Henry Felder (1733 - 1780) MP

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Nicknames: "Hans Heinrick /Felder/"
Birthplace: Zurich, Schupfheim, Switzerland
Death: Died in Orangeburg, South Carolina, United States
Cause of death: Killed by the 'Tories' at or toward the end of the war.
Occupation: Shoemaker, soldier, Company Captain in the Orangeburg District Militia
Managed by: John Fields Weaver, Jr.
Last Updated:

About Henry Felder

Notes from OGS: Born Hans Heinrich Felder; also, John Henry Felder. Was known as Henry Felder, Sr. Owned 4,853.3 acres; commissionr for carrying into execution the Continental Associalton; 2nd Provincial Congress; Grand Jury foreman 1776, prob. author of the "Orangeburg Declaration" 20 May 1776; Capt. of Company of Militia; Commissioner to clear the Fork of Edisto River in 1778 (of violent Tories); killed by Tories 12 Feb. 1780, or "at or about the close of the war." County Cordwainer. REF: F.J.D. Felder Chart 1 Jan 1977. Also, Dr. Julian Dantzler Kelly, Jr. submission dated 5/9/88; OGS News Vol. II, pg. 3; Plats fm 1752-1755; Grant 10:518. OGS News Vol. II, pg. 3, pg. 122, pg. 137.

The names of John Henry and Mary Elizabeth appear on Lineage Chart 615 for South Carolina, found in the Midland, Texas, Genealogy Library. Henry is listed as born 1725 in Switzerland.

Their names also appear in the IGI file as parents of Abraham and Henry.

A complete listing of "Henry Felder, Sr., his two wives and children by each appears in the Texas D.A.R. Society Roster of Revolutionary Ancestors. His service is described as follows: "Patriot, in 1775 was a member of the Second Provincial Congress. Captain of a Company of Militia and killed in fight with Tories about the close of the war."

From a page of DAR information copied by "Red" Dye ("Daughters of the American Revolution, p. 336) in the Midland County Library, Texas: "Henry Felder (1725-83) was a member of the Provincial Congress and commanded militia. He was killed in escaping from his home, burned by the Tories. It is said that he had seven sons, Henry, Jacob, John, Frederick, Samuel, Abraham, and Peter in his command. His son Henry, succeeded him as captain of the company. He was born in Zurich, Switzerland; died in South Carolina."

From a page in the Daughters of the American Colonists Lineage Book, p. 309, Annalene Felder Nelson: "John Henry Felder, Sr., (1725-78), of Orangeburg District, S. C., was a member of the Provincial Congress of South Carolina, 1775, and Original Land Owner. He was born in Switzerland; died in Orangeburg District, S.C."

From the research of Daniel Lanter:

Continuing the report of Dorothy Dykes Entrikin on The Felder Family--relying on Salley's History of Orangeburg District, SC:

John Henry Felder came to America as a youth with his parents from Switzerland and settled in Orangeburg Township, SC in 1735. His parents were granted 350 acres of land on 17 Sep. 1738 by King George II of England. His father died in 1738 and his mother died the following year. The records state that he was under 16 years of age when orphaned.

(Insert note from Debra Oliver: "His parents died when he was fourteen yers old. His guardianship was left in the hands of Henry Wurtzer.")

Upon growing up, he dropped the name John and was subsequently known as Henry Felder. In 1775 Henry Felder was Justice of the Peace of the Quorum for Orangeburg District, SC. The Justice of the Peace was far more important in Colonial days than it is today. Henry Felder was also a member of the state legislature. He was probably educated in Zurich before he left Europe. A traditional joke was that whenever he got in the legislature to present a bill, it became law before he sat down, from which we infer he must have been a John P. Morgan in his day and time. Under the Provincial Government of South Carolina in 1775, Henry Felder was placed on the committee for Effectually carrying into execution the continental association and for receiving and determining upon application relative to law process for St. Matthews Parish which included Orangeburg Township. In the same year he was elected a member of the Second Provincial Congress from St. Matthews Parish and was a member of that body when on March 26, 1776 it adopted a constitution and formed an independent government for South Carolina. Henry Felder held varied offices. He was employed by the Second Provincial Congress to Manufacture gunpowder for the Revolutionary Government. He was a member of the Grand Jury of Orangeburg District in 1776 that addressed Judge Drayton in favor of the revolution. He was manager of the elections and a member of the Grand Jury again in 1778.

Henry Felder was a captain during the Revolution, and his company probably belonged to Rowe's Regiment. The traditions of the Felder family say that Captain Felder had seven sons: Henry, Jacob, John, Frederick, Samuel, Abraham, and Peter in his company. It is said that John, the third son, was killed during the war. He was captured with his stepmother's brother, Snell. While the British soldiers were at dinner banks of the Congove River, they attempted to escape. Snell escaped to the woods, but John jumped into the river and swam across with his hands tied, the guards shooting at all the while. After he reached the opposite bank, he was killed by his own gun in the hands of the guard. A Mr. Rice, of Barnwell District was a member of Captain Felder's Company during the Revolution. He was present with the company on one occasion when they shipped a body of Tories at Holman's Bridge over the South Edisto River in Orangeburg District.

Captain Felder had two homes burned by the Tories during the war; and an account of the burning of the first house appeared in a Gazette (of South Carolina) October 7 and 14, 1778: "Whereas, the subscriber's house was plundered and burned and all his papers were either burned or destroyed: "To prevent fraudulent demands that may hereafter be made on him, he gives this public notice that those persons who have any lawful demands on him either in books of account, bond, note of hand, or otherwise, or desire to make demand on or before the first of January next ensuing, and receive payment; all persons indebted to him are likewise entreated to make payment as far as may be consistent with their knowledge. September 27. Henry Felder."

Judge O'Neil in his "Bench & Bar" has this to say of Captain Henry Felder: "This gentleman was a very active partisan in the Revolution. He brought his love of liberty from his native canton and like Tell of his fatherland, he was willing to peril all rather than submit to tyranny. He guided General Sumter in his approach to Orangeburg and bore a part of the capture of that port. At or about the close of the war the Tories surrounded Captain Felder's house. The gallant Swiss, with the aid of his wife and servants who loaded guns while he fired, killed more than twenty foes. His house was at last fired and he was thus forced to flee. In attempting to escape he was shot and killed." The traditionary account of the above affair, as told by an old Negro servant, who as a young man had been an eye witness of a part of the tragedy, is as follows: One day Captain Felder received a message from Samuel Rowe, a Whig friend, that the Tories intended to attack his home the next day. With his sons and his overseer whose name was Fry, he defended his house, defeated the Tories and drove them off. As soon as they had left, he sent his sons through a bypath to waylay and ambush them, but before reaching the ambush the enemy returned to his home and, setting fire to a load of hay that was under a shed near the house they therefore set the house afire. Captain Felder put on some of his wife's clothes and attempted to escape, but was recognized by his boots as he jumped the fence, and was shot. He continued his fight for several hundred yards and dropped from exhaustion and loss of blood just as he reached the woods. The same Negro above mentioned was cutting wood nearby and went to his master's assistance. He was not yet dead and help being procured, he was taken to a place of safety where he lived a day or two before he died. After the death of Captain Felder, his son Henry commanded the company and after the war his company formed a part of the District Militia. There are two old canons used as corner post in Orangeburg that are said to have been used by Captain Felder on the occasion of the siege of that place. One of the guns has on it "H. Felder, 1781," and the other has on it "H.F."

Commissioner for carrying into execution the Continental Association; 2nd Provincial Congress; Grand Jury foreman 1776; probable author of "Orangeburg Declaration" 20 May 1776; Commissioner to clear the Fork of the Edisto River in 1778 (of violent Tories); Count Cordwainer; Signed Giessendanner petition in 1749.

Thornhill Genealogy, T. J. Thornhill, 1940, presents a different version of Henry's service and circumstances of death: "Dr. Felder's father, Samuel Felder, was one of seven brothers, all of whom were in the Revolutionary War. Their father remained at home and molded bullets for them, which they would come home nights for. As a result, he was watched very closely by the Tories, and once when some of his sons were at home, the Tories attacked his dwelling. He jumped out of a window, the Tories in pursuit, thinking he was one of the Continental soldiers. They chased him around his garden, shooting him as he reached a spring, where he fell and died. Thus perished the Swiss ancestor of the Felders and Revolutionary patriot who settled at Orangeburg, SC"

Daniel Lanter lists the following sources: N.Louise Bailry and Elizabeth Ivey Cooper, Biographical Directory of the South Carolina House of Representatives, Vol. 3, 1775-1790. University of South Carolina Press, Columbia, SC, 1981; A. S. Salley, History of Orangeburg County, SC; Bobby Gilmer Moss, Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution, 1985, p. 307; Dr. Julian D. Kelly, Jr., F. J. D. Felder Chart 1 Jan 1977; submission dated 9 May 1988; South Carolina Deed Abstracts; Orangeburg County, South Carolina plat map; Activities (and Death) in the American Revolution; Cordwainer, Planter, and Store Keeper; Royal Grant to Henry Felder, Vol. 9, p. 314, 17 Feb 1760; Colonial Plat Map, Vol. 7, pp. 97 and 428; Royal Grant to Henry Felder, Vol. 11, p. 687, 24 Nov 1764; Judgement Roll, Henry Felder vs. Andrew Frederick, 18 Jul 1772, Box 93A, No. 162A.

Citations in the records of Rev. Giessendanner of the Orangeburg Church, printed in Salley's History of Orangeburg County: Sunday, June 21st, 1752 in Amelia Church: Baptism. Susceptr. Henry and Mary Elizabeth Felder (#102, p. 131) Sunday, July 26th, 1752 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism. Susceptr. Henry Felder (#112, p. 133) Sunday, Febr 18th, 1753 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism. Susceptr. Henry and Mary Elizabeth Felder (#138, p. 136) Sunday, Octobr 21st, 1753 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism of Frederick, Son of Henry and Mary Elizabeth Felder; born Septembr 1st 1753. Susceptr Frederick Huber, Nicholas Shuler, & Barbara, wife of John Jennings. (#175, p. 141) Sunday, March 24th, 1754 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism. Susceptr Henry and Mary Elizabeth Felder (#205, p. 145) Sunday, Decembr 15th, 1754 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism. Suscep Henry and Mary Elizabeth Felder (#251, p. 151) Sunday, June 22, 1755 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism of Samuel, Son of Henry and Mary Elizabeth Felder; born June 5, 1755. Suscept Samuel Suther, John Inabnet, and Anne, wife of Henry Rickenbacher. (#279, page 155) Sunday, Septembr 21st 1755 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism. Suscept Henry Felder (#289, p. 156) Sunday, December 29th, 1755 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism. Suret: Henry Felder (#307, p. 158) Sunday, March 7, 1756 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism. Suret: Henry Felder (#321, p. 160) Easter Sunday, April 18th, 1756 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism. Suret., Henry and Mary Elizabeth Felder (#330, p. 161) Sunday, July 17th, 1757 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism. Suret, Henry Felder (#420, p. 171) Sunday, July 23d, 1758 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism. Suret: Mary Elizabeth, wife of Henry Felder (#498, p. 177) Sunday, Decembr 31, 1758 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism. Suret: Henry and Mary Elizabeth Felder (#534, p. 182) Sunday, April 22d, 1759 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism of Peter, Son of Henry & Mary Elizabeth Felder; born April 2d 1759. Surets: John and Barbara Giessendaner and Jacob Giessendaner (#558, p. 185) Sunday, Decembr 16th, 1759 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism. Suret. Henry Felder (#595, p. 188) Sunday, January 6th, 1760 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism. Suret. Henry Felder (#600, p. 189) Sunday, Febr 3d, 1760 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism. Suret. Henry Felder (#602, p. 189) Sunday, Septembr 7th, 1760 in Orangeburgh Church: Baptism. Suret Henry Felder

Other citations in Salley: p. 248, Justice of the Peace in 1775: Henry Felder p. 249, Justices of the Quorum for Orangeburgh District, 1775: Henry Felder p. 258 Appointed by a Provincial Congress to represent St. Matthew's Parish, which included Orangeburgh Township, on the "Committee for effectually carrying into execution the Continental Association and for receiving and determining upon applications relative to law processes": Henry Felder (The first of February, 1775, was the day fixed by the Continental Congress after which no British goods should be imported.) p. 260 Elected as delegate to a Colony Congress to meet in Charlestown Dec. 1, 1775. Henry Felder was a delegate from Matthew's Parish, including Orangeburgh Township. p. 269 Member of the Grand Jury of Orangeburgh District supporting the new constitution. pp. 271-272 Presentments of Grand Jurors Nov. 5, 1777, calling for a loyalty oath, "a publick test, by which foes may be disginguished from friends of the American cause." Signers included Henry Felder. pp. 486-489 Incidents cited by Dan Lanter: Seven sons in his regiment; details of son John's death in the war, the report of Rice of the incident at Holman's Bridge; the notice in the Gazette concerning the burning of Capt. Felder's house; Judge O'Neall's comments in Bench and Bar, the traditionary account of Henry's death, and the Orangeburg cannons.

Notes from SWISS FELDER ANCESTRY: It appears that Henry Felder married at the age of fourteen, and that his bride was 23 at the time of their marriage. Although 14 seems rather young for marriage by today's customs, in their time and place a young man of 15 was able to witness documents and own property. Henry had inherited an estate including 350 acres of land, with presumably a home and other property, when his mother had died about eight years earlier. Therefore, young Henry was apparently a candidate for marriage even at his young age, and he and his bride wasted no time in conceiving their first child, Henry, Jr., who was born 8 Sept. 1748, eight months and 20 days after their marriage. . . . It is of particular interest that Hans Heinrich was recorded as a "master tanner" in Switzerland, and that his son (John) Henry Felder, was recorded on 10 May 1751 as "Henry Felder, cordwainer", a now obsolete word for leather worker or shoemaker.

Sources: 1.Abbrev: Daughters of the American Colonists Title: Compiled by Josephine W. Vincent, National Society Daughters of the American Colonists, Lineage Book, Volume XVI, 15001 - 16000. Mrs. Richard N. Grammer, National Registrar. (Annandale, Virginia. 1972)rican Colonists, Lineage Book, Volume XVI, 15001 - 16000. Mrs. Richard N. Grammer, National Registrar.rican Colonists, Lineage Book, Volume XVI, 15001 - 16000. Mrs. Richard N. Grammer, National Registrar. Annandale, Virginia. 1972. Note: Found in Midland Public Library, Midland, Texas. 2.Abbrev: TEXAS D.A.R. SOCIETY ROSTER Title: TEXAS D.A.R. SOCIETY ROSTER, Revolutionary Ancestors, pp. 726-727. 3.Abbrev: Dan Lanter Title: Research of Daniel Lanter, Abilene, Texas - specific sources may be given in body of report. given in body of report. given in body of report. 4.Abbrev: Salley: History of Orangeburg, SC Title: Salley, A. S. Jr., THE HISTORY OF ORANGEBURG COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA From Its First Settlement to the Close of The Revolutionary War (Orangeburg, S. C.: R. Lewis Berry, Printer, 1898)m Its First Settlement to the Close of The Revolutionary Warts First Settlement to the Close of The Revolutionary War. Orangeburg, S. C.: R. Lewis Berry, Printer, 1898. 5.Abbrev: OLIO6MA (Debra Oliver) Title: Debra Oliver, Email debers@telapex.com 6.Abbrev: Orangeburgh German-Swiss Title: Website of Orangeburgh German-Swiss Genealogical Society Website (www.netside.com/~genealogy/orangeburgh.htm) 1998 : disclaimer on website - do NOT quote this website as authority (www.netside.com/~genealogy/orangeburgh.htm) 1998 : disclaimer on website - do NOT quote this website as authority (www.netside.com/~genealogy/orangeburgh.htm) 1998 : disclaimer on website - do NOT quote this website as authority. 7.Abbrev: SWISS FELDER ANCESTRY Title: Julian Dantzler Kelly, "The Swiss Felder Ancestry" (ORANGEBURGH GERMAN-SWISS NEWSLETTER, Summer 1999, Volume 7, Number 7, page 156.)SWISS NEWSLETTER, Summer 1999, Volume 7, Number 7, page 156. 8.Abbrev: Sybile Pierce Title: Sybile Pierce, descendant of John Henry Felder Email: jspierce@FTC-I.net. jspierce@FTC-I.net. jspierce@FTC-I.net. 9.Abbrev: IGI FILE, LDS Family History Library, Mesa, AZ Title: IGI FILE, LDS Family History Library, Mesa, AZ 10.Abbrev: TEXAS D.A.R. SOCIETY ROSTER Title: TEXAS D.A.R. SOCIETY ROSTER, Revolutionary Ancestors, pp. 726-727. Page: pp. 726-727

-------------------- He was a Company Captain in the Independant Orangeburg District Militia

He was quite famous and very intelligent, in the Legislature,was commisssioned by the government to manufacture ammunition for the Revolutionary War Etc. Also, his had seven sons who were in the War also. He was known as the Gallant Swiss as he is German and from Switzerland also was a Captain in the war, was very wealthy in his time.

HEINRICH FELDER [Capt. Henry Felder, Sr.],was baptized 21 Mar 1726 in Wattwil, St. Gall, Switzerland[1] and was "killed by a party of Tories in 1780" in Orangeburgh Township, South Carolina. He married (1) MARY ELISABETH SHAUMLÖFFEL 15 Dec 1747 in Orangeburg Township, South Carolina[10,11]. He married. (2) CATHARINA MAGDALENA SCHNELL abt. 1772[2]. She was baptized. 14 Apr 1747 in Orangeburgh Township, South Carolina[10,11].

Although his mother’s will calls him John Henry (Hans Heinrich), he was baptized Heinrich and there is no indication (other than his mothers will) that he was ever called anything except Henry (Heinrich).

On 10 May 1751 Henry Felder, Cordwainder, purchased 200 acres from Abraham Husenhood and his wife Mary(see the Hazelwood First Family Biography)[9]. A cordwainder was a person who worked or dealt in fine red or brown leather (cordovan). Thus Henry appears to have followed in his father's footsteps as a worker or dealer in leather. In later records he was referred to as Henry Felder, Planter. Also, according to his son, he "kept store in his Dwelling House near Orangeburgh" in 1778 when the building was burned by Tories.[3].

-------------------- Married on December 15, 1747. he was a Judge of St. Matthew's Parish. He was also a member of the 2nd Provincial Congress.

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Capt Henry Felder, Sr's Timeline

1733
October 11, 1733
Zurich, Schupfheim, Switzerland
1747
December 15, 1747
Age 14
Orangeburgh Township, South Carolina, United States
1748
September 8, 1748
Age 14
Four, Orangeburg, South Carolina, United States
1750
July 22, 1750
Age 16
Four, Orangeburg, South Carolina, United States
1752
December 12, 1752
Age 19
Orangeburg, South Carolina, United States
1753
September 1, 1753
Age 19
Four, Orangeburg, South Carolina, United States
1755
June 5, 1755
Age 21
Four, Orangeburg, South Carolina, United States
1756
1756
Age 22
Orangeburgh District, SC
1757
March 28, 1757
Age 23
Four, Orangeburg, South Carolina, United States
1759
April 2, 1759
Age 25
Orangeburg District, SC