Francis John West, Sr. (c.1586 - 1634) MP

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Nicknames: "John /West/", "De La Warre", "Second /Lord/"
Birthplace: Salisbury, Weltshire, England
Death: Died in Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA
Occupation: Colonial Governor of Virginia
Managed by: Bianca May Evelyn Brennan
Last Updated:

About Francis John West, Sr.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=83073452&ref=wvr

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_West

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Francis WEST (AFN: 3038-Q9) Pedigree

Sex:  M  Family  
  

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Event(s)

Birth:   28 Oct 1586   
 Salisbury, Weltshire, England   
Christening:   28 Oct 1586   
    
Death:   1634   
 Will Proven, 28 Apr 1634, Eastern Shores, Virginia   

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Parents

Father:  Thomas WEST (AFN: FQ80-24)  Family  
Mother:  Anne KNOLLYS KNOWLES (AFN: K82C-F3)   
  
Father:   Family  

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Marriage(s)

Spouse:  Margaret (AFN: VVG5-N8)  Family  
Marriage:  Abt 1605  
 Of Salisbury, Wiltshire, England  
   
Spouse:  Jane DAVY (AFN: LSF2-9F)  Family  
Marriage:  Aft 1639  
   
   
Spouse:  Temperance FLOWARDIEU (AFN: GHS9-68)  Family  
Marriage:  21 Mar 1628  
   
   
Spouse:  Mrs-Francis WEST (AFN: PNXN-CM)  Family  
Marriage:    
   
   
       

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Submitter(s) Details

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About Ancestral File

Ancestral File is a collection of genealogical information taken from Pedigree Charts and Family Group Records submitted to the Family History Department since 1978 

-------------------- Governor of VA 1633-7

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-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Capt. John WEST (AFN: FQ80-0R) Pedigree

Sex:  M  Family  

------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Event(s)

Birth:   14 Dec 1590   
 , Testwood, Wiltshire, England   
Christening:   14 Dec 1590   
 Testwood, Hants, Eng   
Death:   1659   
 West Point, Va., Now King Wm Co.   
Burial:      
 Scout Hall   

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Parents

Father:  Thomas WEST (AFN: FQ80-24)  Family  
Mother:  Anne KNOLLYS KNOWLES (AFN: K82C-F3)     

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Marriage(s)

Spouse:  Anne Mrs WEST (AFN: GQR7-0B)  Family  
Marriage:  1613  
 , Hants, Eng.  
   
Spouse:  Anne UNKNOWN (AFN: ZBW9-BF)  Family  
Marriage:    
   
   
Spouse:  Anne (AFN: 11P0-4XQ)  Family  
Marriage:        
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About Ancestral File

Ancestral File is a collection of genealogical information taken from Pedigree Charts and Family Group Records submitted to the Family History Department since 1978. 
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Husband's Name

Capt. John WEST (AFN:FQ80-0R)  Pedigree  

Born:  14 Dec 1590  Place:  , Testwood, Wiltshire, England   
Christened:  14 Dec 1590  Place:  Testwood, Hants, Eng   
Died:  1659  Place:  West Point, Va., Now King Wm Co.   
Buried:    Place:  Scout Hall   
Married:  1613  Place:  , Hants, Eng.   

Father:  Thomas WEST (AFN:FQ80-24)  Family  
Mother:  Anne KNOLLYS KNOWLES (AFN:K82C-F3)   

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Wife's Name

Anne Mrs WEST (AFN:GQR7-0B)  Pedigree  

Born:  1600  Place:  Westover, Ety, Virginia   
Died:  1660/1670  Place:     
Married:  1613  Place:  , Hants, Eng.   

Father:    
Mother:    

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Children

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1.  Sex  Name    
 M John WEST (AFN:8H97-BW)  Pedigree  

   Born:  6 Jun 1632   Place:  York River, York, Virginia   
   Christened:    Place:  Of West Point   
   Died:  1689/1691   Place:  West Point, Gloucester, Virginia ?   
   Buried:    Place:  , , , Virginia  
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Husband's Name

Capt. John WEST (AFN:FQ80-0R)  Pedigree  

Born:  14 Dec 1590  Place:  , Testwood, Wiltshire, England   
Christened:  14 Dec 1590  Place:  Testwood, Hants, Eng   
Died:  1659  Place:  West Point, Va., Now King Wm Co.   
Buried:    Place:  Scout Hall   

Father:  Thomas WEST (AFN:FQ80-24)  Family  
Mother:  Anne KNOLLYS KNOWLES (AFN:K82C-F3)   

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Wife's Name

Anne (AFN:11P0-4XQ)  Pedigree  

Born:  Abt 1592  Place:  Westover, Ety, Va   

Father:    
Mother:    

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Children

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1.  Sex  Name    
 M John WEST (AFN:11P0-4ZX)  Pedigree  

   Born:  Abt. 1646   Place:  <Westover, Ety, Va>  

-------------------- From the New England Historical and Genealogical Register we find that the family of West's as early as 1587 were at the village of Wherwell in Hants, three and one half miles from Andover, near the trouting stream of "The Test" in Hampshire, England. The vicar of the parish of Wherwell, having died, William West, Lord Lawarr or De La Warr (as it was later called), presented the place to Stephen Bachiler.

In 1633, Thomas West came to New England in the ship "Mary and John", and two years later John West, aged eleven years, Nathaniel West, aged fifteen and Thomas West, aged seventeen, and Twiford West, aged nineteen, came to New England and may have been the sons of Thomas West, who came in 1633.

  • History of the Town of Stonington, County of New London, Connecticut By Richard Anson Wheeler 1900 Chapter on Matthew West

The chapter continues to relate how Matthew West is another son of Thomas West. --------------------

   Captain Francis West, whose brief connection with the early political history of New England deserves a passing mention, was the fourth son of Sir Thomas and Lady Anne (Knollys) West, and was born 28 October, 1586, at Buckhurst, Withyecombe, Sussex. His father, the second Lord De La Warr, was himself one of the illustrious members of that family, related to the Royal Houses of England, France, Scotland and Normandy, and which gained a merited prominence in the early colonization of America, bequeathing its name to one of our sovereign states. Captain Francis was "an ancient planter" of Virginia, emigrating thither in 1608, and as early as 1610, was a local magistrate, governing "at the Falles." He held for many years a membership in the Provincial Council, being one of the subscribers to the stock of the Virginia Company, In 1623 he was commissioned Admiral of New England.
   Shortly after his voyage to New England he returned to Virginia, where he resumed his connection with the political affairs of the province. Upon the death of Sir George Yardley, Governor of Virginia, November, 1627, he was chosen by his associates to fill the vacancy, in the absence of Sir John Harvey, who was named in Yardley's commission as his eventual successor.
   In the quarrel between Harvey and the Councillors he took part against the Governor, but signed the treaty of peace, 20 December, 1631, between the factions. He last appears on record at a meeting of the Council of Virginia in February, 1633. There is a family tradition that he met his death by drowning (Christorpher Levett, page 83).
   Francis West, deputy Governor of Virginia from Nov. 14, 1627, on the death of Governor Yardley, to Mar. 5, 1629, when Dr. John Pott was elected Governor by the Council to take his place, West having been selected to go to England to represent the interests of the Colony, which was in an unsettled condition by the revocation of the Charter of 1624. He was born Oct. 28, 1586, and was a brother of Lord Delaware. When Captain Newport came over with the "Second Supply," in October, 1608, he was accompanied by Francis West; who was elected member of the Council there in August, 1609, after the arrival of the "Third Supply", sent out under the new Charter. During the "starving time" which soon followed, West attempted to get provisions from the Indians; but, being unsuccessful, he left the Colony to its fate and sailed away to England.
   After a few months he returned to Virginia; and after Percy left in 1612, he succeeded him as commandant at Jamestown, in which office he continued till 1617, when he was succeeded by Capt. Wm. Powell. He was a member of the Council again from April, 1619, to February, 1633. In conjunction with his brothers, Lord Delaware and John and Nathaniel, he owned lands in Westover and Shirley. In November, 1622, he was appointed Admiral of New England and went there to suppress illicit fishing but he found the New Englanders difficult persons to deal with. In 1624, Captain West was living on his estate at Westover, in Virginia, and soon after succeeded Sir George Yardley as deputy Governor. After Pott took charge in 1629, West went to England, but he was in Virginia again prior to December, 1631, when he attended a meeting of the Council, again in February and September 1632, and in February, 1633. After this last date he drops out of Virginia records, and there is a tradition in Earl Delaware's family that he was drowned (The Hunter Family of Virginia and Connections, page 93-94).

Father: Thomas Leighton West b: 9 JUL 1557 in Hainaker, Sussex, England

Mother: Anne Knollys b: ABT 1553 in Stanford, Berkshire, England

Marriage 1 Margaret of Salisbury b: 1590 in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England -------------------- West Point is on the site of his old plantation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_West

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/WEST/1998-01/0884062391

The Honorable Francis West (1586-1634), ninth child of the Second lord De La Warr, was a member of the Virginia Company of London and came to Virginia with Captain Christopher Newport about July 1608 and was promptly elected to the governor’s council. He was elect wo years after which he served as a member of the Council until the time of his death. -------------------- Notes: Francis West arrived at Jamestown in July, 1608; he returned there on the Mary Ann Margaret in 1610. He was elected to the Governor's council in 1608. From 1612 to 1617 he was the Commandant of Jamestown. In 1622 he was appointed as Admiral to New England. He served as Deputy Governor of Virginia. He also served as Captain General of Virginia. His land was in Elizabeth City, south of the land of James Knott in 1632. He died in February 1633/34. His elder brother, Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr (1577-1618), had served as a governor of the Virginia Company of London from 1610-1611. his younger brother, Governor John West (1590-ca1659) served as Crown Governor of Virginia from 1635-1637. A fourth brother, Nathaniel West died in Virginia in August 1623, aged 30. - Wikipedia

1609 Captain Francis West purchased a site at the falls from the Indians and erected a fort that he called Fort West.

1623 Captain West went to Plymouth to investigate a dispute over fisheries.

1625, June. Captain Francis West was living on the Company's land at Elizabeth City. The census roll then taken, printed in Hotten, has the following: "Captain Francis West, his Munter. Captain Francis West, counseler, aged 36, in the Mary Maragaret, 1610. Mrs. Francis West, widdowe, in the Supply, 1620

1627 Francis West succeeded as governor at death of Sir George Yeardley.

1628 A slave ship from Angola was captured and Negroes were bartered for tobacco while Francis West was governor. King Charles authorized a General Assembly which met in March, Francis West governor.

1628 The principle of taxation by representation was reiterated in resolutions passed in 1631, in 1632, in 1642, in 1652, and many other times before a Virginian gave the Declaration of Independence to the world. The council refused to agree to the king's demand regarding English monopoly of Virginia tobacco, and sent West abroad as the first of a long line of agents who presented the colony's cause to the king. Until royal recognition of the house of burgesses came in 1628, governors Francis Wyatt, George Yeardley, and Francis West were wise enough to allow the burgesses to assist the council unofficially in passing of 'proclamations, ordinances, and orders.' Virginia A Guide to the Old Dominion Compiled by workers of the Writer's Program of the Work Projects Administration in the State of Virginia American Guide Series Illustrated Sponsored by James H. Price, Governor of Virginia New York: Oxford University Press pg. 38-39

1629 Capt. Francis returned to England and was replaced by Dr. John Pott.

The first legislative assembly in English North America took place July 30, 1619 in the choir of the Jamestown church because it was "the most convenient place…they could finde to sit in.". This first House of Burgesses consisted of Company appointed Governor Sir George Yeardley, a six man company appointed governor's council and two representatives of each of the eleven surrounding settlements or plantations, These representatives were chosen by election from among the settlers of each plantation. Members of the council included Captain Francis West.

"Captain Francis West … came to Virginia 1608, and in his will, dated 1629 and probated in 1634, he mentions his now wife, Jane, daughter of Sir Henry Davye, and his son Francis (Tyler's Quarterly, II., 125) . In 1627 he married Temperance Flowerdew, widow of Sir George Yardley. Capt Francis West was commissioned "Admiral of New England" in 1622, and it is recorded that he made several trips there, and it is likely that his son Francis, who was by an earlier marriage, may have accompanied him, and finally settled in New England.

"Francis West was a Deputy Governor of the Colony of Virginia. West was second son of Thomas West, 2nd Baron De La Warr and Anne Knollys. Captain Francis West arrived in Jamestown, Virginia in July 1608; he returned there on the Mary Ann Margaret in 1610. From Nov 17, 1627 to March 5, 1629. He was elected Governor's Council in 1608. From 1612 - 1617 he was Commandant of Jamestown. In 1622 he was appointed as Admiral to New England. He served as Deputy Governor of Virginia. He also served as Captain General of Virginia. His land was in Elizabeth City, south of the land of James Knott in 1632.

He died in Feb 1633/34. His elder brother Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr (1577-1618), had served as governor of the Virginia Company of London from 1610-11. His younger brother, Governor John West (1590-1659) served as Crown Governor of Virginia from 1635-1637). A fourth brother, Nathaniel West died in Virginia in Aug 1623, aged 30." - Wikipedia. The free encyclopedia on the internet. Source Nugent, Nell Marion; Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants. (Vol. 1. 1623-1666. Virginia State Library and Archives, Richmond, Virginia 1936)

"Francis West was Vice-Admiral West in the British Royal Navy, a friend of King George and by a dint of good deeds and noble bearing, was awarded a land tract in Plymouth Colony."

Dictionary of American Biography Published under the Auspices of American Council of Learned Societies, Edited by Dumas Malone Werden-Zunser, Volume XX New York: Charles Scribner's sons MCMXIII pgs 9-10. WEST, FRANCIS (Oct 28, 1586-1634?) of Virginia was born in England (?) Hampshire, the son of Thomas West, the eleventh Baron De La Warr, and his wife, the daughter of Sir Francis Knollys. He and his brothers participated in the establishment of the Virginia Colony. Thomas, the Baron De La Warr [q.v.], and his two younger brothers, Nathaniel and John, who became planters, the latter serving as governor, from 1635 to 1637. Francis arrived in Virginia with Newport in 1608 and was a grantee of the second charter in 1609. He was of the group that quarreled with Captain Smith and in September deposed him in favor of George Percy [q.v.] and a council, of which West was a member. His attempt to establish a settlement at the falls of the James River was abandoned with the winter, and his attention was turned to the all important problem of obtaining supplies. In a small ship he sought trade with the natives, and, failing,, sailed for England before the belated arrival of Gates and Somers in 1610. He evidently returned within the year, succeeding Percy as commander at Jamestown, in 1612, was commissioned master of the ordnance in 16171, and became in time one of the most influential of the "ancient planters," with a seat at Westover, near Berkeley Hundred. He quarreled with Yeardley over the location of the latter plantation, which he claimed infringed upon the lands of the late Lord De La Warr, and when in England the following year joined with other old planters in petitioning for the appointment of a governor of higher birth. He seems to have become infected with the factionalism that rent the company and to have joined with the enemies of Sir Edwin Sandys. He was commissioned in November 1622 admiral of New England, but upon his arrival there the following summer he found "the fisher men to be stuberne fellows" (Bradford, post I, 312) and returned to Virginia. During these last years of the company he joined other older planters in complaints regarding the conditions of the colony, thereby contributing, though probably not intentionally, to the overthrow of the company. With its dissolution, however, he became alarmed lest this step might involve the withdrawal of the political privileges granted in 1618, and signed several protest against any such action.

He continued to hold the confidence of the leaders both in England and Virginia, and, succeeding Yeardley as governor in 1627, he held this post until his departure for England in March in 1629. He returned by 1631, and is recorded as present at a meeting of the council in February 1633. His will, made while in England in December 1629, was proved on Apr. 28, 1634. It is probable that he died in Virginia early in 1634. His first wife Margaret, the widow of Edward Blayney. His second wife was Temperance (Flowerdieu), the widow of Gov. George Yeardley [q.v.]. Her death occurred shortly after the marriage, and it must have ;been on his last trip home that he married Jane, the daughter of Sir Henry Davye. A son, Francis, mentioned in the will seems to have been the only surviving child.

[A.F. Polland in D. N. B.; Alexander Brown, The Genesis of the U.S. (1890), vol. II; The Records of the Va. Co. 94 vols., 1906-35), ed. By S.M. Kingsbury; Minutes of the Council and General Court of Colonial Virginia, 1622-1632 and 1670-1679 (1924), ed. By H. R. Mc Illwaine; Great. Brit., Public Office, Calendar of State Papers, Col. Series, 1574-1660 (1860); Great Brit., Privy Council, Acts of the Privy Council, Col. Series . . . 1613-1680 (1908); Wm. Bradford, Hist. of Plymouth Plantation (1912), vol. I, publ. by Mass. Hist. Soc.; Va. Mag. Of Hist. and Biog., Apr. 1904.] W.F.C. Francis West's brother, Thomas West, 3rd Baron de la Warr (July 9, 1577 - June 7, 1618) was the Englishman for whom the state, river, and the American tribe now called "Delaware" (in the United States) was named.

There have been two creations of Baron De La Warr, and West came from the second. He was son of Thomas West, 2nd Baron De La Warr and Anne Knollys, daughter of Sir Francis Knollys and Catherine Carey. West received his education at Queens College, Oxford. He served in the army under Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, and, in 1601, was charged with supporting Essex's ill-fated insurrection against Queen Elizabeth, but he was acquitted of those charges. He succeeded his father as Baron De La Warr, in 1602, and became a member of the Privy Council.

Lord De La Warr headed the contingent of 150 men, who landed in Jamestown on 10 June 1610, just in time to persuade the original settlers not to give up and go home to England. He had been given instructions by the London Virginia Company to kidnap Native American children. These instructions also sanctioned the murder of Iniocasoockes, the cultural leaders of the local Powhatans. Lord De La Warr proceeded to initiate the First Anglo-Powhatan War, which has been described as an act of genocide. As a veteran of English campaigns against the Irish, De La Warr employed "Irish tactics" against the Indians: troops raided villages, torched cornfields, and stole provisions. He had been appointed governor-for-life (and captain-general) of Virginia, and he outfitted their three ships and recruited and equipped those men at his own expense. Leaving his deputy Sir Samuel Argall (circa 1580 - circa 1626) in charge, Lord De La Warr returned to England and published a book about Virginia, The Relation of the Right Honourable and Lord D-La-Warr, of the Colonie, Planted in Virginia, in 1611. He remained the nominal governor, and he had received complaints from the Virginia settlers about Argall's tyranny in governing them for him, so Lord De-La-?Warr set sail for Virginia again in 1618, to investigate those charges. He died en route, and it was thought for many years that he was buried in the Azore Islands or at sea.

In 2006, recent research had concluded that his body was brought to Jamestown for burial. A gravesite thought by researchers to contain the remains of Captain Bartholomew may instead contain those of Baron De La Warr. - Wikipedia.org

Genealogies of Virginia Families From Tyler's Quarterly Historical Genealogical Magazine Vol IV Walker-Yeardley (and Appendix) Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc 1981 Capt. Francis West … came to Virginia in 1608, and in his will, dated 1629 and probated in 1634, he mentions his now wife, Jane, daughter of Sir Henry Davye, and his son Francis (Tyler's Quarterly, II., 125). In 1627 he married Temperance Flowerdew, widow of Sir George Yardley. Capt. Francis West was commissioned "Admiral of New England" in 1622, and it is recorded that he made several trips there, and it is likely that his son Francis, who was by an earlier marriage, may have accompanied him, and finally settled in New England. Pgs. 454-455

The abstract of his will reads…pg. 544

"I desire to make provision for Jane my now wife, one of the daughters of Sir Henry Davye, knight, in case she survives me.

I desire that my wife, as son as she may after my death, shall sell all my lands, goods, plantations, servants, &c, either in England or Virginia, (except jewels, plate, linen and household stuff) and shall have the whole disposing, profits and ordering thereof until such time as my son Francis West shall accomplish his full age of one and twenty, my said wife in the meantime bringing up said son in learning and in fear of God. When my said son shall come of age my wife shall deliver him one half of said estate to be sold aforesaid. If my said son shall die under age my said wife shall have all my said estate of lands, plantations, servants and goods aforesaid to her own use forever, that is to say, such lands and things as I shall be then seised of in fee simple to her and her heirs forever if she happens to have no issue with me. And if she happens to have any issue by me, then I devise the said whole estate, or money to be made upon the sales of the lands, plantations, servants and goods aforesaid (if my said son Francis shall die during his minority, unto such children as I shall have by my said wife to be equally divided between them, saving that such eldest son as I shall have by my said wife Jane shall have a double portion,. If my said wife shall take a husband after my death, then the moiety of such estate as shall come to her by virtue of this my last will shall be divided between such children as I shall have by her, saving a double portion to the eldest son.

I bequeath to my said wife Jane all such jewels, linen, plate, money & household stuff as I shall possess of at the time of my death to her own use forever.

Executrix: My wife Jane. Overseer: Sir Henry Davye, knight, to whom I bequeath L5 Provided that if the said Francis West and Jane do die without issue of their bodies between them begotten, that then the one half of all estate aforesaid shall be in the power of the said Francis West to bestow and give to whomsoever he pleaseth. Witness: Tho. South, Tho. Hill Proved on the 28th April 1634 by Jane West relict & executrix"

1609 Captain Francis West, the brother of Lord De La Warr, an important investor and aristocrat, steals a boat, the Swallow from Jamestown, loaded with food and sails back to England, leaving others to starve during the winter famine. He will not be prosecuted because of his political connections.

The 1609 settlement at Jamestown was falling apart due to a combination of inept management, famine, disease and weak leadership and poor treatment by the native Americans. This was known as the starving time and included starvation, cannibalism, and eventually desertion and the breakdown of societal authority. At first, the thirty or so men under the command of Captain Francis West were able to help the settlement by trade with the Indians for corn, but then winter pressed in, and these men rebelled and chose to steal the Swallow, one of the colony's two vessels, and give up settlement in favor of trying their hand at piracy. They offended the local Indians for their treatment towards their women and failed to continue to find foodstuffs for their settlement, writing its death warrant, and left.

The settlers, reduced to sixty, subsisting on roots and berries and what fish they could catch, were relieved in 1610, but their relief brought only food for two weeks, and a means of escape. The settlement was abandoned on June 7th, but they met a relief expedition on their expedition further down the James River near Mulberry Island, and were able to return.

The pirates found the work less exciting and easy than expected, some eventually joining other pirate crews, while the rest agreed to a story claiming desertion of the settlement or death, and returned to England.

Francis West and his brothers became part of the Virginia Company of London, which was often called the London Company, they purchased three ships. This company was chartered by King James I for colonization purposes in 1606, and was the one to establish the first English settlement in the New World of North America in what is now the state of Virginia.

Captain Francis West sailed to New England in May 1624 and then to Virginia and returned in August.

Captain Francis West, "Admiral for that coast during this voyage," was an ex officio member of the Plymouth Colony Council. - The Memorial History of Boston, including Suffolk county, Massachusetts 1630-1880 edited by Justin Winsor, librarian of Harvard University Boston: James R. Osgood and Co. 1880, pg 75

The History of Massachusetts. The Colonial Period. By John Stetson Barry. Fourth Edition. Boston: published by the author. 1856. 1623, May or June: Captain Francis West was commissioned as Admiral of New England, with special instructions to restrain all unlicensed ships, and to exact of all interlopers the tonnage duties imposed by the Council. Arriving on the coast early in the summer, and sailing first to Virginia, at his return he touched at Plymouth, and proceeding to the Eastward entered upon the duties of his office: but finding fishermen too stubborn to submit to his authority, and the ocean too wide to be under his surveillance, he relinquished the undertaking, discharged his vessel and left for England. - pgs. 123-124.

Pioneers on Maine Rivers with Lists to 1651 by Wilbur D. Spencer Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. 1973

Visits before 1630: 1622: After the return of the fishing fleet in 1622 the council had become convinced of the necessity of appointing a naval officer to enforce its edicts and collect license fees from the masters of the fishing vess3els. Accordingly, Captain Francis West was chosen temporary admiral to regulate New England commerce and January 28, 1622-3, was provided with a commission to seize Monhegan. (Pg. 297)

1623: Francis West, admiral from England in the Plantation at Damariscove.

At Little Harbor Gorges proceeded to organize the Council of New England, which then consisted of Admiral Francis West, Governor William Bradford from New Plymouth and Christopher Levett.(Pg. 38) The Council of New England was soon dissolved. West immediately withdrew to Virginia, where he became prominent in political affairs: (Pg. 40)

In May, Admiral West arrived on the Maine Coast in the Plantation, accompanied by Thomas Squibbs as captain, and Joseph Stratton as master, of the Katherine which belonged to Lord Edward Gorges. Squibbs had been instructed by the Council to assist West in restoring order among the refractory fisherman. But his principal object was the "discovery" or Mount Desert Island and renaming it Mount Mansell in honor of his patron.

As soon as the admiral became convinced that his purposes could not be accomplished at Monhegan, where the masters were both stubborn and abusive, he released Squibbs who proceeded eastward upon his special quest. With the Plantation he sailed directly to Virginia and remained two months.

During the fishing season there had been many fishing vessels stationed at Damariscove and Monhegan which did not recognize any council authority to exact license fees for local privileges and Francis West was appointed admiral with authority to compel their submission. January 28, 1622-3, a commission was issued to West to seize Monhegan, which most of the fishermen monopolized as their American port. That spring over thirty vessels, besides those employed by Jennings and Company, fished in the vicinity of the island. (Pg. 343)

About the last of June Admiral West arrived at New Plymouth from Monhegan in the Plantation. In the words of Governor Bradford, he had undertaken "to restraine interlopers, and shuch fishing ships as came to fish & trade without a licence from ye Counsell of New-England, for which they should pay a round sume of money. But he could doe no good of them, for they were to stronge for him, and he found ye fisher men to be stuberne fellows."

At that time, since he was unable to secure control of Monhegan, he had made his headquarters during a brief sojourn, at Damariscove, where he discharged his crew and embarked for Massachusetts, as soon as he was satisfied that nothing could be accomplished. (Pg. 344)

At the beginning of September West returned to Maine with his ship which he discharged with its crew at Damariscove, where there was less antagonism among the doughty exponents of free fishing than at Monhegan. In the exercise of his official functions it did not appear that West undertook to deal with Weston, whose fishing vessels had been libeled by the Council for non-payment of license fees. He embarked for England in the Katherine soon after his advent at the Eastward, but his former crew visited New Plymouth in the Plantation." (Pg. 298)

view all 13

Capt. Francis West, Governor's Timeline

1586
October 28, 1586
Salisbury, Weltshire, England
October 28, 1586
October 28, 1586
1590
December 14, 1590
Age 4
Testwood, Hants, Eng
1605
1605
Age 18
1608
1608
Age 21
Salisbury, Wiltshire, England, (Present UK)
1628
March 21, 1628
Age 41
Virginia
1634
January 2, 1634
Age 47
Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA
1639
1639
Age 47
1672
1672
Age 47
Scout Hall