James Avery, Sr.

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James Avery, Sr.

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Newton Abbot, Devon, England
Death: Died in Groton, New London County, Connecticut Colony
Place of Burial: Smith Lake Cemetery, Groton, New London County, Connecticut, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Christopher Avery, II; Margery Avery and Margery Stevens
Husband of Joanna Avery and Abigail Avery
Father of Hannah Minor; Capt. James Avery; Mary Minor (Avery); Capt. Thomas Avery, 1651; John Avery, Sr. and 5 others
Brother of George Avery; William Avery; John Avery, II; George Avery and William Avery

Occupation: Captain, Capt in Groton Militia, Farmer, Govt., CAPTAIN
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About James Avery, Sr.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Avery_%28captain%29

James Avery (b. 1620 in Cornwall, Kingdom of England - April 18, 1700 in Groton, Connecticut) was an American colonial landowner, legislator, and a military commander in King Philip's War. He was one of the notable Colonial commanders in the Great Swamp Fight.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Avery_%28American_colonist%29Information

about the Avery family and homestead: http://www.lfthompson.com/more_captjamesavery.htm:

Captain James Avery, only child of Christopher Avery, and the founder of the family that is known as the Groton Averys, was born in England, about 1620, died April 18, 1700. He came to America with his father, and lived at Gloucester, Massachusetts, for several years. Miss Caulkin's History of New London, p. 67, says: "On the 19th of October, 1650, grants were made by the townsmen to Mr. Blynman, Obadiah Biven, Hugh Caukin, Hugh Roberts, John Coile, Andrew Lester, James Averye, Robert Isbell." He received many other land grants in the several distributions, and others for public and military service. His dwelling in New London, once "the unadorned church and watch tower of the wilderness," is still in good repair and was owned and occupied by an Avery in 1893. He was active in military affairs and is generally spoken of as ensign, lieutenant or captain. In the English-Dutch quarrels and in their own Indian troubles he saw much military service and fully earned his rank of captain. He was equally prominent in civil affairs; he was chosen selectman and held office for twenty years; he was a commissioner to "try small causes." Here he gained his title of judge. Before his court came actions for small debts and complaints of evil speaking and disorderly conduct, wills were proved and marriages performed. He was in this office many years. From 1658 to 1680 he was elected to the general court twelve times. In 1871 Judge Wheeler published a list of representatives from Groton which was set off from New London in 1705. "It is worthy of note that out of 545 representatives of the town of Groton, 104 have borne the name of Avery, and all were descendants of Captain James Avery." He was prominent in church affairs, and the references to him in the records are numerous. He married, November 10, 1643, in Boston, Joanna Greenslade, born about 1622 and living in 1693. Children, the three first being born in Gloucester, Massachusetts, the others in New London, Connecticut: Hannah, James, Mary, Thomas, John (see forward), Rebecca, Jonathan, Christopher and Samuel. Captain Avery married (second), 1698, Mrs. Joshua Holmes, a widow

This information is from Vol. II, pp. 779-782 of Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs, edited by Cuyler Reynolds (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911). It is in SCPL's Reference collection at R 929.1 R45. Some of the formatting of the original, especially in lists of descendants, may have been altered slightly for ease of reading.

Undocumented Notes:

James Avery came to America with his father in 1630 on the 'Arbella'. James was an early land owner at Gloucester as it is shown by extracts from the town book containing an account of 'Land laid out and to whom;' 9 mo. (16)45. 'Andrew Lister had 8 acres of upland upon Planter's Neck, running from Lobster Cove to the sea, the 24th lott next to James Averies.' 1 mo. (16)47, 'James Averie Given 6 acres of upland at the hed of Little River to be laide out.' 26. 3. (16)51. 'Also the said Richard Beefor bought of James Avery three acres of upland.' 15. 10. (16)53. James Avery had marsh at Chebacco. The following items are from the Salem quarterly court records and files. 1: 11: 1645. James Avery of Gloucester took the oath of freeman. 25: 10: 1649. James Averey grand juryman from Gloster. 24: 4: 1650. James Averey grand juryman. In studying the record of these days, the careful student is strongly impressed with the fact that Capt. James Avery was a very remarkable man. Living as he did in stirring times, he was a leader among strong men, enjoying their confidence and respect because he deserved them. Especially it is to be noted that although the state took cognizance of affairs that we now call private and interfered in the details of family life and personal relations in a way that would not now be tolerated, he was never censured or 'presented' for any shortcoming or alleged dereliction of duty of propriety. Eminent in all the relations of life, his descendants look upon him with pride and affection as one 'sans peur et sans reproche.' Capt. James Avery, the only child of Christopher Avery was born 1620. Came to America with his father and lived at Gloucester for several years and sold his possessions there in 1650 to his father and returned to New London. Capt. James acquired large tracts of land at what is now Poquanor (sp?) Bridge, Groton, east of New London. He mar.1st, Nov. 10, 1643 Johanna Greenslade born about 1622 and d. 1693. He mar. 2nd Mrs. Abigail (Ingraham) Chesebrough, widow of Joshua Holmes, July 4, 1698. He died 4-18, 1700. His widow was living as late as 1714.

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JAMES3 AVERY (CHRISTOPHER2, CHRISTOPHER1)1,1 was born 1620 in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England1,1, and died 18 Apr 1700 in Groton, New London, Connecticut1,1. He married JOANNA "JANE" GREENSLADE. She was born Abt. 1622 in , Devon, England, and died Bet. 04 Jul 1693 - 1698 in Prob. , New London, Connecticut.

Child of JAMES AVERY and JOANNA GREENSLADE is:

5. i. CAPT. JOHN4 AVERY, SR., b. 06 May 1654, Groton, New London, Connecticut; d. 17 Apr 1724, North Groton, New London, CT, USA.

But there is also this information on the same website:

CAPT. JAMES3 AVERY, SR. (CHRISTOPHER2, CHRISTOPHER1) was born Bef. 22 Apr 1621 in Exeter or Ipplepen, Devon, England, and died 18 Nov 1700 in Birch Plains, Groton, New London, Connecticut. He married JOANNA "JANE" GREENSLADE 10 Nov 1643 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut. She was born Abt. 1622 in , Devon, England, and died Bet. 04 Jul 1693 - 1698 in Prob. , New London, Connecticut.

Notes for CAPT. JAMES AVERY, SR.:

He came to America with his father, and lived at Gloucester for several years. The Rev. Mr. Blinman, who had been the minister of Gloucester for eight years, was engaged to become minister of the Pequot Plantation. A party of his friends proposed to move with him, and came on to make preparatory arrangements, October 19, 1650. It appears that Hames Avery went back to Gloucester, sold his possession there to his father, and in 1651 returned to New London. In March of that year the principal body of these eastern families arrived. Capt. James acquired large tracts of land at what is now Poquonoc Bridge, Groton, east of New London. About 1636 he build the hive of the Avery's at the head of Poquonoc Plain, a mile and a half from the river Thames. In 1684, the old Blinman edifice, first church of New London, the unadorned church and water-tower of the wilderness, which had stood for thirty years, was sold to Capt. Avery for six pounds, with the condition that he should remove it in one month's time. According to tradition, the church was taken down, it materials carried across the river, and added to the house he had already built at Poquonoc. In spite of this analytic and synthetic process, the ancient dwelling seemed to have retained some of its sacred character, for a century later it was occupied until July 21, 1894, when a spark from a passing locomotive ignited its well-seasoned frame, and in a short time only the ancient chimney remained to mark the sport of his historic house of Eastern Connecticut. A few years later the chimney was taken down, the grounds graded, and a tasteful monument was erected by the descendants of James Avery. He was ensign, lieutenant and captain of the New Lonson companies and served throughout King Philip's was in command of forty Indians from Stonington, New London and Lyme. In 1676 he was captain of one of the four companies which protected the frontier, and for twenty-three years an officer of the town, and twelve times deputy to the General court, 1656-80; also assisting judge in the Prerogative Court, and was most prominent in matters relating to the church, as references to him in such connections are numerous.

Children of JAMES AVERY and JOANNA GREENSLADE are:

6. i. HANNAH4 AVERY, b. 11 Oct 1644, Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts; d. 22 Aug 1721, Stonington, New London, Connecticut.

7. ii. CAPT. JAMES AVERY, b. 16 Dec 1646, Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts; d. 22 Aug 1728, Groton, New London, Connecticut.

8. iii. THOMAS AVERY, b. 06 May 1651, New London, New London, Connecticut; d. 05 Jan 1737, Montville Center, New London, Connecticut.

9. iv. CAPT. JOHN AVERY, SR., b. 10 Feb 1654, Stonington, New London, Connecticut; d. 13 Jul 1726, N. Groton, New London, Connecticut.

           v.   REBECCA AVERY1, b. 06 Oct 1656, New London, New London, Connecticut; d. Aft. 28 Apr 1707, Poss. Massachusetts.
           vi.   JONATHAN AVERY1, b. 05 Jan 1658, New London, New London, Connecticut; d. 15 Sep 1681, in or near , New London, Connecticut.
           vii.   CHRISTOPHER AVERY, b. 30 Apr 1661, New London, New London, Connecticut; d. 08 Dec 1683, Stonington, New London, Connecticut.
          viii.   SAMUEL AVERY, b. 14 Aug 1664, Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts; d. 01 May 1723, S. Groton, New London, Connecticut.

Notes for SAMUEL AVERY:

He was a large farmer, and was chose moderator upon the legal organization of the town of Groton in 1704, and its first townsman at the first town meeting in 1705, and held that office until his death, May 1, 1723. His farm was in what is now South Groton. He is buried about a mile northwest of Seth Williams' farm in Ledyard, on the farm of C.H. Stanton.

            ix.   JOANNA AVERY, b. 1669, New London, New London, Connecticut; d. Bet. 1670 - 1763.

http://www.ultimatefamilyreunion.com/page/page/2742384.htm; accessed 8/15/09

THE HISTORY OF STONINGTON, CONN., by Richard Ansel Wheeler, page 199.

   Capt. James Avery, the only child of Christopher, was born in 1620. Came to America with his father, and lived at

THE HISTORY OF STONINGTON, CONN., by Richard Ansel Wheeler, page 200.

Gloucester for several years. The Rev. Mr. Blinman, who had been a minister of Gloucester for eight years, was engaged to become the minister of the Pequot Plantation. A party of his friends proposed to move with him, and came on to make preparatory arrangements, Oct. 19, 1650. It appears that James Avery went back to Gloucester, sold his possessions there to his father, and in 1651 returned to New London. In March of that year the principal body of these eastern families arrived.

   Capt. James acquired large tracts of land at what is now Poquonoc Bridge, Groton, east of New London. About 1636 he build the hive of the Avery's at the head of Poquonoc Plain, a mile and a half from the river Thames. In 1684, the old Blinman edifice, first church of New London, the unadorned church and water-tower of the wilderness, which had stood for thirty years, was sold to Capt. Avery for six pounds, with the condition that he should remove it in one month's time. According to tradition, the church was taken down, its materials carried across the river, and added to the house he had already built at Poquonoc. In spite of this analytic and synthetic progress, the ancient dwelling seemed to have retained some of its sacred character, for a century later it was occupied until July 21, 1894, when a spark from a passing locomotive ignited its well-seasoned frame, and in a short time only the ancient chimney remained to mark the spot of this historic house of Eastern Connecticut. A few years later the chimney was taken down, the grounds graded, and a tasteful monument was erected by the descendants of James Avery.
    He was ensign, Lieutenant and captain of the New London companies and served throughout King Philip's war in command of forty Indians from Stonington, New London and Lyme. In 1676 he was captain of one of the four companies which protected the frontier, and for twenty-three years an officer of the town, and twelve times deputy to the General Court, 1656-80; also assisting judge in deputy to the Prerogative Court, and was most prominent in maters relating to the church, as references to him in such connections are numerous.
   He m. 1st Nov. 10, 1643, Joanna Greenslade, b. about 1622; she d. after 1693. He m. 2nd, Mrs. Abigail (Ingraham) Chesebrough, widow of Joshua Holmes, July 4, 1698, (No. 2) Holmes family. He d. April 18, 1700. His widow was living at late as 1714.

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 James Avery 1620 Biography

Biography of Captain James AVERY 1620-1700

Captain James Avery, only child of Christopher Avery, and the founder of the family that is known as the Groton Averys, was born in England, about 1620, died April 18, 1700. He came to America with his father, and lived at Gloucester, Massachusetts, for several years. Miss Caulkin's History of New London, p. 67, says: "On the 19th of October, 1650, grants were made by the townsmen to Mr. Blynman, Obadiah Biven, Hugh Caukin, Hugh Roberts, John Coile, Andrew Lester, James Averye, Robert Isbell." He received many other land grants in the several distributions, and others for public and military service. His dwelling in New London, once "the unadorned church and watch tower of the wilderness," is still in good repair and was owned and occupied by an Avery in 1893. He was active in military affairs and is generally spoken of as ensign, lieutenant or captain. In the English-Dutch quarrels and in their own Indian troubles he saw much military service and fully earned his rank of captain. He was equally prominent in civil affairs; he was chosen selectman and held office for twenty years; he was a commissioner to "try small causes." Here he gained his title of judge. Before his court came actions for small debts and complaints of evil speaking and disorderly conduct, wills were proved and marriages performed. He was in this office many years. From 1658 to 1680 he was elected to the general court twelve times. In 1871 Judge Wheeler published a list of representatives from Groton which was set off from New London in 1705. "It is worthy of note that out of 545 representatives of the town of Groton, 104 have borne the name of Avery, and all were descendants of Captain James Avery." He was prominent in church affairs, and the references to him in the records are numerous. He married, November 10, 1643, in Boston, Joanna Greenslade, born about 1622 and living in 1693. Children, the three first being born in Gloucester, Massachusetts, the others in New London, Connecticut: Hannah, James, Mary, Thomas, John (see forward), Rebecca, Jonathan, Christopher and Samuel. Captain Avery married (second), 1698, Mrs. Joshua Holmes, a widow

This information is from Vol. II, pp. 779-782 of Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs, edited by Cuyler Reynolds (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911). It is in SCPL's Reference collection at R 929.1 R45. Some of the formatting of the original, especially in lists of descendants, may have been altered slightly for ease of reading.

Notes


Shortly after 1894, the Avery Memorial Association was incorporated. The association erected a granite memorial in what is now known as the Avery Memorial Park. The shaft is surmounted by a bronze bust, representing Captain James Avery as a typical Puritan, magistrate and Indian fighter. It was designed by the noted sculptor, Bela Lyon Pratt, an Avery descendant. The association is functioning today.

About 1656, he built the "Hive of the Averys" (see drawing of home) at the head of Poquonnock Plain, in the present town of Groton about a mile and a half from the river Thames. Here James Avery lived until he died.

There are several traditions concerning James Avery. One was that he came from Salisbury, Wilts, England in the "Arabella" with John Winthrop and landed at Salem, Mass June 12 1630. Another was that he came over with the younger Winthrop, in 1631, and that, on the voyage, the subsequent governor of Connecticut formed a strong and life-long attachment for James.

________________________________________________________

From Wikipedia on James Avery

Added by sharifrey1 on 3 Sep 2008

From Wikipedia on James Avery

James Avery (American colonist) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 'James Avery'

Bust of James Avery

Spouse(s) Joanna Greenslade (1622-1697)

James Avery (b. 1620 in Cornwall, England - April 18, 1700 in Groton, Connecticut) was an American colonial landowner, legislator, and a military commander in King Philip's War.

Avery was born in England and immigrated to Massachusetts Bay Colony as a child with his parents. As an adult he received several land grants in the vicinity of New London, in Connecticut

 Battles

Avery served as a captain in command of forty Englishmen from Stonington, Lyme, and New London. In 1676. He also served as captain of one of four companies which protected the frontier. In the Great Swamp Fight, a battle at Kingston, Rhode Island, Avery commanded a group of ally Pequot Indians.


General Assembly

He was Deputy to the General Court 12 times from 1656 to 1680.

Home of James Avery built in 1656


Pioneer

Avery was among Groton, Connecticut’s early settlers, for whom Avery Point is named. A monument stands on the location of his 1656 home, called The Hive of the Averys. The home burned down in a fire started from an ember of a passing train on July 20, 1894.


References

  1. Benjamin Tinkham Marshall (1922). A Modern History of New London County, Connecticut. Lewis Historical Printing Company. 
  2. Avery, Elroy McKendree (1893). The Groton Averys, Christopher and James, 9-10.

_________________________________________________________

The Averys of New London

Added by sharifrey1 on 3 Sep 2008

The following was copied from:

Benjamin Tinkham Marshall (1922). A Modern History of New London County, Connecticut. Lewis Historical Printing Company.

The Averys of New London county descend from Captain James Avery, who came from England with his father, Christopher Avery, and, after living for a period in Massachusetts, came, in 1650, to the Pequot Plantation (New London, Connecticut), where he acquired large tracts of land in what is now Poquonock Bridge, Groton, east of New London. About 1656 he built the home of the Averys at the head of Poquonock Plain. Some additions were made to this house in 1684, and it was occupied for more than two centuries until destroyed by fire in 1894. On the spot now stands a monument to the memory of Captain James Avery, who, in 1676, was captain of one of the four companies which protected the frontier, and for twenty-six years was an officer of the town. Twelve times, from 1656 to 1680, he was deputy to the General Court; also assistant judge in the Perogative Court, and prominent in the church.

____________________________

Friend of the Pequot

He soon became active in military affairs and is generally spoken of by the title of Ensign, Lieutenant or Captain. The region in which he had made his home was formerly the chief seat of the formidable Pequot tribe that had been almost exterminated by the English a few years before. After the Pequot War, a few survivors of that once dreaded tribe still lived in the haunts of their fathers, with the Narragansetts on the east, and the Mohegans, under their sachem, Uncas, near by on the west. In 1657, the Narragansetts made a wild foray and Uncas fled from the blood and fire that marked their course. He took refuge in a fort and was besieged by his unrelenting foes. But just in time, "Lieutenant James Avery, Mr. Brewster, Richard Haughton, Samuel Lothrop, and others well armed, succeeded in throwing themselves into the fort; and the Narragansetts, fearing to engage in a conflict with the English, broke up the siege and returned home." The legislature approved o fth emeasures that had been taken for the protection of the faithful ally of the English.

In 1667, the Pequot remnant was transferred to a reservation, although, as the historian informs us, "Mr. Winthrop, Captain Denison, Captain James Avery and some other men of influence, dissented from these views and labored for the accomodation of the Pequots." The fair disposition and judicial temperament of Captain Avery are here clearly shown - qualities that doubtless gave him much of the great influence that we know he possessed with the friendly Indians of that region. For several years, before and after this, the Commissioners of the United Colonies referred almost everything relating to the Pequots to Messrs. Dennison, Stanton, and Avery for adjustment. In 1678, the said Commissioners granted Captain Avery, fibve pounds "for his good service in assisting in the Government of the Pequots for sundry years past."

In 1668, he and Cary Latham were chosen by the town to settle the boundary line with the sachem Uncas. The £15 that secured teh desired formal deed was paid by James Avery and two others, each of whom was indemnified by the town with 200 acres of land. Captain Avery's services seem to have been often called for by the town and by individuals in the settling of such controversies.

Additional information about this story

Description From "A Biographical sketch of Elroy M. Avery : reprinted from the History of Cleveland, with a genealogical outline."

___________________________________________

FROM THE BOOK:

The Groton Avery Clan vol 1, by: Elroy McKendree Avery and Catharine Avery, 1912

THE SECOND GENERATION--JAMES AVERY.

2. Captain James2 Avery (Christopher1) was b. about 1620, in England; m. 1st, November 10, 1643, at Boston, to Joanna Greenslade; m. 2d, July 4, 1698, to Abigail, widow of Joshua Holmes.

Captain James Avery is often spoken of as the founder of the family or clan that we call the Groton Averys. That he was the only child of Christopher Avery is plainly seen by the following entry on the books of the county court of New London, Connecticut, November 24, 1683:

  "Capt. James Avery appearing in this Court and there Declaring himself 
     the only sonn & heir of his Father Mr. Christopher Avery deceased 
     and that there was neither sonn or Daughter but himself was sole heir 
     and he desiring this court would so constitute him and give him power 
     of administration upon the said estate of his father deceased. This 
     Court having duly considered what hath been alleadged do approve of 
     the same and judge the said Capt. James Avery to be the right and 
     full heir to the said estate and do give him power of administrator to 
     the estate of Mr. Christopher Avery his deceased father. 
                                               Attest Charles Hill Rec." 

James Avery came to America with his father and lived at Gloucester for several years. He was married November 10, 1643, as appears by the records of Gloucester:

"James Avery married to Joane (???) November 10, 1643." That her name was Joane Greenslade is learned from her letter of dismissal from the church at Boston to the one at Gloucester in 1644. The first volume of admissions of the First Church of Boston contains what little information we have been able to glean concerning Joane Greenslade. On page 63 is a list of six names of which hers stands third among the admissions as follows:

  "The 18th day of ye 4th Moneth 1643 
     Joan Greenslade, a single woman." 

On page 66 of the same volume is an entry showing her dismissal to the church of Gloucester:

  "The 17th day of ye 1st Moneth 1644 Our Sister Joan Greenslade now ye 
     wife of one James Averill of Gloster had granted hir by ye Churches 
     silence lres of Recomend to ye Church at Gloster." 

In June, 1684, the old Blinman edifice at New London, "the unadorned church and watch-tower of the wilderness, was sold to Captain James Avery for six pounds, with the condition that he should remove it in one month's time." According to tradition, it was taken down and its materials were carried by river and sound and added to the house he had already built at the head of Poquonock Cove. In spite of this analytic and synthetic process, the house seems to have retained something of its sacred character. A century later, "the same timbers, the same boards, joyfully resounded once more to the ancient but well remembered voices of exhortation and praise." (See frontispiece.)

With its charming situation, the old time combination constituted one of the most interesting and picturesque residences in the country. This historic home never passed into alien hands, being continously occupied by James Avery or some of his descendants until it was destroyed by fire on the night of the twentieth of July, 1894.

Soon after the destruction of the "Old Hive," the Avery Memorial Association was incorporated. It received the old homestead site by deed of gift from the owner, James Denison Avery, and there erected a granite memorial in what is now known as the Avery Memorial Park. The shaft is surmounted by a bronze bust, representing the builder of the "Old Hive." The bust is of heroic size and represents the founder as a typical Puritan, magistrate, and Indian fighter. It was designed by the noted sculptor, Bela Lyon Pratt, an Avery descendant. The shaft rises from the middle of the outline of the old house, which outline has been carefully preserved; the old fireplaces have been rebuilt; the old hearthstones are in their places; the old thresholds are marked by the stone steps which the feet of the founder of the race first trod.

In June 1657 Uncas, Sachem of the Mohegans, fled to a fort below Norwich on the Thames River after his tribe was attacked by the Narragansetts. Lt. James Avery, Mr. Brewster, Richard Haughton, son Lathrop & other English from Lyme & New London went to his rescue and drove the Naragansetts away.

Colonial Families, page 3-9.

On 15 July 1675, the Commissioners of the United Colonies negotiated a peace treaty with the Narragansett tribe which removed some danger to the settlers at Stonington, Connecticut; but during the summer, the Indians of other tribes attacked throughout Massachusetts and Rhode Island. On 18 Sept 1675 the settlers at Deerfield, Massachusetts were massacred. During the autumn the Naragansetts broke their pledge of peace, and the Indians concentrated their strength in Rhode Island and again threatened Eastern Connecticut.

On Oct 29, 1675, under orders from the General Court, all homes in Stonington were fortified. Captain James Avery was put in command of 40 cavalry stationed at New London, and Capt. John Mason, Jr. commanded 20 English and Mohegans at Norwich.

In Feb. 1676, under Capt. George Denison, Provost Marshall of New London county, with James Avery, Thomas Miner and John Stanton as his lieutenants, some 40 New London Co. volunteers with their Mohegan and Pequot allies raided the Narragansett country, killing 7 and capturing 13.

On 27 March a third expedition led by Capt. Denison, Lts. Avery and Miner, left Norwich, returning 10 Apr. On this campaign Canonchet, the Narragansett Chief was captured and brought to a council at Anguilla Plain. He bravely refused to submit to surrender to the English, and when told that he must die, he replied, "I like it well that I should die before my heart has grown soft and I have said anything unworthy of myself". He was executed in the Indian fashion by Oneko and two other Pequot sachems closet to his rank among his captors.

On 12 Aug 1676, King Philip was killed by Massachusetts troops near Mt. Hope, Rhode Island, ending the war during which 13 towns had been destroyed, over 600 homes burned, and about 750 English men, women and children killed.

Connecticut Colonial Records, Vol. 2, page 386-7.

Eloise M. Roberts, Some Colonial Families, page 7-8

 Hubbard, the early historian of the Indian wars, writes thus:
  "The inhabitants of New London, Norwich and Stonington, apprehensive 
     of their danger, by reason of the near bordering of the enemy, and 
     upon other prudent considerations, voluntarily listed themselves under 
     some able gentlemen and resolute soldiers among themselves, Major 
     Palmes, Capt. George Denison, Capt. Avery, with whom or under 
     whom, within the compass of 1676, they made ten or more several 
     expeditions, in all of which at those several times, they killed and took 
     two hundred and thirty-nine of the enemy by the help and assistance 
     of the Pequots, Mohegans, and a few friendly Narragansetts; besides 
     thirty taken in their long march homewards, after the fort fight, December 
     19, '75; and besides sixteen captivated in the second expedition, not 
     reckoned within the compass of the said number; together with fifty 
     guns and spoiling the enemy of an hundred bushels of corn." 
 The question of the spoils of war came up often for discussion. In August, 1675:
  "The Councill agreed and ordered that the rigt and division of the captives 
     be left to the decission and determination of Capt. John Mason, Capt. 
     James Avery and Mr. Daniel Witherell, whoe are desired and empowered 
     to disspose the said captiues, whither in hands of the Pequots, 
     Moheags or Naragancetts, to such persons to whome of right they doe 
     belong, according to the severall agreements as the claymers shall 
     make their demands by."

James Avery was prominent in matters relating to the church, and the references to him in such connection are numerous, many of which have been noted in previous pages. The church record kept by the Rev. Mr. Bradstreet begins October 5, 1670, the day of his ordination. It opens with the following:

                 "MEMBERS OF THE CHURCH. 
                  Lieutenant James Avery and wife, 
                  Thomas Miner and wife, 
                  James Morgan, senior and wife," 
                  and eighteen others.

In his famous diary, Thomas Minor makes frequent reference to James Avery with whom he was to be connected by the marriage of three of his children. The following shows that James Avery was expected to watch the spiritual interests of the church:

"These are to signifie to all such whome it may concerne that we whose 
     names are under written being members of the Church of Christe of 
     New London doe owne Thomas minor of stoneington and his wife 
     members with us and under our Care and watch and they doe live ffor 
     ought wee know or heare as doe become Christians 
                                                  JAMES AVERIE 
  new london                                      WILLIAM DOUGLASS 
      June 30, 1669 
              In the name and with the Consent of the Cch" 

As early as 1678, the people on the east side of the great river (the Thames), through James Avery, petitioned the general court for a church and a minister of their own.

  "To the Honord General Assembly now sitting at Hartford. 
        The Humble petition of James Avery in Behalf the Inhabitants that 
        live on the east side new London River. 
        Showing that whereas we that now live at that place and hesought the 
        blessing of God Increased to about twenty eight families and are so 
        seated from new London to which worship we at present pertain that 
        neither ourselves or families can without great hazzard and trouble 
        get to new London to attend the public worship of God on the Lords 
        day to our great hindrance there being a very Great ferry of about 
        a mile over besides six or seven miles that many of us must travell 
        by Land we have in consideration of the good we hope to attain and 
        the insuitable harm that otherwise we cannot but expect have 
        thought it our duty to present to this honored court our condition 
        and grievances in the foresaid respect and that we have humbly 
        requested of our neighbors of new London their willingness that we 
        might have a minister on our side of the river at our own cost who 
        seem to be very unwilling thereunto. Requesting this court serious 
        consideration thereof and that we may have liberty of procuring 
        and settling a ministry on our side of the river to be at our charges 
        and that when the same is attained that we may be free from paying 
        to the ministry at new London we hope this honored court will 
        find the less difficulty to grant in that the like has been granted to 
        sundry other places whose beginnings were not more able to afford 
        maintenance than we hope ours are and to some as at Lyme on the 
        same reason as the difficult passage by water and that the welfare 
        of your petitioners will bee much advantaged thus waiting the 
        Courts pleasure therein we shall for this honored court ever 
        pray &c 
                               JAMES AVERY   in the name of the rest 
     May 9, 1678" 
  (From Ecclesiastical Documents, vol. 1, doc. 47, in the State Library, 
     Hartford. See facsimile on opposite page.) 
 To this, the general court made answer thus:
  "May 15, 1678. This Court haueing considered the petition of Captn Avery, 
    in behalfe of the people on the east side of New London River, petitioning 
    that they might have liberty to provide themselves of a minister 
    to dispense the word of God to them, &c. as p. the petition on file may 
    appeare, the Court haueing heard and considered the case and what 
    hath been objected against it by agents of the Towne of New London, 
    doe declar that they cannot but compassionate the condition of the 
    people of London that have such troublesome passage to the worship 
    of God, and yet they cannot see reason to answer the desires of the 
    petitioners at present, but advise them cheerfully to a carrying on of 
    the works of God in their present state vnite, and when God shall have 
    blessed and increased their numbers and states so as that there may be 
    a likelyhood of their comfortable and honourable mayntayning of two 
    ministers in that towne, and in such case when they are soe accomplished 
    to the sattisfaction of this Court, they may have a minister on 
    that side, but not to be a distinct township without the free consent 
    of the people on the west side of the river and approbation of this Court." 
    (Conn. Col. Rec., vol. 3, p. 13.) 

In 1687, after persistent petitionings in which James Avery was prominent, it was ordered that for the future they should have liberty to invite the minister of the town to preach on their side of the river every third Sabbath during the four most inclement months of the year.

The good work that he had thus begun was continued by his sons and, in 1702, the church on the east side of the river for which he had so long labored became a reality. Although he did not live to see the happy termination of his earnest endeavor, he is justly considered one of the founders of the First Church of Groton as he was of the First Church of New London. In the two hundred years since then four buildings have housed the organization.

The Hon. Richard A. Wheeler, for many years the judge of probate at Stonington, Conn., says (Novembr 10, 1888): "Mr. Avery held the office of commissioner for a good many years, and, judging from his position in civil and military life, he must have been a man of marked abilities, fitted for the exigencies of the times in which he lived." Miss Caulkins says that "after 1666, for fifteen or twenty years, the commissioners (justices) for New London were almost invariably Messrs. Avery, Wetherell and Palmes." (History of New London, p. 180.)

Captain James Avery was twelve times elected to the general court from 1658 to 1680. Groton was set off from New London as a separate town in 1705. In 1871, Judge Wheeler published a list of representatives from Groton from its organization, at the end of which occur these words: "It is worthy of note that out of the 545 representatives of the town of Groton, 104 have borne the name of Avery and all were descendants of Captain James Avery."

In studying the records of those days, the careful student is strongly impressed with the fact that Captain James Avery was a very remarkable man. Living as he did in stirring times, he was a leader among strong men, enjoying their confidence and respect because he deserved them. Especially is it to be noted that, although the state then took cognizance of affairs which we now call private and interfered in the details of family life and personal relations in a way that would not be tolerated now, he was never censured or "presented" for any shortcoming or alleged dereliction of duty or propriety. Eminent in all the relations of life, his descendants look upon him with pride and affection as one sans peur et sans reproche

In 1693 James Avery made preparation for a comfortable old age. He had previously deeded land to each of his sons, but he then made a final provision as the following deed shows:

  "To all Christian people to whom this present Deed of sale shall come 
     James Avery, senior of New London in the Colonie of Connecticut in 
     New England sendeth Greeting. Know ye that I the sd James Avery, 
     senior for and in consideration of that natural affection and love which 
   I give and bear unto my beloved sonn Samuel Avery of the Towne and 
     Colonie aforesaid as also for other considerations payments and Reservations 
     hereby and herein specified to be allowed and performed by my 
     said sonn Samuel Avery with the which I doe acknowledge myself to be 
     fully Satisfied and Contented and upon performance of the same Doe 
     Aquit and Discharge my sayed son Samuel Avery, his heirs, Executors, 
     Administrators, and Assigns forever by these present. Have given, 
     Granted Bargained, Sold, Alliened, Enfeofed and Confirmed and by
     these present Doe fully and Absolutely Give, Grant, bargain, Sell, 
     Allien, Enfeof and Confirme unto my sayde sonn Samuel Avery his 
     heirs, Executors, Administrators, Assigns forever all that my ffarme 
     whereon I dwell with the parcel of land and meadow thereunto belonging 
     situate and being on the east side of New London River at New 
     London containing in estimation two hundred and twelve acres to the 
     James Morgan lott the parcel being butted and bounded viz. Impremis 
     the home lott containing fifty Akers bounded on the west and partly on 
     the south with the Brook or river and part of the salt [blot] and 
     which the Brook empties into and partly on the south by the lane that 
     parts this land and the ffarme in the possession of Major-General John 
     Winthrop on the north with the land of Nehemiah Smith and on the 
     east with land in the possession of my sonne Thomas Avery. More 
     sixty Akers of land lying in Paqunotk bounded on the west with the 
     greate swamp and on the east with Paquanotk coave or River on the 
     north and south with the lands of Mr. Richard Lord and Mr. John 
     Daugs. More one hundred Akers of land with meadow on it lying to 
     the northward of Mr. Richard Smith's house bounded on the south with 
     sd Smith's land and on the east with Ledges of Rock and Comon and 
     on the west with a cart way that leadds to the woods and on the north 
     with land formerly given to my sonn James Avery now layde Down 
     Comon. More two Acres of meadof lying at (?) plaine (?) bounded on 
     the north with a swamp on the east with land of James Avery juniorand 
     the other bounds as by records of said meadow together with all 
     housings Buildings and housings, Barns Stables or chatels ffruit trees 
     all herds profits, privileges comonages and all other Appurtenances as 
     with sd ffarm and grants of land belonging or in any way appertaining 
     to have and to hold the sd ffarm and parcels of land butted and 
     bounded as aforesaid with all other the above granted premises unto 
     my sd sonn Samuel Avery his heirs, Executors, Administrators, Assigns. 
     . . . Provided always and it is nevertheless agreed and conceded by 
     and between the said parties these presents, that I the said James 
     Avery senior, do reserve the north end of the dwelling house during my 
     life and the life of my wife Johanna Avery and also the full moyity or 
     one half part of the neat product or increase of all the land above 
     aliened during my own life and the life of my beloved wife Johanna 
     Avery which sd lands are to be improved by my sd son Samuel Avery 
     to an best advantage the charges thereof are to be equally borne or 
     boarne betwixt us and satisfied out of the produce what remaining to 
     be equally shared betwixted us. Likewise it is agreed by the parties 
     to these present that the stock of neat cattle which now are on the 
     ffarm being two oxen, 16 cows, 4 steers 4 ys old, 8 steers 3 y old, 16 
     steers and heifers 2 ys old, 11 steers and heifers 1 yr old, 50 sheep, 
     7 swine, 4 mares, 2 young horses, 1 bull are at this time belonging the 
     one half share to me the sd James Avery senior and the other half at 
     this time belonging to my sonn Samuel Avery all of which stock is to 
     Runn and be Maintayned with the hay gott out of the sd ffarm and 
     lands agreed on about the cows & the charges to be equally borne by
     each party and the one half of its produce to accrew yearly to me the 
     sd James Avery senior the other half of its produce to be and belong 
     to my sonn Samuel Avery. It is likewise agreed by and between the 
     Said parties to these presents that at the death and decease of the said 
     James Avery senior and my loving wife Johanna Avery or at the 
     decease of my sd sonn Samuel Avery the afore mentioned stock of neat 
     cattle, sheep swine & the increase thereof shall be equally divided the 
     one half to be at the disposal of me the sd James Avery senior 
     and my loving wife Johanna Avery by our last will and testament 
     and the other half to be and belong to my sd son Samuel Avery and his 
     successors.
     It is also agreed between the parties by these present that if my sd sonn 
     Samuel Avery decease before me James Avery senior or before my 
     loving wife Johanna Avery then provision is made by these presents 
     that his heirs, Executors, Administrators, Assigns are to perform what 
     is obliged to Doe by these presents, Relating to the improving of the 
     sd ffarme And providing for the Stock that Remains and belongs to me 
     the sd James Avery senior or to Johanna Avery my wife during both 
     our natural lives otherwise to be at the ordering and in the possession 
     of me the sd James Avery senior or Johanna Avery my wife During 
     our life time and no longer but then to Revert and Return to the heirs, 
     executors or administrators of my sd son Samuel Avery. In witness 
     whereof I the sayde James Avery senior have put to my hand & seale 
     in New London this seventeenth day of ffebry one thousand six hundred 
     ninety two three. 
                                                          JAMES AVERY. 
     Signed sealed returned in the presence of 
         EDWARD PALMES                 Capt. James Avery acknowledges the 
         SARAH PALMES              above written to be his act and deed the 
            the mark of            22 Feb. 1692-3 that the whole deed before 
         MARY (M.) ROBERTS         me Rivhard Christopher Commoner. 
  Extracted out of the original and recorded by me Daniel Witherell Recorder, 
     May 6, 1693. 

Thus we see that the wife, Joanna, was living in 1693. The date of her death is not known. She was the mother of all the children of James Avery.

FIRST GENERATION.

James Avery, only son of Christopher the Emigrant, born 1620;

married November 10th, 1643, in Boston, to Miss Joanna

Greenslade, born about 1622, was living in 1693;

Children, first three born in Gloucester, remainder in New London.

1 Hannah, born October 12, 1644, married Ephraim Miner.

2 James, jr., born December 16, 1646, died August 22, 1748.

3 Mary, born February 19, 1648, died February 2, 1708.

4 Thomas, born May 6, 1651, died January 5, 1737.

5 John, born February 10, 1653-4, died in North Parish.

6 Rebecca, born October 6, 1656, married William Potts.

7 Jonathan, born January 5, 1658, buried September 15, 1681.

8 Christopher, born April 30, 1661, died December 8, 1683.

9 Samuel, born August 14, 1664, died May 1, 1723.

Souces:

Allyn, Charles, "The Battle of Groton Heights: A Collection of Narratives,

Official Reports, Records, Etc. of the Storming of Fort Griswold, the Massacre of it's Garrison, and the Burning of New London by British Troops Under the Command of Brig.-Gen.Benedict Arnold," New London, The Riverside Press, 1882. (P. 256 records eight generations of owners of the Hive)

Hurd, D. Hamilton, "The Complete History of New London County, Connecticut," Philadelphia, J. W. Lewis & Company, 1882. (P. 453-456, history of the Hive

with drawings.)

--------------------

THE HISTORY OF STONINGTON, CONN., by Richard Ansel Wheeler, page 200.

Gloucester for several years. The Rev. Mr. Blinman, who had been a minister of Gloucester for eight years, was engaged to become the minister of the Pequot Plantation. A party of his friends proposed to move with him, and came on to make preparatory arrangements, Oct. 19, 1650. It appears that James Avery went back to Gloucester, sold his possessions there to his father, and in 1651 returned to New London. In March of that year the principal body of these eastern families arrived.

   Capt. James acquired large tracts of land at what is now Poquonoc Bridge, Groton, east of New London. About 1636 he build the hive of the Avery's at the head of Poquonoc Plain, a mile and a half from the river Thames. In 1684, the old Blinman edifice, first church of New London, the unadorned church and water-tower of the wilderness, which had stood for thirty years, was sold to Capt. Avery for six pounds, with the condition that he should remove it in one month's time. According to tradition, the church was taken down, its materials carried across the river, and added to the house he had already built at Poquonoc. In spite of this analytic and synthetic progress, the ancient dwelling seemed to have retained some of its sacred character, for a century later it was occupied until July 21, 1894, when a spark from a passing locomotive ignited its well-seasoned frame, and in a short time only the ancient chimney remained to mark the spot of this historic house of Eastern Connecticut. A few years later the chimney was taken down, the grounds graded, and a tasteful monument was erected by the descendants of James Avery.
    He was ensign, Lieutenant and captain of the New London companies and served throughout King Philip's war in command of forty Indians from Stonington, New London and Lyme. In 1676 he was captain of one of the four companies which protected the frontier, and for twenty-three years an officer of the town, and twelve times deputy to the General Court, 1656-80; also assisting judge in deputy to the Prerogative Court, and was most prominent in maters relating to the church, as references to him in such connections are numerous.
   He m. 1st Nov. 10, 1643, Joanna Greenslade, b. about 1622; she d. after 1693. He m. 2nd, Mrs. Abigail (Ingraham) Chesebrough, widow of Joshua Holmes, July 4, 1698, (No. 2) Holmes family. He d. April 18, 1700. His widow was living at late as 1714.

THE HISTORY OF STONINGTON, CONN., by Richard Ansel Wheeler, page 292.

   Abigail Ingraham 3d husband, Capt. James Avery; for his 2d wife (No. 2), Avery family.

THE GROTON AVERY CLAN, Vol. I, by Elroy McKendree Avery and Catherine Hitchcock (Tilden) Avery, Cleveland, 1912. Found in the DAR Library, Washington DC. Pages 43 through 78.

   James Avery came to America with his father in 1630 on the "Arbella". James was an early land owner at Gloucester as it is shown by extracts from the town book containing an account of "Land laid out and to whom;"
   9 mo. (16)45. "Andrew Lister had 8 acres of upland upon Planter's Neck, running from Lobster Cove to the sea, the 24th lott next to James Averies."
   1 mo. (16)47, "James Averie Given 6 acres of upland at the hed of Little River to be laide out."
   26. 3. (16)51. "Also the said Richard Beefor bought of James Avery three acres of upland."
   15. 10. (16)53. James Avery had marsh at Chebacco.
   The following items are from the Salem quarterly court records and files.
    1: 11: 1645. James Avery of Gloucester took the oath of freeman.
   25: 10: 1649. James Averey grand juryman from Gloster.
   24:  4: 1650. James Averey grand juryman.
   In studying the record of these days, the careful student is strongly impressed with the fact that Capt. James Avery was a very remarkable man. Living as he did in stirring times, he was a leader among strong men, enjoying their confidence and respect because he deserved them. Especially it is to be noted that although the state took cognizance of affairs that we now call private and interfered in the details of family life and personal relations in a way that would not now be tolerated, he was never censured or "presented" for any shortcoming or alleged dereliction of duty of propriety. Eminent in all the relations of life, his descendants look upon him with pride and affection as one "sans p[eur et sans reproche."

ANCESTORS OF ALDEN SMITH SWAN AND HIS WIFE MARY ALTHEA FARWELL, by Josephine C. Frost, The Hills Press, New York MCMXXII, page 32.

Researching this line is Nancyann Norman at nancn@exis.net

Researching this line is David Hoffman at dvhoffman@hotmail.com

Researching this line is Joleene Duff at duff@willinet.net

Notes for JAMES AVERY:

THE HISTORY OF STONINGTON CT, by Wheeler, pages 199 & 200.

THE GROTON AVERY CLAN, Vol. I, by Elroy McKendree Avery and Catherine Hitchcock (Tilden) Avery, Cleveland, 1912. Found in the DAR Library, Washington DC. Pages 43 through 78.

    James Avery came to America with his father in 1630 on the "Arbella". James was an early land owner at Gloucester as it is shown by extracts from the town book containing an account of "Land laid out and to whom;"
    9 mo. (16)45. "Andrew Lister had 8 acres of upland upon Planter's Neck, running from Lobster Cove to the sea, the 24th lott next to James Averies."
    1 mo. (16)47, "James Averie Given 6 acres of upland at the hed of Little River to be laide out."
    26. 3. (16)51. "Also the said Richard Beefor bought of James Avery three acres of upland."
    15. 10. (16)53. James Avery had marsh at Chebacco.
    The following items are from the Salem quarterly court records and files.
     1: 11: 1645. James Avery of Gloucester took the oath of freeman.
    25: 10: 1649. James Averey grand juryman from Gloster.
    24:  4: 1650. James Averey grand juryman.
    In studying the record of these days, the careful student is strongly impressed with the fact that Capt. James Avery was a very remarkable man. Living as he did in stirring times, he was a leader among strong men, enjoying their confidence and respect because he deserved them. Especially it is to be noted that although the state took cognizance of affairs that we now call private and interfered in the details of family life and personal relations in a way that would not now be tolerated, he was never censured or "presented" for any shortcoming or alleged dereliction of duty of propriety. Eminent in all the relations of life, his descendants look upon him with pride and affection as one "sans p[eur et sans reproche."

ANCESTORS OF ALDEN SMITH SWAN AND HIS WIFE MARY ALTHEA FARWELL, by Josephine C. Frost, The Hills Press, New York MCMXXII, page 32.


  Sources: The Averys of Groton; The Groton Avery Clan; Ancestral File; Genealogical and Biographical Record of New London Connecticut

(Beers); History of New London County, Connecticut (Hurd); A Catalogue of the Names of Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut (Hinman); Our Family Genealogy, Morgan-Avery (1851) by N.H. Morgan; The Red King's Rebellion by Russell Bourne; History of Montville; Saturday's Children, A History of the Babcock Family in America by C. Merton Babcock; Babcock and Alied Families by Louis E. de Forest; Virkus; Savage; Nat'l Society, Daughters of Colonial Wars, Lineage Book V.

  Our Family: James Avery came from Devonshire with Gov. Winthrop's company in 1630.
  C.M. Babcock: James Avery, born 1620, came to New England on the Arbella in 1630 with the Winthrop fleet. This is implied, since he came with this father and Christopher is credited with the 1630 arrival. Some say, however, that they might have come in 1631 with Winthrop Jr., since he and James were great friends and may have become well acquainted on the 1631 voyage. James was 12 times deputy to the General Court (1658-1680). He died 18 April 1700. Married Joanna Greenslade 10 Nov. 1643.
  De Forest: Dates are the same as above. Freeman at Gloucster in 1645. Moved to what is now New London in 1651 after receiving some 300 acres of land in 1650 and 1651. He received more land later for his public service. In 1665 Ensign Avery was named lieutenant of the train band and during the threat of Connecticut's attack by the Dutch, he was named a captain in 1673. During King Philip's War he was appointed fifth in command of the united Army against the Indians, and he led the Pequot allies during the Great Swamp Fight 19 Dec. 1675. He was named selectman in 1660 and held that office for 23 years. He was deputy to the General Court almost continuouly from 1659 to 1689. In 1663 and 1664 he was appointed a commissioner to try small causes, and from 1666 to 1670 and from 1674 to 1695 he was judge of the county court.
  Red King: Captains James Avery and George Denison led Hartford's two newly authorized companies in a search for Canochet in 1676, the second year of King Philip's War. The English were augmented by Niantics and Mohegans, in a ratio of some 40 Englishmen to 80 native ancillaries. They succeeded in capturing the Narraganset sachem, who was condemned to death April 2 at Stonington. "Flintlock and Tomahawk" by Douglas Edward Leach mentions this campaign, saying it was led by Capt. Denison. He does not mention James Avery.
  Virkus: Capt. James Avery, 1620-1700. Captain in King Philip's War, judge, deputy to the General Court; married 1643 Joanna Greenslade.
  Information on children comes from "The Averys of Groton" and AF data. An AF record lists a 10th child, Joanna Avery, born 1669 in New London. In the Averys of Groton, someone has written in that same information.
  His land grant in Groton adjoined that of James Morgan. And Averys and Morgans are buried in the same old cemetery in Groton. Pequonnock, or Poquonnock, is now Groton.
  He married (2) Abigail Ingraham Chesbrough Holmes July 4, 1698. She married (1) Samuel Chesbrough, was widowed and then married (2) Joshua Holmes.
  The name Avere first appears in England in the Domesday Book, which was completed in 1084.
  Montville: James Avery, ensign, lieutenant and captain in the early train band. Active in King Philip's War. Twelve times deputy to the General Court.
  Savage: James Avery of Gloucester, married 10 Nov. 1643 Jane Greenslade of Boston. Removed to New London. "He was held in high esteem; lieutentant, captain, served in King Philip's War when he commanded the Pequot allied force; was living in February 1694; representative to the General Court in 1659 and often after to 1669. First three children born in Gloucester and others in New London. Savage records a daughter Joanna, born 1669, not listed in The Averys of Groton or the Groton Avery Clan.
  Colonial Wars: Capt. James Avery, born 1620 in England, died 18 April 1700 in New London. Married Joanna Greenslade 10 Nov. 1643 in Boston or Gloucester, Mass. and had 10 children. Ensign, lieutenant and captain in King Philip's War; led 40 Indians from Stonington, New London and Lyme. 1676, captain of one of four companies that protected the frontier; 23 years a town officer and 12 times deputy to the General Court, 1656-1680.

Researching this line is Nancyann Norman at nancn@exis.net

Researching this line is David Hoffman at dvhoffman@hotmail.com

________

Groton

Groton was settled and originally called East New London or Groton Bank. Settled by Nehemiah Smith and Capt. James Avery in 1656 nearly 20 years after the devasting attack on Mystic fort to the east of Groton Bank, home of the feared Pequot Indian Nation. Groton in the late 1690s petitioned for their own church or "society" as the trek over the Thames River was often hard and dangerous. With the formation of their own town in the very early 1700s Groton Bank was made up of modern day Thames Street that ran along the river. Here a handful of homes were neatly nestled along the river bank with piers and wharfhouses jetting outward. While maritime and Indies trade was popular here as well New London with it's easy access and coves offered a better suit for larger ships. Groton bank had its share but also focused very much on more local trade and fishing.

Groton itself ran northward through a small village called Gales Ferry where a handful of homes and a wharf stood then onto Norwich. Eastward through mostly farm plantations and a few small villages near Poquonnock the site of the Capt. Avery house. -------------------- James Avery was baptized at Wolborough, Devonshire (near Abbotskerswell) on Apr 22,1621, the son of Christopher Avery and Margaret (Abraham) Stevens Avery of Ipplepen, Co.Devonshire, England. Christopher Avery, along with his son James, migrated to Groton,CT about 1636. Christopher's wife (James' mother) Margaret never came to New England. In fact, she died in 1626, and Christopher Avery married Alice Berdon in 1630 in England. Christopher and James left Alice behind in England, never to return.

All Averys in America descend from either this James Avery or from another Avery immigrant progenitor, William Avery of Dedham. It is not yet proven whether any relationship exists between the two Avery branches.

His first wife was Jane/Joanna Greenslade Avery, married at Gloucester,MA on Nov 10,1643. His second wife was Abigail (Ingraham) Cheeseboro Holmes Avery, the widow of Samuel Cheeseboro and of Joshua Holmes, married July 4,1698.

Sources

-------------------- On 25 June 1651 James sold his holding in Gloucester to his father and moved his wife and children to New London, CT. James was made a freeman on 14 Oct 1669. James and his wife were active participants in the community. James was a selectman for 23 years, he also surved as a surveyor, a settler of disputes and was 12 times the deputy of the general court. He was an ensign, Lieutenant and captain of the only band train in town. He fought throughout the King Philips’s War. His heroic and masterful exploits are documented in many CT history books. James died an old man. The Avery Memorial in Groton, New London, CT sits on the site of the family home of James and Joane, also known as the Beehive or Hive of the Averys. The Beehive was the oldest home in Groton, but was destroyed by fire in 1894.

-------------------- James Avery was baptized at Wolborough, Devonshire (near Abbotskerswell) on Apr 22,1621, the son of Christopher Avery and Margaret (Abraham) Stevens Avery of Ipplepen, Co.Devonshire, England. Christopher Avery, along with his son James, migrated to Groton,CT about 1636. Christopher's wife (James' mother) Margaret never came to New England. In fact, she died in 1626, and Christopher Avery married Alice Berdon in 1630 in England. Christopher and James left Alice behind in England, never to return.

All Averys in America descend from either this James Avery or from another Avery immigrant progenitor, William Avery of Dedham. It is not yet proven whether any relationship exists between the two Avery branches.

His first wife was Joanna Greenslade Avery, married at Gloucester,MA on Nov 10,1643. His second wife was Abigail (Ingraham) Cheeseboro Holmes Avery, the widow of Samuel Cheeseboro and of Joshua Holmes, married July 4,1698. (Her marriage to James Avery was brief....she is buried under the name of Abigail Holmes.)

Children(by first marriage): Hannah Avery Minor, James Avery Jr, Mary Avery Minor, Thomas Avery, John Avery, Rebecca Avery Potts, Jonathan Avery, Christopher Avery, and Samuel Avery.

view all 34

James Avery, Sr.'s Timeline

1620
1620
1621
April 22, 1621
Newton Abbot, Devon, England
April 22, 1621
Newton Abbot, Devon, England
April 22, 1621
Newton Abbot, Devon, England
April 22, 1621
Newton Abbot, Devonshire, England
1621
Newton Abbot, Devon, England
1621
Salisbury,England
1641
1641
Age 20
1642
1642
Age 21
Gloucester, MA
1643
November 10, 1643
Age 22
Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)