Surry Co., V A, m. Mary 1676-1755 Edward d. 1780, of Sussex Co., VA.; m. ca 1738 Mary Anderson b. ca 172 1; James 8, m Mary, dau of Geo. Jordan of Surry Co. VA Anne b. 1743 m Thomas Gibbons 1734 -1809 or Charles Parish, York Co. , VA and Hawkins Co., TN see Vol. VI Elizabeth b 1774, Maj James Chisholm 1774- 1835 Capt Elijah) Mary Ann 1795-1853, m 1810 John Johnson 1790-185 2 Lavinia Johnson, m. John D. Thomas; Paris, Lamar Co. TX Mattie Thomas, m. Travis C. Henderson Fanny Henderson, m. Geo. A. Russ, Jan 8 1903 at Austin TX The above is copy of records of Mrs. Fanny Henderson Russ, of Eureka Springs, AR These notes were copied from the work of Patrick Anderson, via internet: Notes for Francis Eppes: Francis came to Virginia a with two brothers, William and Peter before 1625. He was a burgess from Charles City Count y in the assembly of 05/10/1625. Member of the Virginia Council in 1637. His original paten t was at City Point, Virginia called Appomattox Manor. Is now a National Park, the ranger can be reached as RangerTB@aol.com. Francis Eppes 08/26/1635 1700 acres Charles City County on the Appomattox River. Bibliography "Francis Eppes, His Ancestors and Descendants" , Eva Turner Clark "Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia 1607-1625", Annie Lash Jester and Martha Woodroof Hiden, Order of the First Families of Virginia, 1607-1620, 1956..

"Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia", Volume One, Edited by, John Frederic k Dorman, Society of the Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, 1992. http://www.2fools .net/book-0001/0009-0005.html#CHILD5.

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Francis Eppes received 1700 acres in Charles City County in 1635 for the transportation of himself, three sons and 30 servants. This is confusing. No acreage was awarded for his wife. Perhaps this indicates that Francis, Jr. was also born in the Canary Islands?

Laws of Virginia, February 1631/32 "NOWE KNOWE YEE, that according to the sayd orders these persons whose names are here inserted are for the tyme beinge assigned and appoynted to be the present comissioners of and for the upper parts within the precincts of Charles Citty and Henrico, William ffarrar, Esqr. Capt. ffrancis Epes, Captayne Thomas Pawlett, Captayne Thomas Osborne, Thomas Palmer gent. Walter Aston, gent. which sayd comissioners, or any fowre of them, whereof Mr. William ffarrar to be alwayes one, shall have power and authoritie to here and determine, all such suites and controversies betweene partie and partie, as exceede not the value of five pounds stirlinge; and farther, that they take in to their cares, matters of petty offences, the conservation of the peace, the quiett government of, and safetie of the people there residing or beinge; and that all orders, and proclamations be kept and observed, and accordinge to the same, and as neere as may be accordinge to the lawes of the realme of England, to inflict punishment, uppon the offenders and delinquents, and to doe and execute, whatever a justice of peace, or two or more justices of peace may doe, such offences onlie excepted, as concerne the taking away of life or members; Provided alwayes that it shall and may be lawfull for the plaintiff or defendant, in any suite before the sayd commissioners dependinge either before, or after judgment, yf it be before execution awarded, to appeale to the cort of James Citty there holden by the governor and counsell. And they are hereby required from tyme to tyme, to keepe records, of all judgments, orders, and other matters of moment, as by them shall be concluded and agreed on. And this comission to continue in force untill I by my comission under the seale of the colony shall signifie the contrarie. Given at James Citty, the first day of March, 1631, and in the seaventh yeare of the raigne of our soveraigne Lord Charles, by the grace of God of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, kinge, defender of the fayth, and in the 25th yeare of this plantation."

"Francis Epes or Eppes first styled captain and afterwards lieutenant-colonel, settled before 1625, in what soon became Charles City county. In the same year he was a member of the house of burgesses, and in Feb., 1631-32, represented in that house "Both Shirley Hundreds, the Farrar's and Chaplayne's." He was appointed a commissioner (justice) for Charles City and Henrico counties in 1631, and in 1639 and 1645, was a burgess from Charles City. It was on April 30, 1652, that Epes was elected a member of the council, and he probably died before 1655. On Aug. 26, 1635, he patented 1700 acres of land in Charles City county, on the south side of James river, bounded on the east by Bayly's creek, and on the west by Cosons (Cawson's) creek and the Appomattox river. Some of this land is believed to be owned by his descendants. Col. Francis Epes probably married in England, and the arms borne by his descendants in Virginia are the same as those ascribed in English heraldic works to "Epes, or Epps, of Canterbury, Kent."

Henrico County, Virginia: Beginnings of Its Families: Part II. William Clayton Torrence William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 24, No. 3. (Jan., 1916), pp. 202-210. Francis Eppes, the first of his line in Virginia and in Henrico County, was a member of the House of Burgesses, magistrate and in 1652 was elected to the Governor's Council. His son John Eppes was a man of prominence in Charles City County and his son Francis Eppes, the second (circa 1628- 1678) was for some years a magistrate in Henrico County and lieutenant colonel of militia; he also engaged in merchandizing. The succeeding generations of the Eppes family (residing in Henrico, Charles City, Prince George and Chesterfield Counties) were prominent office holders and people of substantial means(2).

"Francis Eppes was a member of council, and his son, Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Eppes, was mortally wounded in 1678, while defending the frontier against the Indians."

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Capt. Francis Eppes's Timeline

1587
May 15, 1587
Ashford Kent England
1597
May 14, 1597
Ashford, Kent, England
May 15, 1597
Ashford, Kent, England
1623
1623
Age 25
1624
1624
Age 26
Virginia
1625
1625
Age 27
England
1627
November 19, 1627
Age 30
Henrico, Virginia
1630
1630
Age 32
Hart St., London, Middlesex, England
1668
October 4, 1668
Age 71
Charles City, Virginia
1674
1674
Age 71
Charles City, Virginia, United States